Ask A Wench — about age.

Cbkgandalf No, not about our ages, though I don't think any of us are bashful there. About the ages of our characters. Jo here, with Charlie pretending to be old.

Maureen Emmons,sent in this question: "Is there an age range you prefer your heroine and/or your hero to be in?" Thessecretssm

Because I've picked your question for this month's Ask A Wench, Maureen, you get a book from me. You can look over my booklist on my website and as long as I have a spare copy, it's yours. Fresh off the presses, I have the Chalice of Roses anthology, and The Stanforth Secrets, the second of my classic Regencies, that are now being reissued. This one will be out in February. E-mail me your choice, Maureen, and your mailing address.

I added to the question, What are your feelings about age difference, either way?

Cara/Andrea: "Age difference is an interesting question. When I first started writing, my editor at the Signet Regency line had a rule: a ten year difference at most. After that, she felt the relationship became unromantic as the hero became too much of a father figure. (She was, of course making the traditional assumption that we would make the hero be older than the heroine.)   Like any rule, it begs to be broken! My feeling is that if a writer can make the story work, I'm willing to accept any age difference. I've read a couple of books where writers have reversed the traditional model and had the heroine be older-and loved them.

That said, I've tended to create heroes and heroines who are fairly close in age. And I tend to favor heroes who have had a little experience in life, as for me that makes them more interesting to work with. Actually, the same with a heroine. I had great fun in my upcoming book doing a secondary love story between a couple in their 60s-70s, which I had never tried before. I really enjoyed the challenge of creating a chemistry between them in which sexual tension was not the main ingredient."

Anne: "The ages of my hero and heroine are usually restricted somewhat by  market considerations — most people want their heroes and heroines to  be in their twenties — or so I've been told. So I pretty much stick  to that. My youngest heroine has been 19, and most of my heroes have  been in their late 20's. I don't like too large an age gap between  them, especially if the heroine is quite young — 7 years is a rule of  thumb. I don't have a problem with a young heroine, and I quite enjoy  an innocent heroine occasionally. To quote Lindsey Davis's Falco,  "Innocence causes all kinds of misunderstandings, and that's even  before you get tangled up with your conscience."  But really I like  variety.

I often have a secondary romance in my books and they're usually where  I have fun with couples that probably wouldn't 'take' as main heroes  and heroines. I've paired maidservants and grooms, battle-scarred  soldiers with uptight spinsters and wild gypsy girls, I've matched  friends of the main couple, and middle-aged divorcees with mysterious  older men and older women with younger men. I especially enjoy giving  an older woman a second or third or fourth chance at love and several  of my older women have revealed a bawdy side to them."
Cherubwedd 

(Too young to wed, perhaps?)

Nicola: "I don't really have strong preferences about the age range of hero and heroine. For me it's all down to the individual characters and whether I can believe in them. That said, I prefer heroines not to be too young and I also prefer heroes to be in their later twenties or older because a bit of life experience forms character. So I've just contradicted myself there. Hmm. well, perhaps I should say, then, that I wouldn't automatically rule out any book on the grounds of the age of hero and heroine.

In terms of age difference I came in for a lot of criticism when I wrote a book with a heroine of 19 and a hero of 32 but again I don't have strong preferences as long as the relationship seems equal and believable and isn't venturing into January (rather than May) to December territory. I've written a heroine who was eight years older than the hero in The Confessions of a Duchess and reall enjoyed exploring the issues that raised."

Mary Jo: "I like my characters to have some  mileage on them.  Innocence is so boring. <G>  My heroes are  usually in their early to mid-30's, and the heroines are as old as I can make  them–mid-20's most often.  I've never done one under 21 that I can  remember. 

I'm not wild about a wide age  difference, especially if the man is a daddy-ish age.  But–good writing  will carry me along, and I'm willing to believe that there are true, powerful  loves can grow between people of any ages." 

Pat: "I like to fit age to story. An ingenue of 17 won't have the same kind of story as a widow of 30, so my characters may range from adolescence to 40 and maybe more.  As to age differences between the hero and heroine–I think greater differences are more easily written in historicals than contemporaries, simply because of the fantasy factor. But that requires another blog!"

As for me, well, I like 'em young. As you see, some writers think youth boring, but I find the high energy and idealism of youth interesting to write about, and sort of slide away from anything too world-weary. That's the great thing about fiction, though. Something for everyone!

Nearly all my characters are in their twenties, with no huge age differences, but I have done two stories where the heroine is older than the hero — Christmas Angel and the novella, The Demon's Mistress. In both cases, the heroine is a widow. I wonder if that's usually the case with older heroines.

I have done young heroines. Imogen in my medieval Dark Champion is sixteen. I did think it unfair that one revi
ewer criticized her for acting young! I suspect it was a criticism of me for writing onMedlove so young. FitzRoger is only 24, however, so the age difference isn't huge.

In a novella, Forbidden Affections, the heroine is 16 and the hero 30. That's raised some comments, but it just seemed right for the story, and she's certainly not your typical 16. And in the medieval The Shattered Rose, I have a flashback to the arranged marriage of the hero and heroine when they were both 16. That was fun to write.

So, what are your tastes and opinions. Does the age of the characters influence your book buying, or your enjoyment of romances?

Jo

90 thoughts on “Ask A Wench — about age.”

  1. I like heroes and heroines to be about the same age, mainly in their twenties. The hero can be a little older than the heroine, but I like an older woman-younger man pairing on occasion. I would also like more subplots with older couple pairs.
    I hate really young heroines with really older heroes. Ugh! Part of that is, I think, the power factor. Men of all ages usually have more power than women, and age is a factor in increasing power. I want my heroes and heroines to be about the same, in age, intelligence and power. The way I describe it is: they walk into the sunset together, not one following the other.
    And I really do NOT want to read about teenagers. Leave the teenagers for YA.

