Ask A Wench — Secondary Characters

Hi all, Anne here, introducing a new occasional feature of Word Wenchery — Ask a Wench. As many of you know, we invite people to submit questions to the wenches, and if a wench chooses your question to answer, you'll win a free book.  We have a long list of these questions, however some are not sufficiently meaty to fill a whole blog. But we don't want to ignore you, so in "Ask a Wench" we'll pose just one question, and give a variety of wenchly responses to it. CatchBride40k

To start AAW off, we've chosen a question sent in by Susan Klinger: "Has there ever been a secondary character who has surprised you and sprung to life so forcefully that s/he has jumped up, grabbed you by the throat, and demanded his/her own book?"   (For this question Susan wins a copy of my latest book TO CATCH A BRIDE)

So, over to the wenches… 

Rake&refrmr Mary Jo said : Susan, my mental imagery is much less vivid than that—I tend to think in terms of “a secondary guy got really interesting and I wanted to work out his story,” but indeed, it happens regularly.  And it’s always a guy. <G> 

The first time this happened was in my very first book, The Diabolical Baron, when the semi-villainous cousin, Reginald Davenport, showed unexpected signs of decency and humor at the end.  Friends loved him because he was a bad boy, I pondered and realized his bad behavior always came when he’d been drinking, and voila!  I wrote my alcoholic book, The Rake and the Reformer.Shattrdrainbws

On another occasion, the brother of the hero of Shattered Rainbows moved from wallpaper to three dimensions toward the end of the book.  Stephen Kenyon’s story became my death and dying romance, One Perfect Rose.  The whole plotline of running away from home and joining a traveling theater company was inspired by Stephen making a remark about “Shakespearean tragedy” in Shattered Rainbows. Who knew my duke loved the theater? <G>   
 
 
And so it goes.  I don’t want to waste a good man! MJP.

Note from Anne: (There's an excerpt here from Shattered Rainbows)

Spywrsilk  Andrea said:

You would think that we could make our secondary characters behave, but against all reason, they often manage to take on a life of their own. In my most recent trilogy, the three heroines—who were all trained at a secret school for female spies— were the stars. Or so I thought. However, Alexandr Orlov had  other ideas.Seduced By A Spy

I had fully intended to keep him in the shadows, playing the role of a cynical nobleman whose motives are shrouded in mystery. He was meant merely to tease, to tantalize the heroines with hints that he might be in league with the villain they sought. Did he stay in character? Hell, no. He displayed such rakish wit, seductive charm  and swashbuckling charisma that when it came to writing the second book of the series, I simply couldn’t refuse his demand to strut his stuff (he’s a rather cocky fellow) as the leading man.

As it turned out that I was wise to listen to his husky murmurs—he’s turned out to be one of my favorite heroes. (You may read his story in ‘Seduced By A Spy’, written under my Andrea Pickens nom de plume. There's an excerpt here.)

MagicMan200 From Pat

Over the years, I’ve had a number of secondary characters spring to life and demand their own books. Sometimes I could oblige. Others, I unfortunately could not. I’d have to say one of the most forceful of those characters was Aidan in my MAGIC series. He simply walked out of the mists, onto the page, and completely took over a scene I was writing. I had no idea he existed until then, and over the course of the six-book series, he was enigmatic, mysterious, and thoroughly fascinating until I had no choice but to tell his story.  I love it when that happens!

From Anne:

I always have trouble with secondary characters wanting to take over a book or a scene and I usually have to prune them b
ack. I have particular trouble with eccentric dowagers, although they don't usually demand their own stories.  But I have had secondary characters demanding their own stories, and, as Mary Jo said, it's usually a man who does it, though not always. (I once had a small girl who wanted her own story once she grew up. She got it in Perfect Kiss, the fourth book in a series advertised as a trilogy.)The Perfect Kiss

 It even happened with the very first book I wrote (Gallant Waif) when the hero's best friend arrived on the scene and started to act heroic. In fact I had to prune him back quite severely so he didn't out-hero the hero!

I went to write his story in the next book, but the heroine I'd picked wasn't right for him and that hero morphed into someone different. I tried several more times and each time, because the heroine wasn't right for him, he morphed into someone else. It was very annoying because at the same time he (and readers) kept asking for his story.

Waif_us I was talking about this with a writer friend of mine and she said: "Francis is so self-assured and in control — what he needs is a heroine who doesn't play by his rules." And she was right.  Almost instantly a heroine popped into my head; a dusty little street-urchin who was a long lost daughter of an aristocratic family. And when my cool, in-command hero attempts to rescue her, she refuses — for very good reasons. So I had my heroine and the bones of my story, but I'd left that publisher and had started a new series by then.

However that story and that hero and heroine kept nagging at me to be written, so I changed his name, gave him a slightly different background and friends, and put him in my new book, with the heroine I'd dreamed up for him all those years ago. The book is called TO CATCH A BRIDE, he's now called Rafe, but in many ways, he's the same character, and finally his story has been told, and I'm so pleased it has. If you want to read an excerpt click here.

So it seems a number of us have encountered secondary characters who demand a book of their own, contrary to our initial plans for them. And some of those characters have got their books, others haven't.

What about you? Have you encountered (or written) any secondary characters who you'd love to see in a book of their own? And which is your favorite secondary-character-to-hero story? I think mine is Dancing With Clara, an old Mary Balogh book, where Frederick, the bad guy from Tempting Harriet becomes the hero.

115 thoughts on “Ask A Wench — Secondary Characters”

  1. I’m writing that book right now! My current hero turned up in Book#3 of my Kensington trilogy, and I had to send him to Italy to get rid of him—he absolutely took over his section of the book. Trouble was, I had given him such unheroic properties that it’s been a challenge to write him, but we’re both having a good time.:)
    Christine Merrill redeemed a bad brother very nicely, too in An Unladylike Offer.

    Reply
  2. I’m writing that book right now! My current hero turned up in Book#3 of my Kensington trilogy, and I had to send him to Italy to get rid of him—he absolutely took over his section of the book. Trouble was, I had given him such unheroic properties that it’s been a challenge to write him, but we’re both having a good time.:)
    Christine Merrill redeemed a bad brother very nicely, too in An Unladylike Offer.

