Bad Girls, Bad Girls, Watcha Goin’ to Do?

Elayton_color_officialjpg273Question: Where is the Romance section in your bookstore?

You see, in my brand new local brick and mortar mega-super-bookstore, you have to be really motivated to find them. And in good shape, too.

The store carries books: hardcover, trade, paperback and coloring books.  But it also sells games, cards and toys, calendars and datebooks, coffee and snacks, and …oh yes, if you look real hard you can find the Romance Section.

I went there yesterday. They keep their romances, like mad wives, locked up high in the tower of the second floor.   I had to go up an escalator, past the huge Childrens’ Books corner, go on after the Fiction, Fiction remainders, through the Teens and Summer Reading section, and then I kept on going past the Sex and Relationship section, on past the Mystery aisles. Then I peered into the corner.

Nd21Romance.

Up in the rafters, at the back of the attic, where the amiable browser isn’t likely to pick up a romance unless it’s already a best seller. We don’t even get the inevitable snarky teenage boys thumbing through the Romances to find interesting bits to read to their giggling girlfriends anymore.

And what of our older readers, who don’t have the strength to fight their way upriver to Romance country?  It’s hard to get there with a walker. Heck, it’s hard to get there without a golf cart. Even the spiders left the place because there’s so little traffic there.

Respect?

Guys, we get nada.

As I exited left to find the down escalator, I passed the Inspirationals, History, the Fantasies, the Manga, Science Fiction, and then slogged on through Cookbooks, Religion and Diet sections.  It’s easier to find “The Inspired Fantastic Mystery of the Great Inca Outdoor Cookbook and Human Sacrifice Diet Manual” than to find a Romance these days.

This is because we’re not considered “literary.”  And yet, take a Romance, clap it into trade or hardcover, give it a bland cover, and you’ll find it in the front of the store, in “New Books.”

Now, I don’t have to preach to the converted here. We know that Romance can achieve both heights and depths, like any other genre, and some damned good books regularly appear as “Romance.”

My question to you is: How can we convince the booksellers of this? They should know.  They get the sales figures.  Is it that they don’t consider Romance as “growable” as other genres?  Or simply that they know they’ll sell, so why bother?

I’d love to see Romance take its proper place in the bookstore, easily found and easy to buy, instead of having to take breadcrumbs to toss out behind me so I can find my way back to the downstairs cashiers. It’s not just the respect issue.  How are we gong to attract new readers if they keep our books like little bad girls in a shamed corner up near the roof?

You’re a might creative lot, you Wenchlettes.  Help a sister(s) out. What do you suggest?

145 thoughts on “Bad Girls, Bad Girls, Watcha Goin’ to Do?”

  1. I never thought in this case it was because romances don’t get any respect. . . I mostly go to B&Ns. . . and practically none of the categories are in the same locations! LOL (As are the bathrooms, for that matter!) 🙂 One is really easy, it’s the only two floor one, and it’s upstairs. As for all the others, sometimes, I have to go left, sometimes I have to do right, but everytime I go into one (that isn’t the second floor one) I have to stand at the front and think about it for a few seconds which way I have to go. You’d think there would be a tiny bit of similarity with the same store chain. . . hmm. 🙂
    Same thing for the science section, but there, it’s worse than romances. . . the romance section might grow, but the science sections keep shrinking. Mighty depressing to think I”m the only one around in a 50 or whatever mile radius who reads science books. . .
    Lois

    Reply
  2. I never thought in this case it was because romances don’t get any respect. . . I mostly go to B&Ns. . . and practically none of the categories are in the same locations! LOL (As are the bathrooms, for that matter!) 🙂 One is really easy, it’s the only two floor one, and it’s upstairs. As for all the others, sometimes, I have to go left, sometimes I have to do right, but everytime I go into one (that isn’t the second floor one) I have to stand at the front and think about it for a few seconds which way I have to go. You’d think there would be a tiny bit of similarity with the same store chain. . . hmm. 🙂
    Same thing for the science section, but there, it’s worse than romances. . . the romance section might grow, but the science sections keep shrinking. Mighty depressing to think I”m the only one around in a 50 or whatever mile radius who reads science books. . .
    Lois

    Reply
  3. I never thought in this case it was because romances don’t get any respect. . . I mostly go to B&Ns. . . and practically none of the categories are in the same locations! LOL (As are the bathrooms, for that matter!) 🙂 One is really easy, it’s the only two floor one, and it’s upstairs. As for all the others, sometimes, I have to go left, sometimes I have to do right, but everytime I go into one (that isn’t the second floor one) I have to stand at the front and think about it for a few seconds which way I have to go. You’d think there would be a tiny bit of similarity with the same store chain. . . hmm. 🙂
    Same thing for the science section, but there, it’s worse than romances. . . the romance section might grow, but the science sections keep shrinking. Mighty depressing to think I”m the only one around in a 50 or whatever mile radius who reads science books. . .
    Lois

    Reply
  4. I never thought in this case it was because romances don’t get any respect. . . I mostly go to B&Ns. . . and practically none of the categories are in the same locations! LOL (As are the bathrooms, for that matter!) 🙂 One is really easy, it’s the only two floor one, and it’s upstairs. As for all the others, sometimes, I have to go left, sometimes I have to do right, but everytime I go into one (that isn’t the second floor one) I have to stand at the front and think about it for a few seconds which way I have to go. You’d think there would be a tiny bit of similarity with the same store chain. . . hmm. 🙂
    Same thing for the science section, but there, it’s worse than romances. . . the romance section might grow, but the science sections keep shrinking. Mighty depressing to think I”m the only one around in a 50 or whatever mile radius who reads science books. . .
    Lois

    Reply
  5. I never thought in this case it was because romances don’t get any respect. . . I mostly go to B&Ns. . . and practically none of the categories are in the same locations! LOL (As are the bathrooms, for that matter!) 🙂 One is really easy, it’s the only two floor one, and it’s upstairs. As for all the others, sometimes, I have to go left, sometimes I have to do right, but everytime I go into one (that isn’t the second floor one) I have to stand at the front and think about it for a few seconds which way I have to go. You’d think there would be a tiny bit of similarity with the same store chain. . . hmm. 🙂
    Same thing for the science section, but there, it’s worse than romances. . . the romance section might grow, but the science sections keep shrinking. Mighty depressing to think I”m the only one around in a 50 or whatever mile radius who reads science books. . .
    Lois

    Reply
  6. I was under the impression that romance accounted for a pretty hefty portion of fiction sales. It may be that the remote location is the elevation of aristocracy rather than an attic of shame. I suspect that the booksellers know that addicted readers will slog through aisle after aisle of self-help, cookery and canibalism books to get to their tipple, and the idea is that they might actually break down and buy “The Human Sacrifice Diet Manual” if only they walk past it often enough.
    You COULD take matters into your own hands, the way a nephew of mine did when he saw my book languishing spine-outward on a low bookstore shelf. “No, no, no,” he said, and simply moved them to a more advantagous face-outward position himself. Maybe we could suggest this kind of guerilla action to our readership? Subtly, of course! Might work–the CLERKS are not likely to notice the difference!

    Reply
  7. I was under the impression that romance accounted for a pretty hefty portion of fiction sales. It may be that the remote location is the elevation of aristocracy rather than an attic of shame. I suspect that the booksellers know that addicted readers will slog through aisle after aisle of self-help, cookery and canibalism books to get to their tipple, and the idea is that they might actually break down and buy “The Human Sacrifice Diet Manual” if only they walk past it often enough.
    You COULD take matters into your own hands, the way a nephew of mine did when he saw my book languishing spine-outward on a low bookstore shelf. “No, no, no,” he said, and simply moved them to a more advantagous face-outward position himself. Maybe we could suggest this kind of guerilla action to our readership? Subtly, of course! Might work–the CLERKS are not likely to notice the difference!

