Ask A Wench – The Influence of the Seasons

The other avenueNicola here, introducing this month’s Ask A Wench topic, which was sent in by Valerie Moore, who wins a book from me as a thank you. Valerie asks:

“How do the seasons affect your style of writing, if at all?” 

It’s an excellent question and gave us all much to ponder on. Do the seasons affect our actual writing style or is it more that the seasons affect our moods and this affects our writing? Certainly in my case, I find it extremely difficult to write about a season that is very different from the one that I’m in. At the moment I’m writing a book set in July whilst I’m in an English winter. I’m trying my best to remember the heat of the sun and the scent of roses whilst stepping out into the stinging rain and the cold wind. Winter can sometimes bring my mood down as well; that definitely affects my writing if not my style, and makes it more difficult. So here are the Wenches’ thoughts on this ever-fascinating topic, some lovely “hygge” ideas and some wonderful photography of the seasons from around the world.

 Pat: I’m not entirely certain anything affects my “style.” My style is me and the stories in my head. What weather does do is affect Slippers before the fire (Pat)my mood. I suffer from severe SAD, and when we lived in the Midwest, it was quite an ordeal to get me feeling warm and sunny enough to write. I had a whole routine of rocking in a chair beside the fire or typing under a UV lamp while sitting in a recliner wrapped in blankets. I suppose my characters might have shivered and been gloomier when I wrote during the winter months, but I never tried to assess that.

 But now I’m finally in sunny Southern California, and I can go outside for my daily dose of Vitamin D. I’m not claiming I write any faster, but I’m more relaxed about it, knowing I don’t have to rearrange my office and myself and everything until words flow again. I don’t think my characters are any happier for the sun, but they do seem to be enjoying less conflict!

Candle (002)Christina: I don’t think the seasons affect my style of writing at all, to be honest. Whenever I’m writing, I am deep inside the story and I don’t even notice my surroundings. There can be mayhem going on around me, but I don’t care because I'm in a different world. So whether it’s winter or summer has no effect whatsoever.

The only thing I will say is that I dislike heat intensely, and I do find it slightly more difficult to concentrate when the weather is hot or humid. I’m definitely a cold weather person and would much rather sit and type with fingerless gloves and wearing several layers of clothing, than being hot and sticky. This used to be a problem when I lived in London, as there was no respite from the heat there – in fact, the summer was pretty much unbearable for me. No amount of opening windows helped as even the draught was warm and moist. Now that I live in the countryside though, things are much better. Our house is old, with high ceilings and big windows, and it’s always cool inside. That means I can escape the sun and write to my heart’s content.

Some people suffer from SAD – feeling depressed in the middle of darkest winter – which presumably affects their writing, but that’s never bothered me. I actively LIKE the dark part of the year and find it cosy that you can light candles and log fires, and stay warm and snug indoors. Perhaps I’m weird, or maybe it’s a result of growing up in a country where there is only daylight for six hours in the winter, but I love it!

Andrea: I live in a spot where I get all four seasons, and really enjoy the rhythms of watching the Andrea's roses light and landscape change as it cycles through the colorful blossoming of spring to the more muted hues and starkness of winter. Does it affect my writing? Not really. The only real difference is the length of my writing day. I try to take a "plotting walk" every day, and I like to go as the sun is setting. I find it’s a great to unwind from a day the computer, and I often untangle plot knots as I walk and find my senses drawn to other things. The color and textures of flowers, the abstract beauty in fallen leaves, the light of the setting sun on the tree, the ruffling of the wind over water—the brain sort-of reacts with different synapses, and changing of the brainwaves often frees up whatever neurons are handling words. I find the outdoors and nature—whatever the season—really helps reset my creativity. 

Andrea's treeIn summer I do my walks around 6 or 7pm, while in the dead of winter, I have to get myself moving closer to 4 or 4:30pm. And even then, the end part can be coming home after twilight. (But, hey, the shorter writing day gives me a bit longer to curl up with a good book and cup of cocoa at night!) So my hours at the keyboard vary. But the seasons don’t really affect the words I’m putting on the page—after all, I’m usually lost in a previous century and prowling through the London slums or the ballrooms of Mayfair. 

