Jane Austen’s London

Cover medJo, here, delighted to welcome Louise Allen, who is already an Honorary Wench, and her new book, Walking Jane Austen's London. This is essential reading for any Regency or Austen fan visiting London, but also great for the armchair traveler.

Your knowledge of Regency London is remarkable, Louise, but did it grow out of your love for Regency fiction, or did the urge to write Regency grow out of your research?

Louise: Thank you for inviting me, Jo, it’s a pleasure to be here at one of my favourite blogs. The interest in the Regency came first and I found myself making more and more research visits to locations in London that I needed for scenes in my books. But I have a serious book-buying habit, so the pile of research books on London history grew and grew and so did my collection of Georgian prints of London. Luckily my husband, the photographer in the family, is also interested so we started to plan longer walks together. Londoners are very friendly and helpful on the whole, so we are often asked if we are lost as we stand on street corners peering at our map and guidebook. These kind people are usually a trifle confused to be shown that the book and map are dated 1814.

Jo: What is the special delight of writing romance in your period, which is 1780 to 1820, so perhaps the “extended Regency”?

Louise: I love the fact that it is a world on the cusp of change between the 18th century and the modern world. The economy was changing, Society was changing, science and technology were developing at breakneck speed and the whole world was opening out and becoming connected. It was also an interesting time for women – in literature, in trade, in political influence. 1-New Theatre Covent Garden crop

(The print is of the stalls at Covent Garden theatre, one of Jane’s favourites. As always, click to enlarge.)

To take just one example, two of the most powerful stage coach proprietors in London were women. Mrs Ann Nelson ran the Bull Inn, Aldgate and had a virtual monopoly of the traffic to the eastern counties and Mrs Ann Mountain owned the Saracen’s Head, Snow Hill, and a coach factory, and sent out thirty stage coaches every day of the week. Unfortunately there is only one of the old coaching inns left in London, the George in Southwark.

Jo: Fascinating! I love learning about entrepreneurial woman of the past.

Louise:  Also, less seriously, I love the look of the period and I try very hard not to imagine my heroes in later years with mutton chop whiskers!

1-Hyde Park Turnpike

(Hyde Park Corner turnpike gates, looking west into London)

Jo: Have you ever written, or thought of writing in a completely different period?

Louise: My first novel, as Francesca Shaw, was set in the 17th century but my editor steered me towards the Regency as having a wider appeal and I was soon hooked and have stayed within the “long Regency” ever since. The only deviation was to write about the Sack of Rome, AD410 (Virgin Slave, Barbarian King) because I knew it was the only way to get the gorgeous Visigoth hero out of my head. Otherwise my earliest setting was 1788 for Forbidden Jewel of India, set in Rajasthan.
Jewelofindia

Jo: Tell us more about Walking Jane Austen’s London.

Louise: This was enormous fun to do, although my feet may never recover from those hard pavements! Fortunately I thought of the idea eighteen months ago and pitched it to Shire Publications then, otherwise I wouldn’t have made it in time for the Pride and Prejudice bicentenary. I scoured Jane Austen’s letters and novels for London references and plotted them all on a map. Then I read piles of reference books, added as many of the must-see late Georgian sites as I could and spent a long time working out how to combine all of these into a series of walks.

Once I had eight possible routes I walked them all with my husband, the photographer for the project, and we took several hundred photographs, from the straightforward shots of three of the houses Jane Austen stayed in on visits to London to the downright quirky, such as a seagull behaving disrespectfully on the Prince Regent’s head, Beau Brummell’s boot scraper and traffic lights for horses on their way to Rotten Row.1-Shop

Then it was back to the drawing board with more research and lots of tweaks to the routes before we walked them again and I finally wrote them up. After that it was a matter of choosing seventy five original prints from my collection to complement seventy five photos.

(Newton’s haberdashery shop, just off Leicester Square where Jane Austen often looked for bargains in Irish linen.)

I was lucky that Shire found me an excellent cartographer who has produced beautifully clear maps for each walk. I was also fortunate that my editor listened to my pleas for an index twice as long as he was expecting, so if you want to locate the Cole Hole Tavern, Prince Henry’s Room, Rotten Row or Astley’s Amphitheatre or all the references from the various novels, you can do so.

Jo: This all sounds irresistibly delicious, Louise!

Louise: Thank you. It is also possible to follow most of the routes on Google Earth and with Street View, as the cartographer had to do when he was wrestling with the tiny alleyways around Dr Johnson’s House and the Cheshire Cheese pub.


TarnishedI wish I had room for at least two more walks. The Southwark area around Borough High Street is fascinating, and the East End and the docks — which I used in my most recent novel Tarnished Amongst the Ton — has endless hidden corners with stories to tell.

There's more about this novel and Louise's other books on her web site.

And you must visit Louise's blog about Jane Austen's London. Regularly. Because there are new treats all the time.

US readers can buy Walking Jane Austen's London in print here.  And in Kindle here.

It's available from all the usual other booksellers, and in most locations.

In addition, Louise is giving away a copy to a randomly selected commenter here. Have you ever visited London? If so, what are your favourite Regency spots? If not, where would you visit first if you went there?

Are you suprised to think of Jane Austen gallivanting around London?

What are your favourite London locations in fiction? Any memorable scenes set in real Regency locations?

Any and all comments welcome!

Cheers,

Jo

320 thoughts on “Jane Austen’s London”

  1. My knowledge of London geography is pretty much limited to whatever gets blown up in Doctor Who, plus what I’ve read in Sherlock Holmes and various regencies over the years. Of all that the one thing I’d most like to see in person is Rotten Row, with all the ladies and gentleman riding, driving and promenading at the fashionable hour, some spring day in the early 1800s. Of course I would need the Doctor’s Tardis for that 🙂

  2. My knowledge of London geography is pretty much limited to whatever gets blown up in Doctor Who, plus what I’ve read in Sherlock Holmes and various regencies over the years. Of all that the one thing I’d most like to see in person is Rotten Row, with all the ladies and gentleman riding, driving and promenading at the fashionable hour, some spring day in the early 1800s. Of course I would need the Doctor’s Tardis for that 🙂

  3. My knowledge of London geography is pretty much limited to whatever gets blown up in Doctor Who, plus what I’ve read in Sherlock Holmes and various regencies over the years. Of all that the one thing I’d most like to see in person is Rotten Row, with all the ladies and gentleman riding, driving and promenading at the fashionable hour, some spring day in the early 1800s. Of course I would need the Doctor’s Tardis for that 🙂

  4. My knowledge of London geography is pretty much limited to whatever gets blown up in Doctor Who, plus what I’ve read in Sherlock Holmes and various regencies over the years. Of all that the one thing I’d most like to see in person is Rotten Row, with all the ladies and gentleman riding, driving and promenading at the fashionable hour, some spring day in the early 1800s. Of course I would need the Doctor’s Tardis for that 🙂

  5. My knowledge of London geography is pretty much limited to whatever gets blown up in Doctor Who, plus what I’ve read in Sherlock Holmes and various regencies over the years. Of all that the one thing I’d most like to see in person is Rotten Row, with all the ladies and gentleman riding, driving and promenading at the fashionable hour, some spring day in the early 1800s. Of course I would need the Doctor’s Tardis for that 🙂

  6. Unfortunately, my time in London was very limited. When I found myself in front of the National Portrait Gallery, I was compelled to go in, and climb all four flights of marble stairs to reach the top, where I saw a reproduction, at full size, of Holbein’s Sir Thomas More and Family. The original had perished in a fire, unknown to me then. I thought about the tiny reproductions of this painting which was my prior experience, while looking at this life-size mural, and got weepy. More weepiness followed as I went through the galleries and the centuries forward, and saw old favorites.
    My experience at the V&A, where I had hoped to see the Pre-Raphaelite collection, was varied. Yes, I was diappointed that the rooms of that collection were undergoing renovation. They had a special exhibit on Regency clothing, at that time, and I spent a good half-hour admiring clothing familiar to me (I was regularly dancing Regency-era dances, in costume). The silver collection was simply overwhelming, and I left the room as soon as I could. I found myself in a dim corridor where various textiles and worked-textile items, such as samplers and slippers, were displayed. What hit me hard was that for each of these painstakingly worked pieces of art, we knew the donor, possibly the person to whom items were first given, but NEVER the name of the woman who had done the work. I was quite irate. The dimness, from shuttered windows and other evidence of renovation, was annoying. I went over to one of the guards and explained that I was having a hard time seeing the exhibits in the cases, and might I use my pocket torch? I thought I’d best ask, as I didn’t fancy being roughly escorted out of the museum! He said it was all right. He thought I was in school or at university. I think I was 33 at the time!
    If I ever get back, I will indeed want Louise Allen’s “guidebook”. I think I want to visit Hyde Park, in order to view the Serpentine.

  7. Unfortunately, my time in London was very limited. When I found myself in front of the National Portrait Gallery, I was compelled to go in, and climb all four flights of marble stairs to reach the top, where I saw a reproduction, at full size, of Holbein’s Sir Thomas More and Family. The original had perished in a fire, unknown to me then. I thought about the tiny reproductions of this painting which was my prior experience, while looking at this life-size mural, and got weepy. More weepiness followed as I went through the galleries and the centuries forward, and saw old favorites.
    My experience at the V&A, where I had hoped to see the Pre-Raphaelite collection, was varied. Yes, I was diappointed that the rooms of that collection were undergoing renovation. They had a special exhibit on Regency clothing, at that time, and I spent a good half-hour admiring clothing familiar to me (I was regularly dancing Regency-era dances, in costume). The silver collection was simply overwhelming, and I left the room as soon as I could. I found myself in a dim corridor where various textiles and worked-textile items, such as samplers and slippers, were displayed. What hit me hard was that for each of these painstakingly worked pieces of art, we knew the donor, possibly the person to whom items were first given, but NEVER the name of the woman who had done the work. I was quite irate. The dimness, from shuttered windows and other evidence of renovation, was annoying. I went over to one of the guards and explained that I was having a hard time seeing the exhibits in the cases, and might I use my pocket torch? I thought I’d best ask, as I didn’t fancy being roughly escorted out of the museum! He said it was all right. He thought I was in school or at university. I think I was 33 at the time!
    If I ever get back, I will indeed want Louise Allen’s “guidebook”. I think I want to visit Hyde Park, in order to view the Serpentine.

  8. Unfortunately, my time in London was very limited. When I found myself in front of the National Portrait Gallery, I was compelled to go in, and climb all four flights of marble stairs to reach the top, where I saw a reproduction, at full size, of Holbein’s Sir Thomas More and Family. The original had perished in a fire, unknown to me then. I thought about the tiny reproductions of this painting which was my prior experience, while looking at this life-size mural, and got weepy. More weepiness followed as I went through the galleries and the centuries forward, and saw old favorites.
    My experience at the V&A, where I had hoped to see the Pre-Raphaelite collection, was varied. Yes, I was diappointed that the rooms of that collection were undergoing renovation. They had a special exhibit on Regency clothing, at that time, and I spent a good half-hour admiring clothing familiar to me (I was regularly dancing Regency-era dances, in costume). The silver collection was simply overwhelming, and I left the room as soon as I could. I found myself in a dim corridor where various textiles and worked-textile items, such as samplers and slippers, were displayed. What hit me hard was that for each of these painstakingly worked pieces of art, we knew the donor, possibly the person to whom items were first given, but NEVER the name of the woman who had done the work. I was quite irate. The dimness, from shuttered windows and other evidence of renovation, was annoying. I went over to one of the guards and explained that I was having a hard time seeing the exhibits in the cases, and might I use my pocket torch? I thought I’d best ask, as I didn’t fancy being roughly escorted out of the museum! He said it was all right. He thought I was in school or at university. I think I was 33 at the time!
    If I ever get back, I will indeed want Louise Allen’s “guidebook”. I think I want to visit Hyde Park, in order to view the Serpentine.

  9. Unfortunately, my time in London was very limited. When I found myself in front of the National Portrait Gallery, I was compelled to go in, and climb all four flights of marble stairs to reach the top, where I saw a reproduction, at full size, of Holbein’s Sir Thomas More and Family. The original had perished in a fire, unknown to me then. I thought about the tiny reproductions of this painting which was my prior experience, while looking at this life-size mural, and got weepy. More weepiness followed as I went through the galleries and the centuries forward, and saw old favorites.
    My experience at the V&A, where I had hoped to see the Pre-Raphaelite collection, was varied. Yes, I was diappointed that the rooms of that collection were undergoing renovation. They had a special exhibit on Regency clothing, at that time, and I spent a good half-hour admiring clothing familiar to me (I was regularly dancing Regency-era dances, in costume). The silver collection was simply overwhelming, and I left the room as soon as I could. I found myself in a dim corridor where various textiles and worked-textile items, such as samplers and slippers, were displayed. What hit me hard was that for each of these painstakingly worked pieces of art, we knew the donor, possibly the person to whom items were first given, but NEVER the name of the woman who had done the work. I was quite irate. The dimness, from shuttered windows and other evidence of renovation, was annoying. I went over to one of the guards and explained that I was having a hard time seeing the exhibits in the cases, and might I use my pocket torch? I thought I’d best ask, as I didn’t fancy being roughly escorted out of the museum! He said it was all right. He thought I was in school or at university. I think I was 33 at the time!
    If I ever get back, I will indeed want Louise Allen’s “guidebook”. I think I want to visit Hyde Park, in order to view the Serpentine.

