Battle Babies!

TreeNicola here, talking about names. Back in July, Christina posted about names and saints’ days, and recently a previous Wench guest, Elizabeth Hawksley, wrote a fascinating piece on her own blog here about why the name Thomas fell out of popularity in 1532. It seems to me that whether we’re talking about about choosing names for characters in books or how we feel about our own names, it’s a perennially fascinating topic.

This time around, my interest was sparked by the BBC genealogy programme Who Do You Think You Are, which returned to our screens in the UK last week with a new series. The first programme explored the family history of actress Jodie Whittaker. Among the family stories that emerged was one relating to her grandmother, who was called Greta Verdun Bedford. This was the moment I learned something completely new to me – that in the past, babies have been named after battles.

Great Verdun Bedford had been named after the First World War Battle of Verdun, which took place in 1916. (The photo is of the battlefield landscape today.) The name was chosen Landscape_in_Verdun_Forest not to commemorate any member of the family who had fought or died there, as Jodie originally imagined, but because there was a strong tradition for choosing battle names for children during that period. A number of other World War I battles were also adopted as names during the War and immediately afterwards, including Heligoland, Dardanelles, Ypres, Loos, Somme and Vimy Ridge. You can find the full list here on the National Archives Page along with the frequency with which they occurred. In total there were over 1600 First World War related baby names registered in the years between 1914 and 1949 and that was only where the child was had a battle name as its first name. If you include middle names, there are many, many more.

Girls were not spared this fashion, either. Some were given identical names to the boys: Flanders, Mons, Jutland. In other cases there were feminine versions of the battles, including Sommeria and Arrasina or Dardanella. In some cases the names were given to recognise the sacrifice of family members in particular battles; in others, they were simply to show solidarity with the troops or with the civilian populations who were suffering.

TrafalgarOf course this got me wondering when this fashion first started. I went on the Ancestry website and searched for people named after some of the better-known Napoleonic War era battles. There were some glorious examples, including Talavera Vernon Anson, who was born in November 1809 (the battle occurred in July of that year). There were also many, many Waterloos and a few Austerlitz’s. A number of boys born in 1806 were given names that were a combination of Horatio, Nelson and Trafalgar, including Horatio Trafalgar Taylor of Oldham in Lancashire.

I tried to see how far back you could trace the influence of battles on naming of babies in the UK. There were definitely some called Blenheim at the start of the 18th century but earlier than that the records aren’t really there to tell you. I did wonder whether in the 15th century an archer came back from the 100 Years War and called his child Agincourt! I wouldn’t be surprised.

Continuing the battle-inspired theme, there were over a hundred babies named “Peace” in 1918 and quite a few called “Victory.” Poppy 3 Some children born on 11th November were called “Armistice” and a tradition that survives to this day is the increase in the number of girls called “Poppy” named around November each year!

As with Nelson, parents were also inspired by prominent leaders during the First World War: 11 children were named Haig and 166 were named Kitchener and 25 called Cavell after British nurse Edith Cavell. There’s a particularly interesting post on this on the Scotland’s People site here.

NapoleonI can’t leave this topic without a nod to Wellington and Napoleon. Whilst it seems logical to assume that people would name their children after heroes like Wellington, whose surname Wellesley was also used in tribute, it’s interesting that a number of British parents called they children Napoleon and even Bonaparte. This probably didn’t indicate any lack of patriotism, just a liking for the names. Someone even went the whole hog and called their son Napoleon The Great! Napoleon Bonaparte Bottomley born in 1860 in Yorkshire, had a brother called Inkerman, after a dubious success for the British and French in the Crimean War, and a sister called Harriet Beecher Stowe!

I wonder whether other countries have this tradition as well?

As far as I know, I have neither battles nor hero names in my family tree and when I’ve found a name that looks unusual it’s been a mis-transcription of something ordinary. Have you come across anything heroic or battle related in your family? Any Florence Nightingales or Churchills, Poppies or Peace? How would you feel being named for a battle, and if you were to choose your own name to commemorate something important to you, what would it be?

165 thoughts on “Battle Babies!”