Anne here. Good question. My answer? No idea.

I live in Melbourne, which is famous (infamous?) for having four seasons in one day. For instance Anne's lilacat the moment it's summer but outside it's a grey drizzly cold day, I am wearing woolly slippers and thinking of putting the heater on. Next week, though, it could be 40 degrees Celsius (104 F) for days, but then a cool change will come through and the temperature will drop by 20+ degrees C. in 20 minutes (ie to 60F.) A year ago half the country was on fire. Now we have floods and it's cold. 

As well, I communicate daily with people in the opposite hemisphere — particularly the US and UK (she says waving to the other wenches.) So while they're contending with snow and storms and freezing pipes and bare, leafless trees, I'm sitting here sweating, with the fan on and watching my weeds grow before my eyes. Unless I'm huddling under a blanket as I write. Or my days are getting shorter and darker, while they're bursting joyfully into spring. I

Anne's peachesIn a final complication I spend large chunks of my day imagining myself in Regency England, which is not only two centuries away from me, it's also in the opposite hemisphere, and depending what season my story is taking place in, it's likely to be different again from either my season or the wenches' one. I tend to assume I understand the English climate, having experienced it at various times in my life, but I still need to research what flowers are out, what fruits and vegetables are in season — as well as what flowers, fruits and vegetables were grown in England 200 years ago, and under what conditions. And what kind of food, therefore, might be on people's plates.

So how do the seasons affect my style of writing? I couldn't possibly say. It's all very confusing. So to share my confusion, I'm sending you lilac, which has finished here, and peaches, which are yet to come. 

Snow 2018 (003)Mary Jo: I'm very aware of weather in my reading and writing, possibly because I grew up on a farm between Buffalo and Rochester
in Western New York State.  That is serious snow country!  It was common to walk between piles of snow higher than my head. Where I live now in Maryland has much milder seasons, though every now and then a real humdinger of a blizzard strikes. 

 Even with less snow, I've usually found the month or two after Christmas to be a good time, peaceful time to burrow in and get a lot of writing done.  There are fewer distractions, which is good because I'm very distractible. (If a Caribbean cruise were on offer, that would certainly interrupt writing time!)  

Ice stormIt's not the same topic, but I always think about the seasons as I read and write.  Because I grew up on a farm, I pay attention to what flower is in bloom when, the length of the days, the season of the year, and how characters respond to weather.  Such details are part of the world building that makes stories more convincing.

 Plus, the weather is a universal topic of conversation even in places that scarcely have weather at all.  <g>  When I moved to San Francisco after college, I was amused by the residents solemnly talking about how variable the weather was when from what I saw, it was pretty darned predictable.  You want weather? I'll show you weather!  Bring on a blizzard!  I'll get lots of writing done while the snow is blowing outside. <G>

 Susan:  I have to agree with Mary Jo–as another born-and-bred Upstate New Yorker, winter suits me best for writing. Winter Front doorweather in a northern climate offers more chances for isolation and quiet than the other seasons, especially a cold and snowy sort of winter that keeps me in the house and seals me off from the world. Any environment that reduces distraction and boosts focus is good for me, helps me concentrate. I'm not always good about creating that sort of atmosphere on my own, so snow piled up on the doorstep can be a big help! I love snow, prefer cold to heat, and love the peacefulness and silence of wintry days. Though for several books, I was caught in a publishing cycle with January and February deadlines that had me writing furiously straight past Christmas into the new year — I did not enjoy that special spin on writing in winter, but I wonder if it formed a seasonal writing habit of a sort! 