    Reply
  2. I like heroes and heroines to be about the same age, mainly in their twenties. The hero can be a little older than the heroine, but I like an older woman-younger man pairing on occasion. I would also like more subplots with older couple pairs.
    I hate really young heroines with really older heroes. Ugh! Part of that is, I think, the power factor. Men of all ages usually have more power than women, and age is a factor in increasing power. I want my heroes and heroines to be about the same, in age, intelligence and power. The way I describe it is: they walk into the sunset together, not one following the other.
    And I really do NOT want to read about teenagers. Leave the teenagers for YA.

    Reply
  3. I like heroes and heroines to be about the same age, mainly in their twenties. The hero can be a little older than the heroine, but I like an older woman-younger man pairing on occasion. I would also like more subplots with older couple pairs.
    I hate really young heroines with really older heroes. Ugh! Part of that is, I think, the power factor. Men of all ages usually have more power than women, and age is a factor in increasing power. I want my heroes and heroines to be about the same, in age, intelligence and power. The way I describe it is: they walk into the sunset together, not one following the other.
    And I really do NOT want to read about teenagers. Leave the teenagers for YA.

    Reply
  4. I like heroes and heroines to be about the same age, mainly in their twenties. The hero can be a little older than the heroine, but I like an older woman-younger man pairing on occasion. I would also like more subplots with older couple pairs.
    I hate really young heroines with really older heroes. Ugh! Part of that is, I think, the power factor. Men of all ages usually have more power than women, and age is a factor in increasing power. I want my heroes and heroines to be about the same, in age, intelligence and power. The way I describe it is: they walk into the sunset together, not one following the other.
    And I really do NOT want to read about teenagers. Leave the teenagers for YA.

    Reply
  5. I like heroes and heroines to be about the same age, mainly in their twenties. The hero can be a little older than the heroine, but I like an older woman-younger man pairing on occasion. I would also like more subplots with older couple pairs.
    I hate really young heroines with really older heroes. Ugh! Part of that is, I think, the power factor. Men of all ages usually have more power than women, and age is a factor in increasing power. I want my heroes and heroines to be about the same, in age, intelligence and power. The way I describe it is: they walk into the sunset together, not one following the other.
    And I really do NOT want to read about teenagers. Leave the teenagers for YA.

    Reply
  6. Age honestly doesn’t matter to me. However I do seem to relate more to heroines that are closer to my age (30). They seem to react as I would and I like that. It obviously helps me identify with the character and that makes the book better.

    Reply
  7. Age honestly doesn’t matter to me. However I do seem to relate more to heroines that are closer to my age (30). They seem to react as I would and I like that. It obviously helps me identify with the character and that makes the book better.

    Reply
  8. Age honestly doesn’t matter to me. However I do seem to relate more to heroines that are closer to my age (30). They seem to react as I would and I like that. It obviously helps me identify with the character and that makes the book better.

    Reply
  9. Age honestly doesn’t matter to me. However I do seem to relate more to heroines that are closer to my age (30). They seem to react as I would and I like that. It obviously helps me identify with the character and that makes the book better.

    Reply
  10. Age honestly doesn’t matter to me. However I do seem to relate more to heroines that are closer to my age (30). They seem to react as I would and I like that. It obviously helps me identify with the character and that makes the book better.

    Reply
  11. I’m not a fan of teenaged heroines–I find them boring. Perhaps because I’m older myself, I prefer more mature protagonists. And I beg to differ–couples in their sixties can certainly have a relationship with lots of sexual tensions (at least in RL they can).
    I don’t have problems with larger age differences as long as both parties have power. Perhaps this is because my brother-in-law was very happily married for 36 years to a woman 17 years his senior.
    So write about anything but ingenues and I’ll read it.
    Ann

    Reply
  12. I’m not a fan of teenaged heroines–I find them boring. Perhaps because I’m older myself, I prefer more mature protagonists. And I beg to differ–couples in their sixties can certainly have a relationship with lots of sexual tensions (at least in RL they can).
    I don’t have problems with larger age differences as long as both parties have power. Perhaps this is because my brother-in-law was very happily married for 36 years to a woman 17 years his senior.
    So write about anything but ingenues and I’ll read it.
    Ann

    Reply
  13. I’m not a fan of teenaged heroines–I find them boring. Perhaps because I’m older myself, I prefer more mature protagonists. And I beg to differ–couples in their sixties can certainly have a relationship with lots of sexual tensions (at least in RL they can).
    I don’t have problems with larger age differences as long as both parties have power. Perhaps this is because my brother-in-law was very happily married for 36 years to a woman 17 years his senior.
    So write about anything but ingenues and I’ll read it.
    Ann

    Reply
  14. I’m not a fan of teenaged heroines–I find them boring. Perhaps because I’m older myself, I prefer more mature protagonists. And I beg to differ–couples in their sixties can certainly have a relationship with lots of sexual tensions (at least in RL they can).
    I don’t have problems with larger age differences as long as both parties have power. Perhaps this is because my brother-in-law was very happily married for 36 years to a woman 17 years his senior.
    So write about anything but ingenues and I’ll read it.
    Ann

    Reply
  15. I’m not a fan of teenaged heroines–I find them boring. Perhaps because I’m older myself, I prefer more mature protagonists. And I beg to differ–couples in their sixties can certainly have a relationship with lots of sexual tensions (at least in RL they can).
    I don’t have problems with larger age differences as long as both parties have power. Perhaps this is because my brother-in-law was very happily married for 36 years to a woman 17 years his senior.
    So write about anything but ingenues and I’ll read it.
    Ann

    Reply
  16. I don’t mind what age the H/H are but I don’t like it to be 20 or more years. I really liked the Rogues series as they were in their mid 20’s. It would be nice to have some in their 50’s+ as we still have feelings at that age. Joan Wilson

    Reply
  17. I don’t mind what age the H/H are but I don’t like it to be 20 or more years. I really liked the Rogues series as they were in their mid 20’s. It would be nice to have some in their 50’s+ as we still have feelings at that age. Joan Wilson