  1. What a lovely post, Nicola! I can’t resist weighing in first as I came across a boy called Napoleon Bonaparte Gilmour while I was doing research for my own family tree. (He’s not one of mine but the name certainly stood out!) He was born 20 Nov 1802 and baptised 28 Apr 1803 (see Bishop’s Transcripts of Salisbury St Thomas parish). Imagine how that poor boy must have felt after the Battle of Waterloo? And I always wondered if his parents regretted their choice? If I had to be named after a battle, I quite fancy Salamanca 😀

    Reply
  2. What a lovely post, Nicola! I can’t resist weighing in first as I came across a boy called Napoleon Bonaparte Gilmour while I was doing research for my own family tree. (He’s not one of mine but the name certainly stood out!) He was born 20 Nov 1802 and baptised 28 Apr 1803 (see Bishop’s Transcripts of Salisbury St Thomas parish). Imagine how that poor boy must have felt after the Battle of Waterloo? And I always wondered if his parents regretted their choice? If I had to be named after a battle, I quite fancy Salamanca 😀

    Reply
  3. What a lovely post, Nicola! I can’t resist weighing in first as I came across a boy called Napoleon Bonaparte Gilmour while I was doing research for my own family tree. (He’s not one of mine but the name certainly stood out!) He was born 20 Nov 1802 and baptised 28 Apr 1803 (see Bishop’s Transcripts of Salisbury St Thomas parish). Imagine how that poor boy must have felt after the Battle of Waterloo? And I always wondered if his parents regretted their choice? If I had to be named after a battle, I quite fancy Salamanca 😀

    Reply
  4. What a lovely post, Nicola! I can’t resist weighing in first as I came across a boy called Napoleon Bonaparte Gilmour while I was doing research for my own family tree. (He’s not one of mine but the name certainly stood out!) He was born 20 Nov 1802 and baptised 28 Apr 1803 (see Bishop’s Transcripts of Salisbury St Thomas parish). Imagine how that poor boy must have felt after the Battle of Waterloo? And I always wondered if his parents regretted their choice? If I had to be named after a battle, I quite fancy Salamanca 😀

    Reply
  5. What a lovely post, Nicola! I can’t resist weighing in first as I came across a boy called Napoleon Bonaparte Gilmour while I was doing research for my own family tree. (He’s not one of mine but the name certainly stood out!) He was born 20 Nov 1802 and baptised 28 Apr 1803 (see Bishop’s Transcripts of Salisbury St Thomas parish). Imagine how that poor boy must have felt after the Battle of Waterloo? And I always wondered if his parents regretted their choice? If I had to be named after a battle, I quite fancy Salamanca 😀

    Reply
  6. Oh dear, poor Napoleon Bonaparte Gilmour! The timing of that really is unfortunate. I wonder if he ever thought about changing his name later in life? I do think parents should think these things through! I know that a lot of people admired Napoleon even if he was “the enemy” but it’s quite another thing lumbering your child with that forever.
    I like Salamanca as a name as well. At least it can be shortened neatly!

    Reply
  7. Oh dear, poor Napoleon Bonaparte Gilmour! The timing of that really is unfortunate. I wonder if he ever thought about changing his name later in life? I do think parents should think these things through! I know that a lot of people admired Napoleon even if he was “the enemy” but it’s quite another thing lumbering your child with that forever.
    I like Salamanca as a name as well. At least it can be shortened neatly!

    Reply
  8. Oh dear, poor Napoleon Bonaparte Gilmour! The timing of that really is unfortunate. I wonder if he ever thought about changing his name later in life? I do think parents should think these things through! I know that a lot of people admired Napoleon even if he was “the enemy” but it’s quite another thing lumbering your child with that forever.
    I like Salamanca as a name as well. At least it can be shortened neatly!

    Reply
  9. Oh dear, poor Napoleon Bonaparte Gilmour! The timing of that really is unfortunate. I wonder if he ever thought about changing his name later in life? I do think parents should think these things through! I know that a lot of people admired Napoleon even if he was “the enemy” but it’s quite another thing lumbering your child with that forever.
    I like Salamanca as a name as well. At least it can be shortened neatly!

    Reply
  10. Oh dear, poor Napoleon Bonaparte Gilmour! The timing of that really is unfortunate. I wonder if he ever thought about changing his name later in life? I do think parents should think these things through! I know that a lot of people admired Napoleon even if he was “the enemy” but it’s quite another thing lumbering your child with that forever.
    I like Salamanca as a name as well. At least it can be shortened neatly!

    Reply
  11. In fiction there’s Magersfontein Lugg, the former burglar who is Albert Campion’s manservant in numerous books. He’s named for a battle in the Boer War. But he was given the name for comic effect.

    Reply
  12. In fiction there’s Magersfontein Lugg, the former burglar who is Albert Campion’s manservant in numerous books. He’s named for a battle in the Boer War. But he was given the name for comic effect.

