Audience Participation, Please!

From Susan/Miranda:

Susan/Sarah’s away on much-needed family leave from the WordWenches today. In her place, we’re inviting YOU to supply today’s blog from the novel you’re currently reading. We’ve done this before, and it’s been quite entertaining — and enlightening.

Since many of you said you preferred to check out a novel by sampling the middle, rather than the beginning, this time let’s sample those middles. Please share with us the title, author, and the first sentence or two of CHAPTER EIGHT of your current read — and let the discussions begin!

I’m willing to begin with a favorite “hero” here among the WordWenches. This is from “Flashman and the Mountain of Lights” by George MacDonald Fraser.

“If there was one thing worse than Jawaheer’s murder, it was his funeral, when his wives and slave-girls were roasted alive along with his corpse, according to custom. Like much beastliness in the world, suttee is inspired by religion, which means there’s no sense or reason to it — I’ve yet to meet an Indian who could tell me why it’s done, even, except that it’s a hallowed ritual, like posting a sentry to mind the Duke of Wellington’s horse fifty years after the old fellow had kicked the bucket.”

69 thoughts on “Audience Participation, Please!”

  1. From Chapter 8 of Dark Angels by Karleen Koen (just-released a prequel to Through a Glass Darkly, published 20 yrs ago)
    “The next day, hidden from view by a table used for dining, Richard flipped playing cards into a porcelain foo dog’s open mouth. Monsieur collected porcelain. Monsieur collected everything.”

    Reply
  2. From Chapter 8 of Dark Angels by Karleen Koen (just-released a prequel to Through a Glass Darkly, published 20 yrs ago)
    “The next day, hidden from view by a table used for dining, Richard flipped playing cards into a porcelain foo dog’s open mouth. Monsieur collected porcelain. Monsieur collected everything.”

    Reply
  3. From Chapter 8 of Dark Angels by Karleen Koen (just-released a prequel to Through a Glass Darkly, published 20 yrs ago)
    “The next day, hidden from view by a table used for dining, Richard flipped playing cards into a porcelain foo dog’s open mouth. Monsieur collected porcelain. Monsieur collected everything.”

    Reply
  4. Every time we do this, I get caught. *g* Ahh, well… Here it is. Chapter 8. Much Ado About Magic and we all know by whom. Our famous Word Wench, Patricia Rice.
    “She had never been kissed. Startled by the heat and pressure of Trevelyan’s mouth, Sinda felt the pleasure of it without another thought. The odor of ale no longer assaulted her, but the male scent of his skin was new to her, an erotic aroma all its own.”
    Thanks for filling in Susan/Miranda.

    Reply
  5. Every time we do this, I get caught. *g* Ahh, well… Here it is. Chapter 8. Much Ado About Magic and we all know by whom. Our famous Word Wench, Patricia Rice.
    “She had never been kissed. Startled by the heat and pressure of Trevelyan’s mouth, Sinda felt the pleasure of it without another thought. The odor of ale no longer assaulted her, but the male scent of his skin was new to her, an erotic aroma all its own.”
    Thanks for filling in Susan/Miranda.

    Reply
  6. Every time we do this, I get caught. *g* Ahh, well… Here it is. Chapter 8. Much Ado About Magic and we all know by whom. Our famous Word Wench, Patricia Rice.
    “She had never been kissed. Startled by the heat and pressure of Trevelyan’s mouth, Sinda felt the pleasure of it without another thought. The odor of ale no longer assaulted her, but the male scent of his skin was new to her, an erotic aroma all its own.”
    Thanks for filling in Susan/Miranda.

    Reply
  7. Ohh, Margaret, I can’t WAIT to read “Dark Angels” — but I have to finish my current manuscript first because I don’t want Koen’s Restoration blending with my versions of the same time/place/characters. But tempting, very tempting….
    And how appropriate that Monsieur raises his powdered head so close to yesterday’s discussion about cross-dressing! 🙂

    Reply
  8. Ohh, Margaret, I can’t WAIT to read “Dark Angels” — but I have to finish my current manuscript first because I don’t want Koen’s Restoration blending with my versions of the same time/place/characters. But tempting, very tempting….
    And how appropriate that Monsieur raises his powdered head so close to yesterday’s discussion about cross-dressing! 🙂

    Reply
  9. Ohh, Margaret, I can’t WAIT to read “Dark Angels” — but I have to finish my current manuscript first because I don’t want Koen’s Restoration blending with my versions of the same time/place/characters. But tempting, very tempting….
    And how appropriate that Monsieur raises his powdered head so close to yesterday’s discussion about cross-dressing! 🙂

    Reply
  10. I’m going through a dry spell at the moment. I have the unfortunate tendency to read non-stop until I finish a book so I have to be careful when I start one. Over the weekend I read Slave to Sensation by Nalini Singh which I quite liked, but I’m still recovering from sleep deprivation. Got to learn to pace myself!