    Reply
  18. I don’t mind what age the H/H are but I don’t like it to be 20 or more years. I really liked the Rogues series as they were in their mid 20’s. It would be nice to have some in their 50’s+ as we still have feelings at that age. Joan Wilson

    Reply
  19. I don’t mind what age the H/H are but I don’t like it to be 20 or more years. I really liked the Rogues series as they were in their mid 20’s. It would be nice to have some in their 50’s+ as we still have feelings at that age. Joan Wilson

    Reply
  20. I don’t mind what age the H/H are but I don’t like it to be 20 or more years. I really liked the Rogues series as they were in their mid 20’s. It would be nice to have some in their 50’s+ as we still have feelings at that age. Joan Wilson

    Reply
  21. Jo, one of the things I liked about Dark Champion was the age of the heroine- it seemed historically more accurate than having an unmarried twenty year old woman during the Middle Ages. As to my preferences, I don’t like a vast age spread because I feel a man who is that much older would only be interested in the woman physically – there is certainly little likelihood that the two would have any common interests. My least favorite Georgette Heyer novel was “These Old Shades” because Leonie was so much younger than the Duke. I am not particularly fond of the older woman/younger man scenario because IMHO men tend to be less mature than woman at the same age anyway! LOL 😉

    Reply
  22. Jo, one of the things I liked about Dark Champion was the age of the heroine- it seemed historically more accurate than having an unmarried twenty year old woman during the Middle Ages. As to my preferences, I don’t like a vast age spread because I feel a man who is that much older would only be interested in the woman physically – there is certainly little likelihood that the two would have any common interests. My least favorite Georgette Heyer novel was “These Old Shades” because Leonie was so much younger than the Duke. I am not particularly fond of the older woman/younger man scenario because IMHO men tend to be less mature than woman at the same age anyway! LOL 😉

    Reply
  23. Jo, one of the things I liked about Dark Champion was the age of the heroine- it seemed historically more accurate than having an unmarried twenty year old woman during the Middle Ages. As to my preferences, I don’t like a vast age spread because I feel a man who is that much older would only be interested in the woman physically – there is certainly little likelihood that the two would have any common interests. My least favorite Georgette Heyer novel was “These Old Shades” because Leonie was so much younger than the Duke. I am not particularly fond of the older woman/younger man scenario because IMHO men tend to be less mature than woman at the same age anyway! LOL 😉

    Reply
  24. Jo, one of the things I liked about Dark Champion was the age of the heroine- it seemed historically more accurate than having an unmarried twenty year old woman during the Middle Ages. As to my preferences, I don’t like a vast age spread because I feel a man who is that much older would only be interested in the woman physically – there is certainly little likelihood that the two would have any common interests. My least favorite Georgette Heyer novel was “These Old Shades” because Leonie was so much younger than the Duke. I am not particularly fond of the older woman/younger man scenario because IMHO men tend to be less mature than woman at the same age anyway! LOL 😉

    Reply
  25. Jo, one of the things I liked about Dark Champion was the age of the heroine- it seemed historically more accurate than having an unmarried twenty year old woman during the Middle Ages. As to my preferences, I don’t like a vast age spread because I feel a man who is that much older would only be interested in the woman physically – there is certainly little likelihood that the two would have any common interests. My least favorite Georgette Heyer novel was “These Old Shades” because Leonie was so much younger than the Duke. I am not particularly fond of the older woman/younger man scenario because IMHO men tend to be less mature than woman at the same age anyway! LOL 😉

    Reply
  26. For me, whatever works for the story and the time of the story is what works. People have interesting lives and romance at any age, so no preference for me. I expect ages in a historical to be appropriate for the time. So if a sixteen year old would have been an adult in a given century, she can act as an adult in the story and that’s fine by me. Her mother and grandmother would be fine as heroines as well if they have stories to be told.

    Reply
  27. For me, whatever works for the story and the time of the story is what works. People have interesting lives and romance at any age, so no preference for me. I expect ages in a historical to be appropriate for the time. So if a sixteen year old would have been an adult in a given century, she can act as an adult in the story and that’s fine by me. Her mother and grandmother would be fine as heroines as well if they have stories to be told.

    Reply
  28. For me, whatever works for the story and the time of the story is what works. People have interesting lives and romance at any age, so no preference for me. I expect ages in a historical to be appropriate for the time. So if a sixteen year old would have been an adult in a given century, she can act as an adult in the story and that’s fine by me. Her mother and grandmother would be fine as heroines as well if they have stories to be told.

    Reply
  29. For me, whatever works for the story and the time of the story is what works. People have interesting lives and romance at any age, so no preference for me. I expect ages in a historical to be appropriate for the time. So if a sixteen year old would have been an adult in a given century, she can act as an adult in the story and that’s fine by me. Her mother and grandmother would be fine as heroines as well if they have stories to be told.

    Reply
  30. For me, whatever works for the story and the time of the story is what works. People have interesting lives and romance at any age, so no preference for me. I expect ages in a historical to be appropriate for the time. So if a sixteen year old would have been an adult in a given century, she can act as an adult in the story and that’s fine by me. Her mother and grandmother would be fine as heroines as well if they have stories to be told.

    Reply
  31. When I first started reading romance, I didn’t seem to mind the young age of the heroines. However, as I aged I became uncomfortable with the young ages, especially if the hero was quite a bit older. Got into my ick factor. I also think sometimes that the way the teenage character is written reflects the authors way of thinking and not how a young person would really react. Does that make sense?
    I love older couples, second chance at love people. I love women older than men. As far as how great a difference, sometimes when I read a story with age differences of 10 or greater; even though we get that HEA, in the back of my head I always wonder…will he get tired of her, will she tire of him, will he finally say we have nothing in common?