    Reply
  13. In fiction there’s Magersfontein Lugg, the former burglar who is Albert Campion’s manservant in numerous books. He’s named for a battle in the Boer War. But he was given the name for comic effect.

    Reply
  14. In fiction there’s Magersfontein Lugg, the former burglar who is Albert Campion’s manservant in numerous books. He’s named for a battle in the Boer War. But he was given the name for comic effect.

    Reply
  15. In fiction there’s Magersfontein Lugg, the former burglar who is Albert Campion’s manservant in numerous books. He’s named for a battle in the Boer War. But he was given the name for comic effect.

    Reply
  16. Wow, this is something I would never have thought of. Naming someone after a battle seems horrific to me. No matter which side won, it still represents many, many deaths.
    Naming someone after a hero, though better, can still be dicey since now there can be a reputation to live up to.
    I’m for picking a name you like and one a child will not have to live down.

    Reply
  17. Wow, this is something I would never have thought of. Naming someone after a battle seems horrific to me. No matter which side won, it still represents many, many deaths.
    Naming someone after a hero, though better, can still be dicey since now there can be a reputation to live up to.
    I’m for picking a name you like and one a child will not have to live down.

    Reply
  18. Wow, this is something I would never have thought of. Naming someone after a battle seems horrific to me. No matter which side won, it still represents many, many deaths.
    Naming someone after a hero, though better, can still be dicey since now there can be a reputation to live up to.
    I’m for picking a name you like and one a child will not have to live down.

    Reply
  19. Wow, this is something I would never have thought of. Naming someone after a battle seems horrific to me. No matter which side won, it still represents many, many deaths.
    Naming someone after a hero, though better, can still be dicey since now there can be a reputation to live up to.
    I’m for picking a name you like and one a child will not have to live down.

    Reply
  20. Wow, this is something I would never have thought of. Naming someone after a battle seems horrific to me. No matter which side won, it still represents many, many deaths.
    Naming someone after a hero, though better, can still be dicey since now there can be a reputation to live up to.
    I’m for picking a name you like and one a child will not have to live down.

    Reply
  21. In Memphis, Tennesee there is the tradition of a man named “Battle of Manasses Brown.” Battle of Manasses would be the southern name for Civil War battlefield that most history books call the Battle of Bull Run. I assume he was named for the first of those battles, which was won by the rebels.
    I was told about this man when I visited Memphis near the end of WWII.

    Reply
  22. In Memphis, Tennesee there is the tradition of a man named “Battle of Manasses Brown.” Battle of Manasses would be the southern name for Civil War battlefield that most history books call the Battle of Bull Run. I assume he was named for the first of those battles, which was won by the rebels.
    I was told about this man when I visited Memphis near the end of WWII.

    Reply
  23. In Memphis, Tennesee there is the tradition of a man named “Battle of Manasses Brown.” Battle of Manasses would be the southern name for Civil War battlefield that most history books call the Battle of Bull Run. I assume he was named for the first of those battles, which was won by the rebels.
    I was told about this man when I visited Memphis near the end of WWII.

    Reply
  24. In Memphis, Tennesee there is the tradition of a man named “Battle of Manasses Brown.” Battle of Manasses would be the southern name for Civil War battlefield that most history books call the Battle of Bull Run. I assume he was named for the first of those battles, which was won by the rebels.
    I was told about this man when I visited Memphis near the end of WWII.

    Reply
  25. In Memphis, Tennesee there is the tradition of a man named “Battle of Manasses Brown.” Battle of Manasses would be the southern name for Civil War battlefield that most history books call the Battle of Bull Run. I assume he was named for the first of those battles, which was won by the rebels.
    I was told about this man when I visited Memphis near the end of WWII.

    Reply
  26. I’m a genealogist and have seen battle names like Shiloh, Manassas, and Kennesaw Mountain in my research of babies born after the Civil War. They do provide some insights into the parent’s lives. Sometimes I’ve been able to pin down the unit the father served in as a result.
    I love “Who Do You Think You Are?” and hope they will return to the airwaves here.

    Reply
  27. I’m a genealogist and have seen battle names like Shiloh, Manassas, and Kennesaw Mountain in my research of babies born after the Civil War. They do provide some insights into the parent’s lives. Sometimes I’ve been able to pin down the unit the father served in as a result.
    I love “Who Do You Think You Are?” and hope they will return to the airwaves here.

    Reply
  28. I’m a genealogist and have seen battle names like Shiloh, Manassas, and Kennesaw Mountain in my research of babies born after the Civil War. They do provide some insights into the parent’s lives. Sometimes I’ve been able to pin down the unit the father served in as a result.
    I love “Who Do You Think You Are?” and hope they will return to the airwaves here.