  10. Unfortunately, my time in London was very limited. When I found myself in front of the National Portrait Gallery, I was compelled to go in, and climb all four flights of marble stairs to reach the top, where I saw a reproduction, at full size, of Holbein’s Sir Thomas More and Family. The original had perished in a fire, unknown to me then. I thought about the tiny reproductions of this painting which was my prior experience, while looking at this life-size mural, and got weepy. More weepiness followed as I went through the galleries and the centuries forward, and saw old favorites.
    My experience at the V&A, where I had hoped to see the Pre-Raphaelite collection, was varied. Yes, I was diappointed that the rooms of that collection were undergoing renovation. They had a special exhibit on Regency clothing, at that time, and I spent a good half-hour admiring clothing familiar to me (I was regularly dancing Regency-era dances, in costume). The silver collection was simply overwhelming, and I left the room as soon as I could. I found myself in a dim corridor where various textiles and worked-textile items, such as samplers and slippers, were displayed. What hit me hard was that for each of these painstakingly worked pieces of art, we knew the donor, possibly the person to whom items were first given, but NEVER the name of the woman who had done the work. I was quite irate. The dimness, from shuttered windows and other evidence of renovation, was annoying. I went over to one of the guards and explained that I was having a hard time seeing the exhibits in the cases, and might I use my pocket torch? I thought I’d best ask, as I didn’t fancy being roughly escorted out of the museum! He said it was all right. He thought I was in school or at university. I think I was 33 at the time!
    If I ever get back, I will indeed want Louise Allen’s “guidebook”. I think I want to visit Hyde Park, in order to view the Serpentine.

  11. I love the idea of following Jane’s footsteps. I like Regents Park and Regent Street. I used to enjoy walking down Jermyn Street with all the old shop fronts plus wandering through Fortnum & Mason when we lived in London. The Shepherd’s Market area is also fun to explore.

  12. I love the idea of following Jane’s footsteps. I like Regents Park and Regent Street. I used to enjoy walking down Jermyn Street with all the old shop fronts plus wandering through Fortnum & Mason when we lived in London. The Shepherd’s Market area is also fun to explore.

  13. I love the idea of following Jane’s footsteps. I like Regents Park and Regent Street. I used to enjoy walking down Jermyn Street with all the old shop fronts plus wandering through Fortnum & Mason when we lived in London. The Shepherd’s Market area is also fun to explore.

  14. I love the idea of following Jane’s footsteps. I like Regents Park and Regent Street. I used to enjoy walking down Jermyn Street with all the old shop fronts plus wandering through Fortnum & Mason when we lived in London. The Shepherd’s Market area is also fun to explore.

  15. I love the idea of following Jane’s footsteps. I like Regents Park and Regent Street. I used to enjoy walking down Jermyn Street with all the old shop fronts plus wandering through Fortnum & Mason when we lived in London. The Shepherd’s Market area is also fun to explore.

  16. Janice – you can still see riders and carriages on Rotten Row, even if they aren’t as elegantly dressed! Last time I was there one of the Queen’s carriages from the Royal Mews was waiting at the special horse traffic lights at Hyde Park Corner ready to cross over into the park and get some exercise down the Row.
    Marina, I do sympathise with your use of the pocket torch! I won a beautiful 18thc embroidered silk waistcoat and I have to keep it all wrapped up and in the dark 🙁

  17. Janice – you can still see riders and carriages on Rotten Row, even if they aren’t as elegantly dressed! Last time I was there one of the Queen’s carriages from the Royal Mews was waiting at the special horse traffic lights at Hyde Park Corner ready to cross over into the park and get some exercise down the Row.
    Marina, I do sympathise with your use of the pocket torch! I won a beautiful 18thc embroidered silk waistcoat and I have to keep it all wrapped up and in the dark 🙁

  18. Janice – you can still see riders and carriages on Rotten Row, even if they aren’t as elegantly dressed! Last time I was there one of the Queen’s carriages from the Royal Mews was waiting at the special horse traffic lights at Hyde Park Corner ready to cross over into the park and get some exercise down the Row.
    Marina, I do sympathise with your use of the pocket torch! I won a beautiful 18thc embroidered silk waistcoat and I have to keep it all wrapped up and in the dark 🙁

  19. Janice – you can still see riders and carriages on Rotten Row, even if they aren’t as elegantly dressed! Last time I was there one of the Queen’s carriages from the Royal Mews was waiting at the special horse traffic lights at Hyde Park Corner ready to cross over into the park and get some exercise down the Row.
    Marina, I do sympathise with your use of the pocket torch! I won a beautiful 18thc embroidered silk waistcoat and I have to keep it all wrapped up and in the dark 🙁

  20. Janice – you can still see riders and carriages on Rotten Row, even if they aren’t as elegantly dressed! Last time I was there one of the Queen’s carriages from the Royal Mews was waiting at the special horse traffic lights at Hyde Park Corner ready to cross over into the park and get some exercise down the Row.
    Marina, I do sympathise with your use of the pocket torch! I won a beautiful 18thc embroidered silk waistcoat and I have to keep it all wrapped up and in the dark 🙁

  21. Louise, you know that I love your Walks Through Regency London. We’ve used it twice now on trips back to visit family. I think we’ve only got two walks left. The one that passes the British Museum is a killer, we can’t finish it because we keep getting side-tracked by the Museum…it’s so tempting (whines).
    (((hugs))) – from another Janice, this one somewhere in the Middle East.

  22. Louise, you know that I love your Walks Through Regency London. We’ve used it twice now on trips back to visit family. I think we’ve only got two walks left. The one that passes the British Museum is a killer, we can’t finish it because we keep getting side-tracked by the Museum…it’s so tempting (whines).
    (((hugs))) – from another Janice, this one somewhere in the Middle East.

  23. Louise, you know that I love your Walks Through Regency London. We’ve used it twice now on trips back to visit family. I think we’ve only got two walks left. The one that passes the British Museum is a killer, we can’t finish it because we keep getting side-tracked by the Museum…it’s so tempting (whines).
    (((hugs))) – from another Janice, this one somewhere in the Middle East.

  24. Louise, you know that I love your Walks Through Regency London. We’ve used it twice now on trips back to visit family. I think we’ve only got two walks left. The one that passes the British Museum is a killer, we can’t finish it because we keep getting side-tracked by the Museum…it’s so tempting (whines).
    (((hugs))) – from another Janice, this one somewhere in the Middle East.

  25. Louise, you know that I love your Walks Through Regency London. We’ve used it twice now on trips back to visit family. I think we’ve only got two walks left. The one that passes the British Museum is a killer, we can’t finish it because we keep getting side-tracked by the Museum…it’s so tempting (whines).
    (((hugs))) – from another Janice, this one somewhere in the Middle East.

  26. I didn’t get to walk London like this, but I loved Hatchards Bookshop and Fortnum and Mason.
    I hope to get back to London in the next year or two for a longer visit.
    Louise, I’ve loved all your books. Thanks for a great post.
    Amy Pfaff

  27. I didn’t get to walk London like this, but I loved Hatchards Bookshop and Fortnum and Mason.
    I hope to get back to London in the next year or two for a longer visit.
    Louise, I’ve loved all your books. Thanks for a great post.
    Amy Pfaff

  28. I didn’t get to walk London like this, but I loved Hatchards Bookshop and Fortnum and Mason.
    I hope to get back to London in the next year or two for a longer visit.
    Louise, I’ve loved all your books. Thanks for a great post.
    Amy Pfaff

  29. I didn’t get to walk London like this, but I loved Hatchards Bookshop and Fortnum and Mason.
    I hope to get back to London in the next year or two for a longer visit.
    Louise, I’ve loved all your books. Thanks for a great post.
    Amy Pfaff

  30. I didn’t get to walk London like this, but I loved Hatchards Bookshop and Fortnum and Mason.
    I hope to get back to London in the next year or two for a longer visit.
    Louise, I’ve loved all your books. Thanks for a great post.
    Amy Pfaff

  31. I love the book’s cover, it says, “read me”! I used to live in London for a few years and found after a while that I knew the city pretty well as a series of little villages, and I could see how they connected on maps, but couldn’t link them up very well in real life at street level. Using buses rather than the tube helped to fix that. It’s hard to pick a favourite spot as London is so full of history. I like the way everything knits together and there are hidden surprises. You can be hurrying through the City (the business and financial district, I mean) on your way to a meeting, and suddenly, in the middle of all the modern buildings, come across a small, quiet square, or church, or even Dr Johnson’s House. We lived right at the bottom of what was once the Great North Road and I did occasionally look up the hill towards the north and imagine an eloping couple dashing away in a carriage towards Scotland! The Regency says “Mayfair” to me – Cavendish Square, Berkeley Square, Brook Street etc – it’s fun to go inside those houses now and imagine what they must have been like 200 years ago. Jo, I’d love to know where exactly you placed Marlborough Square?

  32. I love the book’s cover, it says, “read me”! I used to live in London for a few years and found after a while that I knew the city pretty well as a series of little villages, and I could see how they connected on maps, but couldn’t link them up very well in real life at street level. Using buses rather than the tube helped to fix that. It’s hard to pick a favourite spot as London is so full of history. I like the way everything knits together and there are hidden surprises. You can be hurrying through the City (the business and financial district, I mean) on your way to a meeting, and suddenly, in the middle of all the modern buildings, come across a small, quiet square, or church, or even Dr Johnson’s House. We lived right at the bottom of what was once the Great North Road and I did occasionally look up the hill towards the north and imagine an eloping couple dashing away in a carriage towards Scotland! The Regency says “Mayfair” to me – Cavendish Square, Berkeley Square, Brook Street etc – it’s fun to go inside those houses now and imagine what they must have been like 200 years ago. Jo, I’d love to know where exactly you placed Marlborough Square?

  33. I love the book’s cover, it says, “read me”! I used to live in London for a few years and found after a while that I knew the city pretty well as a series of little villages, and I could see how they connected on maps, but couldn’t link them up very well in real life at street level. Using buses rather than the tube helped to fix that. It’s hard to pick a favourite spot as London is so full of history. I like the way everything knits together and there are hidden surprises. You can be hurrying through the City (the business and financial district, I mean) on your way to a meeting, and suddenly, in the middle of all the modern buildings, come across a small, quiet square, or church, or even Dr Johnson’s House. We lived right at the bottom of what was once the Great North Road and I did occasionally look up the hill towards the north and imagine an eloping couple dashing away in a carriage towards Scotland! The Regency says “Mayfair” to me – Cavendish Square, Berkeley Square, Brook Street etc – it’s fun to go inside those houses now and imagine what they must have been like 200 years ago. Jo, I’d love to know where exactly you placed Marlborough Square?

  34. I love the book’s cover, it says, “read me”! I used to live in London for a few years and found after a while that I knew the city pretty well as a series of little villages, and I could see how they connected on maps, but couldn’t link them up very well in real life at street level. Using buses rather than the tube helped to fix that. It’s hard to pick a favourite spot as London is so full of history. I like the way everything knits together and there are hidden surprises. You can be hurrying through the City (the business and financial district, I mean) on your way to a meeting, and suddenly, in the middle of all the modern buildings, come across a small, quiet square, or church, or even Dr Johnson’s House. We lived right at the bottom of what was once the Great North Road and I did occasionally look up the hill towards the north and imagine an eloping couple dashing away in a carriage towards Scotland! The Regency says “Mayfair” to me – Cavendish Square, Berkeley Square, Brook Street etc – it’s fun to go inside those houses now and imagine what they must have been like 200 years ago. Jo, I’d love to know where exactly you placed Marlborough Square?

  35. I love the book’s cover, it says, “read me”! I used to live in London for a few years and found after a while that I knew the city pretty well as a series of little villages, and I could see how they connected on maps, but couldn’t link them up very well in real life at street level. Using buses rather than the tube helped to fix that. It’s hard to pick a favourite spot as London is so full of history. I like the way everything knits together and there are hidden surprises. You can be hurrying through the City (the business and financial district, I mean) on your way to a meeting, and suddenly, in the middle of all the modern buildings, come across a small, quiet square, or church, or even Dr Johnson’s House. We lived right at the bottom of what was once the Great North Road and I did occasionally look up the hill towards the north and imagine an eloping couple dashing away in a carriage towards Scotland! The Regency says “Mayfair” to me – Cavendish Square, Berkeley Square, Brook Street etc – it’s fun to go inside those houses now and imagine what they must have been like 200 years ago. Jo, I’d love to know where exactly you placed Marlborough Square?

  36. I love walking in London, and tracking down bits of history. My most recent trip was around Kensington and Holland Park to photograph locations for my own writing, although I vanished down Holland Park Mews for so long that my collaborator became convinced that I’d been arrested by the Greek Government (I’d been very careful not to photograph the Greek Embassy or the house next-door to it).
    We are planning to follow all Louise’s Regency Walks at some point too.

  37. I love walking in London, and tracking down bits of history. My most recent trip was around Kensington and Holland Park to photograph locations for my own writing, although I vanished down Holland Park Mews for so long that my collaborator became convinced that I’d been arrested by the Greek Government (I’d been very careful not to photograph the Greek Embassy or the house next-door to it).
    We are planning to follow all Louise’s Regency Walks at some point too.

  38. I love walking in London, and tracking down bits of history. My most recent trip was around Kensington and Holland Park to photograph locations for my own writing, although I vanished down Holland Park Mews for so long that my collaborator became convinced that I’d been arrested by the Greek Government (I’d been very careful not to photograph the Greek Embassy or the house next-door to it).
    We are planning to follow all Louise’s Regency Walks at some point too.

