Ask A Wench—an Exotic Question!

Old_globeCara/Andrea here, We were recently chatting among ourselves about and somehow strayed off topic (as we are often wont to do!) and the question arose: What is the most exotic place in which we have ever set a story? As we all started thinking back through our books, we decided it would be a fun thing to share in our regular "Ask A Wench" feature. So sit back and get out your atlas as we do a little globetrotting!

MaryJoPutney_SilkandSecrets_200pxMary Jo: As a kid in school, I was always fascinated by the map rack hanging at one end of the blackboard.  In particular, I'd wonder what was in the vast, empty expanses of Central Asia.  So it's probably not surprising that I headed there for my first historical series, the Silk Trilogy.
 
The first book, Silk and Shadows, takes place in England, but Peregrine, the hero, is a wealthy, mysterious prince from somewhere in Asia.  While researching his background, I came across the true story of an 1840s rescue mission to Bokhara in Uzbekistan, and was entranced.  That story because the inspiration for Silk and Secrets, second in the trilogy.  Which in turn led to Veils of Silk, which was set in India.
 



None of these settings were a particularly smart commercial choice, but I loved writing them and people who like these books tend to really like them.  Nonetheless, worn out by research, I decided to return to Britain and I began my Fallen Angels trilogy, which eventually went to seven books.  (Three seemed so skimpy…)
 
But my muse got the urge to travel again, and I returned to Asia for my Bride trilogy.  Though the first book, The Wild Child, was set in England, the heroine's childhood tragedy in India has shaped her life.  The hero's brother from that book was a born traveler, and his book was next, The China Bride.  I continued heading east and half of the third book, The Bartered Bride, took place in the East Indies, the islands that became Indonesia.  These books are a huge amount of research as I try to capture a sense of the place and the people who live there, so I have no current plans to send my characters to Asia again.  But my 2016 book, Once a Soldier, does take place on the Iberian Peninsula after the wars.  Once a traveler, always a traveler!

Rice-Volcano200x300Pat: That question is actually tougher than it sounds, given that I’ve been known to write fantasies about a mystical tropical island that disappears from view.  But if we eliminate imaginary locations, I guess my most exotic location would be St Lucia in the Caribbean. I actually vacationed there one year and fell in love with the rain forest greenery, the colorful birds that flew right up to our cottage porch, the brilliant flowers, and the incredible views of the sea. I wrote about it in one of my romantic mysteries, Volcano, which is coming out in a bundle with my other contemporary mysteries in the next day or two!

Jo: I've set all my books in England except for three—one that was mostly Irish (Dangerous Joy) and one which began in France (A Lady's Secret.) The third is The Rogue's Return, which mostly took part in Canada and on the journey home.

RoguesReturnI had a Rogue to find. In the first Rogue book, published in 1990, but with the first draft written in 1977, I'd created the Company of Rogues, who had such a schoolboyish name because they'd been schoolboys when they'd come together. A number of them played a part in An Arranged Marriage, but I didn't want to overcrowd the book, so I carelessly tossed out that Simon St. Bride was in Canada.

I told the stories of a number of Rogues, hoping Simon would turn up, but by 2005 I accepted that I was going to have to find him. I'd always wanted to set a historical in Canada, but I'd been thinking of Halifax, which was a well developed and active town by the Regency. However, Simon wasn't there. He was off adventuring in York, which is now Toronto, but then was a very rough-hewn place.

In 1816 York was a very new settlement with a military presence and an administration, but little polish. Not surprising, perhaps, that Simon got wounded in a duel and had to marry a young woman who definitely wouldn't suit his aristocratic family. I then had to figure out how they would travel
down river to Montreal, so they could take ship to England, and what life was like on a merchant ship in 1816.  Of course, the research was fun. You can read an excerpt here.

Lady Allerton's Wager UKNicola: I love writing about unusual historical settings and events and when this topic came up for the AAW I assumed I would choose Spitsbergen, in the
Arctic, where I set Whisper of Scandal. However there was a problem. I know that exotic means distant, or relating to a foreign country, but to me it also has connotations of warmth and colorfulness. The word tropical springs to my mind. Spitsbergen is many things—wild, wonderful and spectacular, but it is neither colorful nor tropical so I didn't feel it was right for this topic.