    Reply
  8. I was under the impression that romance accounted for a pretty hefty portion of fiction sales. It may be that the remote location is the elevation of aristocracy rather than an attic of shame. I suspect that the booksellers know that addicted readers will slog through aisle after aisle of self-help, cookery and canibalism books to get to their tipple, and the idea is that they might actually break down and buy “The Human Sacrifice Diet Manual” if only they walk past it often enough.
    You COULD take matters into your own hands, the way a nephew of mine did when he saw my book languishing spine-outward on a low bookstore shelf. “No, no, no,” he said, and simply moved them to a more advantagous face-outward position himself. Maybe we could suggest this kind of guerilla action to our readership? Subtly, of course! Might work–the CLERKS are not likely to notice the difference!

    Reply
  9. I was under the impression that romance accounted for a pretty hefty portion of fiction sales. It may be that the remote location is the elevation of aristocracy rather than an attic of shame. I suspect that the booksellers know that addicted readers will slog through aisle after aisle of self-help, cookery and canibalism books to get to their tipple, and the idea is that they might actually break down and buy “The Human Sacrifice Diet Manual” if only they walk past it often enough.
    You COULD take matters into your own hands, the way a nephew of mine did when he saw my book languishing spine-outward on a low bookstore shelf. “No, no, no,” he said, and simply moved them to a more advantagous face-outward position himself. Maybe we could suggest this kind of guerilla action to our readership? Subtly, of course! Might work–the CLERKS are not likely to notice the difference!

    Reply
  10. I was under the impression that romance accounted for a pretty hefty portion of fiction sales. It may be that the remote location is the elevation of aristocracy rather than an attic of shame. I suspect that the booksellers know that addicted readers will slog through aisle after aisle of self-help, cookery and canibalism books to get to their tipple, and the idea is that they might actually break down and buy “The Human Sacrifice Diet Manual” if only they walk past it often enough.
    You COULD take matters into your own hands, the way a nephew of mine did when he saw my book languishing spine-outward on a low bookstore shelf. “No, no, no,” he said, and simply moved them to a more advantagous face-outward position himself. Maybe we could suggest this kind of guerilla action to our readership? Subtly, of course! Might work–the CLERKS are not likely to notice the difference!

    Reply
  11. >>… guerilla action to our readership? Subtly, of course! Might work–the CLERKS are not likely to notice the difference!>>
    Thanks, Elaine. Been there, done that. sigh. The saddest thing is that they did notice, even with my Groucho mustache on. I had them going for a minute when I wore the Zorro outfit, though.

    Reply
  12. >>… guerilla action to our readership? Subtly, of course! Might work–the CLERKS are not likely to notice the difference!>>
    Thanks, Elaine. Been there, done that. sigh. The saddest thing is that they did notice, even with my Groucho mustache on. I had them going for a minute when I wore the Zorro outfit, though.

    Reply
  13. >>… guerilla action to our readership? Subtly, of course! Might work–the CLERKS are not likely to notice the difference!>>
    Thanks, Elaine. Been there, done that. sigh. The saddest thing is that they did notice, even with my Groucho mustache on. I had them going for a minute when I wore the Zorro outfit, though.

    Reply
  14. >>… guerilla action to our readership? Subtly, of course! Might work–the CLERKS are not likely to notice the difference!>>
    Thanks, Elaine. Been there, done that. sigh. The saddest thing is that they did notice, even with my Groucho mustache on. I had them going for a minute when I wore the Zorro outfit, though.

    Reply
  15. >>… guerilla action to our readership? Subtly, of course! Might work–the CLERKS are not likely to notice the difference!>>
    Thanks, Elaine. Been there, done that. sigh. The saddest thing is that they did notice, even with my Groucho mustache on. I had them going for a minute when I wore the Zorro outfit, though.

    Reply
  16. I think sellers know we romance readers are a “sure thing,” and they don’t have to worry about enticing us…we’ll buy anyway, even if we have to haul out the sled, the huskies and mush through a blizzard. My mom & pop bookstore (actually, it’s the bunch of little old ladies bookstore that I posted about last week) has their romance section all the way in the back…and their erotica, all three books, are shelved in a maze right next to religion, which I find absolutely hilarious.

    Reply
  17. I think sellers know we romance readers are a “sure thing,” and they don’t have to worry about enticing us…we’ll buy anyway, even if we have to haul out the sled, the huskies and mush through a blizzard. My mom & pop bookstore (actually, it’s the bunch of little old ladies bookstore that I posted about last week) has their romance section all the way in the back…and their erotica, all three books, are shelved in a maze right next to religion, which I find absolutely hilarious.

    Reply
  18. I think sellers know we romance readers are a “sure thing,” and they don’t have to worry about enticing us…we’ll buy anyway, even if we have to haul out the sled, the huskies and mush through a blizzard. My mom & pop bookstore (actually, it’s the bunch of little old ladies bookstore that I posted about last week) has their romance section all the way in the back…and their erotica, all three books, are shelved in a maze right next to religion, which I find absolutely hilarious.

    Reply
  19. I think sellers know we romance readers are a “sure thing,” and they don’t have to worry about enticing us…we’ll buy anyway, even if we have to haul out the sled, the huskies and mush through a blizzard. My mom & pop bookstore (actually, it’s the bunch of little old ladies bookstore that I posted about last week) has their romance section all the way in the back…and their erotica, all three books, are shelved in a maze right next to religion, which I find absolutely hilarious.

    Reply
  20. I think sellers know we romance readers are a “sure thing,” and they don’t have to worry about enticing us…we’ll buy anyway, even if we have to haul out the sled, the huskies and mush through a blizzard. My mom & pop bookstore (actually, it’s the bunch of little old ladies bookstore that I posted about last week) has their romance section all the way in the back…and their erotica, all three books, are shelved in a maze right next to religion, which I find absolutely hilarious.

    Reply
  21. My B&N is relatively easy. It’s in the back of the store, but a straight shot from the front door, and the cashiers. You have to walk right by it to get to the escalators up to the children’s section – they do that on purpose to entice the mommies to pick something up too 😉

    Reply
  22. My B&N is relatively easy. It’s in the back of the store, but a straight shot from the front door, and the cashiers. You have to walk right by it to get to the escalators up to the children’s section – they do that on purpose to entice the mommies to pick something up too 😉

    Reply
  23. My B&N is relatively easy. It’s in the back of the store, but a straight shot from the front door, and the cashiers. You have to walk right by it to get to the escalators up to the children’s section – they do that on purpose to entice the mommies to pick something up too 😉

    Reply
  24. My B&N is relatively easy. It’s in the back of the store, but a straight shot from the front door, and the cashiers. You have to walk right by it to get to the escalators up to the children’s section – they do that on purpose to entice the mommies to pick something up too 😉

    Reply
  25. My B&N is relatively easy. It’s in the back of the store, but a straight shot from the front door, and the cashiers. You have to walk right by it to get to the escalators up to the children’s section – they do that on purpose to entice the mommies to pick something up too 😉

    Reply
  26. I’ve been to plenty of bookstores that have the romance section in an easy to locate place. Most stores have websites so complain by sending an e-mail.

    Reply
  27. I’ve been to plenty of bookstores that have the romance section in an easy to locate place. Most stores have websites so complain by sending an e-mail.

    Reply
  28. I’ve been to plenty of bookstores that have the romance section in an easy to locate place. Most stores have websites so complain by sending an e-mail.

    Reply
  29. I’ve been to plenty of bookstores that have the romance section in an easy to locate place. Most stores have websites so complain by sending an e-mail.

    Reply
  30. I’ve been to plenty of bookstores that have the romance section in an easy to locate place. Most stores have websites so complain by sending an e-mail.