    Reply
  11. I’m going through a dry spell at the moment. I have the unfortunate tendency to read non-stop until I finish a book so I have to be careful when I start one. Over the weekend I read Slave to Sensation by Nalini Singh which I quite liked, but I’m still recovering from sleep deprivation. Got to learn to pace myself!

    Reply
  12. I’m going through a dry spell at the moment. I have the unfortunate tendency to read non-stop until I finish a book so I have to be careful when I start one. Over the weekend I read Slave to Sensation by Nalini Singh which I quite liked, but I’m still recovering from sleep deprivation. Got to learn to pace myself!

    Reply
  13. From “Fear of Falling” by Cindi Myers (Blaze 274):
    “Sartain studied Natalie as she moved in and out of the lamplight on her way back from the bathroom. She’d untied him, leaving the scarves draped around the bedpost like captured flags.”
    I’ve got about 50 pages to go before I get there. Can’t wait to read more.
    Chris

    Reply
  14. From “Fear of Falling” by Cindi Myers (Blaze 274):
    “Sartain studied Natalie as she moved in and out of the lamplight on her way back from the bathroom. She’d untied him, leaving the scarves draped around the bedpost like captured flags.”
    I’ve got about 50 pages to go before I get there. Can’t wait to read more.
    Chris

    Reply
  15. From “Fear of Falling” by Cindi Myers (Blaze 274):
    “Sartain studied Natalie as she moved in and out of the lamplight on her way back from the bathroom. She’d untied him, leaving the scarves draped around the bedpost like captured flags.”
    I’ve got about 50 pages to go before I get there. Can’t wait to read more.
    Chris

    Reply
  16. Susan–
    I’m about halfway thru the Koen. Eminently enjoyable. Her protagonist is very engaging and multi-layered.
    It’s the sort of book I prefer to devour all at once, but I’m using it as my carrot-on-a-stick, a nighttime reward for completing my own daily writing tasks.
    Fortunately for me, Dark Angels takes place 15 years prior to the start of my own 17thC w-i-p, so her courtiers are different ones. Plus, the action shifts from Charles II’s court to Louis XIV’s Paris.
    As for Monsieur…he comes across as authentically Monsieur. IMO, a good representation.

    Reply
  17. Susan–
    I’m about halfway thru the Koen. Eminently enjoyable. Her protagonist is very engaging and multi-layered.
    It’s the sort of book I prefer to devour all at once, but I’m using it as my carrot-on-a-stick, a nighttime reward for completing my own daily writing tasks.
    Fortunately for me, Dark Angels takes place 15 years prior to the start of my own 17thC w-i-p, so her courtiers are different ones. Plus, the action shifts from Charles II’s court to Louis XIV’s Paris.
    As for Monsieur…he comes across as authentically Monsieur. IMO, a good representation.

    Reply
  18. Susan–
    I’m about halfway thru the Koen. Eminently enjoyable. Her protagonist is very engaging and multi-layered.
    It’s the sort of book I prefer to devour all at once, but I’m using it as my carrot-on-a-stick, a nighttime reward for completing my own daily writing tasks.
    Fortunately for me, Dark Angels takes place 15 years prior to the start of my own 17thC w-i-p, so her courtiers are different ones. Plus, the action shifts from Charles II’s court to Louis XIV’s Paris.
    As for Monsieur…he comes across as authentically Monsieur. IMO, a good representation.