Lundy rabbitInstead I have chosen Lundy Island, a small island in the Bristol Channel that I used as a setting for one of my early Regencies, Lady Allerton's Wager. To me, Lundy is very exotic because it is like a small, private kingdom, especially in the past because it is so remote that it could be run as a private fiefdom. Lundy is colorful and unusual. There are blue skies,rich green fields and cerise rhododendrons growing wild on the cliffs. Even the rabbits come in multi colors! The waters around the island are equally exotic to explore and are a maritime reserve.

Lundy's history is extraordinary and it was this that I drew on when writing Lady Allerton's Wager. It has a thirteenth century castle, a history of piracy, over 160 shipwrecks, three lighthouses and a grand nineteenth century house with tropical gardens. To me that is the very epitome of exotic and now I want to visit Lundy again!
 
SusanKing_TamingtheHeiressSusan: If you consider Scotland an unusual or exotic location (I too think of exotic as someplace warm and colorful, so to me Scotland isn't exactly exotic), then I've written plenty of stories set in some unusual locales. Taking a story off the beaten path can be a great challenge for a writer and fun for the reader, and I'll take a risk for the sake of a good story. Scotland can present some tough patches for a storyteller in its history and its incredibly beautiful yet often dangerous landscape, but it's worth it, I think! I've set stories all around Scotland, but perhaps the most unusual setting was for Taming the Heiress—a Hebridean rock and a nearby island.

The book was a challenge to write from first page to last, with its Victorian time frame, unusual location, and the hurdles in researching lighthouse design and diving. On a rocky isle near a Hebridean island, the hero and his comrades begin building a lighthouse against the wishes of the wealthy heroine, who happens to own said isle and rock. The characters (and I!) had to deal with a wild location and wilder weather, and the hero got suited up in massive diving gear to go down to the ocean floor, sometimes in the midst of hellacious storms. The risk factor was high for the story, the characters and the writer. But I loved stepping off the beaten path into the ocean on this one, and I love the book and its strong characters, who were equally as stubborn as that Hebridean rock!  

Forbidden RoseJoanna: I find I've stayed in England and France for all my stories. How adventurous is that? Just the two countries. I barely even backstory outside them. There might have been one flashback to Italy, or maybe I just talk about it. But—like Thoreau who'd 'traveled widely in Concord'—I've gone lots of places in the England and France of the past. Probably the most exotic is the underground world my character Marguerite had to traverse to rescue her William Doyle in Forbidden Rose.

Cavern 1Quoting myself here: "Paris feeds on itself, like the Worm Ouroboros chews its own tail.  The fine building stone of Paris is pulled from beneath the city's feet. From Medieval times onward, folks took limestone out of the ground and threw up little trifles of work like Notre Dame and the Louvre."

It's the flip side of the City of Light. Central Paris has huge, dark caverns underneath where the stone was removed and nothing is left but Night. And . . . well . . . modern Parisians who sneak down there sometimes to hold parties, open nightclubs, and decorate the place with art and graffiti. My description of the place is here.

Anne: I'm never sure about "exotic" —one person's exotic location is someone else's back yard. That said, I've always enjoyed books set in foreign countries— I'm not sure whether it's because I've always loved to tr
avel, or whether I just like armchair adventures in interesting places. I grew up reading magical stories and fantasy and historical stories and never cared what the setting was. But I know a lot of readers don't like being taken to exotic locations.

1catchABrideI've set stories in a range of different countries, but probably the most unusual (for a Regency-era story) was Egypt. My editor wasn't enthusiastic—in fact I'd planned to make it the first of a series, because I was keen to write it. But she said no! Make it a later book. When it came to the cover, I sent the art department some gorgeous location pics, English travelers in Egypt, street scenes, gorgeous oriental-inspired art—and this is the cover they gave it. I hated it, but it stayed, because they didn't want to give any hint of foreignness. To Catch A Bride won a number of prestigious awards, but it sold the worst of the series.  The editor was right — readers don't like "foreign." I'm still glad I wrote it, though.