    Reply
  3. I’m writing that book right now! My current hero turned up in Book#3 of my Kensington trilogy, and I had to send him to Italy to get rid of him—he absolutely took over his section of the book. Trouble was, I had given him such unheroic properties that it’s been a challenge to write him, but we’re both having a good time.:)
    Christine Merrill redeemed a bad brother very nicely, too in An Unladylike Offer.

    Reply
  4. I’m writing that book right now! My current hero turned up in Book#3 of my Kensington trilogy, and I had to send him to Italy to get rid of him—he absolutely took over his section of the book. Trouble was, I had given him such unheroic properties that it’s been a challenge to write him, but we’re both having a good time.:)
    Christine Merrill redeemed a bad brother very nicely, too in An Unladylike Offer.

    Reply
  5. I’m writing that book right now! My current hero turned up in Book#3 of my Kensington trilogy, and I had to send him to Italy to get rid of him—he absolutely took over his section of the book. Trouble was, I had given him such unheroic properties that it’s been a challenge to write him, but we’re both having a good time.:)
    Christine Merrill redeemed a bad brother very nicely, too in An Unladylike Offer.

    Reply
  6. Love secondary characters. I’ve read about secondary characters taking over the book and while I was struggling with my own writing I experienced it. My problem was I didn’t have enough experience in writing to stop his take over. So, I have this character who has stolen the show from my hero. It was a thrill when it began to happen, not so much now that I have to do some chopping and rewriting.
    Reginald Davenport is one of my favorite charactrers.

    Reply
  7. Love secondary characters. I’ve read about secondary characters taking over the book and while I was struggling with my own writing I experienced it. My problem was I didn’t have enough experience in writing to stop his take over. So, I have this character who has stolen the show from my hero. It was a thrill when it began to happen, not so much now that I have to do some chopping and rewriting.
    Reginald Davenport is one of my favorite charactrers.

    Reply
  8. Love secondary characters. I’ve read about secondary characters taking over the book and while I was struggling with my own writing I experienced it. My problem was I didn’t have enough experience in writing to stop his take over. So, I have this character who has stolen the show from my hero. It was a thrill when it began to happen, not so much now that I have to do some chopping and rewriting.
    Reginald Davenport is one of my favorite charactrers.

    Reply
  9. Love secondary characters. I’ve read about secondary characters taking over the book and while I was struggling with my own writing I experienced it. My problem was I didn’t have enough experience in writing to stop his take over. So, I have this character who has stolen the show from my hero. It was a thrill when it began to happen, not so much now that I have to do some chopping and rewriting.
    Reginald Davenport is one of my favorite charactrers.

    Reply
  10. Love secondary characters. I’ve read about secondary characters taking over the book and while I was struggling with my own writing I experienced it. My problem was I didn’t have enough experience in writing to stop his take over. So, I have this character who has stolen the show from my hero. It was a thrill when it began to happen, not so much now that I have to do some chopping and rewriting.
    Reginald Davenport is one of my favorite charactrers.

    Reply
  11. I love secondary characters, and I’ve just signed a contract for a book featuring a secondary character from my novel, In Sunshine or in Shadow. The heroine’s daughter is all grown up and ready for her own passionate love story. I didn’t plan it, but it certainly worked out well for both of us – and her hero as well.
    One Perfect Rose was the first MJP book I read. I loved Stephen, and I especially love Michael.

    Reply
  12. I love secondary characters, and I’ve just signed a contract for a book featuring a secondary character from my novel, In Sunshine or in Shadow. The heroine’s daughter is all grown up and ready for her own passionate love story. I didn’t plan it, but it certainly worked out well for both of us – and her hero as well.
    One Perfect Rose was the first MJP book I read. I loved Stephen, and I especially love Michael.

    Reply
  13. I love secondary characters, and I’ve just signed a contract for a book featuring a secondary character from my novel, In Sunshine or in Shadow. The heroine’s daughter is all grown up and ready for her own passionate love story. I didn’t plan it, but it certainly worked out well for both of us – and her hero as well.
    One Perfect Rose was the first MJP book I read. I loved Stephen, and I especially love Michael.

    Reply
  14. I love secondary characters, and I’ve just signed a contract for a book featuring a secondary character from my novel, In Sunshine or in Shadow. The heroine’s daughter is all grown up and ready for her own passionate love story. I didn’t plan it, but it certainly worked out well for both of us – and her hero as well.
    One Perfect Rose was the first MJP book I read. I loved Stephen, and I especially love Michael.

    Reply
  15. I love secondary characters, and I’ve just signed a contract for a book featuring a secondary character from my novel, In Sunshine or in Shadow. The heroine’s daughter is all grown up and ready for her own passionate love story. I didn’t plan it, but it certainly worked out well for both of us – and her hero as well.
    One Perfect Rose was the first MJP book I read. I loved Stephen, and I especially love Michael.

    Reply
  16. Andrea, I spent the better part of yesterday reading Alexandr and Shannon’s story. I’m not surprised that Alex demanded his own story and I am glad he did!
    What fun! 🙂
    And a fun post, wenches. Thanks.

    Reply
  17. Andrea, I spent the better part of yesterday reading Alexandr and Shannon’s story. I’m not surprised that Alex demanded his own story and I am glad he did!
    What fun! 🙂
    And a fun post, wenches. Thanks.

    Reply
  18. Andrea, I spent the better part of yesterday reading Alexandr and Shannon’s story. I’m not surprised that Alex demanded his own story and I am glad he did!
    What fun! 🙂
    And a fun post, wenches. Thanks.

    Reply
  19. Andrea, I spent the better part of yesterday reading Alexandr and Shannon’s story. I’m not surprised that Alex demanded his own story and I am glad he did!
    What fun! 🙂
    And a fun post, wenches. Thanks.

    Reply
  20. Andrea, I spent the better part of yesterday reading Alexandr and Shannon’s story. I’m not surprised that Alex demanded his own story and I am glad he did!
    What fun! 🙂
    And a fun post, wenches. Thanks.