MonetSpring and fall always seem like such busy months, though I do feel energized by crisp, beautiful fall days, especially after the summer months! Summer is just not my season, it's too hot for me (at least in my neck of the woods!) and dealing with the heat can be draining (although I love the extra time summer provides in a house that revolves around educational schedules!). But winter, ah, it's a relief. It's quiet, meditative, keeps me home, gives me less to do. It's an introvert's season, and it has been good for my stories. I like writing about winter as well, and have written two Christmas novellas where the hero and heroine are snowbound; as each begins to realize what they really want in life and what they care most about, they also discover who they care most about. Lately, with a string of brisk and chilly days, I'm making progress on a new novel that just wasn't cooperating a couple of months ago. Maybe there is something to this idea that one season might suit an individual's creative energy more than another!         

Thanks again to Valerie for sending in the question. Please keep the ideas coming – and if we choose one for the Ask A Wench you win a book of your choice. Now it’s over to you. How do the seasons affect you, and the things that you do in your life?

70 thoughts on “Ask A Wench – The Influence of the Seasons”

  1. I live in the mid-west where we have all four seasons. I actually like that even though I don’t love them all equally. Spring and fall are my two favorites. With air conditioning summer is quite nice also. Winter is my least favorite, even though there is nothing more beautiful than fresh falling snow.
    I do get somewhat depressed during the winter, but it has never affected my work life. When I was a child (before we had AC) the summer heat and humidity would sometimes leave me feeling lethargic but it did not spoil my summer vacation (smile).
    Thank you Valarie and ladies for an interesting post.

    Reply
  2. I live in the mid-west where we have all four seasons. I actually like that even though I don’t love them all equally. Spring and fall are my two favorites. With air conditioning summer is quite nice also. Winter is my least favorite, even though there is nothing more beautiful than fresh falling snow.
    I do get somewhat depressed during the winter, but it has never affected my work life. When I was a child (before we had AC) the summer heat and humidity would sometimes leave me feeling lethargic but it did not spoil my summer vacation (smile).
    Thank you Valarie and ladies for an interesting post.

    Reply
  3. I live in the mid-west where we have all four seasons. I actually like that even though I don’t love them all equally. Spring and fall are my two favorites. With air conditioning summer is quite nice also. Winter is my least favorite, even though there is nothing more beautiful than fresh falling snow.
    I do get somewhat depressed during the winter, but it has never affected my work life. When I was a child (before we had AC) the summer heat and humidity would sometimes leave me feeling lethargic but it did not spoil my summer vacation (smile).
    Thank you Valarie and ladies for an interesting post.

    Reply
  4. I live in the mid-west where we have all four seasons. I actually like that even though I don’t love them all equally. Spring and fall are my two favorites. With air conditioning summer is quite nice also. Winter is my least favorite, even though there is nothing more beautiful than fresh falling snow.
    I do get somewhat depressed during the winter, but it has never affected my work life. When I was a child (before we had AC) the summer heat and humidity would sometimes leave me feeling lethargic but it did not spoil my summer vacation (smile).
    Thank you Valarie and ladies for an interesting post.

    Reply
  5. I live in the mid-west where we have all four seasons. I actually like that even though I don’t love them all equally. Spring and fall are my two favorites. With air conditioning summer is quite nice also. Winter is my least favorite, even though there is nothing more beautiful than fresh falling snow.
    I do get somewhat depressed during the winter, but it has never affected my work life. When I was a child (before we had AC) the summer heat and humidity would sometimes leave me feeling lethargic but it did not spoil my summer vacation (smile).
    Thank you Valarie and ladies for an interesting post.

    Reply
  6. I love this. I also live in a place where we have 4 different seasons. I do have my favorites, but what I really love is experiencing the seasons change. Winter turning in to spring, summer into fall, and fall into winter. I tend to stay indoors more in both the summer and winter. I don’t like the heat (although summers evenings/nights can be glorious) and in the winter I like to hibernate with blankets and books.

    Reply
  7. I love this. I also live in a place where we have 4 different seasons. I do have my favorites, but what I really love is experiencing the seasons change. Winter turning in to spring, summer into fall, and fall into winter. I tend to stay indoors more in both the summer and winter. I don’t like the heat (although summers evenings/nights can be glorious) and in the winter I like to hibernate with blankets and books.