    Reply
  31. My complaint is rearranging the store just like grocery stores do. One week I find the section I want and the next it’s been moved to an entirely different part of the store. I want to be able to go in, get what I want and then go out quickly. That’s why I often resort to online bookstores like Amazon and Alibris. I can find what I want when I want it and if I order enough the shipping is free.

    Reply
  32. My complaint is rearranging the store just like grocery stores do. One week I find the section I want and the next it’s been moved to an entirely different part of the store. I want to be able to go in, get what I want and then go out quickly. That’s why I often resort to online bookstores like Amazon and Alibris. I can find what I want when I want it and if I order enough the shipping is free.

    Reply
  33. My complaint is rearranging the store just like grocery stores do. One week I find the section I want and the next it’s been moved to an entirely different part of the store. I want to be able to go in, get what I want and then go out quickly. That’s why I often resort to online bookstores like Amazon and Alibris. I can find what I want when I want it and if I order enough the shipping is free.

    Reply
  34. My complaint is rearranging the store just like grocery stores do. One week I find the section I want and the next it’s been moved to an entirely different part of the store. I want to be able to go in, get what I want and then go out quickly. That’s why I often resort to online bookstores like Amazon and Alibris. I can find what I want when I want it and if I order enough the shipping is free.

    Reply
  35. My complaint is rearranging the store just like grocery stores do. One week I find the section I want and the next it’s been moved to an entirely different part of the store. I want to be able to go in, get what I want and then go out quickly. That’s why I often resort to online bookstores like Amazon and Alibris. I can find what I want when I want it and if I order enough the shipping is free.

    Reply
  36. It’s easy to find at all my local bookstores:
    At B&N it goes: mainstream/mystery/romance/sci-fi & fantasy all in rows across the full length of the second floor (so romance is smack in the middle.
    At Borders fiction is on two sides of an aisle, mainstream, mystery, horror on one side, romance and sci-fi/fantasy on the other.
    At the big independent all the genre fiction is along one wall: horror/mystery/sci-fi/romance.
    No red-headed step-child treatment at all. *shrug*

    Reply
  37. It’s easy to find at all my local bookstores:
    At B&N it goes: mainstream/mystery/romance/sci-fi & fantasy all in rows across the full length of the second floor (so romance is smack in the middle.
    At Borders fiction is on two sides of an aisle, mainstream, mystery, horror on one side, romance and sci-fi/fantasy on the other.
    At the big independent all the genre fiction is along one wall: horror/mystery/sci-fi/romance.
    No red-headed step-child treatment at all. *shrug*

    Reply
  38. It’s easy to find at all my local bookstores:
    At B&N it goes: mainstream/mystery/romance/sci-fi & fantasy all in rows across the full length of the second floor (so romance is smack in the middle.
    At Borders fiction is on two sides of an aisle, mainstream, mystery, horror on one side, romance and sci-fi/fantasy on the other.
    At the big independent all the genre fiction is along one wall: horror/mystery/sci-fi/romance.
    No red-headed step-child treatment at all. *shrug*

    Reply
  39. It’s easy to find at all my local bookstores:
    At B&N it goes: mainstream/mystery/romance/sci-fi & fantasy all in rows across the full length of the second floor (so romance is smack in the middle.
    At Borders fiction is on two sides of an aisle, mainstream, mystery, horror on one side, romance and sci-fi/fantasy on the other.
    At the big independent all the genre fiction is along one wall: horror/mystery/sci-fi/romance.
    No red-headed step-child treatment at all. *shrug*

    Reply
  40. It’s easy to find at all my local bookstores:
    At B&N it goes: mainstream/mystery/romance/sci-fi & fantasy all in rows across the full length of the second floor (so romance is smack in the middle.
    At Borders fiction is on two sides of an aisle, mainstream, mystery, horror on one side, romance and sci-fi/fantasy on the other.
    At the big independent all the genre fiction is along one wall: horror/mystery/sci-fi/romance.
    No red-headed step-child treatment at all. *shrug*

    Reply
  41. Nina chiming in here.
    My Borders Book Store keeps the romance novels far, far from the door.
    I have to wonder if it doesn’t have something to do with (to borrow from Rev Melinda) the Naked Hulking Hairless Mantitty covers.
    Just a thought…

    Reply
  42. Nina chiming in here.
    My Borders Book Store keeps the romance novels far, far from the door.
    I have to wonder if it doesn’t have something to do with (to borrow from Rev Melinda) the Naked Hulking Hairless Mantitty covers.
    Just a thought…

    Reply
  43. Nina chiming in here.
    My Borders Book Store keeps the romance novels far, far from the door.
    I have to wonder if it doesn’t have something to do with (to borrow from Rev Melinda) the Naked Hulking Hairless Mantitty covers.
    Just a thought…

    Reply
  44. Nina chiming in here.
    My Borders Book Store keeps the romance novels far, far from the door.
    I have to wonder if it doesn’t have something to do with (to borrow from Rev Melinda) the Naked Hulking Hairless Mantitty covers.
    Just a thought…

    Reply
  45. Nina chiming in here.
    My Borders Book Store keeps the romance novels far, far from the door.
    I have to wonder if it doesn’t have something to do with (to borrow from Rev Melinda) the Naked Hulking Hairless Mantitty covers.
    Just a thought…

    Reply
  46. I long ago decided it was local management because there seems no rhyme or reason between locales. I know New York is not a place that does anywhere near as well in romance sales as say, Texas. But it’s rather like advertising bestsellers–what’s the point of putting money where you’ve already got it? Why not pump up the next guy/genre on the line? I know, I know, bottom line. They’re gonna cover costs on the bestsellers, but gasp! they might lose money if they advertise or put the slower genres where people can find them.

    Reply
  47. I long ago decided it was local management because there seems no rhyme or reason between locales. I know New York is not a place that does anywhere near as well in romance sales as say, Texas. But it’s rather like advertising bestsellers–what’s the point of putting money where you’ve already got it? Why not pump up the next guy/genre on the line? I know, I know, bottom line. They’re gonna cover costs on the bestsellers, but gasp! they might lose money if they advertise or put the slower genres where people can find them.

    Reply
  48. I long ago decided it was local management because there seems no rhyme or reason between locales. I know New York is not a place that does anywhere near as well in romance sales as say, Texas. But it’s rather like advertising bestsellers–what’s the point of putting money where you’ve already got it? Why not pump up the next guy/genre on the line? I know, I know, bottom line. They’re gonna cover costs on the bestsellers, but gasp! they might lose money if they advertise or put the slower genres where people can find them.

    Reply
  49. I long ago decided it was local management because there seems no rhyme or reason between locales. I know New York is not a place that does anywhere near as well in romance sales as say, Texas. But it’s rather like advertising bestsellers–what’s the point of putting money where you’ve already got it? Why not pump up the next guy/genre on the line? I know, I know, bottom line. They’re gonna cover costs on the bestsellers, but gasp! they might lose money if they advertise or put the slower genres where people can find them.

    Reply
  50. I long ago decided it was local management because there seems no rhyme or reason between locales. I know New York is not a place that does anywhere near as well in romance sales as say, Texas. But it’s rather like advertising bestsellers–what’s the point of putting money where you’ve already got it? Why not pump up the next guy/genre on the line? I know, I know, bottom line. They’re gonna cover costs on the bestsellers, but gasp! they might lose money if they advertise or put the slower genres where people can find them.

    Reply
  51. In my local bookstore it is right beside Starbucks, so you can browse while you wait for your latte (or whatever you’re drinking). At my sister’s local BS it is across the store, but closer to the checkout. In both cases it is near SF/Fantasy as well as mystery. Perhaps they are more intent on keeping fiction (evil that it is) away from the oh so much more morally responsible non-fiction.

    Reply
  52. In my local bookstore it is right beside Starbucks, so you can browse while you wait for your latte (or whatever you’re drinking). At my sister’s local BS it is across the store, but closer to the checkout. In both cases it is near SF/Fantasy as well as mystery. Perhaps they are more intent on keeping fiction (evil that it is) away from the oh so much more morally responsible non-fiction.