    Reply
  21. I’m always thrilled to see my favorite secondary characters get their own stories.
    Mary Jo, I loved Reginald and was happy to see him get his own book and I enjoyed Stephen’s story in ONE PERFECT ROSE (I still have the small hardback). SHATTERED RAINBOWS has a permanent place of honor on my keeper shelf. Michael and his story are my favorite all the books you’ve published.
    Anne, thank you so much for Grace’s story. THE PERFECT KISS was a perfect end to a wonderful series!

    Reply
  22. I’m always thrilled to see my favorite secondary characters get their own stories.
    Mary Jo, I loved Reginald and was happy to see him get his own book and I enjoyed Stephen’s story in ONE PERFECT ROSE (I still have the small hardback). SHATTERED RAINBOWS has a permanent place of honor on my keeper shelf. Michael and his story are my favorite all the books you’ve published.
    Anne, thank you so much for Grace’s story. THE PERFECT KISS was a perfect end to a wonderful series!

    Reply
  23. I’m always thrilled to see my favorite secondary characters get their own stories.
    Mary Jo, I loved Reginald and was happy to see him get his own book and I enjoyed Stephen’s story in ONE PERFECT ROSE (I still have the small hardback). SHATTERED RAINBOWS has a permanent place of honor on my keeper shelf. Michael and his story are my favorite all the books you’ve published.
    Anne, thank you so much for Grace’s story. THE PERFECT KISS was a perfect end to a wonderful series!

    Reply
  24. I’m always thrilled to see my favorite secondary characters get their own stories.
    Mary Jo, I loved Reginald and was happy to see him get his own book and I enjoyed Stephen’s story in ONE PERFECT ROSE (I still have the small hardback). SHATTERED RAINBOWS has a permanent place of honor on my keeper shelf. Michael and his story are my favorite all the books you’ve published.
    Anne, thank you so much for Grace’s story. THE PERFECT KISS was a perfect end to a wonderful series!

    Reply
  25. I’m always thrilled to see my favorite secondary characters get their own stories.
    Mary Jo, I loved Reginald and was happy to see him get his own book and I enjoyed Stephen’s story in ONE PERFECT ROSE (I still have the small hardback). SHATTERED RAINBOWS has a permanent place of honor on my keeper shelf. Michael and his story are my favorite all the books you’ve published.
    Anne, thank you so much for Grace’s story. THE PERFECT KISS was a perfect end to a wonderful series!

    Reply
  26. Maggie, I think the villain to hero journey is such an interesting one — though difficult. I’ve never yet made it myself, but then I tend to finish off my villains on one way or another. Best of luck with him. Sounds like some time in Italy would do him good — would certainly do me good. 😉
    Kay, I sympathize with your scene-stealing character. Prune him back and save him for the next book.

    Reply
  27. Maggie, I think the villain to hero journey is such an interesting one — though difficult. I’ve never yet made it myself, but then I tend to finish off my villains on one way or another. Best of luck with him. Sounds like some time in Italy would do him good — would certainly do me good. 😉
    Kay, I sympathize with your scene-stealing character. Prune him back and save him for the next book.

    Reply
  28. Maggie, I think the villain to hero journey is such an interesting one — though difficult. I’ve never yet made it myself, but then I tend to finish off my villains on one way or another. Best of luck with him. Sounds like some time in Italy would do him good — would certainly do me good. 😉
    Kay, I sympathize with your scene-stealing character. Prune him back and save him for the next book.

    Reply
  29. Maggie, I think the villain to hero journey is such an interesting one — though difficult. I’ve never yet made it myself, but then I tend to finish off my villains on one way or another. Best of luck with him. Sounds like some time in Italy would do him good — would certainly do me good. 😉
    Kay, I sympathize with your scene-stealing character. Prune him back and save him for the next book.

    Reply
  30. Maggie, I think the villain to hero journey is such an interesting one — though difficult. I’ve never yet made it myself, but then I tend to finish off my villains on one way or another. Best of luck with him. Sounds like some time in Italy would do him good — would certainly do me good. 😉
    Kay, I sympathize with your scene-stealing character. Prune him back and save him for the next book.

    Reply
  31. Cynthia, congratulations on the new contract — that’s lovely news. I think once I connect with a character it’s a pleasure to revisit them and find out what happened to them.
    Anne, I have Alexandr and Shannon’s story sitting in my TBR pile. Can’t wait. Trouble is, not enough time for much reading at the moment.
    PJ, Shattered Rainbows is one of my all time favorite keepers, too. When I went to MJP’s site to get the url for the excerpt I started rereading it and thought, ohh, I must read the book again.

    Reply
  32. Cynthia, congratulations on the new contract — that’s lovely news. I think once I connect with a character it’s a pleasure to revisit them and find out what happened to them.
    Anne, I have Alexandr and Shannon’s story sitting in my TBR pile. Can’t wait. Trouble is, not enough time for much reading at the moment.
    PJ, Shattered Rainbows is one of my all time favorite keepers, too. When I went to MJP’s site to get the url for the excerpt I started rereading it and thought, ohh, I must read the book again.

    Reply
  33. Cynthia, congratulations on the new contract — that’s lovely news. I think once I connect with a character it’s a pleasure to revisit them and find out what happened to them.
    Anne, I have Alexandr and Shannon’s story sitting in my TBR pile. Can’t wait. Trouble is, not enough time for much reading at the moment.
    PJ, Shattered Rainbows is one of my all time favorite keepers, too. When I went to MJP’s site to get the url for the excerpt I started rereading it and thought, ohh, I must read the book again.

    Reply
  34. Cynthia, congratulations on the new contract — that’s lovely news. I think once I connect with a character it’s a pleasure to revisit them and find out what happened to them.
    Anne, I have Alexandr and Shannon’s story sitting in my TBR pile. Can’t wait. Trouble is, not enough time for much reading at the moment.
    PJ, Shattered Rainbows is one of my all time favorite keepers, too. When I went to MJP’s site to get the url for the excerpt I started rereading it and thought, ohh, I must read the book again.

