Ask the Wenches

Anne here. Puzzled-little-girl-princess

This is a quick Sunday post, calling for wenchly readers to send us any questions they'd like to ask the wenches.

We're running low on our "Ask-A-Wench" questions from readers, so if you have any burning questions you'd like answered by us, post them below, or send them to our trusty wench wrangler, Laura.

85 thoughts on “Ask the Wenches”

  1. How do you handle “bad” reviews? Reviews that appear to have been written by someone who never read, or finished, the book? The reviews are out there, spreading misinformation or spite or whatever – is there anything you can do about an inaccurate or slanted review that might turn away potentian readers? Or do you just have to grin and bear it?

    Reply
  2. How do you handle “bad” reviews? Reviews that appear to have been written by someone who never read, or finished, the book? The reviews are out there, spreading misinformation or spite or whatever – is there anything you can do about an inaccurate or slanted review that might turn away potentian readers? Or do you just have to grin and bear it?

    Reply
  3. How do you handle “bad” reviews? Reviews that appear to have been written by someone who never read, or finished, the book? The reviews are out there, spreading misinformation or spite or whatever – is there anything you can do about an inaccurate or slanted review that might turn away potentian readers? Or do you just have to grin and bear it?

    Reply
  4. How do you handle “bad” reviews? Reviews that appear to have been written by someone who never read, or finished, the book? The reviews are out there, spreading misinformation or spite or whatever – is there anything you can do about an inaccurate or slanted review that might turn away potentian readers? Or do you just have to grin and bear it?

    Reply
  5. How do you handle “bad” reviews? Reviews that appear to have been written by someone who never read, or finished, the book? The reviews are out there, spreading misinformation or spite or whatever – is there anything you can do about an inaccurate or slanted review that might turn away potentian readers? Or do you just have to grin and bear it?

    Reply
  6. I am interested in beta readers. Does every author have them? What is their purpose, plot, character development, grammar, spelling? How much influence do they have? Thanks Anne.

    Reply
  7. I am interested in beta readers. Does every author have them? What is their purpose, plot, character development, grammar, spelling? How much influence do they have? Thanks Anne.

    Reply
  8. I am interested in beta readers. Does every author have them? What is their purpose, plot, character development, grammar, spelling? How much influence do they have? Thanks Anne.

    Reply
  9. I am interested in beta readers. Does every author have them? What is their purpose, plot, character development, grammar, spelling? How much influence do they have? Thanks Anne.

    Reply
  10. I am interested in beta readers. Does every author have them? What is their purpose, plot, character development, grammar, spelling? How much influence do they have? Thanks Anne.

    Reply
  11. Is it hard to write characters you don’t like? Do you run into people in your stories who simply are not someone you want to know well? I can see enjoying writing characters who are fun and charming and simply nice people. But, how difficult is it to spend time with someone you dislike – a lot? And if they are supposed to be villainous, how evil do you make them?
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  12. Is it hard to write characters you don’t like? Do you run into people in your stories who simply are not someone you want to know well? I can see enjoying writing characters who are fun and charming and simply nice people. But, how difficult is it to spend time with someone you dislike – a lot? And if they are supposed to be villainous, how evil do you make them?
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  13. Is it hard to write characters you don’t like? Do you run into people in your stories who simply are not someone you want to know well? I can see enjoying writing characters who are fun and charming and simply nice people. But, how difficult is it to spend time with someone you dislike – a lot? And if they are supposed to be villainous, how evil do you make them?
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  14. Is it hard to write characters you don’t like? Do you run into people in your stories who simply are not someone you want to know well? I can see enjoying writing characters who are fun and charming and simply nice people. But, how difficult is it to spend time with someone you dislike – a lot? And if they are supposed to be villainous, how evil do you make them?
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  15. Is it hard to write characters you don’t like? Do you run into people in your stories who simply are not someone you want to know well? I can see enjoying writing characters who are fun and charming and simply nice people. But, how difficult is it to spend time with someone you dislike – a lot? And if they are supposed to be villainous, how evil do you make them?
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  16. Have you ever felt obliged to write about a main character because they were next in an ongoing series, when you really wanted to write somebody else’s story instead? If so, how did you cope?

    Reply
  17. Have you ever felt obliged to write about a main character because they were next in an ongoing series, when you really wanted to write somebody else’s story instead? If so, how did you cope?

    Reply
  18. Have you ever felt obliged to write about a main character because they were next in an ongoing series, when you really wanted to write somebody else’s story instead? If so, how did you cope?

    Reply
  19. Have you ever felt obliged to write about a main character because they were next in an ongoing series, when you really wanted to write somebody else’s story instead? If so, how did you cope?

    Reply
  20. Have you ever felt obliged to write about a main character because they were next in an ongoing series, when you really wanted to write somebody else’s story instead? If so, how did you cope?

    Reply
  21. Has research for a book ever changed the way a story goes fundamentally or does research usually just add depth to a storyline?