    Reply
  53. In my local bookstore it is right beside Starbucks, so you can browse while you wait for your latte (or whatever you’re drinking). At my sister’s local BS it is across the store, but closer to the checkout. In both cases it is near SF/Fantasy as well as mystery. Perhaps they are more intent on keeping fiction (evil that it is) away from the oh so much more morally responsible non-fiction.

    Reply
  54. In my local bookstore it is right beside Starbucks, so you can browse while you wait for your latte (or whatever you’re drinking). At my sister’s local BS it is across the store, but closer to the checkout. In both cases it is near SF/Fantasy as well as mystery. Perhaps they are more intent on keeping fiction (evil that it is) away from the oh so much more morally responsible non-fiction.

    Reply
  55. In my local bookstore it is right beside Starbucks, so you can browse while you wait for your latte (or whatever you’re drinking). At my sister’s local BS it is across the store, but closer to the checkout. In both cases it is near SF/Fantasy as well as mystery. Perhaps they are more intent on keeping fiction (evil that it is) away from the oh so much more morally responsible non-fiction.

    Reply
  56. Perhaps I am alone in this: the embarrassment involved in reading romances. my goodness, in my family it is cause for ridicule, so perhaps this is part of the wider reason that it is hidden away – perhaps all bibliophiles view romance as a reason for jeers. it was with some delight (not to mention embarrassment on both our parts) that I discovered my niece read romance. I gave her a load of books that I’m not keeping. Her husband (as does mine) refers to them as smut. if everyone who doesn’t read them, thinks of them as smut, why would book sellers bring it out of the back? It should almost be required reading for every person working in a book store to read one (a month, a year?) if only to acquaint themselves with what a large portion of the population are reading.

    Reply
  57. Perhaps I am alone in this: the embarrassment involved in reading romances. my goodness, in my family it is cause for ridicule, so perhaps this is part of the wider reason that it is hidden away – perhaps all bibliophiles view romance as a reason for jeers. it was with some delight (not to mention embarrassment on both our parts) that I discovered my niece read romance. I gave her a load of books that I’m not keeping. Her husband (as does mine) refers to them as smut. if everyone who doesn’t read them, thinks of them as smut, why would book sellers bring it out of the back? It should almost be required reading for every person working in a book store to read one (a month, a year?) if only to acquaint themselves with what a large portion of the population are reading.

    Reply
  58. Perhaps I am alone in this: the embarrassment involved in reading romances. my goodness, in my family it is cause for ridicule, so perhaps this is part of the wider reason that it is hidden away – perhaps all bibliophiles view romance as a reason for jeers. it was with some delight (not to mention embarrassment on both our parts) that I discovered my niece read romance. I gave her a load of books that I’m not keeping. Her husband (as does mine) refers to them as smut. if everyone who doesn’t read them, thinks of them as smut, why would book sellers bring it out of the back? It should almost be required reading for every person working in a book store to read one (a month, a year?) if only to acquaint themselves with what a large portion of the population are reading.

    Reply
  59. Perhaps I am alone in this: the embarrassment involved in reading romances. my goodness, in my family it is cause for ridicule, so perhaps this is part of the wider reason that it is hidden away – perhaps all bibliophiles view romance as a reason for jeers. it was with some delight (not to mention embarrassment on both our parts) that I discovered my niece read romance. I gave her a load of books that I’m not keeping. Her husband (as does mine) refers to them as smut. if everyone who doesn’t read them, thinks of them as smut, why would book sellers bring it out of the back? It should almost be required reading for every person working in a book store to read one (a month, a year?) if only to acquaint themselves with what a large portion of the population are reading.

    Reply
  60. Perhaps I am alone in this: the embarrassment involved in reading romances. my goodness, in my family it is cause for ridicule, so perhaps this is part of the wider reason that it is hidden away – perhaps all bibliophiles view romance as a reason for jeers. it was with some delight (not to mention embarrassment on both our parts) that I discovered my niece read romance. I gave her a load of books that I’m not keeping. Her husband (as does mine) refers to them as smut. if everyone who doesn’t read them, thinks of them as smut, why would book sellers bring it out of the back? It should almost be required reading for every person working in a book store to read one (a month, a year?) if only to acquaint themselves with what a large portion of the population are reading.

    Reply
  61. I have no complaints about the romance sections of bookstores I frequent–they’re right in the middle of the store, so easy to find, and large! That’s probably why I’m drawn to those stores.
    On the topic of the embarrassment of reading romance, Piper, I feel your pain! After my last few blog laments (ok, they were rants) on the topic, I wrestled my blushes to the ground and actually Preached A Sermon about Romance Novels.
    It was a HOOT! You should have SEEN the women in the congregation nodding and smiling (and even one of the men told me it had touched his heart)–and all the women shook my hand afterward and admitted that “We read them too!”
    I think it kind of cured me of my Cover Aversion to actually hold up some clinchy Mantitty covers from the pulpit and deconstruct them theologically–kind of an exorcism effect, you know? AND, now that I’ve “outed” myself I have less fear of Shocking the Congregation if I get hit by a bus and someone has to clean out my bedside table.

    Reply
  62. I have no complaints about the romance sections of bookstores I frequent–they’re right in the middle of the store, so easy to find, and large! That’s probably why I’m drawn to those stores.
    On the topic of the embarrassment of reading romance, Piper, I feel your pain! After my last few blog laments (ok, they were rants) on the topic, I wrestled my blushes to the ground and actually Preached A Sermon about Romance Novels.
    It was a HOOT! You should have SEEN the women in the congregation nodding and smiling (and even one of the men told me it had touched his heart)–and all the women shook my hand afterward and admitted that “We read them too!”
    I think it kind of cured me of my Cover Aversion to actually hold up some clinchy Mantitty covers from the pulpit and deconstruct them theologically–kind of an exorcism effect, you know? AND, now that I’ve “outed” myself I have less fear of Shocking the Congregation if I get hit by a bus and someone has to clean out my bedside table.

    Reply
  63. I have no complaints about the romance sections of bookstores I frequent–they’re right in the middle of the store, so easy to find, and large! That’s probably why I’m drawn to those stores.
    On the topic of the embarrassment of reading romance, Piper, I feel your pain! After my last few blog laments (ok, they were rants) on the topic, I wrestled my blushes to the ground and actually Preached A Sermon about Romance Novels.
    It was a HOOT! You should have SEEN the women in the congregation nodding and smiling (and even one of the men told me it had touched his heart)–and all the women shook my hand afterward and admitted that “We read them too!”
    I think it kind of cured me of my Cover Aversion to actually hold up some clinchy Mantitty covers from the pulpit and deconstruct them theologically–kind of an exorcism effect, you know? AND, now that I’ve “outed” myself I have less fear of Shocking the Congregation if I get hit by a bus and someone has to clean out my bedside table.

    Reply
  64. I have no complaints about the romance sections of bookstores I frequent–they’re right in the middle of the store, so easy to find, and large! That’s probably why I’m drawn to those stores.
    On the topic of the embarrassment of reading romance, Piper, I feel your pain! After my last few blog laments (ok, they were rants) on the topic, I wrestled my blushes to the ground and actually Preached A Sermon about Romance Novels.
    It was a HOOT! You should have SEEN the women in the congregation nodding and smiling (and even one of the men told me it had touched his heart)–and all the women shook my hand afterward and admitted that “We read them too!”
    I think it kind of cured me of my Cover Aversion to actually hold up some clinchy Mantitty covers from the pulpit and deconstruct them theologically–kind of an exorcism effect, you know? AND, now that I’ve “outed” myself I have less fear of Shocking the Congregation if I get hit by a bus and someone has to clean out my bedside table.