    Reply
  29. I’m a genealogist and have seen battle names like Shiloh, Manassas, and Kennesaw Mountain in my research of babies born after the Civil War. They do provide some insights into the parent’s lives. Sometimes I’ve been able to pin down the unit the father served in as a result.
    I love “Who Do You Think You Are?” and hope they will return to the airwaves here.

    Reply
  30. I’m a genealogist and have seen battle names like Shiloh, Manassas, and Kennesaw Mountain in my research of babies born after the Civil War. They do provide some insights into the parent’s lives. Sometimes I’ve been able to pin down the unit the father served in as a result.
    I love “Who Do You Think You Are?” and hope they will return to the airwaves here.

    Reply
  31. Hi Lil! It’s interesting that this was supposed to be a comic name and yet plenty of people were called after Boer War battles! Maybe it suggests that even at the time there were those who thought it was an odd or amusing thing to do?

    Reply
  32. Hi Lil! It’s interesting that this was supposed to be a comic name and yet plenty of people were called after Boer War battles! Maybe it suggests that even at the time there were those who thought it was an odd or amusing thing to do?

    Reply
  33. Hi Lil! It’s interesting that this was supposed to be a comic name and yet plenty of people were called after Boer War battles! Maybe it suggests that even at the time there were those who thought it was an odd or amusing thing to do?

    Reply
  34. Hi Lil! It’s interesting that this was supposed to be a comic name and yet plenty of people were called after Boer War battles! Maybe it suggests that even at the time there were those who thought it was an odd or amusing thing to do?

    Reply
  35. Hi Lil! It’s interesting that this was supposed to be a comic name and yet plenty of people were called after Boer War battles! Maybe it suggests that even at the time there were those who thought it was an odd or amusing thing to do?

    Reply
  36. Hi Alison. I’m with you there. It seems very odd to commemorate an occasion of suffering and bloodshed by giving the place name to a child who is then stuck with it for life. If it’s a victory it feels triumphalist and inappropriate to us now.I guess people must have viewed it very differently in the past.

    Reply
  37. Hi Alison. I’m with you there. It seems very odd to commemorate an occasion of suffering and bloodshed by giving the place name to a child who is then stuck with it for life. If it’s a victory it feels triumphalist and inappropriate to us now.I guess people must have viewed it very differently in the past.

    Reply
  38. Hi Alison. I’m with you there. It seems very odd to commemorate an occasion of suffering and bloodshed by giving the place name to a child who is then stuck with it for life. If it’s a victory it feels triumphalist and inappropriate to us now.I guess people must have viewed it very differently in the past.

    Reply
  39. Hi Alison. I’m with you there. It seems very odd to commemorate an occasion of suffering and bloodshed by giving the place name to a child who is then stuck with it for life. If it’s a victory it feels triumphalist and inappropriate to us now.I guess people must have viewed it very differently in the past.

    Reply
  40. Hi Alison. I’m with you there. It seems very odd to commemorate an occasion of suffering and bloodshed by giving the place name to a child who is then stuck with it for life. If it’s a victory it feels triumphalist and inappropriate to us now.I guess people must have viewed it very differently in the past.

    Reply
  41. Thanks, Sue, it’s so interesting to know that! Not just a British phenomenon then, but it sounds as though it was quite an unusual thing to do. Some Australian asnd NZ readers have told me that there were some children there called Anzac.

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  42. Thanks, Sue, it’s so interesting to know that! Not just a British phenomenon then, but it sounds as though it was quite an unusual thing to do. Some Australian asnd NZ readers have told me that there were some children there called Anzac.

    Reply
  43. Thanks, Sue, it’s so interesting to know that! Not just a British phenomenon then, but it sounds as though it was quite an unusual thing to do. Some Australian asnd NZ readers have told me that there were some children there called Anzac.

    Reply
  44. Thanks, Sue, it’s so interesting to know that! Not just a British phenomenon then, but it sounds as though it was quite an unusual thing to do. Some Australian asnd NZ readers have told me that there were some children there called Anzac.

    Reply
  45. Thanks, Sue, it’s so interesting to know that! Not just a British phenomenon then, but it sounds as though it was quite an unusual thing to do. Some Australian asnd NZ readers have told me that there were some children there called Anzac.

    Reply
  46. Fascinating, Pamela. Thank you! I can see the connection when a father or male relative served. I wonder whether any children were named for battles in the Revolutionary War?