    Reply
  35. Cynthia, congratulations on the new contract — that’s lovely news. I think once I connect with a character it’s a pleasure to revisit them and find out what happened to them.
    Anne, I have Alexandr and Shannon’s story sitting in my TBR pile. Can’t wait. Trouble is, not enough time for much reading at the moment.
    PJ, Shattered Rainbows is one of my all time favorite keepers, too. When I went to MJP’s site to get the url for the excerpt I started rereading it and thought, ohh, I must read the book again.

    Reply
  36. Sorry I chose an older book for my example, Anne! The only online link to it now is at Belgrave House for the e-book, I believe: http://tinyurl.com/yhv4tsa
    I’m a guest over at Romance Bandits today so just now stopping in here while lifting my head out of revisions. And if the grammar in that sentence is any indication, I’d better go take a nap!

    Reply
  37. Sorry I chose an older book for my example, Anne! The only online link to it now is at Belgrave House for the e-book, I believe: http://tinyurl.com/yhv4tsa
    I’m a guest over at Romance Bandits today so just now stopping in here while lifting my head out of revisions. And if the grammar in that sentence is any indication, I’d better go take a nap!

    Reply
  38. Sorry I chose an older book for my example, Anne! The only online link to it now is at Belgrave House for the e-book, I believe: http://tinyurl.com/yhv4tsa
    I’m a guest over at Romance Bandits today so just now stopping in here while lifting my head out of revisions. And if the grammar in that sentence is any indication, I’d better go take a nap!

    Reply
  39. Sorry I chose an older book for my example, Anne! The only online link to it now is at Belgrave House for the e-book, I believe: http://tinyurl.com/yhv4tsa
    I’m a guest over at Romance Bandits today so just now stopping in here while lifting my head out of revisions. And if the grammar in that sentence is any indication, I’d better go take a nap!

    Reply
  40. Sorry I chose an older book for my example, Anne! The only online link to it now is at Belgrave House for the e-book, I believe: http://tinyurl.com/yhv4tsa
    I’m a guest over at Romance Bandits today so just now stopping in here while lifting my head out of revisions. And if the grammar in that sentence is any indication, I’d better go take a nap!

    Reply
  41. Anne, you may remember that I emailed you as soon as I finished The Stolen Princess and asked if we were going to get Nash’s and Marcus’s stories. 🙂
    I loved all your examples. Jo may hold the record for how long I’ve waited for a secondary character’s story. It was 14 years, I think, between Dare’s reported death in An Unwilling Bride and his story in To Rescue a Rogue. Of course, I’m still waiting for Loretta to write Peregrine and Olivia’s story.

    Reply
  42. Anne, you may remember that I emailed you as soon as I finished The Stolen Princess and asked if we were going to get Nash’s and Marcus’s stories. 🙂
    I loved all your examples. Jo may hold the record for how long I’ve waited for a secondary character’s story. It was 14 years, I think, between Dare’s reported death in An Unwilling Bride and his story in To Rescue a Rogue. Of course, I’m still waiting for Loretta to write Peregrine and Olivia’s story.

    Reply
  43. Anne, you may remember that I emailed you as soon as I finished The Stolen Princess and asked if we were going to get Nash’s and Marcus’s stories. 🙂
    I loved all your examples. Jo may hold the record for how long I’ve waited for a secondary character’s story. It was 14 years, I think, between Dare’s reported death in An Unwilling Bride and his story in To Rescue a Rogue. Of course, I’m still waiting for Loretta to write Peregrine and Olivia’s story.

    Reply
  44. Anne, you may remember that I emailed you as soon as I finished The Stolen Princess and asked if we were going to get Nash’s and Marcus’s stories. 🙂
    I loved all your examples. Jo may hold the record for how long I’ve waited for a secondary character’s story. It was 14 years, I think, between Dare’s reported death in An Unwilling Bride and his story in To Rescue a Rogue. Of course, I’m still waiting for Loretta to write Peregrine and Olivia’s story.

    Reply
  45. Anne, you may remember that I emailed you as soon as I finished The Stolen Princess and asked if we were going to get Nash’s and Marcus’s stories. 🙂
    I loved all your examples. Jo may hold the record for how long I’ve waited for a secondary character’s story. It was 14 years, I think, between Dare’s reported death in An Unwilling Bride and his story in To Rescue a Rogue. Of course, I’m still waiting for Loretta to write Peregrine and Olivia’s story.

    Reply
  46. Hi Janga, I do indeed remember that — you and a heap of other people, all wanting the other brothers stories. The irony was, Marcus was supposed to be a nasty, unlikeable character, and he nudged himself into the “potential hero” spotlight in the wings and stood there expectantly. So we’ll see…
    Actually you reminded me of the Elizabeth Lowell secondary character from her fabulous Scottish border medievals — Eric, one of the Learned. Readers were desperate for his story, but apparently she didn’t want to write it. The nagging continued, so years later she wrote it — sort of — the hero was the great grandson (or something) of the original, and the setting was contemporary. I’m a bit vague as I was one of those who were hanging out for the medieval Eric, and though the contemporary was good, I wanted to return to the original world she’d created, not have it come to mine. LOL

    Reply
  47. Hi Janga, I do indeed remember that — you and a heap of other people, all wanting the other brothers stories. The irony was, Marcus was supposed to be a nasty, unlikeable character, and he nudged himself into the “potential hero” spotlight in the wings and stood there expectantly. So we’ll see…
    Actually you reminded me of the Elizabeth Lowell secondary character from her fabulous Scottish border medievals — Eric, one of the Learned. Readers were desperate for his story, but apparently she didn’t want to write it. The nagging continued, so years later she wrote it — sort of — the hero was the great grandson (or something) of the original, and the setting was contemporary. I’m a bit vague as I was one of those who were hanging out for the medieval Eric, and though the contemporary was good, I wanted to return to the original world she’d created, not have it come to mine. LOL