    Reply
  32. When I first started reading romance, I didn’t seem to mind the young age of the heroines. However, as I aged I became uncomfortable with the young ages, especially if the hero was quite a bit older. Got into my ick factor. I also think sometimes that the way the teenage character is written reflects the authors way of thinking and not how a young person would really react. Does that make sense?
    I love older couples, second chance at love people. I love women older than men. As far as how great a difference, sometimes when I read a story with age differences of 10 or greater; even though we get that HEA, in the back of my head I always wonder…will he get tired of her, will she tire of him, will he finally say we have nothing in common?

    Reply
  33. When I first started reading romance, I didn’t seem to mind the young age of the heroines. However, as I aged I became uncomfortable with the young ages, especially if the hero was quite a bit older. Got into my ick factor. I also think sometimes that the way the teenage character is written reflects the authors way of thinking and not how a young person would really react. Does that make sense?
    I love older couples, second chance at love people. I love women older than men. As far as how great a difference, sometimes when I read a story with age differences of 10 or greater; even though we get that HEA, in the back of my head I always wonder…will he get tired of her, will she tire of him, will he finally say we have nothing in common?

    Reply
  34. When I first started reading romance, I didn’t seem to mind the young age of the heroines. However, as I aged I became uncomfortable with the young ages, especially if the hero was quite a bit older. Got into my ick factor. I also think sometimes that the way the teenage character is written reflects the authors way of thinking and not how a young person would really react. Does that make sense?
    I love older couples, second chance at love people. I love women older than men. As far as how great a difference, sometimes when I read a story with age differences of 10 or greater; even though we get that HEA, in the back of my head I always wonder…will he get tired of her, will she tire of him, will he finally say we have nothing in common?

    Reply
  35. When I first started reading romance, I didn’t seem to mind the young age of the heroines. However, as I aged I became uncomfortable with the young ages, especially if the hero was quite a bit older. Got into my ick factor. I also think sometimes that the way the teenage character is written reflects the authors way of thinking and not how a young person would really react. Does that make sense?
    I love older couples, second chance at love people. I love women older than men. As far as how great a difference, sometimes when I read a story with age differences of 10 or greater; even though we get that HEA, in the back of my head I always wonder…will he get tired of her, will she tire of him, will he finally say we have nothing in common?

    Reply
  36. Hmm. Overall, I tend to prefer a heroine who’s at least in her early twenties–older is fine–and a hero who’s no more than ten years her senior. (The reverse can also work, in the right hands.) Unless the writer convinces me that the age difference is immaterial compared with everything the hero and heroine have in common–tricky, but that can be done too.
    What I have less tolerance for as I age is the immature heroine or, worse, the immature hero. And immaturity is less a matter of years than of attitude. Some people are more mature at eighteen than others are at twenty-eight. Although I’m not a big fan of dewy teen ingenues, I can forgive them their youth and inexperience more readily than I can forgive the self-indulgent rakes who are still acting like drunken frat boys at thirty and above.

    Reply
  37. Hmm. Overall, I tend to prefer a heroine who’s at least in her early twenties–older is fine–and a hero who’s no more than ten years her senior. (The reverse can also work, in the right hands.) Unless the writer convinces me that the age difference is immaterial compared with everything the hero and heroine have in common–tricky, but that can be done too.
    What I have less tolerance for as I age is the immature heroine or, worse, the immature hero. And immaturity is less a matter of years than of attitude. Some people are more mature at eighteen than others are at twenty-eight. Although I’m not a big fan of dewy teen ingenues, I can forgive them their youth and inexperience more readily than I can forgive the self-indulgent rakes who are still acting like drunken frat boys at thirty and above.

    Reply
  38. Hmm. Overall, I tend to prefer a heroine who’s at least in her early twenties–older is fine–and a hero who’s no more than ten years her senior. (The reverse can also work, in the right hands.) Unless the writer convinces me that the age difference is immaterial compared with everything the hero and heroine have in common–tricky, but that can be done too.
    What I have less tolerance for as I age is the immature heroine or, worse, the immature hero. And immaturity is less a matter of years than of attitude. Some people are more mature at eighteen than others are at twenty-eight. Although I’m not a big fan of dewy teen ingenues, I can forgive them their youth and inexperience more readily than I can forgive the self-indulgent rakes who are still acting like drunken frat boys at thirty and above.

    Reply
  39. Hmm. Overall, I tend to prefer a heroine who’s at least in her early twenties–older is fine–and a hero who’s no more than ten years her senior. (The reverse can also work, in the right hands.) Unless the writer convinces me that the age difference is immaterial compared with everything the hero and heroine have in common–tricky, but that can be done too.
    What I have less tolerance for as I age is the immature heroine or, worse, the immature hero. And immaturity is less a matter of years than of attitude. Some people are more mature at eighteen than others are at twenty-eight. Although I’m not a big fan of dewy teen ingenues, I can forgive them their youth and inexperience more readily than I can forgive the self-indulgent rakes who are still acting like drunken frat boys at thirty and above.

    Reply
  40. Hmm. Overall, I tend to prefer a heroine who’s at least in her early twenties–older is fine–and a hero who’s no more than ten years her senior. (The reverse can also work, in the right hands.) Unless the writer convinces me that the age difference is immaterial compared with everything the hero and heroine have in common–tricky, but that can be done too.
    What I have less tolerance for as I age is the immature heroine or, worse, the immature hero. And immaturity is less a matter of years than of attitude. Some people are more mature at eighteen than others are at twenty-eight. Although I’m not a big fan of dewy teen ingenues, I can forgive them their youth and inexperience more readily than I can forgive the self-indulgent rakes who are still acting like drunken frat boys at thirty and above.