    Reply
  8. I love this. I also live in a place where we have 4 different seasons. I do have my favorites, but what I really love is experiencing the seasons change. Winter turning in to spring, summer into fall, and fall into winter. I tend to stay indoors more in both the summer and winter. I don’t like the heat (although summers evenings/nights can be glorious) and in the winter I like to hibernate with blankets and books.

    Reply
  9. I love this. I also live in a place where we have 4 different seasons. I do have my favorites, but what I really love is experiencing the seasons change. Winter turning in to spring, summer into fall, and fall into winter. I tend to stay indoors more in both the summer and winter. I don’t like the heat (although summers evenings/nights can be glorious) and in the winter I like to hibernate with blankets and books.

    Reply
  10. I love this. I also live in a place where we have 4 different seasons. I do have my favorites, but what I really love is experiencing the seasons change. Winter turning in to spring, summer into fall, and fall into winter. I tend to stay indoors more in both the summer and winter. I don’t like the heat (although summers evenings/nights can be glorious) and in the winter I like to hibernate with blankets and books.

    Reply
  11. It is a fascinating topic. I live in Qld where we don’t actually have seasons. We have warm, hot and sauna. On the most Arctic days of our ‘winter’ I might carry a light cardigan. So imagining deep drifts of leaves or snow is hard.

    Reply
  12. It is a fascinating topic. I live in Qld where we don’t actually have seasons. We have warm, hot and sauna. On the most Arctic days of our ‘winter’ I might carry a light cardigan. So imagining deep drifts of leaves or snow is hard.

    Reply
  13. It is a fascinating topic. I live in Qld where we don’t actually have seasons. We have warm, hot and sauna. On the most Arctic days of our ‘winter’ I might carry a light cardigan. So imagining deep drifts of leaves or snow is hard.

    Reply
  14. It is a fascinating topic. I live in Qld where we don’t actually have seasons. We have warm, hot and sauna. On the most Arctic days of our ‘winter’ I might carry a light cardigan. So imagining deep drifts of leaves or snow is hard.

    Reply
  15. It is a fascinating topic. I live in Qld where we don’t actually have seasons. We have warm, hot and sauna. On the most Arctic days of our ‘winter’ I might carry a light cardigan. So imagining deep drifts of leaves or snow is hard.

    Reply
  16. Thank you for your comments, Mary. I like the variation of having four seasons too. Without air conditioning, though, our summers in the UK are getting too hot for me now. Interesting that you found that before the advent of AC too! I’m glad that the sometimes depressing days of winter didn’t affect your work and hope it doesn’t bring you down too badly.

    Reply
  17. Thank you for your comments, Mary. I like the variation of having four seasons too. Without air conditioning, though, our summers in the UK are getting too hot for me now. Interesting that you found that before the advent of AC too! I’m glad that the sometimes depressing days of winter didn’t affect your work and hope it doesn’t bring you down too badly.

    Reply
  18. Thank you for your comments, Mary. I like the variation of having four seasons too. Without air conditioning, though, our summers in the UK are getting too hot for me now. Interesting that you found that before the advent of AC too! I’m glad that the sometimes depressing days of winter didn’t affect your work and hope it doesn’t bring you down too badly.

    Reply
  19. Thank you for your comments, Mary. I like the variation of having four seasons too. Without air conditioning, though, our summers in the UK are getting too hot for me now. Interesting that you found that before the advent of AC too! I’m glad that the sometimes depressing days of winter didn’t affect your work and hope it doesn’t bring you down too badly.

    Reply
  20. Thank you for your comments, Mary. I like the variation of having four seasons too. Without air conditioning, though, our summers in the UK are getting too hot for me now. Interesting that you found that before the advent of AC too! I’m glad that the sometimes depressing days of winter didn’t affect your work and hope it doesn’t bring you down too badly.

    Reply
  21. Thank you, Mel, I’m glad you enjoyed the post. I love hearing about the differences in climate in other parts of the world. A place where on the coldest day you might need a light cardigan is so very different from what we are accustomed to, but then so are the other extremes of cold. Fascinating!