The Storybook HeroCara/Andrea: 
I’ve always written in the Regency era, so have tended to stay close to “home”—that is, London and the English countryside. That said, I didn’t know the unwritten publisher rules about exotic settings when I first started out . . . and being an avid traveler, both in the armchair and in real life, I loved the idea of finding a story where I could take my characters far from their usual haunts. Luckily, I had a very tolerant editor, who didn’t quash my enthusiastic burbling about an adventure set in Russia, with the hero and heroine dodging Napoleon’s invading troops as they sought to bring two young children stranded in the chaos of war safely back to England. (This days, I’m sure the idea would have been met with a resounding “NYET!”) The Storybook Hero ended up being a RITA finalist, but I was discouraged from straying from the British Isles after that. Subsequent publishers were very firm on “no exotic setting” rule. (Though in my Regency-set mystery, The Cocoa Conspiracy, I did get to set a book at the Congress of Vienna, which was great fun!)

So dear readers, now it's your turn to chime in! How do you feel about books set in exotic destinations? Will you go there with an author? Or do you prefer to stay in familiar settings?

100 thoughts on “Ask A Wench—an Exotic Question!”

  1. I do enjoy the odd exotic location, but it has to be researched well enough that I can take it seriously. There’s nothing ore jarring than exotic for the sake of it, and there’s little in the description to make you feel you are experiencing it with the characters.

    Reply
  2. I do enjoy the odd exotic location, but it has to be researched well enough that I can take it seriously. There’s nothing ore jarring than exotic for the sake of it, and there’s little in the description to make you feel you are experiencing it with the characters.

    Reply
  3. I do enjoy the odd exotic location, but it has to be researched well enough that I can take it seriously. There’s nothing ore jarring than exotic for the sake of it, and there’s little in the description to make you feel you are experiencing it with the characters.

    Reply
  4. I do enjoy the odd exotic location, but it has to be researched well enough that I can take it seriously. There’s nothing ore jarring than exotic for the sake of it, and there’s little in the description to make you feel you are experiencing it with the characters.

    Reply
  5. I do enjoy the odd exotic location, but it has to be researched well enough that I can take it seriously. There’s nothing ore jarring than exotic for the sake of it, and there’s little in the description to make you feel you are experiencing it with the characters.

    Reply
  6. Well, if “the past is a foreign country,” I suppose you could say that anyone writing historicals is writing about exotic locales. Still, by now I’ve read enough about the 18th and 19th centuries in England to make other locations appealing.
    Do you suppose “exotic” locations are more appealing to people who have been reading historicals for years and years? For readers who are new to the genre, a trip to Almacks may be new and fascinating. And there will always be people who want to go to Alacks because it is comfortable and familiar and just different enough to be exciting.

    Reply
  7. Well, if “the past is a foreign country,” I suppose you could say that anyone writing historicals is writing about exotic locales. Still, by now I’ve read enough about the 18th and 19th centuries in England to make other locations appealing.
    Do you suppose “exotic” locations are more appealing to people who have been reading historicals for years and years? For readers who are new to the genre, a trip to Almacks may be new and fascinating. And there will always be people who want to go to Alacks because it is comfortable and familiar and just different enough to be exciting.

    Reply
  8. Well, if “the past is a foreign country,” I suppose you could say that anyone writing historicals is writing about exotic locales. Still, by now I’ve read enough about the 18th and 19th centuries in England to make other locations appealing.
    Do you suppose “exotic” locations are more appealing to people who have been reading historicals for years and years? For readers who are new to the genre, a trip to Almacks may be new and fascinating. And there will always be people who want to go to Alacks because it is comfortable and familiar and just different enough to be exciting.

    Reply
  9. Well, if “the past is a foreign country,” I suppose you could say that anyone writing historicals is writing about exotic locales. Still, by now I’ve read enough about the 18th and 19th centuries in England to make other locations appealing.
    Do you suppose “exotic” locations are more appealing to people who have been reading historicals for years and years? For readers who are new to the genre, a trip to Almacks may be new and fascinating. And there will always be people who want to go to Alacks because it is comfortable and familiar and just different enough to be exciting.

    Reply
  10. Well, if “the past is a foreign country,” I suppose you could say that anyone writing historicals is writing about exotic locales. Still, by now I’ve read enough about the 18th and 19th centuries in England to make other locations appealing.
    Do you suppose “exotic” locations are more appealing to people who have been reading historicals for years and years? For readers who are new to the genre, a trip to Almacks may be new and fascinating. And there will always be people who want to go to Alacks because it is comfortable and familiar and just different enough to be exciting.

