Basil, sweet basil!

Basil 2by Mary Jo

I grew up in the farm country of Western New York and had a fine vegetable garden, but tomatoes were basically just another vegetable, less prized than sweet corn or squash or potatoes.  There were none in my garden. In retrospect, I think that being so far north meant that tomatoes didn't grow as well as they do farther south.

I formulated this theory after moving to Maryland, where tomatoes are very nearly a religion. <G>  Perfect, juicy, sun-ripened Maryland tomatoes are much sought after.  Locations of farm stands with great tomatoes are greedily exchanged.

And where there are tomatoes, there should be basil.  Being a northerner, I didn't make the connection until some years back I read a piece in the Baltimore Sun by a local Italian-American journalist saying that he grew basil in his back yard because people in his family had grown their own basil for centuries.  

Being historically inclined, I thought that sounded pretty interesting, and soon I noticed that in spring, all the supermarkets seemed to have basil plants in little peat pots, ready to pop into the ground as soon as it's warm enough.  So I planted some basil in the flowerboxes on my deck, and now I'm a convert.  Fresh basil is AMAZING.

Basil is possibly native to India, where it's been cultivated for over 5000 years, but it had spread into Europe by the time of the ancient Greeks.  It's a member of the mint family, which probably explains the wonderful scent.  There are many
Capresevariations, but most common is sweet basil, which has been known as "the royal herb" or "the king of herbs."

Dried basil loses most of its flavor and is reminiscent of hay, but the fresh variety makes many things taste wonderful.  A classic Italian dish is caprese salad, which is fresh sliced tomatoes, ditto fresh sliced mozzarella, and fresh basil, seasoned with a little salt and olive oil and maybe a bit of fresh ground pepper.  If all the ingredients aren't fresh, forget it, but if they are, the dish is sublime and the red, white, and green colors echo the Italian flag in a nicely patriotic way.

But basil is good in so many ways.  I like to chop some fresh leaves up and scramble Pestothem with an egg and if I've feeling decadent, some grated cheese. Lovely.  The Mayhem Consultant is half Italian, and he once mentioned a salad his family members made that was sliced tomatoes, chopped fresh basil, olive oil, and salt and pepper.  I gave it a try, and now it's a summer staple around here.

It's a romance, really.  Tomatoes and basil, born to be together!  <G>  Bruschetta, which is chopped tomatoes and basil and a little olive oil on toasted bread is another simple taste superstar.

Pesto PastaBut basil is splendid in other applications, too.  I discovered pesto sauce some years ago when a friend said her basil was going crazy in her garden so she'd decided to make pesto, and she handed me a small container with green stuff sloshing around inside.  It was love at first taste.  <G>  

These days prepared pesto is probably found in most supermarkets (at least, it is in Maryland), and it's very versatile.  As Wikipedia says, it's traditionally made of "crushed garlic, European pine nuts, coarse salt, basil, Parmigiano-Reggiano (Parmesan cheese) and pecorino sardo (cheese made from sheep's milk), all blended with olive oil."  Wonderful tossed with pasta–I love it with tortellini–it can also be served with fish, eggs, and other things.   Someone somewhere is probably making pesto or basil ice cream, and if so, I'd like to taste it.

Basil in a boxI realize that many of you already know what I've been prattling about, but I like talking about my summer basil.  <G>  That's it surrounded by flowers in one of my deck flower boxes.

Fresh herbs in general are a wonderful thing, and even if it isn't practical for you to grow any of your own, they're now widely available commercially.   Nothing perks up a dish like fresh herbs and many are easy to grow: oregano, chives, thyme, sage, and more.  So if you haven't tried growing your own herbs, give fresh basil a try–you won't regret it!

Do you grow your own herbs?  If so, which ones?  And if you don't grow them, do you cook with them when you can?

Mary Jo

220 thoughts on “Basil, sweet basil!”

  1. We use parsley, dill, and thyme on a regular basis. In our food, I mean. Basil, not so often, although it canbe found in supermarkets. You’ll find basil in our orthodox churches. Priests use bunches of basil to spray holy water over the crowds. I am not a church-goer myself. I don’t eat basil with pleasure because it reminds me of churches. You may think I have no faith, but I do. It’s just that my own belief in God does not ‘require’ my presence in church, nor does it make me obey its impositions. I’d rather pray in the mountains or in a forest. Priests would probably call me heathen. Lol

    Reply
  2. We use parsley, dill, and thyme on a regular basis. In our food, I mean. Basil, not so often, although it canbe found in supermarkets. You’ll find basil in our orthodox churches. Priests use bunches of basil to spray holy water over the crowds. I am not a church-goer myself. I don’t eat basil with pleasure because it reminds me of churches. You may think I have no faith, but I do. It’s just that my own belief in God does not ‘require’ my presence in church, nor does it make me obey its impositions. I’d rather pray in the mountains or in a forest. Priests would probably call me heathen. Lol

    Reply
  3. We use parsley, dill, and thyme on a regular basis. In our food, I mean. Basil, not so often, although it canbe found in supermarkets. You’ll find basil in our orthodox churches. Priests use bunches of basil to spray holy water over the crowds. I am not a church-goer myself. I don’t eat basil with pleasure because it reminds me of churches. You may think I have no faith, but I do. It’s just that my own belief in God does not ‘require’ my presence in church, nor does it make me obey its impositions. I’d rather pray in the mountains or in a forest. Priests would probably call me heathen. Lol

    Reply
  4. We use parsley, dill, and thyme on a regular basis. In our food, I mean. Basil, not so often, although it canbe found in supermarkets. You’ll find basil in our orthodox churches. Priests use bunches of basil to spray holy water over the crowds. I am not a church-goer myself. I don’t eat basil with pleasure because it reminds me of churches. You may think I have no faith, but I do. It’s just that my own belief in God does not ‘require’ my presence in church, nor does it make me obey its impositions. I’d rather pray in the mountains or in a forest. Priests would probably call me heathen. Lol

    Reply
  5. We use parsley, dill, and thyme on a regular basis. In our food, I mean. Basil, not so often, although it canbe found in supermarkets. You’ll find basil in our orthodox churches. Priests use bunches of basil to spray holy water over the crowds. I am not a church-goer myself. I don’t eat basil with pleasure because it reminds me of churches. You may think I have no faith, but I do. It’s just that my own belief in God does not ‘require’ my presence in church, nor does it make me obey its impositions. I’d rather pray in the mountains or in a forest. Priests would probably call me heathen. Lol

    Reply
  6. Are you interested in learning how I eat parsley, dill, and thyme? Parsley is used both fresh and boiled. We use the whole plant in our soup, but the leaves, in particular, are also used in salads or as ornaments for almost any food. They are very healthy and most people love their flavour. Dill is not used only for pickles. I often make a cheese cream spread with fresh dill and sometimes I fill tomatoes or bell peppers with it. I also add dill to scrambled eggs or omelettes. Dill – either fresh or dried – can be added to our sour soup, called bortsch or borsch (which is not necessarily red or pink). Borsch can be made with a large variety of herbs and vegetables, according to people’s taste and depending on the season. Needless to say we add thyme to it, too. 🙂 Dried thyme is often added to our meat, especially pork or lamb.

    Reply
  7. Are you interested in learning how I eat parsley, dill, and thyme? Parsley is used both fresh and boiled. We use the whole plant in our soup, but the leaves, in particular, are also used in salads or as ornaments for almost any food. They are very healthy and most people love their flavour. Dill is not used only for pickles. I often make a cheese cream spread with fresh dill and sometimes I fill tomatoes or bell peppers with it. I also add dill to scrambled eggs or omelettes. Dill – either fresh or dried – can be added to our sour soup, called bortsch or borsch (which is not necessarily red or pink). Borsch can be made with a large variety of herbs and vegetables, according to people’s taste and depending on the season. Needless to say we add thyme to it, too. 🙂 Dried thyme is often added to our meat, especially pork or lamb.