    Reply
  19. Okay, here we go:
    “Randolph stared at the tall, thin man standing in front of the desk, so stunned by the news that the high-priced, forensic accountant had delivered that he could not immediately react. Webber had to be wrong.”
    This is from Jayne Ann Krentz’s FALLING AWAKE, a romantic suspense title published a couple of years ago. I go on JAK kicks regularly. She’s always been a good writer, and she’s continued to grow and refine her style over the year. I like her set-ups–often artsy and maybe a bit New Age–and I like her characters and this book even has a cat in it! I’m having a fine time with it.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  20. Okay, here we go:
    “Randolph stared at the tall, thin man standing in front of the desk, so stunned by the news that the high-priced, forensic accountant had delivered that he could not immediately react. Webber had to be wrong.”
    This is from Jayne Ann Krentz’s FALLING AWAKE, a romantic suspense title published a couple of years ago. I go on JAK kicks regularly. She’s always been a good writer, and she’s continued to grow and refine her style over the year. I like her set-ups–often artsy and maybe a bit New Age–and I like her characters and this book even has a cat in it! I’m having a fine time with it.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  21. Okay, here we go:
    “Randolph stared at the tall, thin man standing in front of the desk, so stunned by the news that the high-priced, forensic accountant had delivered that he could not immediately react. Webber had to be wrong.”
    This is from Jayne Ann Krentz’s FALLING AWAKE, a romantic suspense title published a couple of years ago. I go on JAK kicks regularly. She’s always been a good writer, and she’s continued to grow and refine her style over the year. I like her set-ups–often artsy and maybe a bit New Age–and I like her characters and this book even has a cat in it! I’m having a fine time with it.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  22. “Meredith walked along Vauxhall’s graveled South Walk, and attempted to accomplish the impossible: ignore the man walking beside her.” That would be from Who Will Take This Man from Jackie D’Alessandro. I’m rereading the first three before I read the newest Never A Lady. 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  23. “Meredith walked along Vauxhall’s graveled South Walk, and attempted to accomplish the impossible: ignore the man walking beside her.” That would be from Who Will Take This Man from Jackie D’Alessandro. I’m rereading the first three before I read the newest Never A Lady. 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  24. “Meredith walked along Vauxhall’s graveled South Walk, and attempted to accomplish the impossible: ignore the man walking beside her.” That would be from Who Will Take This Man from Jackie D’Alessandro. I’m rereading the first three before I read the newest Never A Lady. 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  25. Not trying to suck up – this is honestly what I’m reading right now.
    From Jo Beverley’s To Rescue a Rogue:
    “This would be Mara’s first visit to a London theater, and she welcomed the opportunity to wear one of her finer dresses. It suited her very well, and the low bodice and evening corset did wonders for her breasts. She wished Dare would see her like this.”

    Reply
  26. Not trying to suck up – this is honestly what I’m reading right now.
    From Jo Beverley’s To Rescue a Rogue:
    “This would be Mara’s first visit to a London theater, and she welcomed the opportunity to wear one of her finer dresses. It suited her very well, and the low bodice and evening corset did wonders for her breasts. She wished Dare would see her like this.”

    Reply
  27. Not trying to suck up – this is honestly what I’m reading right now.
    From Jo Beverley’s To Rescue a Rogue:
    “This would be Mara’s first visit to a London theater, and she welcomed the opportunity to wear one of her finer dresses. It suited her very well, and the low bodice and evening corset did wonders for her breasts. She wished Dare would see her like this.”

    Reply
  28. Well, I’m cheating slightly as this book is up next on my TBR pile (I’m between books right now).
    From Ch 8 of Tracy Chevalier’s Falling Angels
    “I do like to make an effort with my At Homes. I always have them in the front parlour, and use the rose-pattern tea set, and Elizabeth bakes a cake — lemon this week.” (Gertrude Waterhouse)
    The story is told in multiple pov, all using first person. Can’t wait to get into it. I’ve loved all her other books so far!

    Reply
  29. Well, I’m cheating slightly as this book is up next on my TBR pile (I’m between books right now).
    From Ch 8 of Tracy Chevalier’s Falling Angels
    “I do like to make an effort with my At Homes. I always have them in the front parlour, and use the rose-pattern tea set, and Elizabeth bakes a cake — lemon this week.” (Gertrude Waterhouse)
    The story is told in multiple pov, all using first person. Can’t wait to get into it. I’ve loved all her other books so far!

    Reply
  30. Well, I’m cheating slightly as this book is up next on my TBR pile (I’m between books right now).
    From Ch 8 of Tracy Chevalier’s Falling Angels
    “I do like to make an effort with my At Homes. I always have them in the front parlour, and use the rose-pattern tea set, and Elizabeth bakes a cake — lemon this week.” (Gertrude Waterhouse)
    The story is told in multiple pov, all using first person. Can’t wait to get into it. I’ve loved all her other books so far!