  39. I love walking in London, and tracking down bits of history. My most recent trip was around Kensington and Holland Park to photograph locations for my own writing, although I vanished down Holland Park Mews for so long that my collaborator became convinced that I’d been arrested by the Greek Government (I’d been very careful not to photograph the Greek Embassy or the house next-door to it).
    We are planning to follow all Louise’s Regency Walks at some point too.

  40. I love walking in London, and tracking down bits of history. My most recent trip was around Kensington and Holland Park to photograph locations for my own writing, although I vanished down Holland Park Mews for so long that my collaborator became convinced that I’d been arrested by the Greek Government (I’d been very careful not to photograph the Greek Embassy or the house next-door to it).
    We are planning to follow all Louise’s Regency Walks at some point too.

  41. This book sounds fascinating. Whenever I explore London or any other English market town or city I always imagine what it would have been like in past times. 🙂

  42. This book sounds fascinating. Whenever I explore London or any other English market town or city I always imagine what it would have been like in past times. 🙂

  43. This book sounds fascinating. Whenever I explore London or any other English market town or city I always imagine what it would have been like in past times. 🙂

  44. This book sounds fascinating. Whenever I explore London or any other English market town or city I always imagine what it would have been like in past times. 🙂

  45. This book sounds fascinating. Whenever I explore London or any other English market town or city I always imagine what it would have been like in past times. 🙂

  46. Charlotte, you may be triggering a captcha code that you have to type in before it posts. It even happens to the Wenches sometimes!
    When you click “post” wait and check there’s no extra box popping up somewhere.
    Jo

  47. Charlotte, you may be triggering a captcha code that you have to type in before it posts. It even happens to the Wenches sometimes!
    When you click “post” wait and check there’s no extra box popping up somewhere.
    Jo

  48. Charlotte, you may be triggering a captcha code that you have to type in before it posts. It even happens to the Wenches sometimes!
    When you click “post” wait and check there’s no extra box popping up somewhere.
    Jo

  49. Charlotte, you may be triggering a captcha code that you have to type in before it posts. It even happens to the Wenches sometimes!
    When you click “post” wait and check there’s no extra box popping up somewhere.
    Jo

  50. Charlotte, you may be triggering a captcha code that you have to type in before it posts. It even happens to the Wenches sometimes!
    When you click “post” wait and check there’s no extra box popping up somewhere.
    Jo

  51. I’m loving all these comments! I sympathise with Stevie – I almost got arrested at gunpoint for peering at the Saudi Embassy. My explanations that it was an interesting building cut no ice! Julie – I’m with you, buses are best. My favourite is the upstairs front seat of the #23. If you get on at Liverpool Street station it has a fabulous route – you even notice swooping down into the Tyburn valley as you go alongOxford Street

  52. I’m loving all these comments! I sympathise with Stevie – I almost got arrested at gunpoint for peering at the Saudi Embassy. My explanations that it was an interesting building cut no ice! Julie – I’m with you, buses are best. My favourite is the upstairs front seat of the #23. If you get on at Liverpool Street station it has a fabulous route – you even notice swooping down into the Tyburn valley as you go alongOxford Street

  53. I’m loving all these comments! I sympathise with Stevie – I almost got arrested at gunpoint for peering at the Saudi Embassy. My explanations that it was an interesting building cut no ice! Julie – I’m with you, buses are best. My favourite is the upstairs front seat of the #23. If you get on at Liverpool Street station it has a fabulous route – you even notice swooping down into the Tyburn valley as you go alongOxford Street

  54. I’m loving all these comments! I sympathise with Stevie – I almost got arrested at gunpoint for peering at the Saudi Embassy. My explanations that it was an interesting building cut no ice! Julie – I’m with you, buses are best. My favourite is the upstairs front seat of the #23. If you get on at Liverpool Street station it has a fabulous route – you even notice swooping down into the Tyburn valley as you go alongOxford Street

  55. I’m loving all these comments! I sympathise with Stevie – I almost got arrested at gunpoint for peering at the Saudi Embassy. My explanations that it was an interesting building cut no ice! Julie – I’m with you, buses are best. My favourite is the upstairs front seat of the #23. If you get on at Liverpool Street station it has a fabulous route – you even notice swooping down into the Tyburn valley as you go alongOxford Street

  56. Love the double decker buses and all of London. When I was last there I was collecting books inRegency england buit not specifically Austen’s or Heyer’s London. Both sound like interesting tours– but then I think any reason for going back to England would sound good.
    Nancy

  57. Love the double decker buses and all of London. When I was last there I was collecting books inRegency england buit not specifically Austen’s or Heyer’s London. Both sound like interesting tours– but then I think any reason for going back to England would sound good.
    Nancy

  58. Love the double decker buses and all of London. When I was last there I was collecting books inRegency england buit not specifically Austen’s or Heyer’s London. Both sound like interesting tours– but then I think any reason for going back to England would sound good.
    Nancy

  59. Love the double decker buses and all of London. When I was last there I was collecting books inRegency england buit not specifically Austen’s or Heyer’s London. Both sound like interesting tours– but then I think any reason for going back to England would sound good.
    Nancy

  60. Love the double decker buses and all of London. When I was last there I was collecting books inRegency england buit not specifically Austen’s or Heyer’s London. Both sound like interesting tours– but then I think any reason for going back to England would sound good.
    Nancy

  61. Thanks for your response re Marlborough Square, Jo. It does sort of hover over Mayfair – I sometimes want to stick it down over Grosvenor Square or maybe a bit nearer Bond Street and slightly more to the south – but can never quite fix it!!!!

  62. Thanks for your response re Marlborough Square, Jo. It does sort of hover over Mayfair – I sometimes want to stick it down over Grosvenor Square or maybe a bit nearer Bond Street and slightly more to the south – but can never quite fix it!!!!

  63. Thanks for your response re Marlborough Square, Jo. It does sort of hover over Mayfair – I sometimes want to stick it down over Grosvenor Square or maybe a bit nearer Bond Street and slightly more to the south – but can never quite fix it!!!!

  64. Thanks for your response re Marlborough Square, Jo. It does sort of hover over Mayfair – I sometimes want to stick it down over Grosvenor Square or maybe a bit nearer Bond Street and slightly more to the south – but can never quite fix it!!!!

  65. Thanks for your response re Marlborough Square, Jo. It does sort of hover over Mayfair – I sometimes want to stick it down over Grosvenor Square or maybe a bit nearer Bond Street and slightly more to the south – but can never quite fix it!!!!

  66. Love the Duke of Wellington’s house. Poor man-all those gifts after Waterloo and what do you do with them? The statue of Napoleon dressed as Caesar makes me laugh out loud. Jeri

  67. Love the Duke of Wellington’s house. Poor man-all those gifts after Waterloo and what do you do with them? The statue of Napoleon dressed as Caesar makes me laugh out loud. Jeri

  68. Love the Duke of Wellington’s house. Poor man-all those gifts after Waterloo and what do you do with them? The statue of Napoleon dressed as Caesar makes me laugh out loud. Jeri

  69. Love the Duke of Wellington’s house. Poor man-all those gifts after Waterloo and what do you do with them? The statue of Napoleon dressed as Caesar makes me laugh out loud. Jeri

  70. Love the Duke of Wellington’s house. Poor man-all those gifts after Waterloo and what do you do with them? The statue of Napoleon dressed as Caesar makes me laugh out loud. Jeri

  71. Someday I’ll get to England!!!! The walking tour sounds marvelous to have as a guide. I may have to settle for the arm chair tour until I can afford the actual trip.

  72. Someday I’ll get to England!!!! The walking tour sounds marvelous to have as a guide. I may have to settle for the arm chair tour until I can afford the actual trip.

  73. Someday I’ll get to England!!!! The walking tour sounds marvelous to have as a guide. I may have to settle for the arm chair tour until I can afford the actual trip.

  74. Someday I’ll get to England!!!! The walking tour sounds marvelous to have as a guide. I may have to settle for the arm chair tour until I can afford the actual trip.

  75. Someday I’ll get to England!!!! The walking tour sounds marvelous to have as a guide. I may have to settle for the arm chair tour until I can afford the actual trip.

  76. I look forward to reading your book. I was frustrated when visiting London by how challenging it is to discern Regency London under all the stuff that’s happened to the city since: Victorian building boom, Blitz, etc. A good guidebook would have been invaluable. Oddly I have found Dublin, which seems to have peaked architecturally about 1800, a much better place for imagining what Georgian London must have looked and felt like.

  77. I look forward to reading your book. I was frustrated when visiting London by how challenging it is to discern Regency London under all the stuff that’s happened to the city since: Victorian building boom, Blitz, etc. A good guidebook would have been invaluable. Oddly I have found Dublin, which seems to have peaked architecturally about 1800, a much better place for imagining what Georgian London must have looked and felt like.

  78. I look forward to reading your book. I was frustrated when visiting London by how challenging it is to discern Regency London under all the stuff that’s happened to the city since: Victorian building boom, Blitz, etc. A good guidebook would have been invaluable. Oddly I have found Dublin, which seems to have peaked architecturally about 1800, a much better place for imagining what Georgian London must have looked and felt like.

  79. I look forward to reading your book. I was frustrated when visiting London by how challenging it is to discern Regency London under all the stuff that’s happened to the city since: Victorian building boom, Blitz, etc. A good guidebook would have been invaluable. Oddly I have found Dublin, which seems to have peaked architecturally about 1800, a much better place for imagining what Georgian London must have looked and felt like.

  80. I look forward to reading your book. I was frustrated when visiting London by how challenging it is to discern Regency London under all the stuff that’s happened to the city since: Victorian building boom, Blitz, etc. A good guidebook would have been invaluable. Oddly I have found Dublin, which seems to have peaked architecturally about 1800, a much better place for imagining what Georgian London must have looked and felt like.

  81. Jeri – I know just what you mean about the statue of Napoleon. I’m sure Wellington must have had a quiet smirk whenever he passed it.
    Kathleen – I must try and get to Dublin! On my list & have never made it. Sometimes it is very hard to ‘touch’ the past – I tracked down an alley where JA wrote about finding charming bonnets and found it the most squalid modern passageway 🙁

  82. Jeri – I know just what you mean about the statue of Napoleon. I’m sure Wellington must have had a quiet smirk whenever he passed it.
    Kathleen – I must try and get to Dublin! On my list & have never made it. Sometimes it is very hard to ‘touch’ the past – I tracked down an alley where JA wrote about finding charming bonnets and found it the most squalid modern passageway 🙁

  83. Jeri – I know just what you mean about the statue of Napoleon. I’m sure Wellington must have had a quiet smirk whenever he passed it.
    Kathleen – I must try and get to Dublin! On my list & have never made it. Sometimes it is very hard to ‘touch’ the past – I tracked down an alley where JA wrote about finding charming bonnets and found it the most squalid modern passageway 🙁

  84. Jeri – I know just what you mean about the statue of Napoleon. I’m sure Wellington must have had a quiet smirk whenever he passed it.
    Kathleen – I must try and get to Dublin! On my list & have never made it. Sometimes it is very hard to ‘touch’ the past – I tracked down an alley where JA wrote about finding charming bonnets and found it the most squalid modern passageway 🙁

  85. Jeri – I know just what you mean about the statue of Napoleon. I’m sure Wellington must have had a quiet smirk whenever he passed it.
    Kathleen – I must try and get to Dublin! On my list & have never made it. Sometimes it is very hard to ‘touch’ the past – I tracked down an alley where JA wrote about finding charming bonnets and found it the most squalid modern passageway 🙁

  86. What a fabulous idea for a book- will definitely be trying some of them (will just have to add another few miles to my pushchair while Baby enjoys the view!)
    Here’s an interesting tidbit for fans of Regency Architecture. The Georgian homes that skirt Regent’s Park (white painted townhouses with mews at the back were designed by famed architect John Nash (he also desinged Buckingham Palace). Take a good look at them the next time you walk by- you’ll notice on Brunswick Place that a few of the houses have decorative detail on the outside while some do not (decorative detail was not then fashionable and not in the typical Nash style). The reason for this is that Nash built no. 5 Brunswick Place for a female relative to live in… and she preferred to see a decorative building from her windows. Nash indulged her and the two homes you can see from the windows of No. 5 do indeed have decorative detailing on them.
    I’ve been lucky enough to have been inside No. 5 Brunswick place and it is beautiful (just like the view!)
    I love the regency era… can you tell?x

  87. What a fabulous idea for a book- will definitely be trying some of them (will just have to add another few miles to my pushchair while Baby enjoys the view!)
    Here’s an interesting tidbit for fans of Regency Architecture. The Georgian homes that skirt Regent’s Park (white painted townhouses with mews at the back were designed by famed architect John Nash (he also desinged Buckingham Palace). Take a good look at them the next time you walk by- you’ll notice on Brunswick Place that a few of the houses have decorative detail on the outside while some do not (decorative detail was not then fashionable and not in the typical Nash style). The reason for this is that Nash built no. 5 Brunswick Place for a female relative to live in… and she preferred to see a decorative building from her windows. Nash indulged her and the two homes you can see from the windows of No. 5 do indeed have decorative detailing on them.
    I’ve been lucky enough to have been inside No. 5 Brunswick place and it is beautiful (just like the view!)
    I love the regency era… can you tell?x