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  47. Fascinating, Pamela. Thank you! I can see the connection when a father or male relative served. I wonder whether any children were named for battles in the Revolutionary War?

    Reply
  48. Fascinating, Pamela. Thank you! I can see the connection when a father or male relative served. I wonder whether any children were named for battles in the Revolutionary War?

    Reply
  49. Fascinating, Pamela. Thank you! I can see the connection when a father or male relative served. I wonder whether any children were named for battles in the Revolutionary War?

    Reply
  50. Fascinating, Pamela. Thank you! I can see the connection when a father or male relative served. I wonder whether any children were named for battles in the Revolutionary War?

    Reply
  51. Fabulous names for fabulous creatures! I do remember that the British Army had a horse called Agincourt which was recently on parade for a French state visit. They just couldn’t help themselves…

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  52. Fabulous names for fabulous creatures! I do remember that the British Army had a horse called Agincourt which was recently on parade for a French state visit. They just couldn’t help themselves…

    Reply
  53. Fabulous names for fabulous creatures! I do remember that the British Army had a horse called Agincourt which was recently on parade for a French state visit. They just couldn’t help themselves…

    Reply
  54. Fabulous names for fabulous creatures! I do remember that the British Army had a horse called Agincourt which was recently on parade for a French state visit. They just couldn’t help themselves…

    Reply
  55. Fabulous names for fabulous creatures! I do remember that the British Army had a horse called Agincourt which was recently on parade for a French state visit. They just couldn’t help themselves…

    Reply
  56. Wow, this is fascinating. A great post! I agree with the Karen, I can’t imagine naming a baby after a horrific event such as Waterloo or the many battles of the Civil War here in the US.

    Reply
  57. Wow, this is fascinating. A great post! I agree with the Karen, I can’t imagine naming a baby after a horrific event such as Waterloo or the many battles of the Civil War here in the US.

    Reply
  58. Wow, this is fascinating. A great post! I agree with the Karen, I can’t imagine naming a baby after a horrific event such as Waterloo or the many battles of the Civil War here in the US.

    Reply
  59. Wow, this is fascinating. A great post! I agree with the Karen, I can’t imagine naming a baby after a horrific event such as Waterloo or the many battles of the Civil War here in the US.

    Reply
  60. Wow, this is fascinating. A great post! I agree with the Karen, I can’t imagine naming a baby after a horrific event such as Waterloo or the many battles of the Civil War here in the US.

    Reply
  61. Thanks, Maryellen. I’m so glad you found it interesting. I felt exactly the same when I found out about it – I couldn’t imagine anyone wanting to mark a battle in that way (or land a child with a name like that!)

    Reply
  62. Thanks, Maryellen. I’m so glad you found it interesting. I felt exactly the same when I found out about it – I couldn’t imagine anyone wanting to mark a battle in that way (or land a child with a name like that!)

    Reply
  63. Thanks, Maryellen. I’m so glad you found it interesting. I felt exactly the same when I found out about it – I couldn’t imagine anyone wanting to mark a battle in that way (or land a child with a name like that!)

    Reply
  64. Thanks, Maryellen. I’m so glad you found it interesting. I felt exactly the same when I found out about it – I couldn’t imagine anyone wanting to mark a battle in that way (or land a child with a name like that!)

    Reply
  65. Thanks, Maryellen. I’m so glad you found it interesting. I felt exactly the same when I found out about it – I couldn’t imagine anyone wanting to mark a battle in that way (or land a child with a name like that!)

    Reply
  66. This post is terrific. And the comments blow me away.
    I think the battle names make sense when you consider how important those battles were in the lives of everyone.
    I personally am thrilled that I have never heard of any girls being named Betty Bulge Jones or something like that.
    I hope that everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  67. This post is terrific. And the comments blow me away.
    I think the battle names make sense when you consider how important those battles were in the lives of everyone.
    I personally am thrilled that I have never heard of any girls being named Betty Bulge Jones or something like that.
    I hope that everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  68. This post is terrific. And the comments blow me away.
    I think the battle names make sense when you consider how important those battles were in the lives of everyone.
    I personally am thrilled that I have never heard of any girls being named Betty Bulge Jones or something like that.
    I hope that everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  69. This post is terrific. And the comments blow me away.
    I think the battle names make sense when you consider how important those battles were in the lives of everyone.
    I personally am thrilled that I have never heard of any girls being named Betty Bulge Jones or something like that.
    I hope that everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  70. This post is terrific. And the comments blow me away.
    I think the battle names make sense when you consider how important those battles were in the lives of everyone.
    I personally am thrilled that I have never heard of any girls being named Betty Bulge Jones or something like that.
    I hope that everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  71. This discussion sparked my recollection of a man named Kennesaw Mountain Landis. So I checked to see when he was born – 1866. His father was wounded in the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain. KMT was a very well known man as he was a judge (1905 – 1922) and also the Baseball Commissioner (1920 to 1944).
    I’d never really thought about naming children after battles before. Interesting that it was a THING…
    Peace as a name wasn’t too surprising because the Puritan’s and Parliamentarian’s did that a lot. Virtue, Chastity, etc.
    My family trees are filled with the same name or same couple of names over and over so it is hard to know which DO/Dombey Otto/Otto was being referred to in legal documents because they didn’t always use clear identify. Just an example of one name. Lots of other names used repeatedly.
    As others said, very fascinating post…Thanks!