    Reply
  41. Ooh, one of my favorite hot buttons! I certainly agree that in the right hands almost any age and any age difference can be acceptable. But if you are asking what I prefer, it’s no more than a 5 year differential (don’t care who is older/younger) for all the reasons Linda Banche discussed in her post. In Real Life I certainly know couples with much greater age disparities who are very happy, but we’re talking about my personal romantic fantasy, and much older heroes paired with very young heroines just doesn’t do it. It’s too much like Real Life — all those midlife crisis men divorcing Wife #1 to marry trophy Wife #2. I’ve put many a book back on the library/bookstore shelf when I noted an 18 y.o. heroine matched with a 34 y.o. hero. Now, if she were matched with a 22 y.o. and he with a 32 y.o. I’d have no problem.
    In addition, part of my disbelief in the HEA for the May-December pairing stems from knowing that our brains are still quite plastic, with lots of unformed neural connections, until we are in our mid-20’s. I keep wanting to tell that 18 y.o. heroine that she will grow and change. If paired with a 22 y.o. hero, they have the chance to go through that process together and affect how each of them grows and changes, whereas with a 34 y.o. he’s pretty fully formed. Obviously our brains are not set in cement and we all hope to learn as we get older, but when I think of the kind of man I was attracted to in my teens and what I thought True Love meant (sturm und drang seemed to be a requirement), I’m very happy I met my husband in my mid-20’s.

    Reply
  42. Ooh, one of my favorite hot buttons! I certainly agree that in the right hands almost any age and any age difference can be acceptable. But if you are asking what I prefer, it’s no more than a 5 year differential (don’t care who is older/younger) for all the reasons Linda Banche discussed in her post. In Real Life I certainly know couples with much greater age disparities who are very happy, but we’re talking about my personal romantic fantasy, and much older heroes paired with very young heroines just doesn’t do it. It’s too much like Real Life — all those midlife crisis men divorcing Wife #1 to marry trophy Wife #2. I’ve put many a book back on the library/bookstore shelf when I noted an 18 y.o. heroine matched with a 34 y.o. hero. Now, if she were matched with a 22 y.o. and he with a 32 y.o. I’d have no problem.
    In addition, part of my disbelief in the HEA for the May-December pairing stems from knowing that our brains are still quite plastic, with lots of unformed neural connections, until we are in our mid-20’s. I keep wanting to tell that 18 y.o. heroine that she will grow and change. If paired with a 22 y.o. hero, they have the chance to go through that process together and affect how each of them grows and changes, whereas with a 34 y.o. he’s pretty fully formed. Obviously our brains are not set in cement and we all hope to learn as we get older, but when I think of the kind of man I was attracted to in my teens and what I thought True Love meant (sturm und drang seemed to be a requirement), I’m very happy I met my husband in my mid-20’s.

    Reply
  43. Ooh, one of my favorite hot buttons! I certainly agree that in the right hands almost any age and any age difference can be acceptable. But if you are asking what I prefer, it’s no more than a 5 year differential (don’t care who is older/younger) for all the reasons Linda Banche discussed in her post. In Real Life I certainly know couples with much greater age disparities who are very happy, but we’re talking about my personal romantic fantasy, and much older heroes paired with very young heroines just doesn’t do it. It’s too much like Real Life — all those midlife crisis men divorcing Wife #1 to marry trophy Wife #2. I’ve put many a book back on the library/bookstore shelf when I noted an 18 y.o. heroine matched with a 34 y.o. hero. Now, if she were matched with a 22 y.o. and he with a 32 y.o. I’d have no problem.
    In addition, part of my disbelief in the HEA for the May-December pairing stems from knowing that our brains are still quite plastic, with lots of unformed neural connections, until we are in our mid-20’s. I keep wanting to tell that 18 y.o. heroine that she will grow and change. If paired with a 22 y.o. hero, they have the chance to go through that process together and affect how each of them grows and changes, whereas with a 34 y.o. he’s pretty fully formed. Obviously our brains are not set in cement and we all hope to learn as we get older, but when I think of the kind of man I was attracted to in my teens and what I thought True Love meant (sturm und drang seemed to be a requirement), I’m very happy I met my husband in my mid-20’s.

    Reply
  44. Ooh, one of my favorite hot buttons! I certainly agree that in the right hands almost any age and any age difference can be acceptable. But if you are asking what I prefer, it’s no more than a 5 year differential (don’t care who is older/younger) for all the reasons Linda Banche discussed in her post. In Real Life I certainly know couples with much greater age disparities who are very happy, but we’re talking about my personal romantic fantasy, and much older heroes paired with very young heroines just doesn’t do it. It’s too much like Real Life — all those midlife crisis men divorcing Wife #1 to marry trophy Wife #2. I’ve put many a book back on the library/bookstore shelf when I noted an 18 y.o. heroine matched with a 34 y.o. hero. Now, if she were matched with a 22 y.o. and he with a 32 y.o. I’d have no problem.
    In addition, part of my disbelief in the HEA for the May-December pairing stems from knowing that our brains are still quite plastic, with lots of unformed neural connections, until we are in our mid-20’s. I keep wanting to tell that 18 y.o. heroine that she will grow and change. If paired with a 22 y.o. hero, they have the chance to go through that process together and affect how each of them grows and changes, whereas with a 34 y.o. he’s pretty fully formed. Obviously our brains are not set in cement and we all hope to learn as we get older, but when I think of the kind of man I was attracted to in my teens and what I thought True Love meant (sturm und drang seemed to be a requirement), I’m very happy I met my husband in my mid-20’s.

    Reply
  45. Ooh, one of my favorite hot buttons! I certainly agree that in the right hands almost any age and any age difference can be acceptable. But if you are asking what I prefer, it’s no more than a 5 year differential (don’t care who is older/younger) for all the reasons Linda Banche discussed in her post. In Real Life I certainly know couples with much greater age disparities who are very happy, but we’re talking about my personal romantic fantasy, and much older heroes paired with very young heroines just doesn’t do it. It’s too much like Real Life — all those midlife crisis men divorcing Wife #1 to marry trophy Wife #2. I’ve put many a book back on the library/bookstore shelf when I noted an 18 y.o. heroine matched with a 34 y.o. hero. Now, if she were matched with a 22 y.o. and he with a 32 y.o. I’d have no problem.
    In addition, part of my disbelief in the HEA for the May-December pairing stems from knowing that our brains are still quite plastic, with lots of unformed neural connections, until we are in our mid-20’s. I keep wanting to tell that 18 y.o. heroine that she will grow and change. If paired with a 22 y.o. hero, they have the chance to go through that process together and affect how each of them grows and changes, whereas with a 34 y.o. he’s pretty fully formed. Obviously our brains are not set in cement and we all hope to learn as we get older, but when I think of the kind of man I was attracted to in my teens and what I thought True Love meant (sturm und drang seemed to be a requirement), I’m very happy I met my husband in my mid-20’s.