  88. What a fabulous idea for a book- will definitely be trying some of them (will just have to add another few miles to my pushchair while Baby enjoys the view!)
    Here’s an interesting tidbit for fans of Regency Architecture. The Georgian homes that skirt Regent’s Park (white painted townhouses with mews at the back were designed by famed architect John Nash (he also desinged Buckingham Palace). Take a good look at them the next time you walk by- you’ll notice on Brunswick Place that a few of the houses have decorative detail on the outside while some do not (decorative detail was not then fashionable and not in the typical Nash style). The reason for this is that Nash built no. 5 Brunswick Place for a female relative to live in… and she preferred to see a decorative building from her windows. Nash indulged her and the two homes you can see from the windows of No. 5 do indeed have decorative detailing on them.
    I’ve been lucky enough to have been inside No. 5 Brunswick place and it is beautiful (just like the view!)
    I love the regency era… can you tell?x

  89. What a fabulous idea for a book- will definitely be trying some of them (will just have to add another few miles to my pushchair while Baby enjoys the view!)
    Here’s an interesting tidbit for fans of Regency Architecture. The Georgian homes that skirt Regent’s Park (white painted townhouses with mews at the back were designed by famed architect John Nash (he also desinged Buckingham Palace). Take a good look at them the next time you walk by- you’ll notice on Brunswick Place that a few of the houses have decorative detail on the outside while some do not (decorative detail was not then fashionable and not in the typical Nash style). The reason for this is that Nash built no. 5 Brunswick Place for a female relative to live in… and she preferred to see a decorative building from her windows. Nash indulged her and the two homes you can see from the windows of No. 5 do indeed have decorative detailing on them.
    I’ve been lucky enough to have been inside No. 5 Brunswick place and it is beautiful (just like the view!)
    I love the regency era… can you tell?x

  90. What a fabulous idea for a book- will definitely be trying some of them (will just have to add another few miles to my pushchair while Baby enjoys the view!)
    Here’s an interesting tidbit for fans of Regency Architecture. The Georgian homes that skirt Regent’s Park (white painted townhouses with mews at the back were designed by famed architect John Nash (he also desinged Buckingham Palace). Take a good look at them the next time you walk by- you’ll notice on Brunswick Place that a few of the houses have decorative detail on the outside while some do not (decorative detail was not then fashionable and not in the typical Nash style). The reason for this is that Nash built no. 5 Brunswick Place for a female relative to live in… and she preferred to see a decorative building from her windows. Nash indulged her and the two homes you can see from the windows of No. 5 do indeed have decorative detailing on them.
    I’ve been lucky enough to have been inside No. 5 Brunswick place and it is beautiful (just like the view!)
    I love the regency era… can you tell?x

  91. I have only been to London a few times the last time I got lost..
    I love Jane austin and a carriage ride around London sounds perfect I wonder if mr Darcy would be there.
    I’m looking forward to your talk next week at the conference

  92. I have only been to London a few times the last time I got lost..
    I love Jane austin and a carriage ride around London sounds perfect I wonder if mr Darcy would be there.
    I’m looking forward to your talk next week at the conference

  93. I have only been to London a few times the last time I got lost..
    I love Jane austin and a carriage ride around London sounds perfect I wonder if mr Darcy would be there.
    I’m looking forward to your talk next week at the conference

  94. I have only been to London a few times the last time I got lost..
    I love Jane austin and a carriage ride around London sounds perfect I wonder if mr Darcy would be there.
    I’m looking forward to your talk next week at the conference

  95. I have only been to London a few times the last time I got lost..
    I love Jane austin and a carriage ride around London sounds perfect I wonder if mr Darcy would be there.
    I’m looking forward to your talk next week at the conference

  96. I will have to settle for armchair tour as it is unlikely I will be able to go to London anytime soon. It all sounds so very interesting, and it’s fun to read everyone’s post that has been there. I would like to be able to visit all of the sites that are in my fav genre’s storiesand that are listed here by the people that have been to visit there.
    My first choice would have to be Covent Garden though. All those clandestine meetings with shrubs and trees ohter tucked away places to duck behind for a quick make out session. LOL
    Jo i hope you and Louise and all of the other wonderful regency authors keep writing these stories forever.

  97. I will have to settle for armchair tour as it is unlikely I will be able to go to London anytime soon. It all sounds so very interesting, and it’s fun to read everyone’s post that has been there. I would like to be able to visit all of the sites that are in my fav genre’s storiesand that are listed here by the people that have been to visit there.
    My first choice would have to be Covent Garden though. All those clandestine meetings with shrubs and trees ohter tucked away places to duck behind for a quick make out session. LOL
    Jo i hope you and Louise and all of the other wonderful regency authors keep writing these stories forever.

  98. I will have to settle for armchair tour as it is unlikely I will be able to go to London anytime soon. It all sounds so very interesting, and it’s fun to read everyone’s post that has been there. I would like to be able to visit all of the sites that are in my fav genre’s storiesand that are listed here by the people that have been to visit there.
    My first choice would have to be Covent Garden though. All those clandestine meetings with shrubs and trees ohter tucked away places to duck behind for a quick make out session. LOL
    Jo i hope you and Louise and all of the other wonderful regency authors keep writing these stories forever.

  99. I will have to settle for armchair tour as it is unlikely I will be able to go to London anytime soon. It all sounds so very interesting, and it’s fun to read everyone’s post that has been there. I would like to be able to visit all of the sites that are in my fav genre’s storiesand that are listed here by the people that have been to visit there.
    My first choice would have to be Covent Garden though. All those clandestine meetings with shrubs and trees ohter tucked away places to duck behind for a quick make out session. LOL
    Jo i hope you and Louise and all of the other wonderful regency authors keep writing these stories forever.

  100. I will have to settle for armchair tour as it is unlikely I will be able to go to London anytime soon. It all sounds so very interesting, and it’s fun to read everyone’s post that has been there. I would like to be able to visit all of the sites that are in my fav genre’s storiesand that are listed here by the people that have been to visit there.
    My first choice would have to be Covent Garden though. All those clandestine meetings with shrubs and trees ohter tucked away places to duck behind for a quick make out session. LOL
    Jo i hope you and Louise and all of the other wonderful regency authors keep writing these stories forever.

  101. I adore Gunter’s Ice shop, Almack’s, Bond Street and Regent’s Park! Each of these places have such wonderful atmospheric appeal!

  102. I adore Gunter’s Ice shop, Almack’s, Bond Street and Regent’s Park! Each of these places have such wonderful atmospheric appeal!

  103. I adore Gunter’s Ice shop, Almack’s, Bond Street and Regent’s Park! Each of these places have such wonderful atmospheric appeal!

  104. I adore Gunter’s Ice shop, Almack’s, Bond Street and Regent’s Park! Each of these places have such wonderful atmospheric appeal!

  105. I adore Gunter’s Ice shop, Almack’s, Bond Street and Regent’s Park! Each of these places have such wonderful atmospheric appeal!

  106. I have yet to make it to London, but have been there vicariously thanks to Google Maps. When I realized I could see the town houses on the street where my characters lived, or glimpse 84 Charing Cross Road, I was entranced. I can’t wait to read about your travels.

  107. I have yet to make it to London, but have been there vicariously thanks to Google Maps. When I realized I could see the town houses on the street where my characters lived, or glimpse 84 Charing Cross Road, I was entranced. I can’t wait to read about your travels.

  108. I have yet to make it to London, but have been there vicariously thanks to Google Maps. When I realized I could see the town houses on the street where my characters lived, or glimpse 84 Charing Cross Road, I was entranced. I can’t wait to read about your travels.

  109. I have yet to make it to London, but have been there vicariously thanks to Google Maps. When I realized I could see the town houses on the street where my characters lived, or glimpse 84 Charing Cross Road, I was entranced. I can’t wait to read about your travels.

  110. I have yet to make it to London, but have been there vicariously thanks to Google Maps. When I realized I could see the town houses on the street where my characters lived, or glimpse 84 Charing Cross Road, I was entranced. I can’t wait to read about your travels.

  111. Aileen – nice to find another 84, Charing Cross Road fan!
    Arizona – the site of Gunther’s is now a Pret! Goodness knows what he’d have said.
    See you next week, Charlotte.
    Fascinating insight into Nash, Sharon

  112. Aileen – nice to find another 84, Charing Cross Road fan!
    Arizona – the site of Gunther’s is now a Pret! Goodness knows what he’d have said.
    See you next week, Charlotte.
    Fascinating insight into Nash, Sharon

  113. Aileen – nice to find another 84, Charing Cross Road fan!
    Arizona – the site of Gunther’s is now a Pret! Goodness knows what he’d have said.
    See you next week, Charlotte.
    Fascinating insight into Nash, Sharon

  114. Aileen – nice to find another 84, Charing Cross Road fan!
    Arizona – the site of Gunther’s is now a Pret! Goodness knows what he’d have said.
    See you next week, Charlotte.
    Fascinating insight into Nash, Sharon

  115. Aileen – nice to find another 84, Charing Cross Road fan!
    Arizona – the site of Gunther’s is now a Pret! Goodness knows what he’d have said.
    See you next week, Charlotte.
    Fascinating insight into Nash, Sharon

  116. When I went to England with my sister in 2001 one of the highlights was the Spencer House. It is the only great English townhouse to survive intact. It was only open for tours on Sunday. One room had pillars and furniture covered with gold leaf. It has become my vision of the “house in town”. The library was not as impressive. It didn’t have enough books! The house was restored to the 18th century after it was purchased in 1985.

  117. When I went to England with my sister in 2001 one of the highlights was the Spencer House. It is the only great English townhouse to survive intact. It was only open for tours on Sunday. One room had pillars and furniture covered with gold leaf. It has become my vision of the “house in town”. The library was not as impressive. It didn’t have enough books! The house was restored to the 18th century after it was purchased in 1985.

  118. When I went to England with my sister in 2001 one of the highlights was the Spencer House. It is the only great English townhouse to survive intact. It was only open for tours on Sunday. One room had pillars and furniture covered with gold leaf. It has become my vision of the “house in town”. The library was not as impressive. It didn’t have enough books! The house was restored to the 18th century after it was purchased in 1985.

  119. When I went to England with my sister in 2001 one of the highlights was the Spencer House. It is the only great English townhouse to survive intact. It was only open for tours on Sunday. One room had pillars and furniture covered with gold leaf. It has become my vision of the “house in town”. The library was not as impressive. It didn’t have enough books! The house was restored to the 18th century after it was purchased in 1985.

  120. When I went to England with my sister in 2001 one of the highlights was the Spencer House. It is the only great English townhouse to survive intact. It was only open for tours on Sunday. One room had pillars and furniture covered with gold leaf. It has become my vision of the “house in town”. The library was not as impressive. It didn’t have enough books! The house was restored to the 18th century after it was purchased in 1985.

  121. Lovely to see you here again at the Wenches, Louise! Like Jeri I love Apsley House, the Duke of Wellington’s town house. Just the address of Number 1 London makes me smile.
    I’m looking forward to walking some of Jane Austen’s London in company with your book (and wearing a pair of comfortable shoes!) when next I visit.

  122. Lovely to see you here again at the Wenches, Louise! Like Jeri I love Apsley House, the Duke of Wellington’s town house. Just the address of Number 1 London makes me smile.
    I’m looking forward to walking some of Jane Austen’s London in company with your book (and wearing a pair of comfortable shoes!) when next I visit.

  123. Lovely to see you here again at the Wenches, Louise! Like Jeri I love Apsley House, the Duke of Wellington’s town house. Just the address of Number 1 London makes me smile.
    I’m looking forward to walking some of Jane Austen’s London in company with your book (and wearing a pair of comfortable shoes!) when next I visit.

  124. Lovely to see you here again at the Wenches, Louise! Like Jeri I love Apsley House, the Duke of Wellington’s town house. Just the address of Number 1 London makes me smile.
    I’m looking forward to walking some of Jane Austen’s London in company with your book (and wearing a pair of comfortable shoes!) when next I visit.

  125. Lovely to see you here again at the Wenches, Louise! Like Jeri I love Apsley House, the Duke of Wellington’s town house. Just the address of Number 1 London makes me smile.
    I’m looking forward to walking some of Jane Austen’s London in company with your book (and wearing a pair of comfortable shoes!) when next I visit.

  126. I was stationed at RAF Lakenheath in Suffolk, England for almost five years. When I lived there I had no idea I would want to write books set in the Regency era so I didn’t know a lot about some of the iconic places in London that were so important in the era. I visited Piccadilly several times but never even saw Hatchard’s. I will definitely buy Louise’s book!

  127. I was stationed at RAF Lakenheath in Suffolk, England for almost five years. When I lived there I had no idea I would want to write books set in the Regency era so I didn’t know a lot about some of the iconic places in London that were so important in the era. I visited Piccadilly several times but never even saw Hatchard’s. I will definitely buy Louise’s book!

  128. I was stationed at RAF Lakenheath in Suffolk, England for almost five years. When I lived there I had no idea I would want to write books set in the Regency era so I didn’t know a lot about some of the iconic places in London that were so important in the era. I visited Piccadilly several times but never even saw Hatchard’s. I will definitely buy Louise’s book!

  129. I was stationed at RAF Lakenheath in Suffolk, England for almost five years. When I lived there I had no idea I would want to write books set in the Regency era so I didn’t know a lot about some of the iconic places in London that were so important in the era. I visited Piccadilly several times but never even saw Hatchard’s. I will definitely buy Louise’s book!

  130. I was stationed at RAF Lakenheath in Suffolk, England for almost five years. When I lived there I had no idea I would want to write books set in the Regency era so I didn’t know a lot about some of the iconic places in London that were so important in the era. I visited Piccadilly several times but never even saw Hatchard’s. I will definitely buy Louise’s book!