    Reply
  31. Crime Scene at Cardwell Ranch, by BJ Daniels – a free promotional book that I still wound up paying full price for at Wal-Mart. Fortunately I’ve yet to regret it.
    “Hud had expected more resistance but Dana led him to the back of the shop where there was a small kitchen with a table and chairs. The room smelled of chocolate.”
    Who could resist murder and chocolate?

    Reply
  32. Crime Scene at Cardwell Ranch, by BJ Daniels – a free promotional book that I still wound up paying full price for at Wal-Mart. Fortunately I’ve yet to regret it.
    “Hud had expected more resistance but Dana led him to the back of the shop where there was a small kitchen with a table and chairs. The room smelled of chocolate.”
    Who could resist murder and chocolate?

    Reply
  33. Crime Scene at Cardwell Ranch, by BJ Daniels – a free promotional book that I still wound up paying full price for at Wal-Mart. Fortunately I’ve yet to regret it.
    “Hud had expected more resistance but Dana led him to the back of the shop where there was a small kitchen with a table and chairs. The room smelled of chocolate.”
    Who could resist murder and chocolate?

    Reply
  34. From Sherrie:
    This is from a book I’m reading for research titled The Aeronauts–a Dramatic History of the Great Age of Ballooning, by L.T.C. Rolt: ” ‘I hope these new mechanic meteors will prove only playthings for the learned and the idle, and not be converted into new engines of destruction to the human race, as is so often the case of refinements or discoveries in science.’ So wrote Horace Walpole in 1785, but his hope was vain for the military use of balloons had been recognized from the beginning.”

    Reply
  35. From Sherrie:
    This is from a book I’m reading for research titled The Aeronauts–a Dramatic History of the Great Age of Ballooning, by L.T.C. Rolt: ” ‘I hope these new mechanic meteors will prove only playthings for the learned and the idle, and not be converted into new engines of destruction to the human race, as is so often the case of refinements or discoveries in science.’ So wrote Horace Walpole in 1785, but his hope was vain for the military use of balloons had been recognized from the beginning.”

    Reply
  36. From Sherrie:
    This is from a book I’m reading for research titled The Aeronauts–a Dramatic History of the Great Age of Ballooning, by L.T.C. Rolt: ” ‘I hope these new mechanic meteors will prove only playthings for the learned and the idle, and not be converted into new engines of destruction to the human race, as is so often the case of refinements or discoveries in science.’ So wrote Horace Walpole in 1785, but his hope was vain for the military use of balloons had been recognized from the beginning.”

    Reply
  37. Pride and Petticoats by Shana Galen
    Charlotte would have laughed if Dewhurst hadn’t made her so angry. As though a pampered British aristocrat could even conceive of the notion of not getting what he wanted.
    This is the first book I’ve read by this author and am only to chapter 4. P&P is a funny story with a likeable heroine. The author’s voice is intelligent and the story is fun and fluffy. I call this “intelligent fluff.” I like intelligent fluff.

    Reply
  38. Pride and Petticoats by Shana Galen
    Charlotte would have laughed if Dewhurst hadn’t made her so angry. As though a pampered British aristocrat could even conceive of the notion of not getting what he wanted.
    This is the first book I’ve read by this author and am only to chapter 4. P&P is a funny story with a likeable heroine. The author’s voice is intelligent and the story is fun and fluffy. I call this “intelligent fluff.” I like intelligent fluff.

    Reply
  39. Pride and Petticoats by Shana Galen
    Charlotte would have laughed if Dewhurst hadn’t made her so angry. As though a pampered British aristocrat could even conceive of the notion of not getting what he wanted.
    This is the first book I’ve read by this author and am only to chapter 4. P&P is a funny story with a likeable heroine. The author’s voice is intelligent and the story is fun and fluffy. I call this “intelligent fluff.” I like intelligent fluff.

    Reply
  40. From Lady Anne’s Dangerous Man by Jeane Westin:
    Anne scrambled atop the carriage driver’s seat and hastily turned the horses toward the river. The crowd shouted angrily, throwing more street refuse, and as she left the town square behind her, she heard the chandler railing at top voice against rich Londoners who brought plague to honest country folk.

    Reply
  41. From Lady Anne’s Dangerous Man by Jeane Westin:
    Anne scrambled atop the carriage driver’s seat and hastily turned the horses toward the river. The crowd shouted angrily, throwing more street refuse, and as she left the town square behind her, she heard the chandler railing at top voice against rich Londoners who brought plague to honest country folk.