    Reply
  8. Are you interested in learning how I eat parsley, dill, and thyme? Parsley is used both fresh and boiled. We use the whole plant in our soup, but the leaves, in particular, are also used in salads or as ornaments for almost any food. They are very healthy and most people love their flavour. Dill is not used only for pickles. I often make a cheese cream spread with fresh dill and sometimes I fill tomatoes or bell peppers with it. I also add dill to scrambled eggs or omelettes. Dill – either fresh or dried – can be added to our sour soup, called bortsch or borsch (which is not necessarily red or pink). Borsch can be made with a large variety of herbs and vegetables, according to people’s taste and depending on the season. Needless to say we add thyme to it, too. 🙂 Dried thyme is often added to our meat, especially pork or lamb.

    Reply
  9. Are you interested in learning how I eat parsley, dill, and thyme? Parsley is used both fresh and boiled. We use the whole plant in our soup, but the leaves, in particular, are also used in salads or as ornaments for almost any food. They are very healthy and most people love their flavour. Dill is not used only for pickles. I often make a cheese cream spread with fresh dill and sometimes I fill tomatoes or bell peppers with it. I also add dill to scrambled eggs or omelettes. Dill – either fresh or dried – can be added to our sour soup, called bortsch or borsch (which is not necessarily red or pink). Borsch can be made with a large variety of herbs and vegetables, according to people’s taste and depending on the season. Needless to say we add thyme to it, too. 🙂 Dried thyme is often added to our meat, especially pork or lamb.

    Reply
  10. Are you interested in learning how I eat parsley, dill, and thyme? Parsley is used both fresh and boiled. We use the whole plant in our soup, but the leaves, in particular, are also used in salads or as ornaments for almost any food. They are very healthy and most people love their flavour. Dill is not used only for pickles. I often make a cheese cream spread with fresh dill and sometimes I fill tomatoes or bell peppers with it. I also add dill to scrambled eggs or omelettes. Dill – either fresh or dried – can be added to our sour soup, called bortsch or borsch (which is not necessarily red or pink). Borsch can be made with a large variety of herbs and vegetables, according to people’s taste and depending on the season. Needless to say we add thyme to it, too. 🙂 Dried thyme is often added to our meat, especially pork or lamb.

    Reply
  11. I don’t cook any more than I can help (which is breakfast generally), but my favorite service market does, and their tabouli with fresh parsley and tomatoes is addictive. When I do make something myself, I avoid salt and sugar, but I use considerable pepper. I am very lucky to live within a few minutes of several very good fresh produce markets now. My days of eating canned stuff or phoning out for a pizza are gone, and I feel better for it.

    Reply
  12. I don’t cook any more than I can help (which is breakfast generally), but my favorite service market does, and their tabouli with fresh parsley and tomatoes is addictive. When I do make something myself, I avoid salt and sugar, but I use considerable pepper. I am very lucky to live within a few minutes of several very good fresh produce markets now. My days of eating canned stuff or phoning out for a pizza are gone, and I feel better for it.

    Reply
  13. I don’t cook any more than I can help (which is breakfast generally), but my favorite service market does, and their tabouli with fresh parsley and tomatoes is addictive. When I do make something myself, I avoid salt and sugar, but I use considerable pepper. I am very lucky to live within a few minutes of several very good fresh produce markets now. My days of eating canned stuff or phoning out for a pizza are gone, and I feel better for it.

    Reply
  14. I don’t cook any more than I can help (which is breakfast generally), but my favorite service market does, and their tabouli with fresh parsley and tomatoes is addictive. When I do make something myself, I avoid salt and sugar, but I use considerable pepper. I am very lucky to live within a few minutes of several very good fresh produce markets now. My days of eating canned stuff or phoning out for a pizza are gone, and I feel better for it.

    Reply
  15. I don’t cook any more than I can help (which is breakfast generally), but my favorite service market does, and their tabouli with fresh parsley and tomatoes is addictive. When I do make something myself, I avoid salt and sugar, but I use considerable pepper. I am very lucky to live within a few minutes of several very good fresh produce markets now. My days of eating canned stuff or phoning out for a pizza are gone, and I feel better for it.

    Reply
  16. I’ve been growing and cooking with herbs for at least 40 years. I love how they improve my cooking with so little effort. The first herb I grew was mint. I was ignorant of mint’s growing habits at the time, so put 5 plants along the back of my house. It spread like crazy! Our yard smelled good all summer from my husband mowing my mint out of the yard. I haven’t made that mistake again, but still grow lots of mint.

    Reply
  17. I’ve been growing and cooking with herbs for at least 40 years. I love how they improve my cooking with so little effort. The first herb I grew was mint. I was ignorant of mint’s growing habits at the time, so put 5 plants along the back of my house. It spread like crazy! Our yard smelled good all summer from my husband mowing my mint out of the yard. I haven’t made that mistake again, but still grow lots of mint.

    Reply
  18. I’ve been growing and cooking with herbs for at least 40 years. I love how they improve my cooking with so little effort. The first herb I grew was mint. I was ignorant of mint’s growing habits at the time, so put 5 plants along the back of my house. It spread like crazy! Our yard smelled good all summer from my husband mowing my mint out of the yard. I haven’t made that mistake again, but still grow lots of mint.

    Reply
  19. I’ve been growing and cooking with herbs for at least 40 years. I love how they improve my cooking with so little effort. The first herb I grew was mint. I was ignorant of mint’s growing habits at the time, so put 5 plants along the back of my house. It spread like crazy! Our yard smelled good all summer from my husband mowing my mint out of the yard. I haven’t made that mistake again, but still grow lots of mint.

    Reply
  20. I’ve been growing and cooking with herbs for at least 40 years. I love how they improve my cooking with so little effort. The first herb I grew was mint. I was ignorant of mint’s growing habits at the time, so put 5 plants along the back of my house. It spread like crazy! Our yard smelled good all summer from my husband mowing my mint out of the yard. I haven’t made that mistake again, but still grow lots of mint.

    Reply
  21. I was away from home during June, and when I got back, all the farmsteads and nurseries were out of herb plants, so I’m limited to buying my fresh herbs by the bunch. Which is fine, but I miss going out to snip off as much as I want.
    It’s been hideously hot lately, here and everywhere, I guess, so I had salad caprese yesterday—the perfect hot day meal.

    Reply
  22. I was away from home during June, and when I got back, all the farmsteads and nurseries were out of herb plants, so I’m limited to buying my fresh herbs by the bunch. Which is fine, but I miss going out to snip off as much as I want.
    It’s been hideously hot lately, here and everywhere, I guess, so I had salad caprese yesterday—the perfect hot day meal.

    Reply
  23. I was away from home during June, and when I got back, all the farmsteads and nurseries were out of herb plants, so I’m limited to buying my fresh herbs by the bunch. Which is fine, but I miss going out to snip off as much as I want.
    It’s been hideously hot lately, here and everywhere, I guess, so I had salad caprese yesterday—the perfect hot day meal.

    Reply
  24. I was away from home during June, and when I got back, all the farmsteads and nurseries were out of herb plants, so I’m limited to buying my fresh herbs by the bunch. Which is fine, but I miss going out to snip off as much as I want.
    It’s been hideously hot lately, here and everywhere, I guess, so I had salad caprese yesterday—the perfect hot day meal.

    Reply
  25. I was away from home during June, and when I got back, all the farmsteads and nurseries were out of herb plants, so I’m limited to buying my fresh herbs by the bunch. Which is fine, but I miss going out to snip off as much as I want.
    It’s been hideously hot lately, here and everywhere, I guess, so I had salad caprese yesterday—the perfect hot day meal.

    Reply
  26. I make my own pesto and freeze it which is, as you rightly note, the only way to preserve the fresh basil smell and taste. Although I took a gardening break this summer, I usually grow tomatoes and basil. We have sage and rosemary, too, and those herbs are perennials in our climate. I use rosemary with olive oil and garlic when I roast red potatoes. The sage is mostly ornamental.

    Reply
  27. I make my own pesto and freeze it which is, as you rightly note, the only way to preserve the fresh basil smell and taste. Although I took a gardening break this summer, I usually grow tomatoes and basil. We have sage and rosemary, too, and those herbs are perennials in our climate. I use rosemary with olive oil and garlic when I roast red potatoes. The sage is mostly ornamental.