    Reply
  22. Thank you, Mel, I’m glad you enjoyed the post. I love hearing about the differences in climate in other parts of the world. A place where on the coldest day you might need a light cardigan is so very different from what we are accustomed to, but then so are the other extremes of cold. Fascinating!

    Reply
  23. Thank you, Mel, I’m glad you enjoyed the post. I love hearing about the differences in climate in other parts of the world. A place where on the coldest day you might need a light cardigan is so very different from what we are accustomed to, but then so are the other extremes of cold. Fascinating!

    Reply
  24. Thank you, Mel, I’m glad you enjoyed the post. I love hearing about the differences in climate in other parts of the world. A place where on the coldest day you might need a light cardigan is so very different from what we are accustomed to, but then so are the other extremes of cold. Fascinating!

    Reply
  25. Thank you, Mel, I’m glad you enjoyed the post. I love hearing about the differences in climate in other parts of the world. A place where on the coldest day you might need a light cardigan is so very different from what we are accustomed to, but then so are the other extremes of cold. Fascinating!

    Reply
  26. I deal with SAD. But, I live in Texas – we get lots of sunshine. I know that grey and dark days make me feel not so well. So, I am grateful for the sunshine and the heat.
    I admire all of you if you are able to overcome the actual weather and find yourself in another season and another time.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  27. I deal with SAD. But, I live in Texas – we get lots of sunshine. I know that grey and dark days make me feel not so well. So, I am grateful for the sunshine and the heat.
    I admire all of you if you are able to overcome the actual weather and find yourself in another season and another time.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  28. I deal with SAD. But, I live in Texas – we get lots of sunshine. I know that grey and dark days make me feel not so well. So, I am grateful for the sunshine and the heat.
    I admire all of you if you are able to overcome the actual weather and find yourself in another season and another time.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  29. I deal with SAD. But, I live in Texas – we get lots of sunshine. I know that grey and dark days make me feel not so well. So, I am grateful for the sunshine and the heat.
    I admire all of you if you are able to overcome the actual weather and find yourself in another season and another time.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  30. I deal with SAD. But, I live in Texas – we get lots of sunshine. I know that grey and dark days make me feel not so well. So, I am grateful for the sunshine and the heat.
    I admire all of you if you are able to overcome the actual weather and find yourself in another season and another time.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  31. Here in GA, or at least my part of GA which is near Atlanta, we have 4 seasons. Down in S. GA it is more like 3 seasons.
    I do like having 4 seasons even though summers can be much too long and hot (which I don’t care for). But then again I hate cold weather even more. Sometimes our spring happens in the blink of an eye because winter will linger so long and then BOOM we are suddenly in early or mid-summer.
    Over the past 15 years winters have gotten shorter. The average first and last frost dates are 15 days earlier and 15 days later. Which just means we have 20 more days of summer (boo hiss).
    Gardening keeps me attuned to the seasons and the natural world. Watching birds also keeps you aware of the seasons as migration takes place, courting and territorial activities and then watching the young birds.
    Too hot makes me hibernate inside – thank goodness for air conditioning! Too cold makes me hibernate inside as well. My temperature tolerance range is getting more narrow as I get older.

    Reply
  32. Here in GA, or at least my part of GA which is near Atlanta, we have 4 seasons. Down in S. GA it is more like 3 seasons.
    I do like having 4 seasons even though summers can be much too long and hot (which I don’t care for). But then again I hate cold weather even more. Sometimes our spring happens in the blink of an eye because winter will linger so long and then BOOM we are suddenly in early or mid-summer.
    Over the past 15 years winters have gotten shorter. The average first and last frost dates are 15 days earlier and 15 days later. Which just means we have 20 more days of summer (boo hiss).
    Gardening keeps me attuned to the seasons and the natural world. Watching birds also keeps you aware of the seasons as migration takes place, courting and territorial activities and then watching the young birds.
    Too hot makes me hibernate inside – thank goodness for air conditioning! Too cold makes me hibernate inside as well. My temperature tolerance range is getting more narrow as I get older.