    Reply
  65. I have no complaints about the romance sections of bookstores I frequent–they’re right in the middle of the store, so easy to find, and large! That’s probably why I’m drawn to those stores.
    On the topic of the embarrassment of reading romance, Piper, I feel your pain! After my last few blog laments (ok, they were rants) on the topic, I wrestled my blushes to the ground and actually Preached A Sermon about Romance Novels.
    It was a HOOT! You should have SEEN the women in the congregation nodding and smiling (and even one of the men told me it had touched his heart)–and all the women shook my hand afterward and admitted that “We read them too!”
    I think it kind of cured me of my Cover Aversion to actually hold up some clinchy Mantitty covers from the pulpit and deconstruct them theologically–kind of an exorcism effect, you know? AND, now that I’ve “outed” myself I have less fear of Shocking the Congregation if I get hit by a bus and someone has to clean out my bedside table.

    Reply
  66. Piper – “Smutty books?” Oh my, that does bring me back. About a hundred years ago when I was young, one of my sons’ teachers asked me if I was the mother who wrote “those smutty books.” Didn’t know what to say then. Have a thousand brilliant rejoinders now. sigh.
    And RevMelinda! Waah Hoo! You go girl!
    (I’d love love love to hear your sermon about romance novels. Really!)

    Reply
  67. Piper – “Smutty books?” Oh my, that does bring me back. About a hundred years ago when I was young, one of my sons’ teachers asked me if I was the mother who wrote “those smutty books.” Didn’t know what to say then. Have a thousand brilliant rejoinders now. sigh.
    And RevMelinda! Waah Hoo! You go girl!
    (I’d love love love to hear your sermon about romance novels. Really!)

    Reply
  68. Piper – “Smutty books?” Oh my, that does bring me back. About a hundred years ago when I was young, one of my sons’ teachers asked me if I was the mother who wrote “those smutty books.” Didn’t know what to say then. Have a thousand brilliant rejoinders now. sigh.
    And RevMelinda! Waah Hoo! You go girl!
    (I’d love love love to hear your sermon about romance novels. Really!)

    Reply
  69. Piper – “Smutty books?” Oh my, that does bring me back. About a hundred years ago when I was young, one of my sons’ teachers asked me if I was the mother who wrote “those smutty books.” Didn’t know what to say then. Have a thousand brilliant rejoinders now. sigh.
    And RevMelinda! Waah Hoo! You go girl!
    (I’d love love love to hear your sermon about romance novels. Really!)

    Reply
  70. Piper – “Smutty books?” Oh my, that does bring me back. About a hundred years ago when I was young, one of my sons’ teachers asked me if I was the mother who wrote “those smutty books.” Didn’t know what to say then. Have a thousand brilliant rejoinders now. sigh.
    And RevMelinda! Waah Hoo! You go girl!
    (I’d love love love to hear your sermon about romance novels. Really!)

    Reply
  71. Hi Edith,
    OK, I am INCREDIBLY flattered that you would want to hear my sermon! ::blushing::
    Here’s a link to it if you want to read it (not quite the same, but close):
    http://tworevs.blogspot.com/2007/06/do-you-love-me.html
    I’ve hesitated to post it because it’s pretty Christian-y (well, I am a Christian minister LOL!). I know that we’re a pretty diverse group spiritually/faithwise here on Word Wenches, and I want to be respectful of that and not offend/ impose on anybody. . .
    Melinda

    Reply
  72. Hi Edith,
    OK, I am INCREDIBLY flattered that you would want to hear my sermon! ::blushing::
    Here’s a link to it if you want to read it (not quite the same, but close):
    http://tworevs.blogspot.com/2007/06/do-you-love-me.html
    I’ve hesitated to post it because it’s pretty Christian-y (well, I am a Christian minister LOL!). I know that we’re a pretty diverse group spiritually/faithwise here on Word Wenches, and I want to be respectful of that and not offend/ impose on anybody. . .
    Melinda

    Reply
  73. Hi Edith,
    OK, I am INCREDIBLY flattered that you would want to hear my sermon! ::blushing::
    Here’s a link to it if you want to read it (not quite the same, but close):
    http://tworevs.blogspot.com/2007/06/do-you-love-me.html
    I’ve hesitated to post it because it’s pretty Christian-y (well, I am a Christian minister LOL!). I know that we’re a pretty diverse group spiritually/faithwise here on Word Wenches, and I want to be respectful of that and not offend/ impose on anybody. . .
    Melinda

    Reply
  74. Hi Edith,
    OK, I am INCREDIBLY flattered that you would want to hear my sermon! ::blushing::
    Here’s a link to it if you want to read it (not quite the same, but close):
    http://tworevs.blogspot.com/2007/06/do-you-love-me.html
    I’ve hesitated to post it because it’s pretty Christian-y (well, I am a Christian minister LOL!). I know that we’re a pretty diverse group spiritually/faithwise here on Word Wenches, and I want to be respectful of that and not offend/ impose on anybody. . .
    Melinda

    Reply
  75. Hi Edith,
    OK, I am INCREDIBLY flattered that you would want to hear my sermon! ::blushing::
    Here’s a link to it if you want to read it (not quite the same, but close):
    http://tworevs.blogspot.com/2007/06/do-you-love-me.html
    I’ve hesitated to post it because it’s pretty Christian-y (well, I am a Christian minister LOL!). I know that we’re a pretty diverse group spiritually/faithwise here on Word Wenches, and I want to be respectful of that and not offend/ impose on anybody. . .
    Melinda

    Reply
  76. Romances get no respect because of pure sexism. It is the only genre written for and by women, mostly. I suppose we could organize a campaign of people writing to complain to the main offices, but wouldn’t you think that the publishers would know better?
    I remember Stephen King, AFTER he had written a number of best-sellers, changing his publishers because EVERY SINGLE TIME HE CAME TO THEIR OFFICE, HE WAS IGNORED AND HAD TO BE RE-INTRODUCED, TIME AND TIME AGAIN. That was certainly a costly snub, wasn’t it? Wouldn’t it be nice if romance authors could have such a revenge?

    Reply
  77. Romances get no respect because of pure sexism. It is the only genre written for and by women, mostly. I suppose we could organize a campaign of people writing to complain to the main offices, but wouldn’t you think that the publishers would know better?
    I remember Stephen King, AFTER he had written a number of best-sellers, changing his publishers because EVERY SINGLE TIME HE CAME TO THEIR OFFICE, HE WAS IGNORED AND HAD TO BE RE-INTRODUCED, TIME AND TIME AGAIN. That was certainly a costly snub, wasn’t it? Wouldn’t it be nice if romance authors could have such a revenge?

    Reply
  78. Romances get no respect because of pure sexism. It is the only genre written for and by women, mostly. I suppose we could organize a campaign of people writing to complain to the main offices, but wouldn’t you think that the publishers would know better?
    I remember Stephen King, AFTER he had written a number of best-sellers, changing his publishers because EVERY SINGLE TIME HE CAME TO THEIR OFFICE, HE WAS IGNORED AND HAD TO BE RE-INTRODUCED, TIME AND TIME AGAIN. That was certainly a costly snub, wasn’t it? Wouldn’t it be nice if romance authors could have such a revenge?

    Reply
  79. Romances get no respect because of pure sexism. It is the only genre written for and by women, mostly. I suppose we could organize a campaign of people writing to complain to the main offices, but wouldn’t you think that the publishers would know better?
    I remember Stephen King, AFTER he had written a number of best-sellers, changing his publishers because EVERY SINGLE TIME HE CAME TO THEIR OFFICE, HE WAS IGNORED AND HAD TO BE RE-INTRODUCED, TIME AND TIME AGAIN. That was certainly a costly snub, wasn’t it? Wouldn’t it be nice if romance authors could have such a revenge?