  131. What a lovely book, Louise! No 1 London is one Regency favourite, and I love to walk down St Jermyn Street and imagine the Regency ladies and especially the gentlemen shopping there. But the street which always makes me think of Georgette Heyer’s Sophy and numerous Regency heroes is St James’s Street (which Jermyn Street is off) with its gentlemen’s clubs!

  132. What a lovely book, Louise! No 1 London is one Regency favourite, and I love to walk down St Jermyn Street and imagine the Regency ladies and especially the gentlemen shopping there. But the street which always makes me think of Georgette Heyer’s Sophy and numerous Regency heroes is St James’s Street (which Jermyn Street is off) with its gentlemen’s clubs!

  133. What a lovely book, Louise! No 1 London is one Regency favourite, and I love to walk down St Jermyn Street and imagine the Regency ladies and especially the gentlemen shopping there. But the street which always makes me think of Georgette Heyer’s Sophy and numerous Regency heroes is St James’s Street (which Jermyn Street is off) with its gentlemen’s clubs!

  134. What a lovely book, Louise! No 1 London is one Regency favourite, and I love to walk down St Jermyn Street and imagine the Regency ladies and especially the gentlemen shopping there. But the street which always makes me think of Georgette Heyer’s Sophy and numerous Regency heroes is St James’s Street (which Jermyn Street is off) with its gentlemen’s clubs!

  135. What a lovely book, Louise! No 1 London is one Regency favourite, and I love to walk down St Jermyn Street and imagine the Regency ladies and especially the gentlemen shopping there. But the street which always makes me think of Georgette Heyer’s Sophy and numerous Regency heroes is St James’s Street (which Jermyn Street is off) with its gentlemen’s clubs!

  136. Yes, I’ve visited London, but I was only twelve at the time, so had not yet developed my lifelong obsession with the Regency era! I wish I could go back now . . . .

  137. Yes, I’ve visited London, but I was only twelve at the time, so had not yet developed my lifelong obsession with the Regency era! I wish I could go back now . . . .

  138. Yes, I’ve visited London, but I was only twelve at the time, so had not yet developed my lifelong obsession with the Regency era! I wish I could go back now . . . .

  139. Yes, I’ve visited London, but I was only twelve at the time, so had not yet developed my lifelong obsession with the Regency era! I wish I could go back now . . . .

  140. Yes, I’ve visited London, but I was only twelve at the time, so had not yet developed my lifelong obsession with the Regency era! I wish I could go back now . . . .

  141. would love to win this book am planning to travel to London again in 2014 and this would be an amazing adventure to take with Jane Austen.

  142. would love to win this book am planning to travel to London again in 2014 and this would be an amazing adventure to take with Jane Austen.

  143. would love to win this book am planning to travel to London again in 2014 and this would be an amazing adventure to take with Jane Austen.

  144. would love to win this book am planning to travel to London again in 2014 and this would be an amazing adventure to take with Jane Austen.

  145. would love to win this book am planning to travel to London again in 2014 and this would be an amazing adventure to take with Jane Austen.

  146. I thought Spencer House was wonderful too, Mary and I’d agree with the comfortable shoes, Nicola!
    I pass RAF Lakenheath frequently, Angelina -amazing how many people I meet who know it. HJ – St James’s Street& the area around it is one of my favourite Regency hot-spots. Hope you make it back soon, Jane – and have a wonderful trip next year, Deborah!

  147. I thought Spencer House was wonderful too, Mary and I’d agree with the comfortable shoes, Nicola!
    I pass RAF Lakenheath frequently, Angelina -amazing how many people I meet who know it. HJ – St James’s Street& the area around it is one of my favourite Regency hot-spots. Hope you make it back soon, Jane – and have a wonderful trip next year, Deborah!

  148. I thought Spencer House was wonderful too, Mary and I’d agree with the comfortable shoes, Nicola!
    I pass RAF Lakenheath frequently, Angelina -amazing how many people I meet who know it. HJ – St James’s Street& the area around it is one of my favourite Regency hot-spots. Hope you make it back soon, Jane – and have a wonderful trip next year, Deborah!

  149. I thought Spencer House was wonderful too, Mary and I’d agree with the comfortable shoes, Nicola!
    I pass RAF Lakenheath frequently, Angelina -amazing how many people I meet who know it. HJ – St James’s Street& the area around it is one of my favourite Regency hot-spots. Hope you make it back soon, Jane – and have a wonderful trip next year, Deborah!

  150. I thought Spencer House was wonderful too, Mary and I’d agree with the comfortable shoes, Nicola!
    I pass RAF Lakenheath frequently, Angelina -amazing how many people I meet who know it. HJ – St James’s Street& the area around it is one of my favourite Regency hot-spots. Hope you make it back soon, Jane – and have a wonderful trip next year, Deborah!

  151. I’ve loved visiting London and would adore another trip there. This book sounds simply fascinating!

  152. I’ve loved visiting London and would adore another trip there. This book sounds simply fascinating!

  153. I’ve loved visiting London and would adore another trip there. This book sounds simply fascinating!

  154. I’ve loved visiting London and would adore another trip there. This book sounds simply fascinating!

  155. I’ve loved visiting London and would adore another trip there. This book sounds simply fascinating!

  156. This book sounds captivating and special. Visiting London is always wonderful and enthralling.

  157. This book sounds captivating and special. Visiting London is always wonderful and enthralling.

  158. This book sounds captivating and special. Visiting London is always wonderful and enthralling.

  159. This book sounds captivating and special. Visiting London is always wonderful and enthralling.

  160. This book sounds captivating and special. Visiting London is always wonderful and enthralling.

  161. I have never visited London, but have lived it through historical books. I think I would like to visit Rotten Row, Covent Garden, and Wellington’s house.

  162. I have never visited London, but have lived it through historical books. I think I would like to visit Rotten Row, Covent Garden, and Wellington’s house.

  163. I have never visited London, but have lived it through historical books. I think I would like to visit Rotten Row, Covent Garden, and Wellington’s house.

  164. I have never visited London, but have lived it through historical books. I think I would like to visit Rotten Row, Covent Garden, and Wellington’s house.

  165. I have never visited London, but have lived it through historical books. I think I would like to visit Rotten Row, Covent Garden, and Wellington’s house.

  166. This book sounds like a “must have” to me, Louise! I have never been to London, but would love to. Maybe someday… As a big fan of nature and gardening, I’d look forward to the parks and gardens the most. Museums would be a close second. Thanks for stopping by.

  167. This book sounds like a “must have” to me, Louise! I have never been to London, but would love to. Maybe someday… As a big fan of nature and gardening, I’d look forward to the parks and gardens the most. Museums would be a close second. Thanks for stopping by.

  168. This book sounds like a “must have” to me, Louise! I have never been to London, but would love to. Maybe someday… As a big fan of nature and gardening, I’d look forward to the parks and gardens the most. Museums would be a close second. Thanks for stopping by.

  169. This book sounds like a “must have” to me, Louise! I have never been to London, but would love to. Maybe someday… As a big fan of nature and gardening, I’d look forward to the parks and gardens the most. Museums would be a close second. Thanks for stopping by.

  170. This book sounds like a “must have” to me, Louise! I have never been to London, but would love to. Maybe someday… As a big fan of nature and gardening, I’d look forward to the parks and gardens the most. Museums would be a close second. Thanks for stopping by.

  171. I lived and worked in London for 2 years, around 1970. I was a young American and so excited to be living in England. The area I knew best, where I lived and got married, was Islington/Highbury, which, I think, would have been separate villages back in Jane Austen’s time. I loved wandering the streets there.
    Since I did not start reading historical romance until many years later, I realize I missed seeing many areas that I would love to explore now. I think this calls for planning a new trip!! I have not been to London for many years –it is time for a return, and I will definitely take this book with me.

  172. I lived and worked in London for 2 years, around 1970. I was a young American and so excited to be living in England. The area I knew best, where I lived and got married, was Islington/Highbury, which, I think, would have been separate villages back in Jane Austen’s time. I loved wandering the streets there.
    Since I did not start reading historical romance until many years later, I realize I missed seeing many areas that I would love to explore now. I think this calls for planning a new trip!! I have not been to London for many years –it is time for a return, and I will definitely take this book with me.

  173. I lived and worked in London for 2 years, around 1970. I was a young American and so excited to be living in England. The area I knew best, where I lived and got married, was Islington/Highbury, which, I think, would have been separate villages back in Jane Austen’s time. I loved wandering the streets there.
    Since I did not start reading historical romance until many years later, I realize I missed seeing many areas that I would love to explore now. I think this calls for planning a new trip!! I have not been to London for many years –it is time for a return, and I will definitely take this book with me.

  174. I lived and worked in London for 2 years, around 1970. I was a young American and so excited to be living in England. The area I knew best, where I lived and got married, was Islington/Highbury, which, I think, would have been separate villages back in Jane Austen’s time. I loved wandering the streets there.
    Since I did not start reading historical romance until many years later, I realize I missed seeing many areas that I would love to explore now. I think this calls for planning a new trip!! I have not been to London for many years –it is time for a return, and I will definitely take this book with me.

  175. I lived and worked in London for 2 years, around 1970. I was a young American and so excited to be living in England. The area I knew best, where I lived and got married, was Islington/Highbury, which, I think, would have been separate villages back in Jane Austen’s time. I loved wandering the streets there.
    Since I did not start reading historical romance until many years later, I realize I missed seeing many areas that I would love to explore now. I think this calls for planning a new trip!! I have not been to London for many years –it is time for a return, and I will definitely take this book with me.

  176. What a wonderful book idea! I wish I lived closer so that I could try all the walks. A small ocean in the way.
    I was going to say I really enjoyed the Serpentine the one time I was in London, but like another commenter I was also fascinated by Hatchards. I felt silly bringing home more books than any other souvenir, but I was pretty pleased with myself to have scored ones that didn’t come into print in the U.S.

  177. What a wonderful book idea! I wish I lived closer so that I could try all the walks. A small ocean in the way.
    I was going to say I really enjoyed the Serpentine the one time I was in London, but like another commenter I was also fascinated by Hatchards. I felt silly bringing home more books than any other souvenir, but I was pretty pleased with myself to have scored ones that didn’t come into print in the U.S.

  178. What a wonderful book idea! I wish I lived closer so that I could try all the walks. A small ocean in the way.
    I was going to say I really enjoyed the Serpentine the one time I was in London, but like another commenter I was also fascinated by Hatchards. I felt silly bringing home more books than any other souvenir, but I was pretty pleased with myself to have scored ones that didn’t come into print in the U.S.

  179. What a wonderful book idea! I wish I lived closer so that I could try all the walks. A small ocean in the way.
    I was going to say I really enjoyed the Serpentine the one time I was in London, but like another commenter I was also fascinated by Hatchards. I felt silly bringing home more books than any other souvenir, but I was pretty pleased with myself to have scored ones that didn’t come into print in the U.S.

  180. What a wonderful book idea! I wish I lived closer so that I could try all the walks. A small ocean in the way.
    I was going to say I really enjoyed the Serpentine the one time I was in London, but like another commenter I was also fascinated by Hatchards. I felt silly bringing home more books than any other souvenir, but I was pretty pleased with myself to have scored ones that didn’t come into print in the U.S.

  181. Thanks for the post, Louise. Your book sounds fascinating and I think it would be a lovely companion to take on a trip to London. So many great places to visit there; I love Wellington’s house and it’s got such a fabulous address too! Another favourite is the Sir John Soane Museum, partly because Sir John always seems to me to have collected exactly the kind of things I imagine a cultured Regency gentleman would have bought if he could.

  182. Thanks for the post, Louise. Your book sounds fascinating and I think it would be a lovely companion to take on a trip to London. So many great places to visit there; I love Wellington’s house and it’s got such a fabulous address too! Another favourite is the Sir John Soane Museum, partly because Sir John always seems to me to have collected exactly the kind of things I imagine a cultured Regency gentleman would have bought if he could.

  183. Thanks for the post, Louise. Your book sounds fascinating and I think it would be a lovely companion to take on a trip to London. So many great places to visit there; I love Wellington’s house and it’s got such a fabulous address too! Another favourite is the Sir John Soane Museum, partly because Sir John always seems to me to have collected exactly the kind of things I imagine a cultured Regency gentleman would have bought if he could.

  184. Thanks for the post, Louise. Your book sounds fascinating and I think it would be a lovely companion to take on a trip to London. So many great places to visit there; I love Wellington’s house and it’s got such a fabulous address too! Another favourite is the Sir John Soane Museum, partly because Sir John always seems to me to have collected exactly the kind of things I imagine a cultured Regency gentleman would have bought if he could.

  185. Thanks for the post, Louise. Your book sounds fascinating and I think it would be a lovely companion to take on a trip to London. So many great places to visit there; I love Wellington’s house and it’s got such a fabulous address too! Another favourite is the Sir John Soane Museum, partly because Sir John always seems to me to have collected exactly the kind of things I imagine a cultured Regency gentleman would have bought if he could.

  186. The book sounds amazing and a must have. I’ve never been to England but with retirement only a year off we’ve already begun to plan several weeks in England mostly in and around London. I’m looking forward to, well, everything!

  187. The book sounds amazing and a must have. I’ve never been to England but with retirement only a year off we’ve already begun to plan several weeks in England mostly in and around London. I’m looking forward to, well, everything!