    Reply
  48. Hi Janga, I do indeed remember that — you and a heap of other people, all wanting the other brothers stories. The irony was, Marcus was supposed to be a nasty, unlikeable character, and he nudged himself into the “potential hero” spotlight in the wings and stood there expectantly. So we’ll see…
    Actually you reminded me of the Elizabeth Lowell secondary character from her fabulous Scottish border medievals — Eric, one of the Learned. Readers were desperate for his story, but apparently she didn’t want to write it. The nagging continued, so years later she wrote it — sort of — the hero was the great grandson (or something) of the original, and the setting was contemporary. I’m a bit vague as I was one of those who were hanging out for the medieval Eric, and though the contemporary was good, I wanted to return to the original world she’d created, not have it come to mine. LOL

    Reply
  49. Hi Janga, I do indeed remember that — you and a heap of other people, all wanting the other brothers stories. The irony was, Marcus was supposed to be a nasty, unlikeable character, and he nudged himself into the “potential hero” spotlight in the wings and stood there expectantly. So we’ll see…
    Actually you reminded me of the Elizabeth Lowell secondary character from her fabulous Scottish border medievals — Eric, one of the Learned. Readers were desperate for his story, but apparently she didn’t want to write it. The nagging continued, so years later she wrote it — sort of — the hero was the great grandson (or something) of the original, and the setting was contemporary. I’m a bit vague as I was one of those who were hanging out for the medieval Eric, and though the contemporary was good, I wanted to return to the original world she’d created, not have it come to mine. LOL

    Reply
  50. Hi Janga, I do indeed remember that — you and a heap of other people, all wanting the other brothers stories. The irony was, Marcus was supposed to be a nasty, unlikeable character, and he nudged himself into the “potential hero” spotlight in the wings and stood there expectantly. So we’ll see…
    Actually you reminded me of the Elizabeth Lowell secondary character from her fabulous Scottish border medievals — Eric, one of the Learned. Readers were desperate for his story, but apparently she didn’t want to write it. The nagging continued, so years later she wrote it — sort of — the hero was the great grandson (or something) of the original, and the setting was contemporary. I’m a bit vague as I was one of those who were hanging out for the medieval Eric, and though the contemporary was good, I wanted to return to the original world she’d created, not have it come to mine. LOL

    Reply
  51. I echo Janga’s statement about Dare’s story and it was worth the wait too! The other two that come to mind are both Stephanie Laurens’ books: Barnaby Adair from the Cynster stories – I loved it and Dalziel from the Bastion Club series which I didn’t enjoy. Then of course all the Mary Balogh’s spinning from the Slightly books. As you can tell I’m a reader not a writer and I love books with a connection.

    Reply
  52. I echo Janga’s statement about Dare’s story and it was worth the wait too! The other two that come to mind are both Stephanie Laurens’ books: Barnaby Adair from the Cynster stories – I loved it and Dalziel from the Bastion Club series which I didn’t enjoy. Then of course all the Mary Balogh’s spinning from the Slightly books. As you can tell I’m a reader not a writer and I love books with a connection.

    Reply
  53. I echo Janga’s statement about Dare’s story and it was worth the wait too! The other two that come to mind are both Stephanie Laurens’ books: Barnaby Adair from the Cynster stories – I loved it and Dalziel from the Bastion Club series which I didn’t enjoy. Then of course all the Mary Balogh’s spinning from the Slightly books. As you can tell I’m a reader not a writer and I love books with a connection.

    Reply
  54. I echo Janga’s statement about Dare’s story and it was worth the wait too! The other two that come to mind are both Stephanie Laurens’ books: Barnaby Adair from the Cynster stories – I loved it and Dalziel from the Bastion Club series which I didn’t enjoy. Then of course all the Mary Balogh’s spinning from the Slightly books. As you can tell I’m a reader not a writer and I love books with a connection.

    Reply
  55. I echo Janga’s statement about Dare’s story and it was worth the wait too! The other two that come to mind are both Stephanie Laurens’ books: Barnaby Adair from the Cynster stories – I loved it and Dalziel from the Bastion Club series which I didn’t enjoy. Then of course all the Mary Balogh’s spinning from the Slightly books. As you can tell I’m a reader not a writer and I love books with a connection.

    Reply
  56. Karyn Monk had a young man in the book THE PRISONER, that seemed to be headed for a book, but never made it. He was a minor character at the start and gradually grew as an individual throughout the book. It would be interesting to catch up with him a few years down the road.
    There have been so many in the books I’ve read and most of the time, the got their chance. Anne, why can’t an eccentric dowager have her own story. It certainly wouldn’t be the usual H & H story, but it could be fun.

    Reply
  57. Karyn Monk had a young man in the book THE PRISONER, that seemed to be headed for a book, but never made it. He was a minor character at the start and gradually grew as an individual throughout the book. It would be interesting to catch up with him a few years down the road.
    There have been so many in the books I’ve read and most of the time, the got their chance. Anne, why can’t an eccentric dowager have her own story. It certainly wouldn’t be the usual H & H story, but it could be fun.

    Reply
  58. Karyn Monk had a young man in the book THE PRISONER, that seemed to be headed for a book, but never made it. He was a minor character at the start and gradually grew as an individual throughout the book. It would be interesting to catch up with him a few years down the road.
    There have been so many in the books I’ve read and most of the time, the got their chance. Anne, why can’t an eccentric dowager have her own story. It certainly wouldn’t be the usual H & H story, but it could be fun.

    Reply
  59. Karyn Monk had a young man in the book THE PRISONER, that seemed to be headed for a book, but never made it. He was a minor character at the start and gradually grew as an individual throughout the book. It would be interesting to catch up with him a few years down the road.
    There have been so many in the books I’ve read and most of the time, the got their chance. Anne, why can’t an eccentric dowager have her own story. It certainly wouldn’t be the usual H & H story, but it could be fun.

    Reply
  60. Karyn Monk had a young man in the book THE PRISONER, that seemed to be headed for a book, but never made it. He was a minor character at the start and gradually grew as an individual throughout the book. It would be interesting to catch up with him a few years down the road.
    There have been so many in the books I’ve read and most of the time, the got their chance. Anne, why can’t an eccentric dowager have her own story. It certainly wouldn’t be the usual H & H story, but it could be fun.