    Reply
  42. From Lady Anne’s Dangerous Man by Jeane Westin:
    Anne scrambled atop the carriage driver’s seat and hastily turned the horses toward the river. The crowd shouted angrily, throwing more street refuse, and as she left the town square behind her, she heard the chandler railing at top voice against rich Londoners who brought plague to honest country folk.

    Reply
  43. The Vampire Who Loved Me by Teresa Medeiros:
    Julian had face enemies of all sorts in his life – bloodthirsty vampires, ferocious soldiers, irate husbands – all willing to go to excessive lengths to put an end to his worthless existence. But he’d never known the depth of dread he felt as Portia calmly disengaged herself from his embrace and turned to face him.

    Reply
  44. The Vampire Who Loved Me by Teresa Medeiros:
    Julian had face enemies of all sorts in his life – bloodthirsty vampires, ferocious soldiers, irate husbands – all willing to go to excessive lengths to put an end to his worthless existence. But he’d never known the depth of dread he felt as Portia calmly disengaged herself from his embrace and turned to face him.

    Reply
  45. The Vampire Who Loved Me by Teresa Medeiros:
    Julian had face enemies of all sorts in his life – bloodthirsty vampires, ferocious soldiers, irate husbands – all willing to go to excessive lengths to put an end to his worthless existence. But he’d never known the depth of dread he felt as Portia calmly disengaged herself from his embrace and turned to face him.

    Reply
  46. Hi, I’m usually just a lurker, but this sounds like fun. I’m the second one to post from JAK, but this book is under her Amanda Quick pseudonym. I’m re-reading Wicked Widow — ” ‘Tell me the tale from the beginning,’ Artemas said.
    Madeline looked out at the small bare garden through the library window. She clasped her hands behind her back and concentrated on composing her thoughts. She was keenly aware of Artemas lounging against the edge of her desk, waiting for her to begin her explanations.”

    Reply
  47. Hi, I’m usually just a lurker, but this sounds like fun. I’m the second one to post from JAK, but this book is under her Amanda Quick pseudonym. I’m re-reading Wicked Widow — ” ‘Tell me the tale from the beginning,’ Artemas said.
    Madeline looked out at the small bare garden through the library window. She clasped her hands behind her back and concentrated on composing her thoughts. She was keenly aware of Artemas lounging against the edge of her desk, waiting for her to begin her explanations.”

    Reply
  48. Hi, I’m usually just a lurker, but this sounds like fun. I’m the second one to post from JAK, but this book is under her Amanda Quick pseudonym. I’m re-reading Wicked Widow — ” ‘Tell me the tale from the beginning,’ Artemas said.
    Madeline looked out at the small bare garden through the library window. She clasped her hands behind her back and concentrated on composing her thoughts. She was keenly aware of Artemas lounging against the edge of her desk, waiting for her to begin her explanations.”

    Reply
  49. I’m also between books, and since Michelle already posted from the next book in my TBR pile, TO RESCUE A ROGUE, I’ll post from the book I just finished, SHARPE’S GOLD:
    “Casatejada was like a shattered ants’ nest. All morning the patrols left, searched the valley, then galloped in their dust clouds back to the houses and the thin spires of smoke that were the only signs left of the night’s activity. Others rounded up stray horses, circling the valley floor, reminding Harper of the pony drives on his native Donegal moors.”
    I’m really going to have to try the Flashman books. That’s the second time in the past few weeks I’ve seen one of them quoted in a meme like this, and both left me wanting more.

    Reply
  50. I’m also between books, and since Michelle already posted from the next book in my TBR pile, TO RESCUE A ROGUE, I’ll post from the book I just finished, SHARPE’S GOLD:
    “Casatejada was like a shattered ants’ nest. All morning the patrols left, searched the valley, then galloped in their dust clouds back to the houses and the thin spires of smoke that were the only signs left of the night’s activity. Others rounded up stray horses, circling the valley floor, reminding Harper of the pony drives on his native Donegal moors.”
    I’m really going to have to try the Flashman books. That’s the second time in the past few weeks I’ve seen one of them quoted in a meme like this, and both left me wanting more.