    Reply
  46. Wow. Interesting answers here. I tend to think within the parameters of the era the story is written. Some would have had the girl married off to a very much older man by the time she was around 14, especially in the case of financial arrangements. Then again, she might have married two, three or even four more times in her lifetime because each of her older husbands would have died, leaving her marriageable again.
    Then you have the 18 to 20yo Hns, and the 27-30yo spinsters…it’s all just whatever fits in the time setting of the novel.
    I do think however, that especially in contemporaries, I’d very much like to see the 45+ Hn written. Just because we age doesn’t mean we have to lose our sensuality but unfortunately, I see many young romance readers giving the old “EWW” comment any time a Hn is over 22 or so. Which is a real shame because exploring those older relationships can be very interesting indeed.

    Reply
  47. Wow. Interesting answers here. I tend to think within the parameters of the era the story is written. Some would have had the girl married off to a very much older man by the time she was around 14, especially in the case of financial arrangements. Then again, she might have married two, three or even four more times in her lifetime because each of her older husbands would have died, leaving her marriageable again.
    Then you have the 18 to 20yo Hns, and the 27-30yo spinsters…it’s all just whatever fits in the time setting of the novel.
    I do think however, that especially in contemporaries, I’d very much like to see the 45+ Hn written. Just because we age doesn’t mean we have to lose our sensuality but unfortunately, I see many young romance readers giving the old “EWW” comment any time a Hn is over 22 or so. Which is a real shame because exploring those older relationships can be very interesting indeed.

    Reply
  48. Wow. Interesting answers here. I tend to think within the parameters of the era the story is written. Some would have had the girl married off to a very much older man by the time she was around 14, especially in the case of financial arrangements. Then again, she might have married two, three or even four more times in her lifetime because each of her older husbands would have died, leaving her marriageable again.
    Then you have the 18 to 20yo Hns, and the 27-30yo spinsters…it’s all just whatever fits in the time setting of the novel.
    I do think however, that especially in contemporaries, I’d very much like to see the 45+ Hn written. Just because we age doesn’t mean we have to lose our sensuality but unfortunately, I see many young romance readers giving the old “EWW” comment any time a Hn is over 22 or so. Which is a real shame because exploring those older relationships can be very interesting indeed.

    Reply
  49. Wow. Interesting answers here. I tend to think within the parameters of the era the story is written. Some would have had the girl married off to a very much older man by the time she was around 14, especially in the case of financial arrangements. Then again, she might have married two, three or even four more times in her lifetime because each of her older husbands would have died, leaving her marriageable again.
    Then you have the 18 to 20yo Hns, and the 27-30yo spinsters…it’s all just whatever fits in the time setting of the novel.
    I do think however, that especially in contemporaries, I’d very much like to see the 45+ Hn written. Just because we age doesn’t mean we have to lose our sensuality but unfortunately, I see many young romance readers giving the old “EWW” comment any time a Hn is over 22 or so. Which is a real shame because exploring those older relationships can be very interesting indeed.

    Reply
  50. Wow. Interesting answers here. I tend to think within the parameters of the era the story is written. Some would have had the girl married off to a very much older man by the time she was around 14, especially in the case of financial arrangements. Then again, she might have married two, three or even four more times in her lifetime because each of her older husbands would have died, leaving her marriageable again.
    Then you have the 18 to 20yo Hns, and the 27-30yo spinsters…it’s all just whatever fits in the time setting of the novel.
    I do think however, that especially in contemporaries, I’d very much like to see the 45+ Hn written. Just because we age doesn’t mean we have to lose our sensuality but unfortunately, I see many young romance readers giving the old “EWW” comment any time a Hn is over 22 or so. Which is a real shame because exploring those older relationships can be very interesting indeed.

    Reply
  51. I like mature heroines, and in the contemporaries I wrote, they were over 30. But historically, an older heroine would run more risks in childbirth, and the possibility of children is one of the underlying assumptions of romance. which on one level is about the creation of families.
    Two of Henry VIII’s wives died bearing their first child at age 34, IIRC–Jane Seymour died giving birth to Edward, and Kathere Parr died in childbirth when married to Thomas Seymour.
    So my historical heroines are generally in their mid 20s. (And the heroes are generally about 7 years older–enough older to have established themselves, but not so much as to put the characters too far apart.)

    Reply
  52. I like mature heroines, and in the contemporaries I wrote, they were over 30. But historically, an older heroine would run more risks in childbirth, and the possibility of children is one of the underlying assumptions of romance. which on one level is about the creation of families.
    Two of Henry VIII’s wives died bearing their first child at age 34, IIRC–Jane Seymour died giving birth to Edward, and Kathere Parr died in childbirth when married to Thomas Seymour.
    So my historical heroines are generally in their mid 20s. (And the heroes are generally about 7 years older–enough older to have established themselves, but not so much as to put the characters too far apart.)

    Reply
  53. I like mature heroines, and in the contemporaries I wrote, they were over 30. But historically, an older heroine would run more risks in childbirth, and the possibility of children is one of the underlying assumptions of romance. which on one level is about the creation of families.
    Two of Henry VIII’s wives died bearing their first child at age 34, IIRC–Jane Seymour died giving birth to Edward, and Kathere Parr died in childbirth when married to Thomas Seymour.
    So my historical heroines are generally in their mid 20s. (And the heroes are generally about 7 years older–enough older to have established themselves, but not so much as to put the characters too far apart.)