    Reply
  33. Here in GA, or at least my part of GA which is near Atlanta, we have 4 seasons. Down in S. GA it is more like 3 seasons.
    I do like having 4 seasons even though summers can be much too long and hot (which I don’t care for). But then again I hate cold weather even more. Sometimes our spring happens in the blink of an eye because winter will linger so long and then BOOM we are suddenly in early or mid-summer.
    Over the past 15 years winters have gotten shorter. The average first and last frost dates are 15 days earlier and 15 days later. Which just means we have 20 more days of summer (boo hiss).
    Gardening keeps me attuned to the seasons and the natural world. Watching birds also keeps you aware of the seasons as migration takes place, courting and territorial activities and then watching the young birds.
    Too hot makes me hibernate inside – thank goodness for air conditioning! Too cold makes me hibernate inside as well. My temperature tolerance range is getting more narrow as I get older.

    Reply
  34. Here in GA, or at least my part of GA which is near Atlanta, we have 4 seasons. Down in S. GA it is more like 3 seasons.
    I do like having 4 seasons even though summers can be much too long and hot (which I don’t care for). But then again I hate cold weather even more. Sometimes our spring happens in the blink of an eye because winter will linger so long and then BOOM we are suddenly in early or mid-summer.
    Over the past 15 years winters have gotten shorter. The average first and last frost dates are 15 days earlier and 15 days later. Which just means we have 20 more days of summer (boo hiss).
    Gardening keeps me attuned to the seasons and the natural world. Watching birds also keeps you aware of the seasons as migration takes place, courting and territorial activities and then watching the young birds.
    Too hot makes me hibernate inside – thank goodness for air conditioning! Too cold makes me hibernate inside as well. My temperature tolerance range is getting more narrow as I get older.

    Reply
  35. Here in GA, or at least my part of GA which is near Atlanta, we have 4 seasons. Down in S. GA it is more like 3 seasons.
    I do like having 4 seasons even though summers can be much too long and hot (which I don’t care for). But then again I hate cold weather even more. Sometimes our spring happens in the blink of an eye because winter will linger so long and then BOOM we are suddenly in early or mid-summer.
    Over the past 15 years winters have gotten shorter. The average first and last frost dates are 15 days earlier and 15 days later. Which just means we have 20 more days of summer (boo hiss).
    Gardening keeps me attuned to the seasons and the natural world. Watching birds also keeps you aware of the seasons as migration takes place, courting and territorial activities and then watching the young birds.
    Too hot makes me hibernate inside – thank goodness for air conditioning! Too cold makes me hibernate inside as well. My temperature tolerance range is getting more narrow as I get older.

    Reply
  36. I seem to have missed this post. I almost hate winter, because I can get cold even in summer. BUT, each season has its joys. I wouldn’t wish to live in a non-seasonal place.

    Reply
  37. I seem to have missed this post. I almost hate winter, because I can get cold even in summer. BUT, each season has its joys. I wouldn’t wish to live in a non-seasonal place.

    Reply
  38. I seem to have missed this post. I almost hate winter, because I can get cold even in summer. BUT, each season has its joys. I wouldn’t wish to live in a non-seasonal place.

    Reply
  39. I seem to have missed this post. I almost hate winter, because I can get cold even in summer. BUT, each season has its joys. I wouldn’t wish to live in a non-seasonal place.

    Reply
  40. I seem to have missed this post. I almost hate winter, because I can get cold even in summer. BUT, each season has its joys. I wouldn’t wish to live in a non-seasonal place.

    Reply
  41. I seem to have missed this post also. I lived with 4 definite seasons for much of my life. I have been a sufferer of SAD since childhood so winter was a very long depressing time for me. I am also prone to lung infections and the cold air was very detrimental so many winters I would develop pneumonia. Driving long distances to work was also a very depressing part of winter as the roads were in a rural area and many times almost impassable. Thank God for 4 wheel drive. Now we have retired to sunny Fl. When the temp in winter hits 40 degrees, I’m freezing. I do see a change of seasons although it is more subtle. There are trees like the Cypress that drop their leaves and the oaks seem to go through a transformation. We receive the ends of the cold fronts from up north and the winds off the ocean so it isn’t a paradise all year around. However, most days are sunny and my moods are much more optimistic. Now I like to see snow in the media or in pictures and read about it.