    Reply
  22. Has research for a book ever changed the way a story goes fundamentally or does research usually just add depth to a storyline?

    Reply
  23. Has research for a book ever changed the way a story goes fundamentally or does research usually just add depth to a storyline?

    Reply
  24. Has research for a book ever changed the way a story goes fundamentally or does research usually just add depth to a storyline?

    Reply
  25. Has research for a book ever changed the way a story goes fundamentally or does research usually just add depth to a storyline?

    Reply
  26. Over the years, I’ve enjoyed conversations with friends and family about how they experience reading. Many, including my husband and daughter, say that reading a novel is akin to watching a movie. My experience is totally different. When I begin reading it’s as though I’m narrating in my head. Ultimately though I get caught up in the story and am barely aware that I’m turning pages. I see nothing but the words on the page; I do not ‘see’ the characters or the scenery. What I experience is called aphantasia.
    Here are a couple of articles:
    https://bookriot.com/2016/09/02/what-do-you-see-when-you-read/
    https://www.tor.com/2019/02/13/how-do-you-see-the-books-you-read/
    My questions ~
    1. What is your experience when you read?
    2. Do you feel that how you read impacts how you write?

    Reply
  27. Over the years, I’ve enjoyed conversations with friends and family about how they experience reading. Many, including my husband and daughter, say that reading a novel is akin to watching a movie. My experience is totally different. When I begin reading it’s as though I’m narrating in my head. Ultimately though I get caught up in the story and am barely aware that I’m turning pages. I see nothing but the words on the page; I do not ‘see’ the characters or the scenery. What I experience is called aphantasia.
    Here are a couple of articles:
    https://bookriot.com/2016/09/02/what-do-you-see-when-you-read/
    https://www.tor.com/2019/02/13/how-do-you-see-the-books-you-read/
    My questions ~
    1. What is your experience when you read?
    2. Do you feel that how you read impacts how you write?

    Reply
  28. Over the years, I’ve enjoyed conversations with friends and family about how they experience reading. Many, including my husband and daughter, say that reading a novel is akin to watching a movie. My experience is totally different. When I begin reading it’s as though I’m narrating in my head. Ultimately though I get caught up in the story and am barely aware that I’m turning pages. I see nothing but the words on the page; I do not ‘see’ the characters or the scenery. What I experience is called aphantasia.
    Here are a couple of articles:
    https://bookriot.com/2016/09/02/what-do-you-see-when-you-read/
    https://www.tor.com/2019/02/13/how-do-you-see-the-books-you-read/
    My questions ~
    1. What is your experience when you read?
    2. Do you feel that how you read impacts how you write?

    Reply
  29. Over the years, I’ve enjoyed conversations with friends and family about how they experience reading. Many, including my husband and daughter, say that reading a novel is akin to watching a movie. My experience is totally different. When I begin reading it’s as though I’m narrating in my head. Ultimately though I get caught up in the story and am barely aware that I’m turning pages. I see nothing but the words on the page; I do not ‘see’ the characters or the scenery. What I experience is called aphantasia.
    Here are a couple of articles:
    https://bookriot.com/2016/09/02/what-do-you-see-when-you-read/
    https://www.tor.com/2019/02/13/how-do-you-see-the-books-you-read/
    My questions ~
    1. What is your experience when you read?
    2. Do you feel that how you read impacts how you write?

    Reply
  30. Over the years, I’ve enjoyed conversations with friends and family about how they experience reading. Many, including my husband and daughter, say that reading a novel is akin to watching a movie. My experience is totally different. When I begin reading it’s as though I’m narrating in my head. Ultimately though I get caught up in the story and am barely aware that I’m turning pages. I see nothing but the words on the page; I do not ‘see’ the characters or the scenery. What I experience is called aphantasia.
    Here are a couple of articles:
    https://bookriot.com/2016/09/02/what-do-you-see-when-you-read/
    https://www.tor.com/2019/02/13/how-do-you-see-the-books-you-read/
    My questions ~
    1. What is your experience when you read?
    2. Do you feel that how you read impacts how you write?

    Reply
  31. Is it more difficult to write a novella than a novel? Is it a matter of simplifying plot, character development, etc, or is it actually more difficult to accomplish in a shorter format?

    Reply
  32. Is it more difficult to write a novella than a novel? Is it a matter of simplifying plot, character development, etc, or is it actually more difficult to accomplish in a shorter format?

    Reply
  33. Is it more difficult to write a novella than a novel? Is it a matter of simplifying plot, character development, etc, or is it actually more difficult to accomplish in a shorter format?

    Reply
  34. Is it more difficult to write a novella than a novel? Is it a matter of simplifying plot, character development, etc, or is it actually more difficult to accomplish in a shorter format?

    Reply
  35. Is it more difficult to write a novella than a novel? Is it a matter of simplifying plot, character development, etc, or is it actually more difficult to accomplish in a shorter format?

    Reply

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