    Reply
  28. I make my own pesto and freeze it which is, as you rightly note, the only way to preserve the fresh basil smell and taste. Although I took a gardening break this summer, I usually grow tomatoes and basil. We have sage and rosemary, too, and those herbs are perennials in our climate. I use rosemary with olive oil and garlic when I roast red potatoes. The sage is mostly ornamental.

    Reply
  29. I make my own pesto and freeze it which is, as you rightly note, the only way to preserve the fresh basil smell and taste. Although I took a gardening break this summer, I usually grow tomatoes and basil. We have sage and rosemary, too, and those herbs are perennials in our climate. I use rosemary with olive oil and garlic when I roast red potatoes. The sage is mostly ornamental.

    Reply
  30. I make my own pesto and freeze it which is, as you rightly note, the only way to preserve the fresh basil smell and taste. Although I took a gardening break this summer, I usually grow tomatoes and basil. We have sage and rosemary, too, and those herbs are perennials in our climate. I use rosemary with olive oil and garlic when I roast red potatoes. The sage is mostly ornamental.

    Reply
  31. Oana-Maria Uliu, you have plenty of “heathen” company enjoying the spirituality of those forests! I didn’t realize that Orthodox priests used basil for sprinkling holy water, but I can understand how the scent associations would not be good if they remind you of being cooped up inside. Parsley, dill, and thyme are also wonderful, so at least you’re not herb-deprived!

    Reply
  32. Oana-Maria Uliu, you have plenty of “heathen” company enjoying the spirituality of those forests! I didn’t realize that Orthodox priests used basil for sprinkling holy water, but I can understand how the scent associations would not be good if they remind you of being cooped up inside. Parsley, dill, and thyme are also wonderful, so at least you’re not herb-deprived!

    Reply
  33. Oana-Maria Uliu, you have plenty of “heathen” company enjoying the spirituality of those forests! I didn’t realize that Orthodox priests used basil for sprinkling holy water, but I can understand how the scent associations would not be good if they remind you of being cooped up inside. Parsley, dill, and thyme are also wonderful, so at least you’re not herb-deprived!

    Reply
  34. Oana-Maria Uliu, you have plenty of “heathen” company enjoying the spirituality of those forests! I didn’t realize that Orthodox priests used basil for sprinkling holy water, but I can understand how the scent associations would not be good if they remind you of being cooped up inside. Parsley, dill, and thyme are also wonderful, so at least you’re not herb-deprived!

    Reply
  35. Oana-Maria Uliu, you have plenty of “heathen” company enjoying the spirituality of those forests! I didn’t realize that Orthodox priests used basil for sprinkling holy water, but I can understand how the scent associations would not be good if they remind you of being cooped up inside. Parsley, dill, and thyme are also wonderful, so at least you’re not herb-deprived!

    Reply
  36. My ex is growing herbs and vegetables in pots and containers: basil, bush basil (small plant), oregano, sage, savory, purple basil, chocolate mint, rosemary, chives, cherry tonatos, Roma tomatos, bell peppers, eggplant. He told me to stop by and pick what I want, whenever I want. I used basil in a dish I tried to make that I had at Carrabas (wish I remembered the name). Wasn’t exactly the same but it was tasty.
    I heated fresh basil and oregano in olive oil, added diced onion and garlic and sautéd them until soft and onion was translucent. Then I added 2-3 inch julienned yellow squash and zucchini, cooking them until somewhat translucent. At the end I added halved cherry tomatoes and a little more basil, cooking for another 2-3 minutes. Quantities used were eyedballed for the number of people I was cooking for.

    Reply
  37. My ex is growing herbs and vegetables in pots and containers: basil, bush basil (small plant), oregano, sage, savory, purple basil, chocolate mint, rosemary, chives, cherry tonatos, Roma tomatos, bell peppers, eggplant. He told me to stop by and pick what I want, whenever I want. I used basil in a dish I tried to make that I had at Carrabas (wish I remembered the name). Wasn’t exactly the same but it was tasty.
    I heated fresh basil and oregano in olive oil, added diced onion and garlic and sautéd them until soft and onion was translucent. Then I added 2-3 inch julienned yellow squash and zucchini, cooking them until somewhat translucent. At the end I added halved cherry tomatoes and a little more basil, cooking for another 2-3 minutes. Quantities used were eyedballed for the number of people I was cooking for.

    Reply
  38. My ex is growing herbs and vegetables in pots and containers: basil, bush basil (small plant), oregano, sage, savory, purple basil, chocolate mint, rosemary, chives, cherry tonatos, Roma tomatos, bell peppers, eggplant. He told me to stop by and pick what I want, whenever I want. I used basil in a dish I tried to make that I had at Carrabas (wish I remembered the name). Wasn’t exactly the same but it was tasty.
    I heated fresh basil and oregano in olive oil, added diced onion and garlic and sautéd them until soft and onion was translucent. Then I added 2-3 inch julienned yellow squash and zucchini, cooking them until somewhat translucent. At the end I added halved cherry tomatoes and a little more basil, cooking for another 2-3 minutes. Quantities used were eyedballed for the number of people I was cooking for.

    Reply
  39. My ex is growing herbs and vegetables in pots and containers: basil, bush basil (small plant), oregano, sage, savory, purple basil, chocolate mint, rosemary, chives, cherry tonatos, Roma tomatos, bell peppers, eggplant. He told me to stop by and pick what I want, whenever I want. I used basil in a dish I tried to make that I had at Carrabas (wish I remembered the name). Wasn’t exactly the same but it was tasty.
    I heated fresh basil and oregano in olive oil, added diced onion and garlic and sautéd them until soft and onion was translucent. Then I added 2-3 inch julienned yellow squash and zucchini, cooking them until somewhat translucent. At the end I added halved cherry tomatoes and a little more basil, cooking for another 2-3 minutes. Quantities used were eyedballed for the number of people I was cooking for.

    Reply
  40. My ex is growing herbs and vegetables in pots and containers: basil, bush basil (small plant), oregano, sage, savory, purple basil, chocolate mint, rosemary, chives, cherry tonatos, Roma tomatos, bell peppers, eggplant. He told me to stop by and pick what I want, whenever I want. I used basil in a dish I tried to make that I had at Carrabas (wish I remembered the name). Wasn’t exactly the same but it was tasty.
    I heated fresh basil and oregano in olive oil, added diced onion and garlic and sautéd them until soft and onion was translucent. Then I added 2-3 inch julienned yellow squash and zucchini, cooking them until somewhat translucent. At the end I added halved cherry tomatoes and a little more basil, cooking for another 2-3 minutes. Quantities used were eyedballed for the number of people I was cooking for.

    Reply
  41. I always have fresh parsley in my refrigerator–it’s widely available in supermarkets here all year around, and it always adds that wonderful fresh green flavors to almost everything, as you say. I like dill, but don’t grow it and don’t use it as much as it deserves. Thyme is also good, but it can be a bit intense. It dries well, though.

    Reply
  42. I always have fresh parsley in my refrigerator–it’s widely available in supermarkets here all year around, and it always adds that wonderful fresh green flavors to almost everything, as you say. I like dill, but don’t grow it and don’t use it as much as it deserves. Thyme is also good, but it can be a bit intense. It dries well, though.

    Reply
  43. I always have fresh parsley in my refrigerator–it’s widely available in supermarkets here all year around, and it always adds that wonderful fresh green flavors to almost everything, as you say. I like dill, but don’t grow it and don’t use it as much as it deserves. Thyme is also good, but it can be a bit intense. It dries well, though.

    Reply
  44. I always have fresh parsley in my refrigerator–it’s widely available in supermarkets here all year around, and it always adds that wonderful fresh green flavors to almost everything, as you say. I like dill, but don’t grow it and don’t use it as much as it deserves. Thyme is also good, but it can be a bit intense. It dries well, though.

    Reply
  45. I always have fresh parsley in my refrigerator–it’s widely available in supermarkets here all year around, and it always adds that wonderful fresh green flavors to almost everything, as you say. I like dill, but don’t grow it and don’t use it as much as it deserves. Thyme is also good, but it can be a bit intense. It dries well, though.