    Reply
  80. Romances get no respect because of pure sexism. It is the only genre written for and by women, mostly. I suppose we could organize a campaign of people writing to complain to the main offices, but wouldn’t you think that the publishers would know better?
    I remember Stephen King, AFTER he had written a number of best-sellers, changing his publishers because EVERY SINGLE TIME HE CAME TO THEIR OFFICE, HE WAS IGNORED AND HAD TO BE RE-INTRODUCED, TIME AND TIME AGAIN. That was certainly a costly snub, wasn’t it? Wouldn’t it be nice if romance authors could have such a revenge?

    Reply
  81. Melinda, as you know, I’ve read your sermon and thought you did a marvelous job articulating all-encompassing love. Kudos on a most excellent sermon, and one that gets high marks for being one of the most original sermons I’ve ever come across!
    Re romances in bookstores: romance books take up a pretty big chunk of real estate, so could it be that they are placed in the back so that the smaller and perhaps less popular (or less lucrative) genres don’t get ignored? I don’t really know. Maybe one day we should invite a bookstore manager to be a Word Wenches guest and explain bookstore marketing. *g*

    Reply
  82. Melinda, as you know, I’ve read your sermon and thought you did a marvelous job articulating all-encompassing love. Kudos on a most excellent sermon, and one that gets high marks for being one of the most original sermons I’ve ever come across!
    Re romances in bookstores: romance books take up a pretty big chunk of real estate, so could it be that they are placed in the back so that the smaller and perhaps less popular (or less lucrative) genres don’t get ignored? I don’t really know. Maybe one day we should invite a bookstore manager to be a Word Wenches guest and explain bookstore marketing. *g*

    Reply
  83. Melinda, as you know, I’ve read your sermon and thought you did a marvelous job articulating all-encompassing love. Kudos on a most excellent sermon, and one that gets high marks for being one of the most original sermons I’ve ever come across!
    Re romances in bookstores: romance books take up a pretty big chunk of real estate, so could it be that they are placed in the back so that the smaller and perhaps less popular (or less lucrative) genres don’t get ignored? I don’t really know. Maybe one day we should invite a bookstore manager to be a Word Wenches guest and explain bookstore marketing. *g*

    Reply
  84. Melinda, as you know, I’ve read your sermon and thought you did a marvelous job articulating all-encompassing love. Kudos on a most excellent sermon, and one that gets high marks for being one of the most original sermons I’ve ever come across!
    Re romances in bookstores: romance books take up a pretty big chunk of real estate, so could it be that they are placed in the back so that the smaller and perhaps less popular (or less lucrative) genres don’t get ignored? I don’t really know. Maybe one day we should invite a bookstore manager to be a Word Wenches guest and explain bookstore marketing. *g*

    Reply
  85. Melinda, as you know, I’ve read your sermon and thought you did a marvelous job articulating all-encompassing love. Kudos on a most excellent sermon, and one that gets high marks for being one of the most original sermons I’ve ever come across!
    Re romances in bookstores: romance books take up a pretty big chunk of real estate, so could it be that they are placed in the back so that the smaller and perhaps less popular (or less lucrative) genres don’t get ignored? I don’t really know. Maybe one day we should invite a bookstore manager to be a Word Wenches guest and explain bookstore marketing. *g*

    Reply
  86. Faithful readers wait breathlessly for new books from favorite authors! I have no idea why romance books are marketed the way they are. I would like them in removable brown wrappers so I can disguise them to read in scrupulous company. My family rags on me for the steamy illustrations! However, I like the illustration.

    Reply
  87. Faithful readers wait breathlessly for new books from favorite authors! I have no idea why romance books are marketed the way they are. I would like them in removable brown wrappers so I can disguise them to read in scrupulous company. My family rags on me for the steamy illustrations! However, I like the illustration.

    Reply
  88. Faithful readers wait breathlessly for new books from favorite authors! I have no idea why romance books are marketed the way they are. I would like them in removable brown wrappers so I can disguise them to read in scrupulous company. My family rags on me for the steamy illustrations! However, I like the illustration.

    Reply
  89. Faithful readers wait breathlessly for new books from favorite authors! I have no idea why romance books are marketed the way they are. I would like them in removable brown wrappers so I can disguise them to read in scrupulous company. My family rags on me for the steamy illustrations! However, I like the illustration.

    Reply
  90. Faithful readers wait breathlessly for new books from favorite authors! I have no idea why romance books are marketed the way they are. I would like them in removable brown wrappers so I can disguise them to read in scrupulous company. My family rags on me for the steamy illustrations! However, I like the illustration.

    Reply
  91. RevMelinda, this serious agnostic (not a default position, but one that has been considered long and hard, over more than 40 years) enjoyed your sermon a LOT.
    Beautifully composed and argued, full of insight and truth.
    A good friend of mine who is a successful American romance author (a name all of you here would know) speaks often of the fundamental values of honour and love that are expressed in the romance format.
    Human love and devotion form one of the cornerstones of a stable society, and whether we see them as the mirror of a divine counterpart or not, they are immensely important concepts. Anyone who dismisses ‘romance fiction’ as frivolous and trivial needs a sharp clump around the head: it is about one of the most fundamental and positive elements of human society.

    Reply
  92. RevMelinda, this serious agnostic (not a default position, but one that has been considered long and hard, over more than 40 years) enjoyed your sermon a LOT.
    Beautifully composed and argued, full of insight and truth.
    A good friend of mine who is a successful American romance author (a name all of you here would know) speaks often of the fundamental values of honour and love that are expressed in the romance format.
    Human love and devotion form one of the cornerstones of a stable society, and whether we see them as the mirror of a divine counterpart or not, they are immensely important concepts. Anyone who dismisses ‘romance fiction’ as frivolous and trivial needs a sharp clump around the head: it is about one of the most fundamental and positive elements of human society.

    Reply
  93. RevMelinda, this serious agnostic (not a default position, but one that has been considered long and hard, over more than 40 years) enjoyed your sermon a LOT.
    Beautifully composed and argued, full of insight and truth.
    A good friend of mine who is a successful American romance author (a name all of you here would know) speaks often of the fundamental values of honour and love that are expressed in the romance format.
    Human love and devotion form one of the cornerstones of a stable society, and whether we see them as the mirror of a divine counterpart or not, they are immensely important concepts. Anyone who dismisses ‘romance fiction’ as frivolous and trivial needs a sharp clump around the head: it is about one of the most fundamental and positive elements of human society.

    Reply
  94. RevMelinda, this serious agnostic (not a default position, but one that has been considered long and hard, over more than 40 years) enjoyed your sermon a LOT.
    Beautifully composed and argued, full of insight and truth.
    A good friend of mine who is a successful American romance author (a name all of you here would know) speaks often of the fundamental values of honour and love that are expressed in the romance format.
    Human love and devotion form one of the cornerstones of a stable society, and whether we see them as the mirror of a divine counterpart or not, they are immensely important concepts. Anyone who dismisses ‘romance fiction’ as frivolous and trivial needs a sharp clump around the head: it is about one of the most fundamental and positive elements of human society.

    Reply
  95. RevMelinda, this serious agnostic (not a default position, but one that has been considered long and hard, over more than 40 years) enjoyed your sermon a LOT.
    Beautifully composed and argued, full of insight and truth.
    A good friend of mine who is a successful American romance author (a name all of you here would know) speaks often of the fundamental values of honour and love that are expressed in the romance format.
    Human love and devotion form one of the cornerstones of a stable society, and whether we see them as the mirror of a divine counterpart or not, they are immensely important concepts. Anyone who dismisses ‘romance fiction’ as frivolous and trivial needs a sharp clump around the head: it is about one of the most fundamental and positive elements of human society.