    Reply
  61. Sue, yes, indeed, the Cynster series certainly did have a number of secondary characters rising to hero status. I also enjoy books with a connection — it’s like you revisit that particular world.
    Patricia, there is no real reason why an eccentric dowager can’t have her own story — I actually did that in my Merridwew sister’s “Perfect”-in-the-title books, when Aunt Gussie and great Uncle Oswald teamed up. The trouble is, my editor probably wouldn’t buy a book about a middle aged heroine– not popular enough with the market — so I need to thread the older heroines’ love stories in as secondary romances.
    I have fun with my secondary romances — nearly all of which are of couples the market wouldn’t want as central heroes and heroines.
    One day I’d like to write the story of Aunt Gussie in her younger days, when she was taken up by her handsome Argentine hero. Maybe a novella.

    Reply
  62. Sue, yes, indeed, the Cynster series certainly did have a number of secondary characters rising to hero status. I also enjoy books with a connection — it’s like you revisit that particular world.
    Patricia, there is no real reason why an eccentric dowager can’t have her own story — I actually did that in my Merridwew sister’s “Perfect”-in-the-title books, when Aunt Gussie and great Uncle Oswald teamed up. The trouble is, my editor probably wouldn’t buy a book about a middle aged heroine– not popular enough with the market — so I need to thread the older heroines’ love stories in as secondary romances.
    I have fun with my secondary romances — nearly all of which are of couples the market wouldn’t want as central heroes and heroines.
    One day I’d like to write the story of Aunt Gussie in her younger days, when she was taken up by her handsome Argentine hero. Maybe a novella.

    Reply
  63. Sue, yes, indeed, the Cynster series certainly did have a number of secondary characters rising to hero status. I also enjoy books with a connection — it’s like you revisit that particular world.
    Patricia, there is no real reason why an eccentric dowager can’t have her own story — I actually did that in my Merridwew sister’s “Perfect”-in-the-title books, when Aunt Gussie and great Uncle Oswald teamed up. The trouble is, my editor probably wouldn’t buy a book about a middle aged heroine– not popular enough with the market — so I need to thread the older heroines’ love stories in as secondary romances.
    I have fun with my secondary romances — nearly all of which are of couples the market wouldn’t want as central heroes and heroines.
    One day I’d like to write the story of Aunt Gussie in her younger days, when she was taken up by her handsome Argentine hero. Maybe a novella.

    Reply
  64. Sue, yes, indeed, the Cynster series certainly did have a number of secondary characters rising to hero status. I also enjoy books with a connection — it’s like you revisit that particular world.
    Patricia, there is no real reason why an eccentric dowager can’t have her own story — I actually did that in my Merridwew sister’s “Perfect”-in-the-title books, when Aunt Gussie and great Uncle Oswald teamed up. The trouble is, my editor probably wouldn’t buy a book about a middle aged heroine– not popular enough with the market — so I need to thread the older heroines’ love stories in as secondary romances.
    I have fun with my secondary romances — nearly all of which are of couples the market wouldn’t want as central heroes and heroines.
    One day I’d like to write the story of Aunt Gussie in her younger days, when she was taken up by her handsome Argentine hero. Maybe a novella.

    Reply
  65. Sue, yes, indeed, the Cynster series certainly did have a number of secondary characters rising to hero status. I also enjoy books with a connection — it’s like you revisit that particular world.
    Patricia, there is no real reason why an eccentric dowager can’t have her own story — I actually did that in my Merridwew sister’s “Perfect”-in-the-title books, when Aunt Gussie and great Uncle Oswald teamed up. The trouble is, my editor probably wouldn’t buy a book about a middle aged heroine– not popular enough with the market — so I need to thread the older heroines’ love stories in as secondary romances.
    I have fun with my secondary romances — nearly all of which are of couples the market wouldn’t want as central heroes and heroines.
    One day I’d like to write the story of Aunt Gussie in her younger days, when she was taken up by her handsome Argentine hero. Maybe a novella.

    Reply
  66. Oh great post – always interesting to see those secondary characters rear their heads isn’t it. Great to see them get their own stories in the ‘wenches’ books.
    I’m finding that I would love to tell the tale of two of my secondary characters in on of my novels. Especially the one that’s a good spy…and has a wicked sense of humour.

    Reply
  67. Oh great post – always interesting to see those secondary characters rear their heads isn’t it. Great to see them get their own stories in the ‘wenches’ books.
    I’m finding that I would love to tell the tale of two of my secondary characters in on of my novels. Especially the one that’s a good spy…and has a wicked sense of humour.

    Reply
  68. Oh great post – always interesting to see those secondary characters rear their heads isn’t it. Great to see them get their own stories in the ‘wenches’ books.
    I’m finding that I would love to tell the tale of two of my secondary characters in on of my novels. Especially the one that’s a good spy…and has a wicked sense of humour.

    Reply
  69. Oh great post – always interesting to see those secondary characters rear their heads isn’t it. Great to see them get their own stories in the ‘wenches’ books.
    I’m finding that I would love to tell the tale of two of my secondary characters in on of my novels. Especially the one that’s a good spy…and has a wicked sense of humour.

    Reply
  70. Oh great post – always interesting to see those secondary characters rear their heads isn’t it. Great to see them get their own stories in the ‘wenches’ books.
    I’m finding that I would love to tell the tale of two of my secondary characters in on of my novels. Especially the one that’s a good spy…and has a wicked sense of humour.