  188. The book sounds amazing and a must have. I’ve never been to England but with retirement only a year off we’ve already begun to plan several weeks in England mostly in and around London. I’m looking forward to, well, everything!

  189. The book sounds amazing and a must have. I’ve never been to England but with retirement only a year off we’ve already begun to plan several weeks in England mostly in and around London. I’m looking forward to, well, everything!

  190. The book sounds amazing and a must have. I’ve never been to England but with retirement only a year off we’ve already begun to plan several weeks in England mostly in and around London. I’m looking forward to, well, everything!

  191. I love the Soane Museum too, Gail. Sir John actually features in Regency Rumours: Scandal Comes to Wimpole Park, which is out in the UK in August, US September. Viki – have a wonderful time planning your retirement activities! Hatchards Is great, I agree, Wynne – and right opposite that Regency hotspot, Albany, where Georgette Heyer lived.

  192. I love the Soane Museum too, Gail. Sir John actually features in Regency Rumours: Scandal Comes to Wimpole Park, which is out in the UK in August, US September. Viki – have a wonderful time planning your retirement activities! Hatchards Is great, I agree, Wynne – and right opposite that Regency hotspot, Albany, where Georgette Heyer lived.

  193. I love the Soane Museum too, Gail. Sir John actually features in Regency Rumours: Scandal Comes to Wimpole Park, which is out in the UK in August, US September. Viki – have a wonderful time planning your retirement activities! Hatchards Is great, I agree, Wynne – and right opposite that Regency hotspot, Albany, where Georgette Heyer lived.

  194. I love the Soane Museum too, Gail. Sir John actually features in Regency Rumours: Scandal Comes to Wimpole Park, which is out in the UK in August, US September. Viki – have a wonderful time planning your retirement activities! Hatchards Is great, I agree, Wynne – and right opposite that Regency hotspot, Albany, where Georgette Heyer lived.

  195. I love the Soane Museum too, Gail. Sir John actually features in Regency Rumours: Scandal Comes to Wimpole Park, which is out in the UK in August, US September. Viki – have a wonderful time planning your retirement activities! Hatchards Is great, I agree, Wynne – and right opposite that Regency hotspot, Albany, where Georgette Heyer lived.

  196. Oh dear! Late to the party, but I had to stop by and say I cannot wait to get my hands on this books. I spent a great deal of time in London between the ages of 9 and 12 as we lived in England and the trip wasn’t far by train. (I lived in Suffolk.) I visited again for a few weeks when I was in college.
    The British Museum and the National Gallery were two of my favorite spots then. I spent hours and hours in the museum when I was a child. And I loved the Tower of London – especially the Armory.
    I want so much to return and see the Soane Musuem, Hatchard’s and all of the places so connected to the Regency.

  197. Oh dear! Late to the party, but I had to stop by and say I cannot wait to get my hands on this books. I spent a great deal of time in London between the ages of 9 and 12 as we lived in England and the trip wasn’t far by train. (I lived in Suffolk.) I visited again for a few weeks when I was in college.
    The British Museum and the National Gallery were two of my favorite spots then. I spent hours and hours in the museum when I was a child. And I loved the Tower of London – especially the Armory.
    I want so much to return and see the Soane Musuem, Hatchard’s and all of the places so connected to the Regency.

  198. Oh dear! Late to the party, but I had to stop by and say I cannot wait to get my hands on this books. I spent a great deal of time in London between the ages of 9 and 12 as we lived in England and the trip wasn’t far by train. (I lived in Suffolk.) I visited again for a few weeks when I was in college.
    The British Museum and the National Gallery were two of my favorite spots then. I spent hours and hours in the museum when I was a child. And I loved the Tower of London – especially the Armory.
    I want so much to return and see the Soane Musuem, Hatchard’s and all of the places so connected to the Regency.

  199. Oh dear! Late to the party, but I had to stop by and say I cannot wait to get my hands on this books. I spent a great deal of time in London between the ages of 9 and 12 as we lived in England and the trip wasn’t far by train. (I lived in Suffolk.) I visited again for a few weeks when I was in college.
    The British Museum and the National Gallery were two of my favorite spots then. I spent hours and hours in the museum when I was a child. And I loved the Tower of London – especially the Armory.
    I want so much to return and see the Soane Musuem, Hatchard’s and all of the places so connected to the Regency.

  200. Oh dear! Late to the party, but I had to stop by and say I cannot wait to get my hands on this books. I spent a great deal of time in London between the ages of 9 and 12 as we lived in England and the trip wasn’t far by train. (I lived in Suffolk.) I visited again for a few weeks when I was in college.
    The British Museum and the National Gallery were two of my favorite spots then. I spent hours and hours in the museum when I was a child. And I loved the Tower of London – especially the Armory.
    I want so much to return and see the Soane Musuem, Hatchard’s and all of the places so connected to the Regency.

  201. I had the opportunity to be in a London for a few days. It was not enough time, but I was able to go to Mayfair and Hyde Park. I would love to go back and visit cheapside.

  202. I had the opportunity to be in a London for a few days. It was not enough time, but I was able to go to Mayfair and Hyde Park. I would love to go back and visit cheapside.

  203. I had the opportunity to be in a London for a few days. It was not enough time, but I was able to go to Mayfair and Hyde Park. I would love to go back and visit cheapside.

  204. I had the opportunity to be in a London for a few days. It was not enough time, but I was able to go to Mayfair and Hyde Park. I would love to go back and visit cheapside.

  205. I had the opportunity to be in a London for a few days. It was not enough time, but I was able to go to Mayfair and Hyde Park. I would love to go back and visit cheapside.

  206. There are still sooo many places I want to see in London that it will take me another 30 years.
    I was awe-struck by the old shops still selling stock in Jermyn Street amidst the more modern and very expensive ones. The back room of the perfume and soap shop has wonderful glass cases full of history, including letters from royalty to whom they provided products.

  207. There are still sooo many places I want to see in London that it will take me another 30 years.
    I was awe-struck by the old shops still selling stock in Jermyn Street amidst the more modern and very expensive ones. The back room of the perfume and soap shop has wonderful glass cases full of history, including letters from royalty to whom they provided products.

  208. There are still sooo many places I want to see in London that it will take me another 30 years.
    I was awe-struck by the old shops still selling stock in Jermyn Street amidst the more modern and very expensive ones. The back room of the perfume and soap shop has wonderful glass cases full of history, including letters from royalty to whom they provided products.

  209. There are still sooo many places I want to see in London that it will take me another 30 years.
    I was awe-struck by the old shops still selling stock in Jermyn Street amidst the more modern and very expensive ones. The back room of the perfume and soap shop has wonderful glass cases full of history, including letters from royalty to whom they provided products.

  210. There are still sooo many places I want to see in London that it will take me another 30 years.
    I was awe-struck by the old shops still selling stock in Jermyn Street amidst the more modern and very expensive ones. The back room of the perfume and soap shop has wonderful glass cases full of history, including letters from royalty to whom they provided products.

  211. I first visited London in 2000, and I am about to visit again in September. I have a ton of things on my list of things to do, but I’ll be sure to leave an afternoon to wander around Mayfair and all those famous addresses we encounter in Regency fiction. Perhaps if my current WIP is published I can claim the trip as tax deductable 😉

  212. I first visited London in 2000, and I am about to visit again in September. I have a ton of things on my list of things to do, but I’ll be sure to leave an afternoon to wander around Mayfair and all those famous addresses we encounter in Regency fiction. Perhaps if my current WIP is published I can claim the trip as tax deductable 😉

  213. I first visited London in 2000, and I am about to visit again in September. I have a ton of things on my list of things to do, but I’ll be sure to leave an afternoon to wander around Mayfair and all those famous addresses we encounter in Regency fiction. Perhaps if my current WIP is published I can claim the trip as tax deductable 😉

  214. I first visited London in 2000, and I am about to visit again in September. I have a ton of things on my list of things to do, but I’ll be sure to leave an afternoon to wander around Mayfair and all those famous addresses we encounter in Regency fiction. Perhaps if my current WIP is published I can claim the trip as tax deductable 😉

  215. I first visited London in 2000, and I am about to visit again in September. I have a ton of things on my list of things to do, but I’ll be sure to leave an afternoon to wander around Mayfair and all those famous addresses we encounter in Regency fiction. Perhaps if my current WIP is published I can claim the trip as tax deductable 😉

  216. We Re headed there this year in the Fall promted by the@ClaireCookwrite Austen’s celebration. This book is like a dream come true and for once I am at the right time in the right place.
    For me the rooms of people’s homes are among my favorite fictional locations in those books I have read. Of course these are impossible to recreate but the descriptions and conversations are always like a character for me.

  217. We Re headed there this year in the Fall promted by the@ClaireCookwrite Austen’s celebration. This book is like a dream come true and for once I am at the right time in the right place.
    For me the rooms of people’s homes are among my favorite fictional locations in those books I have read. Of course these are impossible to recreate but the descriptions and conversations are always like a character for me.

  218. We Re headed there this year in the Fall promted by the@ClaireCookwrite Austen’s celebration. This book is like a dream come true and for once I am at the right time in the right place.
    For me the rooms of people’s homes are among my favorite fictional locations in those books I have read. Of course these are impossible to recreate but the descriptions and conversations are always like a character for me.

  219. We Re headed there this year in the Fall promted by the@ClaireCookwrite Austen’s celebration. This book is like a dream come true and for once I am at the right time in the right place.
    For me the rooms of people’s homes are among my favorite fictional locations in those books I have read. Of course these are impossible to recreate but the descriptions and conversations are always like a character for me.

  220. We Re headed there this year in the Fall promted by the@ClaireCookwrite Austen’s celebration. This book is like a dream come true and for once I am at the right time in the right place.
    For me the rooms of people’s homes are among my favorite fictional locations in those books I have read. Of course these are impossible to recreate but the descriptions and conversations are always like a character for me.

  221. Louise, what a wonderful book. The last time I was in London, I did the Mayfair Walk offered by London Walks and totally loved it. I took copious notes and photographs even as my feet walked and my eyes up and ahead. I was greatly multitasking. 🙂 Looking forward to reading about your different walks.
    PS: Harl Hist does such fabulous covers! Your Indian book is case in point. Utterly gorgeous!

  222. Louise, what a wonderful book. The last time I was in London, I did the Mayfair Walk offered by London Walks and totally loved it. I took copious notes and photographs even as my feet walked and my eyes up and ahead. I was greatly multitasking. 🙂 Looking forward to reading about your different walks.
    PS: Harl Hist does such fabulous covers! Your Indian book is case in point. Utterly gorgeous!

  223. Louise, what a wonderful book. The last time I was in London, I did the Mayfair Walk offered by London Walks and totally loved it. I took copious notes and photographs even as my feet walked and my eyes up and ahead. I was greatly multitasking. 🙂 Looking forward to reading about your different walks.
    PS: Harl Hist does such fabulous covers! Your Indian book is case in point. Utterly gorgeous!

  224. Louise, what a wonderful book. The last time I was in London, I did the Mayfair Walk offered by London Walks and totally loved it. I took copious notes and photographs even as my feet walked and my eyes up and ahead. I was greatly multitasking. 🙂 Looking forward to reading about your different walks.
    PS: Harl Hist does such fabulous covers! Your Indian book is case in point. Utterly gorgeous!

  225. Louise, what a wonderful book. The last time I was in London, I did the Mayfair Walk offered by London Walks and totally loved it. I took copious notes and photographs even as my feet walked and my eyes up and ahead. I was greatly multitasking. 🙂 Looking forward to reading about your different walks.
    PS: Harl Hist does such fabulous covers! Your Indian book is case in point. Utterly gorgeous!

  226. I can’t wait to put my hands on this book. Thanks for sharing it with us here and also on your blog. You transport me to my happy place and time – a double treat!

  227. I can’t wait to put my hands on this book. Thanks for sharing it with us here and also on your blog. You transport me to my happy place and time – a double treat!

  228. I can’t wait to put my hands on this book. Thanks for sharing it with us here and also on your blog. You transport me to my happy place and time – a double treat!

  229. I can’t wait to put my hands on this book. Thanks for sharing it with us here and also on your blog. You transport me to my happy place and time – a double treat!

  230. I can’t wait to put my hands on this book. Thanks for sharing it with us here and also on your blog. You transport me to my happy place and time – a double treat!