    Reply
  72. This discussion sparked my recollection of a man named Kennesaw Mountain Landis. So I checked to see when he was born – 1866. His father was wounded in the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain. KMT was a very well known man as he was a judge (1905 – 1922) and also the Baseball Commissioner (1920 to 1944).
    I’d never really thought about naming children after battles before. Interesting that it was a THING…
    Peace as a name wasn’t too surprising because the Puritan’s and Parliamentarian’s did that a lot. Virtue, Chastity, etc.
    My family trees are filled with the same name or same couple of names over and over so it is hard to know which DO/Dombey Otto/Otto was being referred to in legal documents because they didn’t always use clear identify. Just an example of one name. Lots of other names used repeatedly.
    As others said, very fascinating post…Thanks!

    Reply
  73. This discussion sparked my recollection of a man named Kennesaw Mountain Landis. So I checked to see when he was born – 1866. His father was wounded in the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain. KMT was a very well known man as he was a judge (1905 – 1922) and also the Baseball Commissioner (1920 to 1944).
    I’d never really thought about naming children after battles before. Interesting that it was a THING…
    Peace as a name wasn’t too surprising because the Puritan’s and Parliamentarian’s did that a lot. Virtue, Chastity, etc.
    My family trees are filled with the same name or same couple of names over and over so it is hard to know which DO/Dombey Otto/Otto was being referred to in legal documents because they didn’t always use clear identify. Just an example of one name. Lots of other names used repeatedly.
    As others said, very fascinating post…Thanks!

    Reply
  74. This discussion sparked my recollection of a man named Kennesaw Mountain Landis. So I checked to see when he was born – 1866. His father was wounded in the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain. KMT was a very well known man as he was a judge (1905 – 1922) and also the Baseball Commissioner (1920 to 1944).
    I’d never really thought about naming children after battles before. Interesting that it was a THING…
    Peace as a name wasn’t too surprising because the Puritan’s and Parliamentarian’s did that a lot. Virtue, Chastity, etc.
    My family trees are filled with the same name or same couple of names over and over so it is hard to know which DO/Dombey Otto/Otto was being referred to in legal documents because they didn’t always use clear identify. Just an example of one name. Lots of other names used repeatedly.
    As others said, very fascinating post…Thanks!

    Reply
  75. This discussion sparked my recollection of a man named Kennesaw Mountain Landis. So I checked to see when he was born – 1866. His father was wounded in the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain. KMT was a very well known man as he was a judge (1905 – 1922) and also the Baseball Commissioner (1920 to 1944).
    I’d never really thought about naming children after battles before. Interesting that it was a THING…
    Peace as a name wasn’t too surprising because the Puritan’s and Parliamentarian’s did that a lot. Virtue, Chastity, etc.
    My family trees are filled with the same name or same couple of names over and over so it is hard to know which DO/Dombey Otto/Otto was being referred to in legal documents because they didn’t always use clear identify. Just an example of one name. Lots of other names used repeatedly.
    As others said, very fascinating post…Thanks!

    Reply
  76. Do you remember Aunt Peace from Louisa May Alcott’s Rose in Bloom series? I’ve always thought my Quaker great-grandmother must have been like Aunt Peace.

    Reply
  77. Do you remember Aunt Peace from Louisa May Alcott’s Rose in Bloom series? I’ve always thought my Quaker great-grandmother must have been like Aunt Peace.

    Reply
  78. Do you remember Aunt Peace from Louisa May Alcott’s Rose in Bloom series? I’ve always thought my Quaker great-grandmother must have been like Aunt Peace.