    Reply
  42. I seem to have missed this post also. I lived with 4 definite seasons for much of my life. I have been a sufferer of SAD since childhood so winter was a very long depressing time for me. I am also prone to lung infections and the cold air was very detrimental so many winters I would develop pneumonia. Driving long distances to work was also a very depressing part of winter as the roads were in a rural area and many times almost impassable. Thank God for 4 wheel drive. Now we have retired to sunny Fl. When the temp in winter hits 40 degrees, I’m freezing. I do see a change of seasons although it is more subtle. There are trees like the Cypress that drop their leaves and the oaks seem to go through a transformation. We receive the ends of the cold fronts from up north and the winds off the ocean so it isn’t a paradise all year around. However, most days are sunny and my moods are much more optimistic. Now I like to see snow in the media or in pictures and read about it.

    Reply
  43. I seem to have missed this post also. I lived with 4 definite seasons for much of my life. I have been a sufferer of SAD since childhood so winter was a very long depressing time for me. I am also prone to lung infections and the cold air was very detrimental so many winters I would develop pneumonia. Driving long distances to work was also a very depressing part of winter as the roads were in a rural area and many times almost impassable. Thank God for 4 wheel drive. Now we have retired to sunny Fl. When the temp in winter hits 40 degrees, I’m freezing. I do see a change of seasons although it is more subtle. There are trees like the Cypress that drop their leaves and the oaks seem to go through a transformation. We receive the ends of the cold fronts from up north and the winds off the ocean so it isn’t a paradise all year around. However, most days are sunny and my moods are much more optimistic. Now I like to see snow in the media or in pictures and read about it.

    Reply
  44. I seem to have missed this post also. I lived with 4 definite seasons for much of my life. I have been a sufferer of SAD since childhood so winter was a very long depressing time for me. I am also prone to lung infections and the cold air was very detrimental so many winters I would develop pneumonia. Driving long distances to work was also a very depressing part of winter as the roads were in a rural area and many times almost impassable. Thank God for 4 wheel drive. Now we have retired to sunny Fl. When the temp in winter hits 40 degrees, I’m freezing. I do see a change of seasons although it is more subtle. There are trees like the Cypress that drop their leaves and the oaks seem to go through a transformation. We receive the ends of the cold fronts from up north and the winds off the ocean so it isn’t a paradise all year around. However, most days are sunny and my moods are much more optimistic. Now I like to see snow in the media or in pictures and read about it.

    Reply
  45. I seem to have missed this post also. I lived with 4 definite seasons for much of my life. I have been a sufferer of SAD since childhood so winter was a very long depressing time for me. I am also prone to lung infections and the cold air was very detrimental so many winters I would develop pneumonia. Driving long distances to work was also a very depressing part of winter as the roads were in a rural area and many times almost impassable. Thank God for 4 wheel drive. Now we have retired to sunny Fl. When the temp in winter hits 40 degrees, I’m freezing. I do see a change of seasons although it is more subtle. There are trees like the Cypress that drop their leaves and the oaks seem to go through a transformation. We receive the ends of the cold fronts from up north and the winds off the ocean so it isn’t a paradise all year around. However, most days are sunny and my moods are much more optimistic. Now I like to see snow in the media or in pictures and read about it.

    Reply
  46. Thank you, Annette. I’m sorry to hear that you have SAD but so glad that the sunshine and the warmth helps. We’re in the middle of a winter storm here – sometimes being able to escape to another time and place is a big bonus!

    Reply
  47. Thank you, Annette. I’m sorry to hear that you have SAD but so glad that the sunshine and the warmth helps. We’re in the middle of a winter storm here – sometimes being able to escape to another time and place is a big bonus!