    Reply
  51. I’m also between books, and since Michelle already posted from the next book in my TBR pile, TO RESCUE A ROGUE, I’ll post from the book I just finished, SHARPE’S GOLD:
    “Casatejada was like a shattered ants’ nest. All morning the patrols left, searched the valley, then galloped in their dust clouds back to the houses and the thin spires of smoke that were the only signs left of the night’s activity. Others rounded up stray horses, circling the valley floor, reminding Harper of the pony drives on his native Donegal moors.”
    I’m really going to have to try the Flashman books. That’s the second time in the past few weeks I’ve seen one of them quoted in a meme like this, and both left me wanting more.

    Reply
  52. Just started this one tonight: Slave to Sensation by Nalini Singh.
    “He was beginning to expect her in his dreams. When she touched his shoulder, he rolled away to look up at her. His intention had been to tell her that he had no heart to play with her tonight, but when he saw her, he stopped.”
    I’ve only read the first chapter but I think I’m going to like this one.

    Reply
  53. Just started this one tonight: Slave to Sensation by Nalini Singh.
    “He was beginning to expect her in his dreams. When she touched his shoulder, he rolled away to look up at her. His intention had been to tell her that he had no heart to play with her tonight, but when he saw her, he stopped.”
    I’ve only read the first chapter but I think I’m going to like this one.

    Reply
  54. Just started this one tonight: Slave to Sensation by Nalini Singh.
    “He was beginning to expect her in his dreams. When she touched his shoulder, he rolled away to look up at her. His intention had been to tell her that he had no heart to play with her tonight, but when he saw her, he stopped.”
    I’ve only read the first chapter but I think I’m going to like this one.

    Reply
  55. Caroline straightened with a groan, pressing a hand to the small of her back. She’d done all she could to help the sick and wounded, which wasn’t much.
    from Hope’s Captive by Kate Lyon…the first Americana/Western romance I’ve read all year!

    Reply
  56. Caroline straightened with a groan, pressing a hand to the small of her back. She’d done all she could to help the sick and wounded, which wasn’t much.
    from Hope’s Captive by Kate Lyon…the first Americana/Western romance I’ve read all year!

    Reply
  57. Caroline straightened with a groan, pressing a hand to the small of her back. She’d done all she could to help the sick and wounded, which wasn’t much.
    from Hope’s Captive by Kate Lyon…the first Americana/Western romance I’ve read all year!

    Reply
  58. “I don’t care what you do with the invitations but I will certainly not be answering them. I am not your secretary.
    My Dearest Enemy by Connie Brockway.
    Just found this one at the USB.

    Reply
  59. “I don’t care what you do with the invitations but I will certainly not be answering them. I am not your secretary.
    My Dearest Enemy by Connie Brockway.
    Just found this one at the USB.

    Reply
  60. “I don’t care what you do with the invitations but I will certainly not be answering them. I am not your secretary.
    My Dearest Enemy by Connie Brockway.
    Just found this one at the USB.

    Reply
  61. Interesting how most of these opening lines from middle-of-the-book chapters could just as easily be first-page openers. I want to read MORE!
    Also interesting to see not only the variety of books we’re all reading, but when we’re reading them. Even given the different time zones for posting, looks like we’re reading 24 hours a day — which some of us probably are.:)
    About the Flashman series: not only are they a lot of fun — by his own reckoning, our hero Flashy’s the baddest, most cowardly, and conniving (but ever so charming to the ladies) lucky rascal in history — but the history and research behind his adventures is fantastic. Highly reccommended!

    Reply
  62. Interesting how most of these opening lines from middle-of-the-book chapters could just as easily be first-page openers. I want to read MORE!
    Also interesting to see not only the variety of books we’re all reading, but when we’re reading them. Even given the different time zones for posting, looks like we’re reading 24 hours a day — which some of us probably are.:)
    About the Flashman series: not only are they a lot of fun — by his own reckoning, our hero Flashy’s the baddest, most cowardly, and conniving (but ever so charming to the ladies) lucky rascal in history — but the history and research behind his adventures is fantastic. Highly reccommended!

    Reply
  63. Interesting how most of these opening lines from middle-of-the-book chapters could just as easily be first-page openers. I want to read MORE!
    Also interesting to see not only the variety of books we’re all reading, but when we’re reading them. Even given the different time zones for posting, looks like we’re reading 24 hours a day — which some of us probably are.:)
    About the Flashman series: not only are they a lot of fun — by his own reckoning, our hero Flashy’s the baddest, most cowardly, and conniving (but ever so charming to the ladies) lucky rascal in history — but the history and research behind his adventures is fantastic. Highly reccommended!