    Reply
  11. “I’m never sure about “exotic” —one person’s exotic location is someone else’s back yard.”
    Every time I hear or see people discussing what is “exotic” I always think of the years my family was based in India. Around Christmas the newspapers used to run stories about “exotic” and “rare” foods for the season.
    And the Brussels sprout was always featured!
    I do think it is harder to convince historical romance readers to try new locations. However, I have been forcing myself to be more adventurous, and it has – generally – been a rewarding experience.
    I think even reading about nineteenth century Australia is too scary for many readers, and back in those days Australians were pretty much just Brits with different nature!

    Reply
  12. “I’m never sure about “exotic” —one person’s exotic location is someone else’s back yard.”
    Every time I hear or see people discussing what is “exotic” I always think of the years my family was based in India. Around Christmas the newspapers used to run stories about “exotic” and “rare” foods for the season.
    And the Brussels sprout was always featured!
    I do think it is harder to convince historical romance readers to try new locations. However, I have been forcing myself to be more adventurous, and it has – generally – been a rewarding experience.
    I think even reading about nineteenth century Australia is too scary for many readers, and back in those days Australians were pretty much just Brits with different nature!

    Reply
  13. “I’m never sure about “exotic” —one person’s exotic location is someone else’s back yard.”
    Every time I hear or see people discussing what is “exotic” I always think of the years my family was based in India. Around Christmas the newspapers used to run stories about “exotic” and “rare” foods for the season.
    And the Brussels sprout was always featured!
    I do think it is harder to convince historical romance readers to try new locations. However, I have been forcing myself to be more adventurous, and it has – generally – been a rewarding experience.
    I think even reading about nineteenth century Australia is too scary for many readers, and back in those days Australians were pretty much just Brits with different nature!

    Reply
  14. “I’m never sure about “exotic” —one person’s exotic location is someone else’s back yard.”
    Every time I hear or see people discussing what is “exotic” I always think of the years my family was based in India. Around Christmas the newspapers used to run stories about “exotic” and “rare” foods for the season.
    And the Brussels sprout was always featured!
    I do think it is harder to convince historical romance readers to try new locations. However, I have been forcing myself to be more adventurous, and it has – generally – been a rewarding experience.
    I think even reading about nineteenth century Australia is too scary for many readers, and back in those days Australians were pretty much just Brits with different nature!

    Reply
  15. “I’m never sure about “exotic” —one person’s exotic location is someone else’s back yard.”
    Every time I hear or see people discussing what is “exotic” I always think of the years my family was based in India. Around Christmas the newspapers used to run stories about “exotic” and “rare” foods for the season.
    And the Brussels sprout was always featured!
    I do think it is harder to convince historical romance readers to try new locations. However, I have been forcing myself to be more adventurous, and it has – generally – been a rewarding experience.
    I think even reading about nineteenth century Australia is too scary for many readers, and back in those days Australians were pretty much just Brits with different nature!

    Reply
  16. I agree with Lillian–for a lot of readers, the historical setting itself is exotic enough. And I can understand that after a long, hard day at work, it’s a relief to escape into a familiar fantasy like the Regency. Really exotic settings require more work, and we are generally a very tired nation. *G* Luckily, there are enough different kinds of books out there to suit most tastes.

    Reply
  17. I agree with Lillian–for a lot of readers, the historical setting itself is exotic enough. And I can understand that after a long, hard day at work, it’s a relief to escape into a familiar fantasy like the Regency. Really exotic settings require more work, and we are generally a very tired nation. *G* Luckily, there are enough different kinds of books out there to suit most tastes.

    Reply
  18. I agree with Lillian–for a lot of readers, the historical setting itself is exotic enough. And I can understand that after a long, hard day at work, it’s a relief to escape into a familiar fantasy like the Regency. Really exotic settings require more work, and we are generally a very tired nation. *G* Luckily, there are enough different kinds of books out there to suit most tastes.

    Reply
  19. I agree with Lillian–for a lot of readers, the historical setting itself is exotic enough. And I can understand that after a long, hard day at work, it’s a relief to escape into a familiar fantasy like the Regency. Really exotic settings require more work, and we are generally a very tired nation. *G* Luckily, there are enough different kinds of books out there to suit most tastes.