    Reply
  48. Thank you, Annette. I’m sorry to hear that you have SAD but so glad that the sunshine and the warmth helps. We’re in the middle of a winter storm here – sometimes being able to escape to another time and place is a big bonus!

    Reply
  49. Thank you, Annette. I’m sorry to hear that you have SAD but so glad that the sunshine and the warmth helps. We’re in the middle of a winter storm here – sometimes being able to escape to another time and place is a big bonus!

    Reply
  50. Thank you, Annette. I’m sorry to hear that you have SAD but so glad that the sunshine and the warmth helps. We’re in the middle of a winter storm here – sometimes being able to escape to another time and place is a big bonus!

    Reply
  51. It’s very interesting to hear about your “quick” spring, Vicki. The seasons in other parts of the world is a revelation to me, so different from the UK. It’s a great pity that the summer is getting longer when it’s so nice to have variety. Like you, I love being in touch with the natural world and the way in which you can sense the changing seasons. The birds have started singing early in the morning again here – it’s so lovely to hear them!

    Reply
  52. It’s very interesting to hear about your “quick” spring, Vicki. The seasons in other parts of the world is a revelation to me, so different from the UK. It’s a great pity that the summer is getting longer when it’s so nice to have variety. Like you, I love being in touch with the natural world and the way in which you can sense the changing seasons. The birds have started singing early in the morning again here – it’s so lovely to hear them!

    Reply
  53. It’s very interesting to hear about your “quick” spring, Vicki. The seasons in other parts of the world is a revelation to me, so different from the UK. It’s a great pity that the summer is getting longer when it’s so nice to have variety. Like you, I love being in touch with the natural world and the way in which you can sense the changing seasons. The birds have started singing early in the morning again here – it’s so lovely to hear them!

    Reply
  54. It’s very interesting to hear about your “quick” spring, Vicki. The seasons in other parts of the world is a revelation to me, so different from the UK. It’s a great pity that the summer is getting longer when it’s so nice to have variety. Like you, I love being in touch with the natural world and the way in which you can sense the changing seasons. The birds have started singing early in the morning again here – it’s so lovely to hear them!

    Reply
  55. It’s very interesting to hear about your “quick” spring, Vicki. The seasons in other parts of the world is a revelation to me, so different from the UK. It’s a great pity that the summer is getting longer when it’s so nice to have variety. Like you, I love being in touch with the natural world and the way in which you can sense the changing seasons. The birds have started singing early in the morning again here – it’s so lovely to hear them!

    Reply
  56. Hi Sue. I’m with you – I think living without seasons would feel quite disappointing. The variety is good even if the cold is not!

    Reply
  57. Hi Sue. I’m with you – I think living without seasons would feel quite disappointing. The variety is good even if the cold is not!

    Reply
  58. Hi Sue. I’m with you – I think living without seasons would feel quite disappointing. The variety is good even if the cold is not!

    Reply
  59. Hi Sue. I’m with you – I think living without seasons would feel quite disappointing. The variety is good even if the cold is not!

    Reply
  60. Hi Sue. I’m with you – I think living without seasons would feel quite disappointing. The variety is good even if the cold is not!

    Reply
  61. That sounds like a good compromise – see pictures of snow but avoid the downsides of it! I like that there are subtle differences in the seasons in Florida, though. It’s always nice to have those to look out for.

    Reply
  62. That sounds like a good compromise – see pictures of snow but avoid the downsides of it! I like that there are subtle differences in the seasons in Florida, though. It’s always nice to have those to look out for.

    Reply
  63. That sounds like a good compromise – see pictures of snow but avoid the downsides of it! I like that there are subtle differences in the seasons in Florida, though. It’s always nice to have those to look out for.

    Reply
  64. That sounds like a good compromise – see pictures of snow but avoid the downsides of it! I like that there are subtle differences in the seasons in Florida, though. It’s always nice to have those to look out for.

    Reply
  65. That sounds like a good compromise – see pictures of snow but avoid the downsides of it! I like that there are subtle differences in the seasons in Florida, though. It’s always nice to have those to look out for.

    Reply

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