    Reply
  46. Now I’m thinking I need to get some fresh mozzarella so I can have a salad caprese, too. *G*
    I’m sorry you missed the basil pot season–there is something sumptuous about going out and clipping one’s own fresh herbs in the garden or on the deck.

    Reply
  47. Now I’m thinking I need to get some fresh mozzarella so I can have a salad caprese, too. *G*
    I’m sorry you missed the basil pot season–there is something sumptuous about going out and clipping one’s own fresh herbs in the garden or on the deck.

    Reply
  48. Now I’m thinking I need to get some fresh mozzarella so I can have a salad caprese, too. *G*
    I’m sorry you missed the basil pot season–there is something sumptuous about going out and clipping one’s own fresh herbs in the garden or on the deck.

    Reply
  49. Now I’m thinking I need to get some fresh mozzarella so I can have a salad caprese, too. *G*
    I’m sorry you missed the basil pot season–there is something sumptuous about going out and clipping one’s own fresh herbs in the garden or on the deck.

    Reply
  50. Now I’m thinking I need to get some fresh mozzarella so I can have a salad caprese, too. *G*
    I’m sorry you missed the basil pot season–there is something sumptuous about going out and clipping one’s own fresh herbs in the garden or on the deck.

    Reply
  51. Christina M, what a very useful ex you have! I know there are many mints, but I never heard of chocolate mint. *G*
    That herb and vegetable dish you made sounds AMAZING! I must try that. Thanks.

    Reply
  52. Christina M, what a very useful ex you have! I know there are many mints, but I never heard of chocolate mint. *G*
    That herb and vegetable dish you made sounds AMAZING! I must try that. Thanks.

    Reply
  53. Christina M, what a very useful ex you have! I know there are many mints, but I never heard of chocolate mint. *G*
    That herb and vegetable dish you made sounds AMAZING! I must try that. Thanks.

    Reply
  54. Christina M, what a very useful ex you have! I know there are many mints, but I never heard of chocolate mint. *G*
    That herb and vegetable dish you made sounds AMAZING! I must try that. Thanks.

    Reply
  55. Christina M, what a very useful ex you have! I know there are many mints, but I never heard of chocolate mint. *G*
    That herb and vegetable dish you made sounds AMAZING! I must try that. Thanks.

    Reply
  56. There’s more to it, I’m afraid, than the feeling of being cooped up. I grew up during Ceausescu’s regime, when religion was almost taboo. Some people would keep going to church, especially in the countryside, but I lived in a town and my father was the manager of a transport company, which implied being a member of the Communist Party and therefore under close scrutiny of the Securitate, so in our family no one talked about religion. We kept some Christmas and Easter rituals, but only at home, in strict secrecy, but I was little and I thought they were games. Granny would take me to visit churches occasionally, so I could see the beautiful icons, yet I had no idea what they represented. But back then churches were also where people would keep their dead before the funeral, so churches got connected to the idea of death and grief in my mind – and the connection stuck.

    Reply
  57. There’s more to it, I’m afraid, than the feeling of being cooped up. I grew up during Ceausescu’s regime, when religion was almost taboo. Some people would keep going to church, especially in the countryside, but I lived in a town and my father was the manager of a transport company, which implied being a member of the Communist Party and therefore under close scrutiny of the Securitate, so in our family no one talked about religion. We kept some Christmas and Easter rituals, but only at home, in strict secrecy, but I was little and I thought they were games. Granny would take me to visit churches occasionally, so I could see the beautiful icons, yet I had no idea what they represented. But back then churches were also where people would keep their dead before the funeral, so churches got connected to the idea of death and grief in my mind – and the connection stuck.

    Reply
  58. There’s more to it, I’m afraid, than the feeling of being cooped up. I grew up during Ceausescu’s regime, when religion was almost taboo. Some people would keep going to church, especially in the countryside, but I lived in a town and my father was the manager of a transport company, which implied being a member of the Communist Party and therefore under close scrutiny of the Securitate, so in our family no one talked about religion. We kept some Christmas and Easter rituals, but only at home, in strict secrecy, but I was little and I thought they were games. Granny would take me to visit churches occasionally, so I could see the beautiful icons, yet I had no idea what they represented. But back then churches were also where people would keep their dead before the funeral, so churches got connected to the idea of death and grief in my mind – and the connection stuck.

    Reply
  59. There’s more to it, I’m afraid, than the feeling of being cooped up. I grew up during Ceausescu’s regime, when religion was almost taboo. Some people would keep going to church, especially in the countryside, but I lived in a town and my father was the manager of a transport company, which implied being a member of the Communist Party and therefore under close scrutiny of the Securitate, so in our family no one talked about religion. We kept some Christmas and Easter rituals, but only at home, in strict secrecy, but I was little and I thought they were games. Granny would take me to visit churches occasionally, so I could see the beautiful icons, yet I had no idea what they represented. But back then churches were also where people would keep their dead before the funeral, so churches got connected to the idea of death and grief in my mind – and the connection stuck.

    Reply
  60. There’s more to it, I’m afraid, than the feeling of being cooped up. I grew up during Ceausescu’s regime, when religion was almost taboo. Some people would keep going to church, especially in the countryside, but I lived in a town and my father was the manager of a transport company, which implied being a member of the Communist Party and therefore under close scrutiny of the Securitate, so in our family no one talked about religion. We kept some Christmas and Easter rituals, but only at home, in strict secrecy, but I was little and I thought they were games. Granny would take me to visit churches occasionally, so I could see the beautiful icons, yet I had no idea what they represented. But back then churches were also where people would keep their dead before the funeral, so churches got connected to the idea of death and grief in my mind – and the connection stuck.

    Reply
  61. After the so-called Revolution we had in 1989 (I was 11 at the time) I started educating myself regarding religion and I developed a personal concept of God, despite the fact that – as a baby – I was baptised a Christian Orthodox.

    Reply
  62. After the so-called Revolution we had in 1989 (I was 11 at the time) I started educating myself regarding religion and I developed a personal concept of God, despite the fact that – as a baby – I was baptised a Christian Orthodox.

    Reply
  63. After the so-called Revolution we had in 1989 (I was 11 at the time) I started educating myself regarding religion and I developed a personal concept of God, despite the fact that – as a baby – I was baptised a Christian Orthodox.

    Reply
  64. After the so-called Revolution we had in 1989 (I was 11 at the time) I started educating myself regarding religion and I developed a personal concept of God, despite the fact that – as a baby – I was baptised a Christian Orthodox.

    Reply
  65. After the so-called Revolution we had in 1989 (I was 11 at the time) I started educating myself regarding religion and I developed a personal concept of God, despite the fact that – as a baby – I was baptised a Christian Orthodox.

    Reply
  66. Today one of my coworkers brought in some fresh basil to share if we would like. She had too much to use. I was just trying to decide if I would like to take some home, so now I KNOW I will. Thanks for all the information!!!

    Reply
  67. Today one of my coworkers brought in some fresh basil to share if we would like. She had too much to use. I was just trying to decide if I would like to take some home, so now I KNOW I will. Thanks for all the information!!!

    Reply
  68. Today one of my coworkers brought in some fresh basil to share if we would like. She had too much to use. I was just trying to decide if I would like to take some home, so now I KNOW I will. Thanks for all the information!!!

    Reply
  69. Today one of my coworkers brought in some fresh basil to share if we would like. She had too much to use. I was just trying to decide if I would like to take some home, so now I KNOW I will. Thanks for all the information!!!

    Reply
  70. Today one of my coworkers brought in some fresh basil to share if we would like. She had too much to use. I was just trying to decide if I would like to take some home, so now I KNOW I will. Thanks for all the information!!!

    Reply
  71. I am trying to find a space in the house to grow some indoor herbs, because I’m not up to outdoor gardening anymore. Basil, flat-leafe parsley, rosemary, and mint would be my choices.
    As I was reading your post, a reading memory drifted up — a modern romance (Jayne Ann Krentz?) in which the heroine is saving the hero’s family situation while she is attempting to form a pesto home industry. It was the first time I had heard of pesto, and I immediately tried som.