    Reply
  20. I agree with Lillian–for a lot of readers, the historical setting itself is exotic enough. And I can understand that after a long, hard day at work, it’s a relief to escape into a familiar fantasy like the Regency. Really exotic settings require more work, and we are generally a very tired nation. *G* Luckily, there are enough different kinds of books out there to suit most tastes.

    Reply
  21. If the setting is well described and the setting and the story are intertwined, I like it.
    (BUT — my other favorite genres are Science Fiction/Fantasy and Mystery, and both of those frequently use “different” backgrounds, including backgrounds much wilder than Patricia’s Mystic Isle.
    When Anne Gracie wrote that someone’s exotic is someone else’s backyard — I immediately thought “Yes, Melbourne – and the rest of Australia – seem pretty exotic to me!”
    I also agree that historic times are exotic locations and so are all pioneer communities — wherever and whenever. And I pretty much like them all.

    Reply
  22. If the setting is well described and the setting and the story are intertwined, I like it.
    (BUT — my other favorite genres are Science Fiction/Fantasy and Mystery, and both of those frequently use “different” backgrounds, including backgrounds much wilder than Patricia’s Mystic Isle.
    When Anne Gracie wrote that someone’s exotic is someone else’s backyard — I immediately thought “Yes, Melbourne – and the rest of Australia – seem pretty exotic to me!”
    I also agree that historic times are exotic locations and so are all pioneer communities — wherever and whenever. And I pretty much like them all.

    Reply
  23. If the setting is well described and the setting and the story are intertwined, I like it.
    (BUT — my other favorite genres are Science Fiction/Fantasy and Mystery, and both of those frequently use “different” backgrounds, including backgrounds much wilder than Patricia’s Mystic Isle.
    When Anne Gracie wrote that someone’s exotic is someone else’s backyard — I immediately thought “Yes, Melbourne – and the rest of Australia – seem pretty exotic to me!”
    I also agree that historic times are exotic locations and so are all pioneer communities — wherever and whenever. And I pretty much like them all.

    Reply
  24. If the setting is well described and the setting and the story are intertwined, I like it.
    (BUT — my other favorite genres are Science Fiction/Fantasy and Mystery, and both of those frequently use “different” backgrounds, including backgrounds much wilder than Patricia’s Mystic Isle.
    When Anne Gracie wrote that someone’s exotic is someone else’s backyard — I immediately thought “Yes, Melbourne – and the rest of Australia – seem pretty exotic to me!”
    I also agree that historic times are exotic locations and so are all pioneer communities — wherever and whenever. And I pretty much like them all.

    Reply
  25. If the setting is well described and the setting and the story are intertwined, I like it.
    (BUT — my other favorite genres are Science Fiction/Fantasy and Mystery, and both of those frequently use “different” backgrounds, including backgrounds much wilder than Patricia’s Mystic Isle.
    When Anne Gracie wrote that someone’s exotic is someone else’s backyard — I immediately thought “Yes, Melbourne – and the rest of Australia – seem pretty exotic to me!”
    I also agree that historic times are exotic locations and so are all pioneer communities — wherever and whenever. And I pretty much like them all.

    Reply
  26. Ha—good point, Lillian. I think part of the appeal of Regency romances is that England feels familiar to American readers. They all seen pics of princesses, ballrooms and carriages. The English houses and landscape are also recognizable. So yes, as you say different enough to be intriguing, but not enough to be totally foreign.

    Reply
  27. Ha—good point, Lillian. I think part of the appeal of Regency romances is that England feels familiar to American readers. They all seen pics of princesses, ballrooms and carriages. The English houses and landscape are also recognizable. So yes, as you say different enough to be intriguing, but not enough to be totally foreign.

    Reply
  28. Ha—good point, Lillian. I think part of the appeal of Regency romances is that England feels familiar to American readers. They all seen pics of princesses, ballrooms and carriages. The English houses and landscape are also recognizable. So yes, as you say different enough to be intriguing, but not enough to be totally foreign.