    Reply
  64. I put the first Flashman on hold at the library, so we’ll see how it goes. I’ve been a bit wary of the series in the past, knowing it stars a cowardly anti-hero, because normally I like to either identify with or kinda fall in love with the protagonist. Or both–is it weird that there are characters out there where I can’t make up my mind whether I’d rather be them or, um, have them?
    But, anyway, the writing in the Flashman series looks wonderful, and I’m a sucker for well-researched historical adventures, so I’ll give them a go.

    Reply
  65. I put the first Flashman on hold at the library, so we’ll see how it goes. I’ve been a bit wary of the series in the past, knowing it stars a cowardly anti-hero, because normally I like to either identify with or kinda fall in love with the protagonist. Or both–is it weird that there are characters out there where I can’t make up my mind whether I’d rather be them or, um, have them?
    But, anyway, the writing in the Flashman series looks wonderful, and I’m a sucker for well-researched historical adventures, so I’ll give them a go.

    Reply
  66. I put the first Flashman on hold at the library, so we’ll see how it goes. I’ve been a bit wary of the series in the past, knowing it stars a cowardly anti-hero, because normally I like to either identify with or kinda fall in love with the protagonist. Or both–is it weird that there are characters out there where I can’t make up my mind whether I’d rather be them or, um, have them?
    But, anyway, the writing in the Flashman series looks wonderful, and I’m a sucker for well-researched historical adventures, so I’ll give them a go.

    Reply
  67. Jo here — a day late, but I have to play.
    I’m reading Wolf Who Rules by Wen Spencer, which is SF Rom.
    “She had to learn not to be surprised when Windwolf popped up at odd times.”
    I have to say that could be a double entendre *G*
    Next paragraph: She was stretched out on the back room’s floor, making a copy of her grandfather’s spell. Her attempts with the camera had failed, the magical interference corrupting the digital image.
    It’s true that many of these could be the opening to a story, which is very enlightening.
    Because I’m preparing for a group re-read of Dorothy Dunnett’s Game of Kings, I thought I’d check that. However, it has a slightly strange structure, with long chapters, an “opening gambit” and four parts. I just knew part one would end with chapter 7, and sure enough. So this is from part 2, chapter 1.
    “Lord Culter, gently examining the tapestries in the big hall at Branxholm, was talking in a soft and savourless voice which his host found peculiarly uncomfortable.”
    Not a particularly good opening to a book, but a suitable opening of part 2.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  68. Jo here — a day late, but I have to play.
    I’m reading Wolf Who Rules by Wen Spencer, which is SF Rom.
    “She had to learn not to be surprised when Windwolf popped up at odd times.”
    I have to say that could be a double entendre *G*
    Next paragraph: She was stretched out on the back room’s floor, making a copy of her grandfather’s spell. Her attempts with the camera had failed, the magical interference corrupting the digital image.
    It’s true that many of these could be the opening to a story, which is very enlightening.
    Because I’m preparing for a group re-read of Dorothy Dunnett’s Game of Kings, I thought I’d check that. However, it has a slightly strange structure, with long chapters, an “opening gambit” and four parts. I just knew part one would end with chapter 7, and sure enough. So this is from part 2, chapter 1.
    “Lord Culter, gently examining the tapestries in the big hall at Branxholm, was talking in a soft and savourless voice which his host found peculiarly uncomfortable.”
    Not a particularly good opening to a book, but a suitable opening of part 2.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  69. Jo here — a day late, but I have to play.
    I’m reading Wolf Who Rules by Wen Spencer, which is SF Rom.
    “She had to learn not to be surprised when Windwolf popped up at odd times.”
    I have to say that could be a double entendre *G*
    Next paragraph: She was stretched out on the back room’s floor, making a copy of her grandfather’s spell. Her attempts with the camera had failed, the magical interference corrupting the digital image.
    It’s true that many of these could be the opening to a story, which is very enlightening.
    Because I’m preparing for a group re-read of Dorothy Dunnett’s Game of Kings, I thought I’d check that. However, it has a slightly strange structure, with long chapters, an “opening gambit” and four parts. I just knew part one would end with chapter 7, and sure enough. So this is from part 2, chapter 1.
    “Lord Culter, gently examining the tapestries in the big hall at Branxholm, was talking in a soft and savourless voice which his host found peculiarly uncomfortable.”
    Not a particularly good opening to a book, but a suitable opening of part 2.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply

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