    Reply
  71. It’s fun to know that readers still remember some of my characters with such fondness. They really do take on a life of their own. They just don’t happen to have bodies. *g* I enjoy the connected books–it’s reading for community, not just plot.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  72. It’s fun to know that readers still remember some of my characters with such fondness. They really do take on a life of their own. They just don’t happen to have bodies. *g* I enjoy the connected books–it’s reading for community, not just plot.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  73. It’s fun to know that readers still remember some of my characters with such fondness. They really do take on a life of their own. They just don’t happen to have bodies. *g* I enjoy the connected books–it’s reading for community, not just plot.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  74. It’s fun to know that readers still remember some of my characters with such fondness. They really do take on a life of their own. They just don’t happen to have bodies. *g* I enjoy the connected books–it’s reading for community, not just plot.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  75. It’s fun to know that readers still remember some of my characters with such fondness. They really do take on a life of their own. They just don’t happen to have bodies. *g* I enjoy the connected books–it’s reading for community, not just plot.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  76. I’ve been offline for a few days (visiting my youngest son at the University of Wisconsin — go Badgers!) and came back to find I’d won a book. Hooray! Today is my wedding anniversary, and I could not think of a more appropriate gift for the day than a romance novel.
    I find the topic of secondary characters who develop a life of their own interesting. Sometimes interlinked stories are apparent upfront (the Rogues, for example), and I do like them, but it’s the characters who were clearly meant only for walk-ons but come blazingly to life who at times are more intriguing and mysterious. Reggie Davenport was one of the earliest. Diane Farr created George Carstairs as a semi-villain in several books, and I loved his redemption in “Lord Rival”. Wench emerita Loretta Chase created the Comte d’Esmond first as a secondary character who loses the girl but who comes back spectacularly in his own book.
    Thank you so much, both for the gift book and for all the Wenchly books.

    Reply
  77. I’ve been offline for a few days (visiting my youngest son at the University of Wisconsin — go Badgers!) and came back to find I’d won a book. Hooray! Today is my wedding anniversary, and I could not think of a more appropriate gift for the day than a romance novel.
    I find the topic of secondary characters who develop a life of their own interesting. Sometimes interlinked stories are apparent upfront (the Rogues, for example), and I do like them, but it’s the characters who were clearly meant only for walk-ons but come blazingly to life who at times are more intriguing and mysterious. Reggie Davenport was one of the earliest. Diane Farr created George Carstairs as a semi-villain in several books, and I loved his redemption in “Lord Rival”. Wench emerita Loretta Chase created the Comte d’Esmond first as a secondary character who loses the girl but who comes back spectacularly in his own book.
    Thank you so much, both for the gift book and for all the Wenchly books.

    Reply
  78. I’ve been offline for a few days (visiting my youngest son at the University of Wisconsin — go Badgers!) and came back to find I’d won a book. Hooray! Today is my wedding anniversary, and I could not think of a more appropriate gift for the day than a romance novel.
    I find the topic of secondary characters who develop a life of their own interesting. Sometimes interlinked stories are apparent upfront (the Rogues, for example), and I do like them, but it’s the characters who were clearly meant only for walk-ons but come blazingly to life who at times are more intriguing and mysterious. Reggie Davenport was one of the earliest. Diane Farr created George Carstairs as a semi-villain in several books, and I loved his redemption in “Lord Rival”. Wench emerita Loretta Chase created the Comte d’Esmond first as a secondary character who loses the girl but who comes back spectacularly in his own book.
    Thank you so much, both for the gift book and for all the Wenchly books.

    Reply
  79. I’ve been offline for a few days (visiting my youngest son at the University of Wisconsin — go Badgers!) and came back to find I’d won a book. Hooray! Today is my wedding anniversary, and I could not think of a more appropriate gift for the day than a romance novel.
    I find the topic of secondary characters who develop a life of their own interesting. Sometimes interlinked stories are apparent upfront (the Rogues, for example), and I do like them, but it’s the characters who were clearly meant only for walk-ons but come blazingly to life who at times are more intriguing and mysterious. Reggie Davenport was one of the earliest. Diane Farr created George Carstairs as a semi-villain in several books, and I loved his redemption in “Lord Rival”. Wench emerita Loretta Chase created the Comte d’Esmond first as a secondary character who loses the girl but who comes back spectacularly in his own book.
    Thank you so much, both for the gift book and for all the Wenchly books.

    Reply
  80. I’ve been offline for a few days (visiting my youngest son at the University of Wisconsin — go Badgers!) and came back to find I’d won a book. Hooray! Today is my wedding anniversary, and I could not think of a more appropriate gift for the day than a romance novel.
    I find the topic of secondary characters who develop a life of their own interesting. Sometimes interlinked stories are apparent upfront (the Rogues, for example), and I do like them, but it’s the characters who were clearly meant only for walk-ons but come blazingly to life who at times are more intriguing and mysterious. Reggie Davenport was one of the earliest. Diane Farr created George Carstairs as a semi-villain in several books, and I loved his redemption in “Lord Rival”. Wench emerita Loretta Chase created the Comte d’Esmond first as a secondary character who loses the girl but who comes back spectacularly in his own book.
    Thank you so much, both for the gift book and for all the Wenchly books.

    Reply
  81. Happy Anniversary, Susan/DC! Yes, an romance novel does seem a perfect gift. (I hope your hubby enjoys it too!)
    Anne, so glad you are liking Alexandr and Shannon’s story. There’s definitely something about taking a bad boy and turning him good. . .
    And Maggie, um, I’d be happy to go to Italy with your hero. Sounds like he needs a chaperone

    Reply
  82. Happy Anniversary, Susan/DC! Yes, an romance novel does seem a perfect gift. (I hope your hubby enjoys it too!)
    Anne, so glad you are liking Alexandr and Shannon’s story. There’s definitely something about taking a bad boy and turning him good. . .
    And Maggie, um, I’d be happy to go to Italy with your hero. Sounds like he needs a chaperone

    Reply
  83. Happy Anniversary, Susan/DC! Yes, an romance novel does seem a perfect gift. (I hope your hubby enjoys it too!)
    Anne, so glad you are liking Alexandr and Shannon’s story. There’s definitely something about taking a bad boy and turning him good. . .
    And Maggie, um, I’d be happy to go to Italy with your hero. Sounds like he needs a chaperone

    Reply
  84. Happy Anniversary, Susan/DC! Yes, an romance novel does seem a perfect gift. (I hope your hubby enjoys it too!)
    Anne, so glad you are liking Alexandr and Shannon’s story. There’s definitely something about taking a bad boy and turning him good. . .
    And Maggie, um, I’d be happy to go to Italy with your hero. Sounds like he needs a chaperone

    Reply
  85. Happy Anniversary, Susan/DC! Yes, an romance novel does seem a perfect gift. (I hope your hubby enjoys it too!)
    Anne, so glad you are liking Alexandr and Shannon’s story. There’s definitely something about taking a bad boy and turning him good. . .
    And Maggie, um, I’d be happy to go to Italy with your hero. Sounds like he needs a chaperone

    Reply
  86. Edith had a secondary character in The Fire Flower that I never stopped hounding her about – through the entire book I was yelling for the heroine to leave Gideon (tho the book still made me teary) because for goodness sakes woman, look at this guy right in front of you!!
    I just finished To Catch A Bride. You know what I loved possibly the most about it? She never needs saving, and not in a ‘spunky’ or ‘you gotta be kidding’ way. She just doesn’t require it. Fan-freaking-tastic.