  231. I love to o to Fortum and Mason for tea whenever I am lucky enough to visit London! The book looks fantastic! Thanks for the opportunity to win 😀

  232. I love to o to Fortum and Mason for tea whenever I am lucky enough to visit London! The book looks fantastic! Thanks for the opportunity to win 😀

  233. I love to o to Fortum and Mason for tea whenever I am lucky enough to visit London! The book looks fantastic! Thanks for the opportunity to win 😀

  234. I love to o to Fortum and Mason for tea whenever I am lucky enough to visit London! The book looks fantastic! Thanks for the opportunity to win 😀

  235. I love to o to Fortum and Mason for tea whenever I am lucky enough to visit London! The book looks fantastic! Thanks for the opportunity to win 😀

  236. Hallo, Hallo, who can pass up an entry on Jane Austen ! Daresay, not I! Not a self-professed Janeite! Laughs.
    Did anyone else have trouble with the link? I finally made it through but I had to bing it to find: janeaustenslondon.com?! Aye! It was listed at the bottom of the post! 🙂
    Ms. Allen,
    What was one of their first inclinations to say to you and your husband after having learnt the date of the book and map? You perked my curiosity!?
    You and I share a similiar fascination with “worlds on the cusps”,…my great-grandmother lived a foothold in the 19th century and secured a step into the 20th, I oft wish I could have asked her more about that, as I was a trife too young at her passing to be as enthused about history as I am today.
    I have dreamt of visiting London for so very long, that I am not sure where I’d lay my hat first! I have a very dear friend there as well, so of course my heart pulls me in her direction *first!* prior to venturing out and seeing the lay of things! I wish I could be much more specific, but I can say, I am always wrapped up in London from one century or another! My reading habits take me there quite often indeed!!
    I am afraid all the locations are a bit muddled in my mind, as it’s been a bit since I last read a London set novel!! Oy. Although, like many readers of this blog, I always have a ‘few’ (grins) on my need-to-read list!! 🙂 🙂
    The Olympics hosted by London last summer were amongst my most beloved!! {Vancouver, Beijing, Nagano in close second!} Actually, it was due to the Olympics that I learnt more about where my friend lives in connection to London proper, and of course, I must say, the Royal Wedding of Prince William and Kate had me in sheer awe of the streets and locales that populate the Royals. I inherited my appreciation for the Royals from my parents, you see. And, my love of England is in me bones, as I am a Brit by heritage nearly thriceover! 🙂
    I am signing up for her newsletter, I am that excited about this book! 🙂

  237. Hallo, Hallo, who can pass up an entry on Jane Austen ! Daresay, not I! Not a self-professed Janeite! Laughs.
    Did anyone else have trouble with the link? I finally made it through but I had to bing it to find: janeaustenslondon.com?! Aye! It was listed at the bottom of the post! 🙂
    Ms. Allen,
    What was one of their first inclinations to say to you and your husband after having learnt the date of the book and map? You perked my curiosity!?
    You and I share a similiar fascination with “worlds on the cusps”,…my great-grandmother lived a foothold in the 19th century and secured a step into the 20th, I oft wish I could have asked her more about that, as I was a trife too young at her passing to be as enthused about history as I am today.
    I have dreamt of visiting London for so very long, that I am not sure where I’d lay my hat first! I have a very dear friend there as well, so of course my heart pulls me in her direction *first!* prior to venturing out and seeing the lay of things! I wish I could be much more specific, but I can say, I am always wrapped up in London from one century or another! My reading habits take me there quite often indeed!!
    I am afraid all the locations are a bit muddled in my mind, as it’s been a bit since I last read a London set novel!! Oy. Although, like many readers of this blog, I always have a ‘few’ (grins) on my need-to-read list!! 🙂 🙂
    The Olympics hosted by London last summer were amongst my most beloved!! {Vancouver, Beijing, Nagano in close second!} Actually, it was due to the Olympics that I learnt more about where my friend lives in connection to London proper, and of course, I must say, the Royal Wedding of Prince William and Kate had me in sheer awe of the streets and locales that populate the Royals. I inherited my appreciation for the Royals from my parents, you see. And, my love of England is in me bones, as I am a Brit by heritage nearly thriceover! 🙂
    I am signing up for her newsletter, I am that excited about this book! 🙂

  238. Hallo, Hallo, who can pass up an entry on Jane Austen ! Daresay, not I! Not a self-professed Janeite! Laughs.
    Did anyone else have trouble with the link? I finally made it through but I had to bing it to find: janeaustenslondon.com?! Aye! It was listed at the bottom of the post! 🙂
    Ms. Allen,
    What was one of their first inclinations to say to you and your husband after having learnt the date of the book and map? You perked my curiosity!?
    You and I share a similiar fascination with “worlds on the cusps”,…my great-grandmother lived a foothold in the 19th century and secured a step into the 20th, I oft wish I could have asked her more about that, as I was a trife too young at her passing to be as enthused about history as I am today.
    I have dreamt of visiting London for so very long, that I am not sure where I’d lay my hat first! I have a very dear friend there as well, so of course my heart pulls me in her direction *first!* prior to venturing out and seeing the lay of things! I wish I could be much more specific, but I can say, I am always wrapped up in London from one century or another! My reading habits take me there quite often indeed!!
    I am afraid all the locations are a bit muddled in my mind, as it’s been a bit since I last read a London set novel!! Oy. Although, like many readers of this blog, I always have a ‘few’ (grins) on my need-to-read list!! 🙂 🙂
    The Olympics hosted by London last summer were amongst my most beloved!! {Vancouver, Beijing, Nagano in close second!} Actually, it was due to the Olympics that I learnt more about where my friend lives in connection to London proper, and of course, I must say, the Royal Wedding of Prince William and Kate had me in sheer awe of the streets and locales that populate the Royals. I inherited my appreciation for the Royals from my parents, you see. And, my love of England is in me bones, as I am a Brit by heritage nearly thriceover! 🙂
    I am signing up for her newsletter, I am that excited about this book! 🙂

  239. Hallo, Hallo, who can pass up an entry on Jane Austen ! Daresay, not I! Not a self-professed Janeite! Laughs.
    Did anyone else have trouble with the link? I finally made it through but I had to bing it to find: janeaustenslondon.com?! Aye! It was listed at the bottom of the post! 🙂
    Ms. Allen,
    What was one of their first inclinations to say to you and your husband after having learnt the date of the book and map? You perked my curiosity!?
    You and I share a similiar fascination with “worlds on the cusps”,…my great-grandmother lived a foothold in the 19th century and secured a step into the 20th, I oft wish I could have asked her more about that, as I was a trife too young at her passing to be as enthused about history as I am today.
    I have dreamt of visiting London for so very long, that I am not sure where I’d lay my hat first! I have a very dear friend there as well, so of course my heart pulls me in her direction *first!* prior to venturing out and seeing the lay of things! I wish I could be much more specific, but I can say, I am always wrapped up in London from one century or another! My reading habits take me there quite often indeed!!
    I am afraid all the locations are a bit muddled in my mind, as it’s been a bit since I last read a London set novel!! Oy. Although, like many readers of this blog, I always have a ‘few’ (grins) on my need-to-read list!! 🙂 🙂
    The Olympics hosted by London last summer were amongst my most beloved!! {Vancouver, Beijing, Nagano in close second!} Actually, it was due to the Olympics that I learnt more about where my friend lives in connection to London proper, and of course, I must say, the Royal Wedding of Prince William and Kate had me in sheer awe of the streets and locales that populate the Royals. I inherited my appreciation for the Royals from my parents, you see. And, my love of England is in me bones, as I am a Brit by heritage nearly thriceover! 🙂
    I am signing up for her newsletter, I am that excited about this book! 🙂

  240. Hallo, Hallo, who can pass up an entry on Jane Austen ! Daresay, not I! Not a self-professed Janeite! Laughs.
    Did anyone else have trouble with the link? I finally made it through but I had to bing it to find: janeaustenslondon.com?! Aye! It was listed at the bottom of the post! 🙂
    Ms. Allen,
    What was one of their first inclinations to say to you and your husband after having learnt the date of the book and map? You perked my curiosity!?
    You and I share a similiar fascination with “worlds on the cusps”,…my great-grandmother lived a foothold in the 19th century and secured a step into the 20th, I oft wish I could have asked her more about that, as I was a trife too young at her passing to be as enthused about history as I am today.
    I have dreamt of visiting London for so very long, that I am not sure where I’d lay my hat first! I have a very dear friend there as well, so of course my heart pulls me in her direction *first!* prior to venturing out and seeing the lay of things! I wish I could be much more specific, but I can say, I am always wrapped up in London from one century or another! My reading habits take me there quite often indeed!!
    I am afraid all the locations are a bit muddled in my mind, as it’s been a bit since I last read a London set novel!! Oy. Although, like many readers of this blog, I always have a ‘few’ (grins) on my need-to-read list!! 🙂 🙂
    The Olympics hosted by London last summer were amongst my most beloved!! {Vancouver, Beijing, Nagano in close second!} Actually, it was due to the Olympics that I learnt more about where my friend lives in connection to London proper, and of course, I must say, the Royal Wedding of Prince William and Kate had me in sheer awe of the streets and locales that populate the Royals. I inherited my appreciation for the Royals from my parents, you see. And, my love of England is in me bones, as I am a Brit by heritage nearly thriceover! 🙂
    I am signing up for her newsletter, I am that excited about this book! 🙂

  241. What a lovely idea! Not being from London myself, my latest literary perspective on London’s geography was through the BBC’s magnificent “Sherlock” series! I’d love to take a Regency perspective next time I’m around!

  242. What a lovely idea! Not being from London myself, my latest literary perspective on London’s geography was through the BBC’s magnificent “Sherlock” series! I’d love to take a Regency perspective next time I’m around!

  243. What a lovely idea! Not being from London myself, my latest literary perspective on London’s geography was through the BBC’s magnificent “Sherlock” series! I’d love to take a Regency perspective next time I’m around!

  244. What a lovely idea! Not being from London myself, my latest literary perspective on London’s geography was through the BBC’s magnificent “Sherlock” series! I’d love to take a Regency perspective next time I’m around!

  245. What a lovely idea! Not being from London myself, my latest literary perspective on London’s geography was through the BBC’s magnificent “Sherlock” series! I’d love to take a Regency perspective next time I’m around!

  246. I love Regency location tough I am not surprised that JA visited London it was quiet common for young ladies to go there for the Season or shopping. I did visit London few times but what I liked was Victoria Station, I would love to see Hyde Park as we an mostly read in most of the novel, a typical London house & the ALmarck ball just to see the a glimpse of how people were ought to be.
    I read so many Regency novels but it would be hard to name one ..as I am quite poor with titles when I read so many novels, , Jane Austen of course or Dickens (Victorian Era). but if I happened to win a copy it will give me some new locations to ass to my list 🙂
    jandia4junpyo@yahoo.fr

  247. I love Regency location tough I am not surprised that JA visited London it was quiet common for young ladies to go there for the Season or shopping. I did visit London few times but what I liked was Victoria Station, I would love to see Hyde Park as we an mostly read in most of the novel, a typical London house & the ALmarck ball just to see the a glimpse of how people were ought to be.
    I read so many Regency novels but it would be hard to name one ..as I am quite poor with titles when I read so many novels, , Jane Austen of course or Dickens (Victorian Era). but if I happened to win a copy it will give me some new locations to ass to my list 🙂
    jandia4junpyo@yahoo.fr

  248. I love Regency location tough I am not surprised that JA visited London it was quiet common for young ladies to go there for the Season or shopping. I did visit London few times but what I liked was Victoria Station, I would love to see Hyde Park as we an mostly read in most of the novel, a typical London house & the ALmarck ball just to see the a glimpse of how people were ought to be.
    I read so many Regency novels but it would be hard to name one ..as I am quite poor with titles when I read so many novels, , Jane Austen of course or Dickens (Victorian Era). but if I happened to win a copy it will give me some new locations to ass to my list 🙂
    jandia4junpyo@yahoo.fr

  249. I love Regency location tough I am not surprised that JA visited London it was quiet common for young ladies to go there for the Season or shopping. I did visit London few times but what I liked was Victoria Station, I would love to see Hyde Park as we an mostly read in most of the novel, a typical London house & the ALmarck ball just to see the a glimpse of how people were ought to be.
    I read so many Regency novels but it would be hard to name one ..as I am quite poor with titles when I read so many novels, , Jane Austen of course or Dickens (Victorian Era). but if I happened to win a copy it will give me some new locations to ass to my list 🙂
    jandia4junpyo@yahoo.fr

  250. I love Regency location tough I am not surprised that JA visited London it was quiet common for young ladies to go there for the Season or shopping. I did visit London few times but what I liked was Victoria Station, I would love to see Hyde Park as we an mostly read in most of the novel, a typical London house & the ALmarck ball just to see the a glimpse of how people were ought to be.
    I read so many Regency novels but it would be hard to name one ..as I am quite poor with titles when I read so many novels, , Jane Austen of course or Dickens (Victorian Era). but if I happened to win a copy it will give me some new locations to ass to my list 🙂
    jandia4junpyo@yahoo.fr

  251. As a young girl, I have always been interested in British monarchy so the first place I definitely will visit is Buckingham Palace. Maybe I’ll drop by the British library and possibly National Portrait Gallery where Jane Austen’s officially acknowledged portrait is housed. Hopefully I’ll get the chance to visit London within a year or two.

  252. As a young girl, I have always been interested in British monarchy so the first place I definitely will visit is Buckingham Palace. Maybe I’ll drop by the British library and possibly National Portrait Gallery where Jane Austen’s officially acknowledged portrait is housed. Hopefully I’ll get the chance to visit London within a year or two.

  253. As a young girl, I have always been interested in British monarchy so the first place I definitely will visit is Buckingham Palace. Maybe I’ll drop by the British library and possibly National Portrait Gallery where Jane Austen’s officially acknowledged portrait is housed. Hopefully I’ll get the chance to visit London within a year or two.

  254. As a young girl, I have always been interested in British monarchy so the first place I definitely will visit is Buckingham Palace. Maybe I’ll drop by the British library and possibly National Portrait Gallery where Jane Austen’s officially acknowledged portrait is housed. Hopefully I’ll get the chance to visit London within a year or two.

  255. As a young girl, I have always been interested in British monarchy so the first place I definitely will visit is Buckingham Palace. Maybe I’ll drop by the British library and possibly National Portrait Gallery where Jane Austen’s officially acknowledged portrait is housed. Hopefully I’ll get the chance to visit London within a year or two.

  256. I have to say there are many places I would have liked to have seen – but I’ve just recently visited one that still exists – Wellington’s home Apsley House and I absolutely loved it there, I didn’t want to leave!