    Reply
  54. I like mature heroines, and in the contemporaries I wrote, they were over 30. But historically, an older heroine would run more risks in childbirth, and the possibility of children is one of the underlying assumptions of romance. which on one level is about the creation of families.
    Two of Henry VIII’s wives died bearing their first child at age 34, IIRC–Jane Seymour died giving birth to Edward, and Kathere Parr died in childbirth when married to Thomas Seymour.
    So my historical heroines are generally in their mid 20s. (And the heroes are generally about 7 years older–enough older to have established themselves, but not so much as to put the characters too far apart.)

    Reply
  55. I like mature heroines, and in the contemporaries I wrote, they were over 30. But historically, an older heroine would run more risks in childbirth, and the possibility of children is one of the underlying assumptions of romance. which on one level is about the creation of families.
    Two of Henry VIII’s wives died bearing their first child at age 34, IIRC–Jane Seymour died giving birth to Edward, and Kathere Parr died in childbirth when married to Thomas Seymour.
    So my historical heroines are generally in their mid 20s. (And the heroes are generally about 7 years older–enough older to have established themselves, but not so much as to put the characters too far apart.)

    Reply
  56. In historical novels what many modern people forget is the life expectancy of that era!
    A 30 yr old in the 1800’s was probably about 50 to 60!
    SO someone that’s 40 is late late middle age and 50 is OLD!
    SOURCE: Statistics Canada. Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada 1992. Current Demographic Analysis. Ottawa: Minister of Industry, Science and Technology, 1992; p. 150 (1830 expectancy)
    Mean Survival (e0) 42 49 54
    Of course there were exceptions. But teenage lovers turn me off even knowing about the life expectancy!

    Reply
  57. In historical novels what many modern people forget is the life expectancy of that era!
    A 30 yr old in the 1800’s was probably about 50 to 60!
    SO someone that’s 40 is late late middle age and 50 is OLD!
    SOURCE: Statistics Canada. Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada 1992. Current Demographic Analysis. Ottawa: Minister of Industry, Science and Technology, 1992; p. 150 (1830 expectancy)
    Mean Survival (e0) 42 49 54
    Of course there were exceptions. But teenage lovers turn me off even knowing about the life expectancy!

    Reply
  58. In historical novels what many modern people forget is the life expectancy of that era!
    A 30 yr old in the 1800’s was probably about 50 to 60!
    SO someone that’s 40 is late late middle age and 50 is OLD!
    SOURCE: Statistics Canada. Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada 1992. Current Demographic Analysis. Ottawa: Minister of Industry, Science and Technology, 1992; p. 150 (1830 expectancy)
    Mean Survival (e0) 42 49 54
    Of course there were exceptions. But teenage lovers turn me off even knowing about the life expectancy!

    Reply
  59. In historical novels what many modern people forget is the life expectancy of that era!
    A 30 yr old in the 1800’s was probably about 50 to 60!
    SO someone that’s 40 is late late middle age and 50 is OLD!
    SOURCE: Statistics Canada. Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada 1992. Current Demographic Analysis. Ottawa: Minister of Industry, Science and Technology, 1992; p. 150 (1830 expectancy)
    Mean Survival (e0) 42 49 54
    Of course there were exceptions. But teenage lovers turn me off even knowing about the life expectancy!

    Reply
  60. In historical novels what many modern people forget is the life expectancy of that era!
    A 30 yr old in the 1800’s was probably about 50 to 60!
    SO someone that’s 40 is late late middle age and 50 is OLD!
    SOURCE: Statistics Canada. Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada 1992. Current Demographic Analysis. Ottawa: Minister of Industry, Science and Technology, 1992; p. 150 (1830 expectancy)
    Mean Survival (e0) 42 49 54
    Of course there were exceptions. But teenage lovers turn me off even knowing about the life expectancy!

    Reply
  61. This is fascinating. I’ve given quite a bit of thought to age, since in the trilogy I’ve written, all my heroines are 30ish (ancient for a Regency, I know). A couple of my heroines for upcoming books are in their early 20s, but life has matured them beyond their years.Since I’m 30+ myself (snort), I’d rather write about people who’ve had some experience, although I will read h/hs of any age. I don’t have too much patience with the teenage virgins though (and since I work in a high school library, I have pretty much had my fill of teens in RL and would rather not find them in my leisure reading).
    I’m cognizant of the Charles-Diana gap—those 12 years between them were a problem from the get-go (not to mention inconvenient Camilla). I think too large an age difference can be handled with aplomb (Heyer’s Avon and Leonie, for example), but I’d rather have my characters closer in age.

    Reply
  62. This is fascinating. I’ve given quite a bit of thought to age, since in the trilogy I’ve written, all my heroines are 30ish (ancient for a Regency, I know). A couple of my heroines for upcoming books are in their early 20s, but life has matured them beyond their years.Since I’m 30+ myself (snort), I’d rather write about people who’ve had some experience, although I will read h/hs of any age. I don’t have too much patience with the teenage virgins though (and since I work in a high school library, I have pretty much had my fill of teens in RL and would rather not find them in my leisure reading).
    I’m cognizant of the Charles-Diana gap—those 12 years between them were a problem from the get-go (not to mention inconvenient Camilla). I think too large an age difference can be handled with aplomb (Heyer’s Avon and Leonie, for example), but I’d rather have my characters closer in age.

    Reply
  63. This is fascinating. I’ve given quite a bit of thought to age, since in the trilogy I’ve written, all my heroines are 30ish (ancient for a Regency, I know). A couple of my heroines for upcoming books are in their early 20s, but life has matured them beyond their years.Since I’m 30+ myself (snort), I’d rather write about people who’ve had some experience, although I will read h/hs of any age. I don’t have too much patience with the teenage virgins though (and since I work in a high school library, I have pretty much had my fill of teens in RL and would rather not find them in my leisure reading).
    I’m cognizant of the Charles-Diana gap—those 12 years between them were a problem from the get-go (not to mention inconvenient Camilla). I think too large an age difference can be handled with aplomb (Heyer’s Avon and Leonie, for example), but I’d rather have my characters closer in age.