    Reply
  79. Do you remember Aunt Peace from Louisa May Alcott’s Rose in Bloom series? I’ve always thought my Quaker great-grandmother must have been like Aunt Peace.

    Reply
  80. Do you remember Aunt Peace from Louisa May Alcott’s Rose in Bloom series? I’ve always thought my Quaker great-grandmother must have been like Aunt Peace.

    Reply
  81. Sounds like he might have been named around the Peace of Amiens — which, sadly was quite short lived.
    Great post Nicola. So interesting, and something I didn’t know about, either. I don’t know if I could have forgiven a parent who called me Heligoland or Loos! 😉

    Reply
  82. Sounds like he might have been named around the Peace of Amiens — which, sadly was quite short lived.
    Great post Nicola. So interesting, and something I didn’t know about, either. I don’t know if I could have forgiven a parent who called me Heligoland or Loos! 😉

    Reply
  83. Sounds like he might have been named around the Peace of Amiens — which, sadly was quite short lived.
    Great post Nicola. So interesting, and something I didn’t know about, either. I don’t know if I could have forgiven a parent who called me Heligoland or Loos! 😉

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  84. Sounds like he might have been named around the Peace of Amiens — which, sadly was quite short lived.
    Great post Nicola. So interesting, and something I didn’t know about, either. I don’t know if I could have forgiven a parent who called me Heligoland or Loos! 😉

    Reply
  85. Sounds like he might have been named around the Peace of Amiens — which, sadly was quite short lived.
    Great post Nicola. So interesting, and something I didn’t know about, either. I don’t know if I could have forgiven a parent who called me Heligoland or Loos! 😉

    Reply
  86. I haven’t found as many Revolutionary War Battle Names, in my own research but they are out there. I’ll have to dig to see if I have any in my records. In other work I have seen a girl named Oriskany, and a boy named Monmouth.

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  87. I haven’t found as many Revolutionary War Battle Names, in my own research but they are out there. I’ll have to dig to see if I have any in my records. In other work I have seen a girl named Oriskany, and a boy named Monmouth.

    Reply
  88. I haven’t found as many Revolutionary War Battle Names, in my own research but they are out there. I’ll have to dig to see if I have any in my records. In other work I have seen a girl named Oriskany, and a boy named Monmouth.

    Reply
  89. I haven’t found as many Revolutionary War Battle Names, in my own research but they are out there. I’ll have to dig to see if I have any in my records. In other work I have seen a girl named Oriskany, and a boy named Monmouth.

    Reply
  90. I haven’t found as many Revolutionary War Battle Names, in my own research but they are out there. I’ll have to dig to see if I have any in my records. In other work I have seen a girl named Oriskany, and a boy named Monmouth.

    Reply
  91. Parents really didn’t hold back, did they! I wonder whether they thought about what it might be like for a child living with one of these names. I do find the topic fascinating but feel for the children.

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  92. Parents really didn’t hold back, did they! I wonder whether they thought about what it might be like for a child living with one of these names. I do find the topic fascinating but feel for the children.

    Reply
  93. Parents really didn’t hold back, did they! I wonder whether they thought about what it might be like for a child living with one of these names. I do find the topic fascinating but feel for the children.

    Reply
  94. Parents really didn’t hold back, did they! I wonder whether they thought about what it might be like for a child living with one of these names. I do find the topic fascinating but feel for the children.

    Reply
  95. Parents really didn’t hold back, did they! I wonder whether they thought about what it might be like for a child living with one of these names. I do find the topic fascinating but feel for the children.

    Reply
  96. I’d forgotten about Aunt Peace! I wonder if it was a Quaker name anyway and became more popular at a certain period. I have some Quaker ancestors and will take a look at their names. So interesting, thank you!

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  97. I’d forgotten about Aunt Peace! I wonder if it was a Quaker name anyway and became more popular at a certain period. I have some Quaker ancestors and will take a look at their names. So interesting, thank you!

    Reply
  98. I’d forgotten about Aunt Peace! I wonder if it was a Quaker name anyway and became more popular at a certain period. I have some Quaker ancestors and will take a look at their names. So interesting, thank you!

    Reply
  99. I’d forgotten about Aunt Peace! I wonder if it was a Quaker name anyway and became more popular at a certain period. I have some Quaker ancestors and will take a look at their names. So interesting, thank you!

    Reply
  100. I’d forgotten about Aunt Peace! I wonder if it was a Quaker name anyway and became more popular at a certain period. I have some Quaker ancestors and will take a look at their names. So interesting, thank you!