    Reply
  96. Edith, this is such a good point, especially when you consider the enormous market share romance already has. You’d think the stores would want to grow it even more.
    My guess is they figure it’s a niche market of faithful fans, this kind of romance underground that shouldn’t be allowed to spill out into the sunlight. We’re such a community unto ourselves, we do their job for them by word of mouth. Most of us *are* prepared to hike to the farthest ends of the bookstore to get that new Edith Layton:) Also, perhaps they’re worried they’ll lose credibility with the literary folk if they promote romance? One must ask, how credible is promoting every fad diet?
    I don’t know the answer, but I do know that one thing each of us can do is to stand proud as romance readers and writers. Earning someone else’s respect isn’t possible unless you respect yourself first.

    Reply
  97. Edith, this is such a good point, especially when you consider the enormous market share romance already has. You’d think the stores would want to grow it even more.
    My guess is they figure it’s a niche market of faithful fans, this kind of romance underground that shouldn’t be allowed to spill out into the sunlight. We’re such a community unto ourselves, we do their job for them by word of mouth. Most of us *are* prepared to hike to the farthest ends of the bookstore to get that new Edith Layton:) Also, perhaps they’re worried they’ll lose credibility with the literary folk if they promote romance? One must ask, how credible is promoting every fad diet?
    I don’t know the answer, but I do know that one thing each of us can do is to stand proud as romance readers and writers. Earning someone else’s respect isn’t possible unless you respect yourself first.

    Reply
  98. Edith, this is such a good point, especially when you consider the enormous market share romance already has. You’d think the stores would want to grow it even more.
    My guess is they figure it’s a niche market of faithful fans, this kind of romance underground that shouldn’t be allowed to spill out into the sunlight. We’re such a community unto ourselves, we do their job for them by word of mouth. Most of us *are* prepared to hike to the farthest ends of the bookstore to get that new Edith Layton:) Also, perhaps they’re worried they’ll lose credibility with the literary folk if they promote romance? One must ask, how credible is promoting every fad diet?
    I don’t know the answer, but I do know that one thing each of us can do is to stand proud as romance readers and writers. Earning someone else’s respect isn’t possible unless you respect yourself first.

    Reply
  99. Edith, this is such a good point, especially when you consider the enormous market share romance already has. You’d think the stores would want to grow it even more.
    My guess is they figure it’s a niche market of faithful fans, this kind of romance underground that shouldn’t be allowed to spill out into the sunlight. We’re such a community unto ourselves, we do their job for them by word of mouth. Most of us *are* prepared to hike to the farthest ends of the bookstore to get that new Edith Layton:) Also, perhaps they’re worried they’ll lose credibility with the literary folk if they promote romance? One must ask, how credible is promoting every fad diet?
    I don’t know the answer, but I do know that one thing each of us can do is to stand proud as romance readers and writers. Earning someone else’s respect isn’t possible unless you respect yourself first.

    Reply
  100. Edith, this is such a good point, especially when you consider the enormous market share romance already has. You’d think the stores would want to grow it even more.
    My guess is they figure it’s a niche market of faithful fans, this kind of romance underground that shouldn’t be allowed to spill out into the sunlight. We’re such a community unto ourselves, we do their job for them by word of mouth. Most of us *are* prepared to hike to the farthest ends of the bookstore to get that new Edith Layton:) Also, perhaps they’re worried they’ll lose credibility with the literary folk if they promote romance? One must ask, how credible is promoting every fad diet?
    I don’t know the answer, but I do know that one thing each of us can do is to stand proud as romance readers and writers. Earning someone else’s respect isn’t possible unless you respect yourself first.

    Reply
  101. I hate to say this (but I am not the first): I think the cover ‘art’ of category romances drags down the whole genre, and makes those who have not read any of the books assume they are ephemeral trash.
    I am not even talking about the RevMelinda’s raunchy ‘mantitties’ covers (what an unforgettable term!) but just all the people-pics, the kiddie-pics, the ‘illustration from the story’ pics on the covers. This is the way CHILDREN’S books are marketed. Can we be surprised that people think that such books are aimed at rather simple-minded, immature readers?

    Reply
  102. I hate to say this (but I am not the first): I think the cover ‘art’ of category romances drags down the whole genre, and makes those who have not read any of the books assume they are ephemeral trash.
    I am not even talking about the RevMelinda’s raunchy ‘mantitties’ covers (what an unforgettable term!) but just all the people-pics, the kiddie-pics, the ‘illustration from the story’ pics on the covers. This is the way CHILDREN’S books are marketed. Can we be surprised that people think that such books are aimed at rather simple-minded, immature readers?

    Reply
  103. I hate to say this (but I am not the first): I think the cover ‘art’ of category romances drags down the whole genre, and makes those who have not read any of the books assume they are ephemeral trash.
    I am not even talking about the RevMelinda’s raunchy ‘mantitties’ covers (what an unforgettable term!) but just all the people-pics, the kiddie-pics, the ‘illustration from the story’ pics on the covers. This is the way CHILDREN’S books are marketed. Can we be surprised that people think that such books are aimed at rather simple-minded, immature readers?

    Reply
  104. I hate to say this (but I am not the first): I think the cover ‘art’ of category romances drags down the whole genre, and makes those who have not read any of the books assume they are ephemeral trash.
    I am not even talking about the RevMelinda’s raunchy ‘mantitties’ covers (what an unforgettable term!) but just all the people-pics, the kiddie-pics, the ‘illustration from the story’ pics on the covers. This is the way CHILDREN’S books are marketed. Can we be surprised that people think that such books are aimed at rather simple-minded, immature readers?

    Reply
  105. I hate to say this (but I am not the first): I think the cover ‘art’ of category romances drags down the whole genre, and makes those who have not read any of the books assume they are ephemeral trash.
    I am not even talking about the RevMelinda’s raunchy ‘mantitties’ covers (what an unforgettable term!) but just all the people-pics, the kiddie-pics, the ‘illustration from the story’ pics on the covers. This is the way CHILDREN’S books are marketed. Can we be surprised that people think that such books are aimed at rather simple-minded, immature readers?

    Reply
  106. >>http://tworevs.blogspot.com/2007/06/do-you-love-me.html>>
    Oh, RevMelinda, but beautiful!
    Whatever one’s religion is or is not, that is a beautiful sermon, and I recommend it.
    I was truly touched by it.

    Reply
  107. >>http://tworevs.blogspot.com/2007/06/do-you-love-me.html>>
    Oh, RevMelinda, but beautiful!
    Whatever one’s religion is or is not, that is a beautiful sermon, and I recommend it.
    I was truly touched by it.

    Reply
  108. >>http://tworevs.blogspot.com/2007/06/do-you-love-me.html>>
    Oh, RevMelinda, but beautiful!
    Whatever one’s religion is or is not, that is a beautiful sermon, and I recommend it.
    I was truly touched by it.

    Reply
  109. >>http://tworevs.blogspot.com/2007/06/do-you-love-me.html>>
    Oh, RevMelinda, but beautiful!
    Whatever one’s religion is or is not, that is a beautiful sermon, and I recommend it.
    I was truly touched by it.

    Reply
  110. >>http://tworevs.blogspot.com/2007/06/do-you-love-me.html>>
    Oh, RevMelinda, but beautiful!
    Whatever one’s religion is or is not, that is a beautiful sermon, and I recommend it.
    I was truly touched by it.

    Reply
  111. As a long time romance reader (over 35 years) I have found myself reading less and less because of the increase in graphic and/or gratuitous sex. Some authors that have always written more details or hinted very creatively have become more detailed, and I have enjoyed their work much less. Some authors are really good writers with good plot, action, and characters, but 2/3 of the story is either the bedroom scene or leading up to the bedroom scene, and I skip through most of the book! I would rather enjoy the story and imagine the bedroom details. This increasing emphasis on lots of graphic sex may be one of the reasons some stores hide the romance section. I really wish they could be classified better so the reader would know in advance what she’s getting into (and paying for).
    In my mid-20s I got tired of trying to cover up that I read romances and outed myself and my best friend. (She still hasn’t forgiven me.) I decided that I wasn’t going to be ashamed of what I’m reading because, frankly, romances were better stories, more well-written, and more fun than most fiction books on the bestseller list. Also, most women that refused to read romances didn’t strike me as intelligent or as likable as the women that I knew were reading them.
    Oddly enough, now when I see a teenage girl reading a romance novel that I know is very graphic, I have the dilemma of responsibility–do I tell her mother, if she’s there, that her daughter is probably reading more than mom realizes?