    Reply
  72. I am trying to find a space in the house to grow some indoor herbs, because I’m not up to outdoor gardening anymore. Basil, flat-leafe parsley, rosemary, and mint would be my choices.
    As I was reading your post, a reading memory drifted up — a modern romance (Jayne Ann Krentz?) in which the heroine is saving the hero’s family situation while she is attempting to form a pesto home industry. It was the first time I had heard of pesto, and I immediately tried som.

    Reply
  73. I am trying to find a space in the house to grow some indoor herbs, because I’m not up to outdoor gardening anymore. Basil, flat-leafe parsley, rosemary, and mint would be my choices.
    As I was reading your post, a reading memory drifted up — a modern romance (Jayne Ann Krentz?) in which the heroine is saving the hero’s family situation while she is attempting to form a pesto home industry. It was the first time I had heard of pesto, and I immediately tried som.

    Reply
  74. I am trying to find a space in the house to grow some indoor herbs, because I’m not up to outdoor gardening anymore. Basil, flat-leafe parsley, rosemary, and mint would be my choices.
    As I was reading your post, a reading memory drifted up — a modern romance (Jayne Ann Krentz?) in which the heroine is saving the hero’s family situation while she is attempting to form a pesto home industry. It was the first time I had heard of pesto, and I immediately tried som.

    Reply
  75. I am trying to find a space in the house to grow some indoor herbs, because I’m not up to outdoor gardening anymore. Basil, flat-leafe parsley, rosemary, and mint would be my choices.
    As I was reading your post, a reading memory drifted up — a modern romance (Jayne Ann Krentz?) in which the heroine is saving the hero’s family situation while she is attempting to form a pesto home industry. It was the first time I had heard of pesto, and I immediately tried som.

    Reply
  76. We always had backyard gardens when I was growing up here in central Canada — even tomatoes, which did surprisingly well (though they always attracted the persistent green caterpillars called “tomato hornworms” that my father had to pick off all the plants by hand) (ick).
    I don’t remember many herbs in our earliest gardens, but they gradually made their appearance and my mother eventually became a great lover of lemon thyme, and we ALWAYS had a crop of chives close by the kitchen door, so we could clip them fresh as needed for our boiled new potatoes in the summertime.
    I’ll have to try your tomato and basil salad, it sounds wonderful!

    Reply
  77. We always had backyard gardens when I was growing up here in central Canada — even tomatoes, which did surprisingly well (though they always attracted the persistent green caterpillars called “tomato hornworms” that my father had to pick off all the plants by hand) (ick).
    I don’t remember many herbs in our earliest gardens, but they gradually made their appearance and my mother eventually became a great lover of lemon thyme, and we ALWAYS had a crop of chives close by the kitchen door, so we could clip them fresh as needed for our boiled new potatoes in the summertime.
    I’ll have to try your tomato and basil salad, it sounds wonderful!

    Reply
  78. We always had backyard gardens when I was growing up here in central Canada — even tomatoes, which did surprisingly well (though they always attracted the persistent green caterpillars called “tomato hornworms” that my father had to pick off all the plants by hand) (ick).
    I don’t remember many herbs in our earliest gardens, but they gradually made their appearance and my mother eventually became a great lover of lemon thyme, and we ALWAYS had a crop of chives close by the kitchen door, so we could clip them fresh as needed for our boiled new potatoes in the summertime.
    I’ll have to try your tomato and basil salad, it sounds wonderful!

    Reply
  79. We always had backyard gardens when I was growing up here in central Canada — even tomatoes, which did surprisingly well (though they always attracted the persistent green caterpillars called “tomato hornworms” that my father had to pick off all the plants by hand) (ick).
    I don’t remember many herbs in our earliest gardens, but they gradually made their appearance and my mother eventually became a great lover of lemon thyme, and we ALWAYS had a crop of chives close by the kitchen door, so we could clip them fresh as needed for our boiled new potatoes in the summertime.
    I’ll have to try your tomato and basil salad, it sounds wonderful!

    Reply
  80. We always had backyard gardens when I was growing up here in central Canada — even tomatoes, which did surprisingly well (though they always attracted the persistent green caterpillars called “tomato hornworms” that my father had to pick off all the plants by hand) (ick).
    I don’t remember many herbs in our earliest gardens, but they gradually made their appearance and my mother eventually became a great lover of lemon thyme, and we ALWAYS had a crop of chives close by the kitchen door, so we could clip them fresh as needed for our boiled new potatoes in the summertime.
    I’ll have to try your tomato and basil salad, it sounds wonderful!

    Reply
  81. Sue McCormick, a budding pesto maker indeed sounds like Jayne Ann Krentz. I’m sure her descriptions were so luscious that no one could resist finding some pesto of their own. *G*

    Reply
  82. Sue McCormick, a budding pesto maker indeed sounds like Jayne Ann Krentz. I’m sure her descriptions were so luscious that no one could resist finding some pesto of their own. *G*

    Reply
  83. Sue McCormick, a budding pesto maker indeed sounds like Jayne Ann Krentz. I’m sure her descriptions were so luscious that no one could resist finding some pesto of their own. *G*

    Reply
  84. Sue McCormick, a budding pesto maker indeed sounds like Jayne Ann Krentz. I’m sure her descriptions were so luscious that no one could resist finding some pesto of their own. *G*

    Reply
  85. Sue McCormick, a budding pesto maker indeed sounds like Jayne Ann Krentz. I’m sure her descriptions were so luscious that no one could resist finding some pesto of their own. *G*

    Reply
  86. Ooooh, chives, wonderful! I have clumps of them growing here. Not only delicious, but lovely when they bloom in last spring. And no better way to serve them than with boiled new potatoes.

    Reply
  87. Ooooh, chives, wonderful! I have clumps of them growing here. Not only delicious, but lovely when they bloom in last spring. And no better way to serve them than with boiled new potatoes.

    Reply
  88. Ooooh, chives, wonderful! I have clumps of them growing here. Not only delicious, but lovely when they bloom in last spring. And no better way to serve them than with boiled new potatoes.

    Reply
  89. Ooooh, chives, wonderful! I have clumps of them growing here. Not only delicious, but lovely when they bloom in last spring. And no better way to serve them than with boiled new potatoes.

    Reply
  90. Ooooh, chives, wonderful! I have clumps of them growing here. Not only delicious, but lovely when they bloom in last spring. And no better way to serve them than with boiled new potatoes.

    Reply
  91. I love fresh basil, too, Mary Jo, and so do the bugs in my garden, so I’m not always successful at growing it. But I buy fresh bunches all the time, and if anyone wants the secret to keeping fresh basil fresh and not droopy or with blackened leaves (as happens if you put it in the fridge) here’s a post I wrote about it: http://www.annegracie.com/fresh-basil/
    I often make fresh pesto — the supermarket stuff is okay, but nowhere near as good as fresh. I add basil leaves to all my green salads and of course, as you say, anything with tomatoes.
    I grow a few herbs — thyme, parsley, sage, chives, sorrel, mint, of course, including the variety that makes the best mint tea, a clump of lemon grass, and a small bay tree.

    Reply
  92. I love fresh basil, too, Mary Jo, and so do the bugs in my garden, so I’m not always successful at growing it. But I buy fresh bunches all the time, and if anyone wants the secret to keeping fresh basil fresh and not droopy or with blackened leaves (as happens if you put it in the fridge) here’s a post I wrote about it: http://www.annegracie.com/fresh-basil/
    I often make fresh pesto — the supermarket stuff is okay, but nowhere near as good as fresh. I add basil leaves to all my green salads and of course, as you say, anything with tomatoes.
    I grow a few herbs — thyme, parsley, sage, chives, sorrel, mint, of course, including the variety that makes the best mint tea, a clump of lemon grass, and a small bay tree.