    Reply
  101. Thank you, Annette! Yes, that’s a very good point – the wars and battles were so prevalent in society at the time that people might want to mark them in some way. Poor Betty Bulge Jones – that would be terrible to be stuck with!

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  102. Thank you, Annette! Yes, that’s a very good point – the wars and battles were so prevalent in society at the time that people might want to mark them in some way. Poor Betty Bulge Jones – that would be terrible to be stuck with!

    Reply
  103. Thank you, Annette! Yes, that’s a very good point – the wars and battles were so prevalent in society at the time that people might want to mark them in some way. Poor Betty Bulge Jones – that would be terrible to be stuck with!

    Reply
  104. Thank you, Annette! Yes, that’s a very good point – the wars and battles were so prevalent in society at the time that people might want to mark them in some way. Poor Betty Bulge Jones – that would be terrible to be stuck with!

    Reply
  105. Thank you, Annette! Yes, that’s a very good point – the wars and battles were so prevalent in society at the time that people might want to mark them in some way. Poor Betty Bulge Jones – that would be terrible to be stuck with!

    Reply
  106. Thanks so much for sharing this, Vicki. What a fascinating bit of information about Kennesaw Mountain Landis. And of course the Puritan names were already there with Peace and the other virtues.
    If only our ancestors realised how hard they were making it for us to trace our family trees accurately when everyone had the same names…

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  107. Thanks so much for sharing this, Vicki. What a fascinating bit of information about Kennesaw Mountain Landis. And of course the Puritan names were already there with Peace and the other virtues.
    If only our ancestors realised how hard they were making it for us to trace our family trees accurately when everyone had the same names…

    Reply
  108. Thanks so much for sharing this, Vicki. What a fascinating bit of information about Kennesaw Mountain Landis. And of course the Puritan names were already there with Peace and the other virtues.
    If only our ancestors realised how hard they were making it for us to trace our family trees accurately when everyone had the same names…

    Reply
  109. Thanks so much for sharing this, Vicki. What a fascinating bit of information about Kennesaw Mountain Landis. And of course the Puritan names were already there with Peace and the other virtues.
    If only our ancestors realised how hard they were making it for us to trace our family trees accurately when everyone had the same names…

    Reply
  110. Thanks so much for sharing this, Vicki. What a fascinating bit of information about Kennesaw Mountain Landis. And of course the Puritan names were already there with Peace and the other virtues.
    If only our ancestors realised how hard they were making it for us to trace our family trees accurately when everyone had the same names…

    Reply
  111. I have not run across any named for battles, but many children in 19th century US were named for Washington, Jefferson, Lafayette, and other heroes. Also popular were names like America, Liberty, and so forth. When Lafayette returned in the 1820’s and toured the country, he was idolized and feted everywhere.

    Reply
  112. I have not run across any named for battles, but many children in 19th century US were named for Washington, Jefferson, Lafayette, and other heroes. Also popular were names like America, Liberty, and so forth. When Lafayette returned in the 1820’s and toured the country, he was idolized and feted everywhere.

    Reply
  113. I have not run across any named for battles, but many children in 19th century US were named for Washington, Jefferson, Lafayette, and other heroes. Also popular were names like America, Liberty, and so forth. When Lafayette returned in the 1820’s and toured the country, he was idolized and feted everywhere.

    Reply
  114. I have not run across any named for battles, but many children in 19th century US were named for Washington, Jefferson, Lafayette, and other heroes. Also popular were names like America, Liberty, and so forth. When Lafayette returned in the 1820’s and toured the country, he was idolized and feted everywhere.

    Reply
  115. I have not run across any named for battles, but many children in 19th century US were named for Washington, Jefferson, Lafayette, and other heroes. Also popular were names like America, Liberty, and so forth. When Lafayette returned in the 1820’s and toured the country, he was idolized and feted everywhere.

    Reply
  116. That sounds just like Nelson, Linda! I can see how that sort of fame could translate into people naming their children after the hero of the moment.

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  117. That sounds just like Nelson, Linda! I can see how that sort of fame could translate into people naming their children after the hero of the moment.

    Reply
  118. That sounds just like Nelson, Linda! I can see how that sort of fame could translate into people naming their children after the hero of the moment.

    Reply
  119. That sounds just like Nelson, Linda! I can see how that sort of fame could translate into people naming their children after the hero of the moment.

    Reply
  120. That sounds just like Nelson, Linda! I can see how that sort of fame could translate into people naming their children after the hero of the moment.

    Reply

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