    Reply
  29. Ha—good point, Lillian. I think part of the appeal of Regency romances is that England feels familiar to American readers. They all seen pics of princesses, ballrooms and carriages. The English houses and landscape are also recognizable. So yes, as you say different enough to be intriguing, but not enough to be totally foreign.

    Reply
  30. Ha—good point, Lillian. I think part of the appeal of Regency romances is that England feels familiar to American readers. They all seen pics of princesses, ballrooms and carriages. The English houses and landscape are also recognizable. So yes, as you say different enough to be intriguing, but not enough to be totally foreign.

    Reply
  31. It’s true that “exotic” is totally in the eyes of the beholder, Sonya.
    I feel most readers would enjoy being a little adventurous—I find it fun to experience an unknown-to-me setting. But I also acknowledge that the familiar can make a reader comfortable—and after all, reading should be a fun experience.!

    Reply
  32. It’s true that “exotic” is totally in the eyes of the beholder, Sonya.
    I feel most readers would enjoy being a little adventurous—I find it fun to experience an unknown-to-me setting. But I also acknowledge that the familiar can make a reader comfortable—and after all, reading should be a fun experience.!

    Reply
  33. It’s true that “exotic” is totally in the eyes of the beholder, Sonya.
    I feel most readers would enjoy being a little adventurous—I find it fun to experience an unknown-to-me setting. But I also acknowledge that the familiar can make a reader comfortable—and after all, reading should be a fun experience.!

    Reply
  34. It’s true that “exotic” is totally in the eyes of the beholder, Sonya.
    I feel most readers would enjoy being a little adventurous—I find it fun to experience an unknown-to-me setting. But I also acknowledge that the familiar can make a reader comfortable—and after all, reading should be a fun experience.!

    Reply
  35. It’s true that “exotic” is totally in the eyes of the beholder, Sonya.
    I feel most readers would enjoy being a little adventurous—I find it fun to experience an unknown-to-me setting. But I also acknowledge that the familiar can make a reader comfortable—and after all, reading should be a fun experience.!

    Reply
  36. I’ve read a couple of romance novels set in Egypt that were pretty good. One of my all time favorites, by Joanna Lindsey, was set in the Middle East and it was great. All of the main characters were still British though.

    Reply
  37. I’ve read a couple of romance novels set in Egypt that were pretty good. One of my all time favorites, by Joanna Lindsey, was set in the Middle East and it was great. All of the main characters were still British though.

    Reply
  38. I’ve read a couple of romance novels set in Egypt that were pretty good. One of my all time favorites, by Joanna Lindsey, was set in the Middle East and it was great. All of the main characters were still British though.

    Reply
  39. I’ve read a couple of romance novels set in Egypt that were pretty good. One of my all time favorites, by Joanna Lindsey, was set in the Middle East and it was great. All of the main characters were still British though.

    Reply
  40. I’ve read a couple of romance novels set in Egypt that were pretty good. One of my all time favorites, by Joanna Lindsey, was set in the Middle East and it was great. All of the main characters were still British though.

    Reply
  41. I thought the Egyptian setting in “To Catch A Bride” was very well done, and I loved the book, sorry more readers didn’t give it a try! I loved the exotic Asian settings in Mary Jo’s books too. But I have to admit that books set in Tsarist Russia have not often found favor with me. So often people seem to be in danger of freezing to death(not romantic) and the ruling class cruel and despotic. Actually, my grandfather was born under Tsar Nicholas II, and never had a good word to say about him, so I suppose it colored my view!

    Reply
  42. I thought the Egyptian setting in “To Catch A Bride” was very well done, and I loved the book, sorry more readers didn’t give it a try! I loved the exotic Asian settings in Mary Jo’s books too. But I have to admit that books set in Tsarist Russia have not often found favor with me. So often people seem to be in danger of freezing to death(not romantic) and the ruling class cruel and despotic. Actually, my grandfather was born under Tsar Nicholas II, and never had a good word to say about him, so I suppose it colored my view!

    Reply
  43. I thought the Egyptian setting in “To Catch A Bride” was very well done, and I loved the book, sorry more readers didn’t give it a try! I loved the exotic Asian settings in Mary Jo’s books too. But I have to admit that books set in Tsarist Russia have not often found favor with me. So often people seem to be in danger of freezing to death(not romantic) and the ruling class cruel and despotic. Actually, my grandfather was born under Tsar Nicholas II, and never had a good word to say about him, so I suppose it colored my view!