    Reply
  93. I love fresh basil, too, Mary Jo, and so do the bugs in my garden, so I’m not always successful at growing it. But I buy fresh bunches all the time, and if anyone wants the secret to keeping fresh basil fresh and not droopy or with blackened leaves (as happens if you put it in the fridge) here’s a post I wrote about it: http://www.annegracie.com/fresh-basil/
    I often make fresh pesto — the supermarket stuff is okay, but nowhere near as good as fresh. I add basil leaves to all my green salads and of course, as you say, anything with tomatoes.
    I grow a few herbs — thyme, parsley, sage, chives, sorrel, mint, of course, including the variety that makes the best mint tea, a clump of lemon grass, and a small bay tree.

    Reply
  94. I love fresh basil, too, Mary Jo, and so do the bugs in my garden, so I’m not always successful at growing it. But I buy fresh bunches all the time, and if anyone wants the secret to keeping fresh basil fresh and not droopy or with blackened leaves (as happens if you put it in the fridge) here’s a post I wrote about it: http://www.annegracie.com/fresh-basil/
    I often make fresh pesto — the supermarket stuff is okay, but nowhere near as good as fresh. I add basil leaves to all my green salads and of course, as you say, anything with tomatoes.
    I grow a few herbs — thyme, parsley, sage, chives, sorrel, mint, of course, including the variety that makes the best mint tea, a clump of lemon grass, and a small bay tree.

    Reply
  95. I love fresh basil, too, Mary Jo, and so do the bugs in my garden, so I’m not always successful at growing it. But I buy fresh bunches all the time, and if anyone wants the secret to keeping fresh basil fresh and not droopy or with blackened leaves (as happens if you put it in the fridge) here’s a post I wrote about it: http://www.annegracie.com/fresh-basil/
    I often make fresh pesto — the supermarket stuff is okay, but nowhere near as good as fresh. I add basil leaves to all my green salads and of course, as you say, anything with tomatoes.
    I grow a few herbs — thyme, parsley, sage, chives, sorrel, mint, of course, including the variety that makes the best mint tea, a clump of lemon grass, and a small bay tree.

    Reply
  96. Have terrible luck growing things. Even the mint didn’t do well when I had the house and yard though it did fine in my m-I-l’s yard just a few miles away. Now I try growing some on the balcony in containers without success. Bought Chocolate mint and rosemary both of which died as did the basil. Didn’t even have any luck with the catnip for the cat. Wasn’t dried basil the source of basilicum powder or paste used as medicine?
    I keep trying to grow rosemary. Friends have a four foot rosemary plant by their porch which ahs survived snow and ice.
    Never learned to cook with herbs but had a mixture of rosemary and other ingredients that I used to addd to a variety of dishes.

    Reply
  97. Have terrible luck growing things. Even the mint didn’t do well when I had the house and yard though it did fine in my m-I-l’s yard just a few miles away. Now I try growing some on the balcony in containers without success. Bought Chocolate mint and rosemary both of which died as did the basil. Didn’t even have any luck with the catnip for the cat. Wasn’t dried basil the source of basilicum powder or paste used as medicine?
    I keep trying to grow rosemary. Friends have a four foot rosemary plant by their porch which ahs survived snow and ice.
    Never learned to cook with herbs but had a mixture of rosemary and other ingredients that I used to addd to a variety of dishes.

    Reply
  98. Have terrible luck growing things. Even the mint didn’t do well when I had the house and yard though it did fine in my m-I-l’s yard just a few miles away. Now I try growing some on the balcony in containers without success. Bought Chocolate mint and rosemary both of which died as did the basil. Didn’t even have any luck with the catnip for the cat. Wasn’t dried basil the source of basilicum powder or paste used as medicine?
    I keep trying to grow rosemary. Friends have a four foot rosemary plant by their porch which ahs survived snow and ice.
    Never learned to cook with herbs but had a mixture of rosemary and other ingredients that I used to addd to a variety of dishes.

    Reply
  99. Have terrible luck growing things. Even the mint didn’t do well when I had the house and yard though it did fine in my m-I-l’s yard just a few miles away. Now I try growing some on the balcony in containers without success. Bought Chocolate mint and rosemary both of which died as did the basil. Didn’t even have any luck with the catnip for the cat. Wasn’t dried basil the source of basilicum powder or paste used as medicine?
    I keep trying to grow rosemary. Friends have a four foot rosemary plant by their porch which ahs survived snow and ice.
    Never learned to cook with herbs but had a mixture of rosemary and other ingredients that I used to addd to a variety of dishes.

    Reply
  100. Have terrible luck growing things. Even the mint didn’t do well when I had the house and yard though it did fine in my m-I-l’s yard just a few miles away. Now I try growing some on the balcony in containers without success. Bought Chocolate mint and rosemary both of which died as did the basil. Didn’t even have any luck with the catnip for the cat. Wasn’t dried basil the source of basilicum powder or paste used as medicine?
    I keep trying to grow rosemary. Friends have a four foot rosemary plant by their porch which ahs survived snow and ice.
    Never learned to cook with herbs but had a mixture of rosemary and other ingredients that I used to addd to a variety of dishes.

    Reply
  101. What a lovely post, Mary Jo. Being a fan of cooking magazines, and the recipe portions of any other magazines, I have always been ‘compelled’ to try and grow herbs. The thought sounded so ‘Martha/Julia/Jacque’ etc. And I tried. But somehow, the Day Job kept me from actually going back to the recipes I wanted to try, or keep watch on the herb garden and set myself up for failure. (My basil would always bolt to legginess and flower)
    I’d seen lots of pesto recipes that intrigued me but they required a lot of basil, and basil by the bunch is cost prohibitive here. But then this very special thing happened. My neighbor was leaving for their family vacation and (without asking first) brought me AN ENTIRE grocery bag full of basil…really fresh and gorgeous. Well, I looked up a pesto recipe pronto. Oh my. Now I’m so hooked. And because we’re not big pasta eaters here, I’ve discovered some ways we love using it over and over without getting tired of it
    It’s fantastic spread onto a salmon filet before grilling it, (and I’m sure it would work beautifully baked too,) using it as a marinade for chicken breasts, flatbread pizza, toasted on slices of french bread.
    No longer having the the day job, I’m trying to use more and more other fresh herbs. I loved everyone else’s input and ideas. Thanks.

    Reply
  102. What a lovely post, Mary Jo. Being a fan of cooking magazines, and the recipe portions of any other magazines, I have always been ‘compelled’ to try and grow herbs. The thought sounded so ‘Martha/Julia/Jacque’ etc. And I tried. But somehow, the Day Job kept me from actually going back to the recipes I wanted to try, or keep watch on the herb garden and set myself up for failure. (My basil would always bolt to legginess and flower)
    I’d seen lots of pesto recipes that intrigued me but they required a lot of basil, and basil by the bunch is cost prohibitive here. But then this very special thing happened. My neighbor was leaving for their family vacation and (without asking first) brought me AN ENTIRE grocery bag full of basil…really fresh and gorgeous. Well, I looked up a pesto recipe pronto. Oh my. Now I’m so hooked. And because we’re not big pasta eaters here, I’ve discovered some ways we love using it over and over without getting tired of it
    It’s fantastic spread onto a salmon filet before grilling it, (and I’m sure it would work beautifully baked too,) using it as a marinade for chicken breasts, flatbread pizza, toasted on slices of french bread.
    No longer having the the day job, I’m trying to use more and more other fresh herbs. I loved everyone else’s input and ideas. Thanks.

    Reply
  103. What a lovely post, Mary Jo. Being a fan of cooking magazines, and the recipe portions of any other magazines, I have always been ‘compelled’ to try and grow herbs. The thought sounded so ‘Martha/Julia/Jacque’ etc. And I tried. But somehow, the Day Job kept me from actually going back to the recipes I wanted to try, or keep watch on the herb garden and set myself up for failure. (My basil would always bolt to legginess and flower)
    I’d seen lots of pesto recipes that intrigued me but they required a lot of basil, and basil by the bunch is cost prohibitive here. But then this very special thing happened. My neighbor was leaving for their family vacation and (without asking first) brought me AN ENTIRE grocery bag full of basil…really fresh and gorgeous. Well, I looked up a pesto recipe pronto. Oh my. Now I’m so hooked. And because we’re not big pasta eaters here, I’ve discovered some ways we love using it over and over without getting tired of it
    It’s fantastic spread onto a salmon filet before grilling it, (and I’m sure it would work beautifully baked too,) using it as a marinade for chicken breasts, flatbread pizza, toasted on slices of french bread.
    No longer having the the day job, I’m trying to use more and more other fresh herbs. I loved everyone else’s input and ideas. Thanks.