  257. I have to say there are many places I would have liked to have seen – but I’ve just recently visited one that still exists – Wellington’s home Apsley House and I absolutely loved it there, I didn’t want to leave!

  258. I have to say there are many places I would have liked to have seen – but I’ve just recently visited one that still exists – Wellington’s home Apsley House and I absolutely loved it there, I didn’t want to leave!

  259. I have to say there are many places I would have liked to have seen – but I’ve just recently visited one that still exists – Wellington’s home Apsley House and I absolutely loved it there, I didn’t want to leave!

  260. I have to say there are many places I would have liked to have seen – but I’ve just recently visited one that still exists – Wellington’s home Apsley House and I absolutely loved it there, I didn’t want to leave!

  261. I have never been to London, although when I finally visit next fall, I will without a doubt recognize many places because of pictures and reading about them often. Your book will complete my preparations on this much anticipated trip. I’m so excited! Thank you for the timely release of Jane Austen’s London.

  262. I have never been to London, although when I finally visit next fall, I will without a doubt recognize many places because of pictures and reading about them often. Your book will complete my preparations on this much anticipated trip. I’m so excited! Thank you for the timely release of Jane Austen’s London.

  263. I have never been to London, although when I finally visit next fall, I will without a doubt recognize many places because of pictures and reading about them often. Your book will complete my preparations on this much anticipated trip. I’m so excited! Thank you for the timely release of Jane Austen’s London.

  264. I have never been to London, although when I finally visit next fall, I will without a doubt recognize many places because of pictures and reading about them often. Your book will complete my preparations on this much anticipated trip. I’m so excited! Thank you for the timely release of Jane Austen’s London.

  265. I have never been to London, although when I finally visit next fall, I will without a doubt recognize many places because of pictures and reading about them often. Your book will complete my preparations on this much anticipated trip. I’m so excited! Thank you for the timely release of Jane Austen’s London.

  266. Oooh, I hope I win this, it sounds awesome! I have visited London, but I didn’t find it to be a very “historical” city, thanks in large part to fires and the London Blitz. I did visit the US Embassy in St. James’ Court (which looked nothing like I’d pictured from the books), and a few neighborhoods that seemed straight out of Dickens or Shakespeare, but they seemed rare. London is a very modern metropolis compared to other European cities.

  267. Oooh, I hope I win this, it sounds awesome! I have visited London, but I didn’t find it to be a very “historical” city, thanks in large part to fires and the London Blitz. I did visit the US Embassy in St. James’ Court (which looked nothing like I’d pictured from the books), and a few neighborhoods that seemed straight out of Dickens or Shakespeare, but they seemed rare. London is a very modern metropolis compared to other European cities.

  268. Oooh, I hope I win this, it sounds awesome! I have visited London, but I didn’t find it to be a very “historical” city, thanks in large part to fires and the London Blitz. I did visit the US Embassy in St. James’ Court (which looked nothing like I’d pictured from the books), and a few neighborhoods that seemed straight out of Dickens or Shakespeare, but they seemed rare. London is a very modern metropolis compared to other European cities.

  269. Oooh, I hope I win this, it sounds awesome! I have visited London, but I didn’t find it to be a very “historical” city, thanks in large part to fires and the London Blitz. I did visit the US Embassy in St. James’ Court (which looked nothing like I’d pictured from the books), and a few neighborhoods that seemed straight out of Dickens or Shakespeare, but they seemed rare. London is a very modern metropolis compared to other European cities.

  270. Oooh, I hope I win this, it sounds awesome! I have visited London, but I didn’t find it to be a very “historical” city, thanks in large part to fires and the London Blitz. I did visit the US Embassy in St. James’ Court (which looked nothing like I’d pictured from the books), and a few neighborhoods that seemed straight out of Dickens or Shakespeare, but they seemed rare. London is a very modern metropolis compared to other European cities.

  271. The first time I went to London in 1995 I went alone – I found the Rose and Crown by chance my first night in town. I decided to look for a historic pub each evening for dinner. I seemed to eat at a lot of places Charles Dickens ate! Is the Cheshire Cheese that has Dr. Johnsons’ chair? I would LOVE to read this book for my next visit. Thank you!!!

  272. The first time I went to London in 1995 I went alone – I found the Rose and Crown by chance my first night in town. I decided to look for a historic pub each evening for dinner. I seemed to eat at a lot of places Charles Dickens ate! Is the Cheshire Cheese that has Dr. Johnsons’ chair? I would LOVE to read this book for my next visit. Thank you!!!

  273. The first time I went to London in 1995 I went alone – I found the Rose and Crown by chance my first night in town. I decided to look for a historic pub each evening for dinner. I seemed to eat at a lot of places Charles Dickens ate! Is the Cheshire Cheese that has Dr. Johnsons’ chair? I would LOVE to read this book for my next visit. Thank you!!!

  274. The first time I went to London in 1995 I went alone – I found the Rose and Crown by chance my first night in town. I decided to look for a historic pub each evening for dinner. I seemed to eat at a lot of places Charles Dickens ate! Is the Cheshire Cheese that has Dr. Johnsons’ chair? I would LOVE to read this book for my next visit. Thank you!!!

  275. The first time I went to London in 1995 I went alone – I found the Rose and Crown by chance my first night in town. I decided to look for a historic pub each evening for dinner. I seemed to eat at a lot of places Charles Dickens ate! Is the Cheshire Cheese that has Dr. Johnsons’ chair? I would LOVE to read this book for my next visit. Thank you!!!

  276. I am a Janeite, who became one uninfluenced by the numerous JA TV adaptations, though I have watched all of them, as I enjoy period pieces. I love the Regency period, the Victorian and Edwardian eras. I haven’t read Walking Jane Austen’s London, but would love to do so. If I don’t win a copy here, I hope my public library will carry it soon.

  277. I am a Janeite, who became one uninfluenced by the numerous JA TV adaptations, though I have watched all of them, as I enjoy period pieces. I love the Regency period, the Victorian and Edwardian eras. I haven’t read Walking Jane Austen’s London, but would love to do so. If I don’t win a copy here, I hope my public library will carry it soon.

  278. I am a Janeite, who became one uninfluenced by the numerous JA TV adaptations, though I have watched all of them, as I enjoy period pieces. I love the Regency period, the Victorian and Edwardian eras. I haven’t read Walking Jane Austen’s London, but would love to do so. If I don’t win a copy here, I hope my public library will carry it soon.

  279. I am a Janeite, who became one uninfluenced by the numerous JA TV adaptations, though I have watched all of them, as I enjoy period pieces. I love the Regency period, the Victorian and Edwardian eras. I haven’t read Walking Jane Austen’s London, but would love to do so. If I don’t win a copy here, I hope my public library will carry it soon.

  280. I am a Janeite, who became one uninfluenced by the numerous JA TV adaptations, though I have watched all of them, as I enjoy period pieces. I love the Regency period, the Victorian and Edwardian eras. I haven’t read Walking Jane Austen’s London, but would love to do so. If I don’t win a copy here, I hope my public library will carry it soon.

  281. I love this! I will have to read it now, and then re-read it when I next visit London and walk in Jane Austen’s footsteps

  282. I love this! I will have to read it now, and then re-read it when I next visit London and walk in Jane Austen’s footsteps

  283. I love this! I will have to read it now, and then re-read it when I next visit London and walk in Jane Austen’s footsteps

  284. I love this! I will have to read it now, and then re-read it when I next visit London and walk in Jane Austen’s footsteps

  285. I love this! I will have to read it now, and then re-read it when I next visit London and walk in Jane Austen’s footsteps

  286. The only two times Ive been to London, I only saw the airport. I have several guides books of London and England. I love all regency and study the landmark locatons and names.! I will get the book, unless I win one!!

  287. The only two times Ive been to London, I only saw the airport. I have several guides books of London and England. I love all regency and study the landmark locatons and names.! I will get the book, unless I win one!!

  288. The only two times Ive been to London, I only saw the airport. I have several guides books of London and England. I love all regency and study the landmark locatons and names.! I will get the book, unless I win one!!

  289. The only two times Ive been to London, I only saw the airport. I have several guides books of London and England. I love all regency and study the landmark locatons and names.! I will get the book, unless I win one!!

  290. The only two times Ive been to London, I only saw the airport. I have several guides books of London and England. I love all regency and study the landmark locatons and names.! I will get the book, unless I win one!!

  291. London is one of my favorite cities! I love Fortnum and Manson and the Wallace Gallery and just walking around soaking up the atmosphere as well as many other museums and historic cites too numerous to mention here! Walking in Jane Austen’s footsteps wold add immeasurably to another visit(I hope I can go again!).

  292. London is one of my favorite cities! I love Fortnum and Manson and the Wallace Gallery and just walking around soaking up the atmosphere as well as many other museums and historic cites too numerous to mention here! Walking in Jane Austen’s footsteps wold add immeasurably to another visit(I hope I can go again!).

  293. London is one of my favorite cities! I love Fortnum and Manson and the Wallace Gallery and just walking around soaking up the atmosphere as well as many other museums and historic cites too numerous to mention here! Walking in Jane Austen’s footsteps wold add immeasurably to another visit(I hope I can go again!).

  294. London is one of my favorite cities! I love Fortnum and Manson and the Wallace Gallery and just walking around soaking up the atmosphere as well as many other museums and historic cites too numerous to mention here! Walking in Jane Austen’s footsteps wold add immeasurably to another visit(I hope I can go again!).

  295. London is one of my favorite cities! I love Fortnum and Manson and the Wallace Gallery and just walking around soaking up the atmosphere as well as many other museums and historic cites too numerous to mention here! Walking in Jane Austen’s footsteps wold add immeasurably to another visit(I hope I can go again!).

  296. Louise, what a super project & a perfect complement to your ‘Walks Through Regency London’. I have a signed copy bought from you at the Regency Day (London, Oct 2011), celebrating Austen & Heyer. I love it, not only for the walks, but also for your antique prints used as illustrations – they are superb.
    What enormous satisfaction you would have gained from the research and compilation of your new book. It would be worth dropping an email to the Jane Austen Society of Australia advising of your book. Members like to visit the UK to see the JA locations and a London guide would be a winner!
    I would love to have a closer look, with your Regency guidebook in hand, at the St James’s area on a future London visit – I was fascinated by the Regency period locations – hatters, bootmakers, locations of the famous Clubs, & the Beau’s statue – on the short walking tour of the area on the Regency Day.
    Best wishes from Australia.

  297. Louise, what a super project & a perfect complement to your ‘Walks Through Regency London’. I have a signed copy bought from you at the Regency Day (London, Oct 2011), celebrating Austen & Heyer. I love it, not only for the walks, but also for your antique prints used as illustrations – they are superb.
    What enormous satisfaction you would have gained from the research and compilation of your new book. It would be worth dropping an email to the Jane Austen Society of Australia advising of your book. Members like to visit the UK to see the JA locations and a London guide would be a winner!
    I would love to have a closer look, with your Regency guidebook in hand, at the St James’s area on a future London visit – I was fascinated by the Regency period locations – hatters, bootmakers, locations of the famous Clubs, & the Beau’s statue – on the short walking tour of the area on the Regency Day.
    Best wishes from Australia.

  298. Louise, what a super project & a perfect complement to your ‘Walks Through Regency London’. I have a signed copy bought from you at the Regency Day (London, Oct 2011), celebrating Austen & Heyer. I love it, not only for the walks, but also for your antique prints used as illustrations – they are superb.
    What enormous satisfaction you would have gained from the research and compilation of your new book. It would be worth dropping an email to the Jane Austen Society of Australia advising of your book. Members like to visit the UK to see the JA locations and a London guide would be a winner!
    I would love to have a closer look, with your Regency guidebook in hand, at the St James’s area on a future London visit – I was fascinated by the Regency period locations – hatters, bootmakers, locations of the famous Clubs, & the Beau’s statue – on the short walking tour of the area on the Regency Day.
    Best wishes from Australia.

  299. Louise, what a super project & a perfect complement to your ‘Walks Through Regency London’. I have a signed copy bought from you at the Regency Day (London, Oct 2011), celebrating Austen & Heyer. I love it, not only for the walks, but also for your antique prints used as illustrations – they are superb.
    What enormous satisfaction you would have gained from the research and compilation of your new book. It would be worth dropping an email to the Jane Austen Society of Australia advising of your book. Members like to visit the UK to see the JA locations and a London guide would be a winner!
    I would love to have a closer look, with your Regency guidebook in hand, at the St James’s area on a future London visit – I was fascinated by the Regency period locations – hatters, bootmakers, locations of the famous Clubs, & the Beau’s statue – on the short walking tour of the area on the Regency Day.
    Best wishes from Australia.

  300. Louise, what a super project & a perfect complement to your ‘Walks Through Regency London’. I have a signed copy bought from you at the Regency Day (London, Oct 2011), celebrating Austen & Heyer. I love it, not only for the walks, but also for your antique prints used as illustrations – they are superb.
    What enormous satisfaction you would have gained from the research and compilation of your new book. It would be worth dropping an email to the Jane Austen Society of Australia advising of your book. Members like to visit the UK to see the JA locations and a London guide would be a winner!
    I would love to have a closer look, with your Regency guidebook in hand, at the St James’s area on a future London visit – I was fascinated by the Regency period locations – hatters, bootmakers, locations of the famous Clubs, & the Beau’s statue – on the short walking tour of the area on the Regency Day.
    Best wishes from Australia.

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