    Reply
  44. I thought the Egyptian setting in “To Catch A Bride” was very well done, and I loved the book, sorry more readers didn’t give it a try! I loved the exotic Asian settings in Mary Jo’s books too. But I have to admit that books set in Tsarist Russia have not often found favor with me. So often people seem to be in danger of freezing to death(not romantic) and the ruling class cruel and despotic. Actually, my grandfather was born under Tsar Nicholas II, and never had a good word to say about him, so I suppose it colored my view!

    Reply
  45. I thought the Egyptian setting in “To Catch A Bride” was very well done, and I loved the book, sorry more readers didn’t give it a try! I loved the exotic Asian settings in Mary Jo’s books too. But I have to admit that books set in Tsarist Russia have not often found favor with me. So often people seem to be in danger of freezing to death(not romantic) and the ruling class cruel and despotic. Actually, my grandfather was born under Tsar Nicholas II, and never had a good word to say about him, so I suppose it colored my view!

    Reply
  46. That’s interesting, Karin. I suppose a book set in the Russian summer just wouldn’t cut it.
    But also, I used to think snow was romantic until we moved to Canada and spent many years in winters that lasted months, and snow ceased to be at all romantic, no matter where it is!

    Reply
  47. That’s interesting, Karin. I suppose a book set in the Russian summer just wouldn’t cut it.
    But also, I used to think snow was romantic until we moved to Canada and spent many years in winters that lasted months, and snow ceased to be at all romantic, no matter where it is!

    Reply
  48. That’s interesting, Karin. I suppose a book set in the Russian summer just wouldn’t cut it.
    But also, I used to think snow was romantic until we moved to Canada and spent many years in winters that lasted months, and snow ceased to be at all romantic, no matter where it is!

    Reply
  49. That’s interesting, Karin. I suppose a book set in the Russian summer just wouldn’t cut it.
    But also, I used to think snow was romantic until we moved to Canada and spent many years in winters that lasted months, and snow ceased to be at all romantic, no matter where it is!

    Reply
  50. That’s interesting, Karin. I suppose a book set in the Russian summer just wouldn’t cut it.
    But also, I used to think snow was romantic until we moved to Canada and spent many years in winters that lasted months, and snow ceased to be at all romantic, no matter where it is!

    Reply
  51. I like books set in England. I tend to only read historical novels. Contemporary books just don’t do it for me. I love Regency novels so Scotland would probably be an exotic location for me lol!!

    Reply
  52. I like books set in England. I tend to only read historical novels. Contemporary books just don’t do it for me. I love Regency novels so Scotland would probably be an exotic location for me lol!!

    Reply
  53. I like books set in England. I tend to only read historical novels. Contemporary books just don’t do it for me. I love Regency novels so Scotland would probably be an exotic location for me lol!!

    Reply
  54. I like books set in England. I tend to only read historical novels. Contemporary books just don’t do it for me. I love Regency novels so Scotland would probably be an exotic location for me lol!!

    Reply
  55. I like books set in England. I tend to only read historical novels. Contemporary books just don’t do it for me. I love Regency novels so Scotland would probably be an exotic location for me lol!!

    Reply
  56. Russia would be lovely in the summer. I’m picturing a country dacha, the midnight sun, and those fields of sunflowers like in Dr. Zhivago. But it seems like most books I’ve read take place in the winter.

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  57. Russia would be lovely in the summer. I’m picturing a country dacha, the midnight sun, and those fields of sunflowers like in Dr. Zhivago. But it seems like most books I’ve read take place in the winter.

    Reply
  58. Russia would be lovely in the summer. I’m picturing a country dacha, the midnight sun, and those fields of sunflowers like in Dr. Zhivago. But it seems like most books I’ve read take place in the winter.

    Reply
  59. Russia would be lovely in the summer. I’m picturing a country dacha, the midnight sun, and those fields of sunflowers like in Dr. Zhivago. But it seems like most books I’ve read take place in the winter.

    Reply
  60. Russia would be lovely in the summer. I’m picturing a country dacha, the midnight sun, and those fields of sunflowers like in Dr. Zhivago. But it seems like most books I’ve read take place in the winter.

    Reply

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