    Reply
  87. Edith had a secondary character in The Fire Flower that I never stopped hounding her about – through the entire book I was yelling for the heroine to leave Gideon (tho the book still made me teary) because for goodness sakes woman, look at this guy right in front of you!!
    I just finished To Catch A Bride. You know what I loved possibly the most about it? She never needs saving, and not in a ‘spunky’ or ‘you gotta be kidding’ way. She just doesn’t require it. Fan-freaking-tastic.

    Reply
  88. Edith had a secondary character in The Fire Flower that I never stopped hounding her about – through the entire book I was yelling for the heroine to leave Gideon (tho the book still made me teary) because for goodness sakes woman, look at this guy right in front of you!!
    I just finished To Catch A Bride. You know what I loved possibly the most about it? She never needs saving, and not in a ‘spunky’ or ‘you gotta be kidding’ way. She just doesn’t require it. Fan-freaking-tastic.

    Reply
  89. Edith had a secondary character in The Fire Flower that I never stopped hounding her about – through the entire book I was yelling for the heroine to leave Gideon (tho the book still made me teary) because for goodness sakes woman, look at this guy right in front of you!!
    I just finished To Catch A Bride. You know what I loved possibly the most about it? She never needs saving, and not in a ‘spunky’ or ‘you gotta be kidding’ way. She just doesn’t require it. Fan-freaking-tastic.

    Reply
  90. Edith had a secondary character in The Fire Flower that I never stopped hounding her about – through the entire book I was yelling for the heroine to leave Gideon (tho the book still made me teary) because for goodness sakes woman, look at this guy right in front of you!!
    I just finished To Catch A Bride. You know what I loved possibly the most about it? She never needs saving, and not in a ‘spunky’ or ‘you gotta be kidding’ way. She just doesn’t require it. Fan-freaking-tastic.

    Reply
  91. Just noticed an error at the bottom of the blog: Freddie is the villain in “Courting Julia”. In “Tempting Harriet”, he and Clara are shown several years after the events in “Dancing With Clara”, happily married and with (IIRC) two young boys. Harriet is a friend of Clara’s who comes for a visit.

    Reply
  92. Just noticed an error at the bottom of the blog: Freddie is the villain in “Courting Julia”. In “Tempting Harriet”, he and Clara are shown several years after the events in “Dancing With Clara”, happily married and with (IIRC) two young boys. Harriet is a friend of Clara’s who comes for a visit.

    Reply
  93. Just noticed an error at the bottom of the blog: Freddie is the villain in “Courting Julia”. In “Tempting Harriet”, he and Clara are shown several years after the events in “Dancing With Clara”, happily married and with (IIRC) two young boys. Harriet is a friend of Clara’s who comes for a visit.

    Reply
  94. Just noticed an error at the bottom of the blog: Freddie is the villain in “Courting Julia”. In “Tempting Harriet”, he and Clara are shown several years after the events in “Dancing With Clara”, happily married and with (IIRC) two young boys. Harriet is a friend of Clara’s who comes for a visit.

    Reply
  95. Just noticed an error at the bottom of the blog: Freddie is the villain in “Courting Julia”. In “Tempting Harriet”, he and Clara are shown several years after the events in “Dancing With Clara”, happily married and with (IIRC) two young boys. Harriet is a friend of Clara’s who comes for a visit.

    Reply
  96. Liz, thanks so much for that lovely comment on To Catch a Bride. I’m glad you loved Ayisha — she was a gutsy girl who absolutely deserved a happy ending.
    Susan/DC, you’re absolutely right — it is Courting Julia in which Freddie is the bad guy. Sorry, I should have checked before posting.

    Reply
  97. Liz, thanks so much for that lovely comment on To Catch a Bride. I’m glad you loved Ayisha — she was a gutsy girl who absolutely deserved a happy ending.
    Susan/DC, you’re absolutely right — it is Courting Julia in which Freddie is the bad guy. Sorry, I should have checked before posting.

    Reply
  98. Liz, thanks so much for that lovely comment on To Catch a Bride. I’m glad you loved Ayisha — she was a gutsy girl who absolutely deserved a happy ending.
    Susan/DC, you’re absolutely right — it is Courting Julia in which Freddie is the bad guy. Sorry, I should have checked before posting.

    Reply
  99. Liz, thanks so much for that lovely comment on To Catch a Bride. I’m glad you loved Ayisha — she was a gutsy girl who absolutely deserved a happy ending.
    Susan/DC, you’re absolutely right — it is Courting Julia in which Freddie is the bad guy. Sorry, I should have checked before posting.

    Reply
  100. Liz, thanks so much for that lovely comment on To Catch a Bride. I’m glad you loved Ayisha — she was a gutsy girl who absolutely deserved a happy ending.
    Susan/DC, you’re absolutely right — it is Courting Julia in which Freddie is the bad guy. Sorry, I should have checked before posting.

    Reply
  101. I always like to see secondary characters get their own story, especially when I like the secondary character better than the main character.

    Reply
  102. I always like to see secondary characters get their own story, especially when I like the secondary character better than the main character.

    Reply
  103. I always like to see secondary characters get their own story, especially when I like the secondary character better than the main character.

    Reply
  104. I always like to see secondary characters get their own story, especially when I like the secondary character better than the main character.

    Reply
  105. I always like to see secondary characters get their own story, especially when I like the secondary character better than the main character.

    Reply

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