    Reply
  104. What a lovely post, Mary Jo. Being a fan of cooking magazines, and the recipe portions of any other magazines, I have always been ‘compelled’ to try and grow herbs. The thought sounded so ‘Martha/Julia/Jacque’ etc. And I tried. But somehow, the Day Job kept me from actually going back to the recipes I wanted to try, or keep watch on the herb garden and set myself up for failure. (My basil would always bolt to legginess and flower)
    I’d seen lots of pesto recipes that intrigued me but they required a lot of basil, and basil by the bunch is cost prohibitive here. But then this very special thing happened. My neighbor was leaving for their family vacation and (without asking first) brought me AN ENTIRE grocery bag full of basil…really fresh and gorgeous. Well, I looked up a pesto recipe pronto. Oh my. Now I’m so hooked. And because we’re not big pasta eaters here, I’ve discovered some ways we love using it over and over without getting tired of it
    It’s fantastic spread onto a salmon filet before grilling it, (and I’m sure it would work beautifully baked too,) using it as a marinade for chicken breasts, flatbread pizza, toasted on slices of french bread.
    No longer having the the day job, I’m trying to use more and more other fresh herbs. I loved everyone else’s input and ideas. Thanks.

    Reply
  105. What a lovely post, Mary Jo. Being a fan of cooking magazines, and the recipe portions of any other magazines, I have always been ‘compelled’ to try and grow herbs. The thought sounded so ‘Martha/Julia/Jacque’ etc. And I tried. But somehow, the Day Job kept me from actually going back to the recipes I wanted to try, or keep watch on the herb garden and set myself up for failure. (My basil would always bolt to legginess and flower)
    I’d seen lots of pesto recipes that intrigued me but they required a lot of basil, and basil by the bunch is cost prohibitive here. But then this very special thing happened. My neighbor was leaving for their family vacation and (without asking first) brought me AN ENTIRE grocery bag full of basil…really fresh and gorgeous. Well, I looked up a pesto recipe pronto. Oh my. Now I’m so hooked. And because we’re not big pasta eaters here, I’ve discovered some ways we love using it over and over without getting tired of it
    It’s fantastic spread onto a salmon filet before grilling it, (and I’m sure it would work beautifully baked too,) using it as a marinade for chicken breasts, flatbread pizza, toasted on slices of french bread.
    No longer having the the day job, I’m trying to use more and more other fresh herbs. I loved everyone else’s input and ideas. Thanks.

    Reply
  106. Nancy, it’s lucky you have other talents! I’ve looked into basilicum powder a couple of times, but think maybe Georgette Heyer invented it. Do you have more information on it?

    Reply
  107. Nancy, it’s lucky you have other talents! I’ve looked into basilicum powder a couple of times, but think maybe Georgette Heyer invented it. Do you have more information on it?

    Reply
  108. Nancy, it’s lucky you have other talents! I’ve looked into basilicum powder a couple of times, but think maybe Georgette Heyer invented it. Do you have more information on it?

    Reply
  109. Nancy, it’s lucky you have other talents! I’ve looked into basilicum powder a couple of times, but think maybe Georgette Heyer invented it. Do you have more information on it?

    Reply
  110. Nancy, it’s lucky you have other talents! I’ve looked into basilicum powder a couple of times, but think maybe Georgette Heyer invented it. Do you have more information on it?

    Reply
  111. I have 4 kinds of basil, parsley, chives, tarragon, rosemary, sage, dill, rue and winter savory. Two basils I grow for the bees. They have wonderful blossoms and the bees swarm them all summer.

    Reply
  112. I have 4 kinds of basil, parsley, chives, tarragon, rosemary, sage, dill, rue and winter savory. Two basils I grow for the bees. They have wonderful blossoms and the bees swarm them all summer.

    Reply
  113. I have 4 kinds of basil, parsley, chives, tarragon, rosemary, sage, dill, rue and winter savory. Two basils I grow for the bees. They have wonderful blossoms and the bees swarm them all summer.

    Reply
  114. I have 4 kinds of basil, parsley, chives, tarragon, rosemary, sage, dill, rue and winter savory. Two basils I grow for the bees. They have wonderful blossoms and the bees swarm them all summer.

    Reply
  115. I have 4 kinds of basil, parsley, chives, tarragon, rosemary, sage, dill, rue and winter savory. Two basils I grow for the bees. They have wonderful blossoms and the bees swarm them all summer.

    Reply
  116. Brenda–
    FOUR kinds of basil, two just for the bees! I wish I was your neighbor. *G* I could help with over-supplies of those herbs you grow that I don’t, likedill, tarragon, rue, and winter savory. (I’ve never cooked with rue–though some recipes have turned me rueful…)

    Reply
  117. Brenda–
    FOUR kinds of basil, two just for the bees! I wish I was your neighbor. *G* I could help with over-supplies of those herbs you grow that I don’t, likedill, tarragon, rue, and winter savory. (I’ve never cooked with rue–though some recipes have turned me rueful…)

    Reply
  118. Brenda–
    FOUR kinds of basil, two just for the bees! I wish I was your neighbor. *G* I could help with over-supplies of those herbs you grow that I don’t, likedill, tarragon, rue, and winter savory. (I’ve never cooked with rue–though some recipes have turned me rueful…)

    Reply
  119. Brenda–
    FOUR kinds of basil, two just for the bees! I wish I was your neighbor. *G* I could help with over-supplies of those herbs you grow that I don’t, likedill, tarragon, rue, and winter savory. (I’ve never cooked with rue–though some recipes have turned me rueful…)

    Reply
  120. Brenda–
    FOUR kinds of basil, two just for the bees! I wish I was your neighbor. *G* I could help with over-supplies of those herbs you grow that I don’t, likedill, tarragon, rue, and winter savory. (I’ve never cooked with rue–though some recipes have turned me rueful…)

    Reply
  121. Hate to admit it… but I have lead an insulated or is that isolated life… I have never learned the “How to’s” of fresh herbs.. the growing/harvesting/preparing…

    Reply
  122. Hate to admit it… but I have lead an insulated or is that isolated life… I have never learned the “How to’s” of fresh herbs.. the growing/harvesting/preparing…

    Reply
  123. Hate to admit it… but I have lead an insulated or is that isolated life… I have never learned the “How to’s” of fresh herbs.. the growing/harvesting/preparing…

    Reply
  124. Hate to admit it… but I have lead an insulated or is that isolated life… I have never learned the “How to’s” of fresh herbs.. the growing/harvesting/preparing…

    Reply
  125. Hate to admit it… but I have lead an insulated or is that isolated life… I have never learned the “How to’s” of fresh herbs.. the growing/harvesting/preparing…

    Reply
  126. J–not too late to give fresh herbs a try! Most good supermarkets have fresh herbs in the produce section. Some fresh basil, chopped and added to scrambled eggs. Or sprinkled over fresh sliced tomatoes. Yum! And no special training required. *G*

    Reply
  127. J–not too late to give fresh herbs a try! Most good supermarkets have fresh herbs in the produce section. Some fresh basil, chopped and added to scrambled eggs. Or sprinkled over fresh sliced tomatoes. Yum! And no special training required. *G*

    Reply
  128. J–not too late to give fresh herbs a try! Most good supermarkets have fresh herbs in the produce section. Some fresh basil, chopped and added to scrambled eggs. Or sprinkled over fresh sliced tomatoes. Yum! And no special training required. *G*

    Reply
  129. J–not too late to give fresh herbs a try! Most good supermarkets have fresh herbs in the produce section. Some fresh basil, chopped and added to scrambled eggs. Or sprinkled over fresh sliced tomatoes. Yum! And no special training required. *G*

    Reply
  130. J–not too late to give fresh herbs a try! Most good supermarkets have fresh herbs in the produce section. Some fresh basil, chopped and added to scrambled eggs. Or sprinkled over fresh sliced tomatoes. Yum! And no special training required. *G*

    Reply
  131. Nothing better than Insalata tre colore (I add sliced avocados) year round. I make my own pesto and freeze some. Always welcome at a potluck is pesto over pasta with fresh grated Parmesan Reggiano. I also grow Rosemary, savory, tarragon, chive and the knew hot spicy basil and lots of hot chilis. Have to bring them in up here in NH.