    Reply
  112. As a long time romance reader (over 35 years) I have found myself reading less and less because of the increase in graphic and/or gratuitous sex. Some authors that have always written more details or hinted very creatively have become more detailed, and I have enjoyed their work much less. Some authors are really good writers with good plot, action, and characters, but 2/3 of the story is either the bedroom scene or leading up to the bedroom scene, and I skip through most of the book! I would rather enjoy the story and imagine the bedroom details. This increasing emphasis on lots of graphic sex may be one of the reasons some stores hide the romance section. I really wish they could be classified better so the reader would know in advance what she’s getting into (and paying for).
    In my mid-20s I got tired of trying to cover up that I read romances and outed myself and my best friend. (She still hasn’t forgiven me.) I decided that I wasn’t going to be ashamed of what I’m reading because, frankly, romances were better stories, more well-written, and more fun than most fiction books on the bestseller list. Also, most women that refused to read romances didn’t strike me as intelligent or as likable as the women that I knew were reading them.
    Oddly enough, now when I see a teenage girl reading a romance novel that I know is very graphic, I have the dilemma of responsibility–do I tell her mother, if she’s there, that her daughter is probably reading more than mom realizes?

    Reply
  113. As a long time romance reader (over 35 years) I have found myself reading less and less because of the increase in graphic and/or gratuitous sex. Some authors that have always written more details or hinted very creatively have become more detailed, and I have enjoyed their work much less. Some authors are really good writers with good plot, action, and characters, but 2/3 of the story is either the bedroom scene or leading up to the bedroom scene, and I skip through most of the book! I would rather enjoy the story and imagine the bedroom details. This increasing emphasis on lots of graphic sex may be one of the reasons some stores hide the romance section. I really wish they could be classified better so the reader would know in advance what she’s getting into (and paying for).
    In my mid-20s I got tired of trying to cover up that I read romances and outed myself and my best friend. (She still hasn’t forgiven me.) I decided that I wasn’t going to be ashamed of what I’m reading because, frankly, romances were better stories, more well-written, and more fun than most fiction books on the bestseller list. Also, most women that refused to read romances didn’t strike me as intelligent or as likable as the women that I knew were reading them.
    Oddly enough, now when I see a teenage girl reading a romance novel that I know is very graphic, I have the dilemma of responsibility–do I tell her mother, if she’s there, that her daughter is probably reading more than mom realizes?

    Reply
  114. As a long time romance reader (over 35 years) I have found myself reading less and less because of the increase in graphic and/or gratuitous sex. Some authors that have always written more details or hinted very creatively have become more detailed, and I have enjoyed their work much less. Some authors are really good writers with good plot, action, and characters, but 2/3 of the story is either the bedroom scene or leading up to the bedroom scene, and I skip through most of the book! I would rather enjoy the story and imagine the bedroom details. This increasing emphasis on lots of graphic sex may be one of the reasons some stores hide the romance section. I really wish they could be classified better so the reader would know in advance what she’s getting into (and paying for).
    In my mid-20s I got tired of trying to cover up that I read romances and outed myself and my best friend. (She still hasn’t forgiven me.) I decided that I wasn’t going to be ashamed of what I’m reading because, frankly, romances were better stories, more well-written, and more fun than most fiction books on the bestseller list. Also, most women that refused to read romances didn’t strike me as intelligent or as likable as the women that I knew were reading them.
    Oddly enough, now when I see a teenage girl reading a romance novel that I know is very graphic, I have the dilemma of responsibility–do I tell her mother, if she’s there, that her daughter is probably reading more than mom realizes?

    Reply
  115. As a long time romance reader (over 35 years) I have found myself reading less and less because of the increase in graphic and/or gratuitous sex. Some authors that have always written more details or hinted very creatively have become more detailed, and I have enjoyed their work much less. Some authors are really good writers with good plot, action, and characters, but 2/3 of the story is either the bedroom scene or leading up to the bedroom scene, and I skip through most of the book! I would rather enjoy the story and imagine the bedroom details. This increasing emphasis on lots of graphic sex may be one of the reasons some stores hide the romance section. I really wish they could be classified better so the reader would know in advance what she’s getting into (and paying for).
    In my mid-20s I got tired of trying to cover up that I read romances and outed myself and my best friend. (She still hasn’t forgiven me.) I decided that I wasn’t going to be ashamed of what I’m reading because, frankly, romances were better stories, more well-written, and more fun than most fiction books on the bestseller list. Also, most women that refused to read romances didn’t strike me as intelligent or as likable as the women that I knew were reading them.
    Oddly enough, now when I see a teenage girl reading a romance novel that I know is very graphic, I have the dilemma of responsibility–do I tell her mother, if she’s there, that her daughter is probably reading more than mom realizes?

    Reply
  116. My local Borders seems to buck the trend in a way. Downstairs is new books and magazines. The only other books are Mills and Boon by the till. The rest of the romantic fiction is upstairs, but then most things are.
    I prefer to shop online anyway. Even in what must be one of the biggest bookshops in the country, there is a paltry range for sale. Also, online any book is only a click away. No more trawling the bookshop trying to work out whether Loretta Chase is in Fiction or Romance (a bit in both as it turns out!), or “Don’t Look Down” is under Crusie or Mayer.

    Reply
  117. My local Borders seems to buck the trend in a way. Downstairs is new books and magazines. The only other books are Mills and Boon by the till. The rest of the romantic fiction is upstairs, but then most things are.
    I prefer to shop online anyway. Even in what must be one of the biggest bookshops in the country, there is a paltry range for sale. Also, online any book is only a click away. No more trawling the bookshop trying to work out whether Loretta Chase is in Fiction or Romance (a bit in both as it turns out!), or “Don’t Look Down” is under Crusie or Mayer.

    Reply
  118. My local Borders seems to buck the trend in a way. Downstairs is new books and magazines. The only other books are Mills and Boon by the till. The rest of the romantic fiction is upstairs, but then most things are.
    I prefer to shop online anyway. Even in what must be one of the biggest bookshops in the country, there is a paltry range for sale. Also, online any book is only a click away. No more trawling the bookshop trying to work out whether Loretta Chase is in Fiction or Romance (a bit in both as it turns out!), or “Don’t Look Down” is under Crusie or Mayer.

    Reply
  119. My local Borders seems to buck the trend in a way. Downstairs is new books and magazines. The only other books are Mills and Boon by the till. The rest of the romantic fiction is upstairs, but then most things are.
    I prefer to shop online anyway. Even in what must be one of the biggest bookshops in the country, there is a paltry range for sale. Also, online any book is only a click away. No more trawling the bookshop trying to work out whether Loretta Chase is in Fiction or Romance (a bit in both as it turns out!), or “Don’t Look Down” is under Crusie or Mayer.

    Reply
  120. My local Borders seems to buck the trend in a way. Downstairs is new books and magazines. The only other books are Mills and Boon by the till. The rest of the romantic fiction is upstairs, but then most things are.
    I prefer to shop online anyway. Even in what must be one of the biggest bookshops in the country, there is a paltry range for sale. Also, online any book is only a click away. No more trawling the bookshop trying to work out whether Loretta Chase is in Fiction or Romance (a bit in both as it turns out!), or “Don’t Look Down” is under Crusie or Mayer.

    Reply

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