    Reply
  132. Nothing better than Insalata tre colore (I add sliced avocados) year round. I make my own pesto and freeze some. Always welcome at a potluck is pesto over pasta with fresh grated Parmesan Reggiano. I also grow Rosemary, savory, tarragon, chive and the knew hot spicy basil and lots of hot chilis. Have to bring them in up here in NH.

    Reply
  133. Nothing better than Insalata tre colore (I add sliced avocados) year round. I make my own pesto and freeze some. Always welcome at a potluck is pesto over pasta with fresh grated Parmesan Reggiano. I also grow Rosemary, savory, tarragon, chive and the knew hot spicy basil and lots of hot chilis. Have to bring them in up here in NH.

    Reply
  134. Nothing better than Insalata tre colore (I add sliced avocados) year round. I make my own pesto and freeze some. Always welcome at a potluck is pesto over pasta with fresh grated Parmesan Reggiano. I also grow Rosemary, savory, tarragon, chive and the knew hot spicy basil and lots of hot chilis. Have to bring them in up here in NH.

    Reply
  135. Nothing better than Insalata tre colore (I add sliced avocados) year round. I make my own pesto and freeze some. Always welcome at a potluck is pesto over pasta with fresh grated Parmesan Reggiano. I also grow Rosemary, savory, tarragon, chive and the knew hot spicy basil and lots of hot chilis. Have to bring them in up here in NH.

    Reply
  136. One last silly thing….end of summer last year, and in Texas that would be October. I laid in all the supplies in that I don’t always keep on hand in order to make one last batch of pesto…it freezes like a dream! Then I went out to cut the basil. (I had just seen it the day before!) ALL the leaves were gone, leaving the stems. It was a classic chin drop to the chest thing. First shock, then I was really really *&%$ off, then I just wanted to cry. How dare some little varmint come eat my basil Well, I tried to calm myself down in the hopes that since the stems were still there, they would regrow before the season was really done. Well, the next day the stems were gone.
    So this year I planted a ton of it. And in a very tall raised bed, but who knows what ate it last year??? Any ‘varmints’ I can think of around here, raccoons, possums, and dare I say it; cats and squirrels could get anywhere they please in they wanted to so who am I kidding? Ha.
    And by the way we LOVE cats, and currently own one so no need to scorn my pet preferences.

    Reply
  137. One last silly thing….end of summer last year, and in Texas that would be October. I laid in all the supplies in that I don’t always keep on hand in order to make one last batch of pesto…it freezes like a dream! Then I went out to cut the basil. (I had just seen it the day before!) ALL the leaves were gone, leaving the stems. It was a classic chin drop to the chest thing. First shock, then I was really really *&%$ off, then I just wanted to cry. How dare some little varmint come eat my basil Well, I tried to calm myself down in the hopes that since the stems were still there, they would regrow before the season was really done. Well, the next day the stems were gone.
    So this year I planted a ton of it. And in a very tall raised bed, but who knows what ate it last year??? Any ‘varmints’ I can think of around here, raccoons, possums, and dare I say it; cats and squirrels could get anywhere they please in they wanted to so who am I kidding? Ha.
    And by the way we LOVE cats, and currently own one so no need to scorn my pet preferences.

    Reply
  138. One last silly thing….end of summer last year, and in Texas that would be October. I laid in all the supplies in that I don’t always keep on hand in order to make one last batch of pesto…it freezes like a dream! Then I went out to cut the basil. (I had just seen it the day before!) ALL the leaves were gone, leaving the stems. It was a classic chin drop to the chest thing. First shock, then I was really really *&%$ off, then I just wanted to cry. How dare some little varmint come eat my basil Well, I tried to calm myself down in the hopes that since the stems were still there, they would regrow before the season was really done. Well, the next day the stems were gone.
    So this year I planted a ton of it. And in a very tall raised bed, but who knows what ate it last year??? Any ‘varmints’ I can think of around here, raccoons, possums, and dare I say it; cats and squirrels could get anywhere they please in they wanted to so who am I kidding? Ha.
    And by the way we LOVE cats, and currently own one so no need to scorn my pet preferences.

    Reply
  139. One last silly thing….end of summer last year, and in Texas that would be October. I laid in all the supplies in that I don’t always keep on hand in order to make one last batch of pesto…it freezes like a dream! Then I went out to cut the basil. (I had just seen it the day before!) ALL the leaves were gone, leaving the stems. It was a classic chin drop to the chest thing. First shock, then I was really really *&%$ off, then I just wanted to cry. How dare some little varmint come eat my basil Well, I tried to calm myself down in the hopes that since the stems were still there, they would regrow before the season was really done. Well, the next day the stems were gone.
    So this year I planted a ton of it. And in a very tall raised bed, but who knows what ate it last year??? Any ‘varmints’ I can think of around here, raccoons, possums, and dare I say it; cats and squirrels could get anywhere they please in they wanted to so who am I kidding? Ha.
    And by the way we LOVE cats, and currently own one so no need to scorn my pet preferences.

    Reply
  140. One last silly thing….end of summer last year, and in Texas that would be October. I laid in all the supplies in that I don’t always keep on hand in order to make one last batch of pesto…it freezes like a dream! Then I went out to cut the basil. (I had just seen it the day before!) ALL the leaves were gone, leaving the stems. It was a classic chin drop to the chest thing. First shock, then I was really really *&%$ off, then I just wanted to cry. How dare some little varmint come eat my basil Well, I tried to calm myself down in the hopes that since the stems were still there, they would regrow before the season was really done. Well, the next day the stems were gone.
    So this year I planted a ton of it. And in a very tall raised bed, but who knows what ate it last year??? Any ‘varmints’ I can think of around here, raccoons, possums, and dare I say it; cats and squirrels could get anywhere they please in they wanted to so who am I kidding? Ha.
    And by the way we LOVE cats, and currently own one so no need to scorn my pet preferences.

    Reply
  141. My sympathies, Michelle H–I’d be outraged, too! I love cats–have three–but that doesn’t mean I’d be happy if one ate my basil. (They couldn’t, they’re indoor cats, but I’ve seen a squirrel in the deck boxes where I grow my basil.) I hope your raised beds are sending the varmints to more accessible destruction.

    Reply
  142. My sympathies, Michelle H–I’d be outraged, too! I love cats–have three–but that doesn’t mean I’d be happy if one ate my basil. (They couldn’t, they’re indoor cats, but I’ve seen a squirrel in the deck boxes where I grow my basil.) I hope your raised beds are sending the varmints to more accessible destruction.

    Reply
  143. My sympathies, Michelle H–I’d be outraged, too! I love cats–have three–but that doesn’t mean I’d be happy if one ate my basil. (They couldn’t, they’re indoor cats, but I’ve seen a squirrel in the deck boxes where I grow my basil.) I hope your raised beds are sending the varmints to more accessible destruction.

    Reply
  144. My sympathies, Michelle H–I’d be outraged, too! I love cats–have three–but that doesn’t mean I’d be happy if one ate my basil. (They couldn’t, they’re indoor cats, but I’ve seen a squirrel in the deck boxes where I grow my basil.) I hope your raised beds are sending the varmints to more accessible destruction.

    Reply
  145. My sympathies, Michelle H–I’d be outraged, too! I love cats–have three–but that doesn’t mean I’d be happy if one ate my basil. (They couldn’t, they’re indoor cats, but I’ve seen a squirrel in the deck boxes where I grow my basil.) I hope your raised beds are sending the varmints to more accessible destruction.

    Reply

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