    Reply
  64. This is fascinating. I’ve given quite a bit of thought to age, since in the trilogy I’ve written, all my heroines are 30ish (ancient for a Regency, I know). A couple of my heroines for upcoming books are in their early 20s, but life has matured them beyond their years.Since I’m 30+ myself (snort), I’d rather write about people who’ve had some experience, although I will read h/hs of any age. I don’t have too much patience with the teenage virgins though (and since I work in a high school library, I have pretty much had my fill of teens in RL and would rather not find them in my leisure reading).
    I’m cognizant of the Charles-Diana gap—those 12 years between them were a problem from the get-go (not to mention inconvenient Camilla). I think too large an age difference can be handled with aplomb (Heyer’s Avon and Leonie, for example), but I’d rather have my characters closer in age.

    Reply
  65. This is fascinating. I’ve given quite a bit of thought to age, since in the trilogy I’ve written, all my heroines are 30ish (ancient for a Regency, I know). A couple of my heroines for upcoming books are in their early 20s, but life has matured them beyond their years.Since I’m 30+ myself (snort), I’d rather write about people who’ve had some experience, although I will read h/hs of any age. I don’t have too much patience with the teenage virgins though (and since I work in a high school library, I have pretty much had my fill of teens in RL and would rather not find them in my leisure reading).
    I’m cognizant of the Charles-Diana gap—those 12 years between them were a problem from the get-go (not to mention inconvenient Camilla). I think too large an age difference can be handled with aplomb (Heyer’s Avon and Leonie, for example), but I’d rather have my characters closer in age.

    Reply
  66. With historical romances, you do have to reflect the norms of the times. Women were married off early and men had to go out and prove themselves in medieval times. In the Regency era, women were put out into the marriage market while in their teens and considered old by their early 20’s. The men were sort of expected to sew their wild oats untl forced to wed, usually l in their late 20′ to early 30’s. .
    I need sleep, a have fallen asleep at the keyboard setimes.

    Reply
  67. With historical romances, you do have to reflect the norms of the times. Women were married off early and men had to go out and prove themselves in medieval times. In the Regency era, women were put out into the marriage market while in their teens and considered old by their early 20’s. The men were sort of expected to sew their wild oats untl forced to wed, usually l in their late 20′ to early 30’s. .
    I need sleep, a have fallen asleep at the keyboard setimes.

    Reply
  68. With historical romances, you do have to reflect the norms of the times. Women were married off early and men had to go out and prove themselves in medieval times. In the Regency era, women were put out into the marriage market while in their teens and considered old by their early 20’s. The men were sort of expected to sew their wild oats untl forced to wed, usually l in their late 20′ to early 30’s. .
    I need sleep, a have fallen asleep at the keyboard setimes.

    Reply
  69. With historical romances, you do have to reflect the norms of the times. Women were married off early and men had to go out and prove themselves in medieval times. In the Regency era, women were put out into the marriage market while in their teens and considered old by their early 20’s. The men were sort of expected to sew their wild oats untl forced to wed, usually l in their late 20′ to early 30’s. .
    I need sleep, a have fallen asleep at the keyboard setimes.

    Reply
  70. With historical romances, you do have to reflect the norms of the times. Women were married off early and men had to go out and prove themselves in medieval times. In the Regency era, women were put out into the marriage market while in their teens and considered old by their early 20’s. The men were sort of expected to sew their wild oats untl forced to wed, usually l in their late 20′ to early 30’s. .
    I need sleep, a have fallen asleep at the keyboard setimes.

    Reply
  71. Interesting comments, everyone.
    A few responses. The age at which people died in the past wasn’t so drastically different from today. The statistics saying life expectancy was 35 or such come from taking all people born. However, large numbers died in infancy. By some studies, once a person in the past reached 20 their life expectancy was closer to 60,leaving aside being unlucky enough to encounter plague or famine.
    There are plenty of records of people reaching 70, 80, and even 100. 100 was a huge achievement, but it wasn’t beyond belief.
    So our historical heroine of 25 could well have 50 years ahead of her, and might even be childbearing for 20 of them. Probably 15, at least.
    It’s a mystery to me why there are so many small families, especially among the rich, when plenty of poorer families were large.
    I’ll write another post in a moment.
    Jo

    Reply
  72. Interesting comments, everyone.
    A few responses. The age at which people died in the past wasn’t so drastically different from today. The statistics saying life expectancy was 35 or such come from taking all people born. However, large numbers died in infancy. By some studies, once a person in the past reached 20 their life expectancy was closer to 60,leaving aside being unlucky enough to encounter plague or famine.
    There are plenty of records of people reaching 70, 80, and even 100. 100 was a huge achievement, but it wasn’t beyond belief.
    So our historical heroine of 25 could well have 50 years ahead of her, and might even be childbearing for 20 of them. Probably 15, at least.
    It’s a mystery to me why there are so many small families, especially among the rich, when plenty of poorer families were large.
    I’ll write another post in a moment.
    Jo

    Reply
  73. Interesting comments, everyone.
    A few responses. The age at which people died in the past wasn’t so drastically different from today. The statistics saying life expectancy was 35 or such come from taking all people born. However, large numbers died in infancy. By some studies, once a person in the past reached 20 their life expectancy was closer to 60,leaving aside being unlucky enough to encounter plague or famine.
    There are plenty of records of people reaching 70, 80, and even 100. 100 was a huge achievement, but it wasn’t beyond belief.
    So our historical heroine of 25 could well have 50 years ahead of her, and might even be childbearing for 20 of them. Probably 15, at least.
    It’s a mystery to me why there are so many small families, especially among the rich, when plenty of poorer families were large.
    I’ll write another post in a moment.
    Jo

    Reply
  74. Interesting comments, everyone.
    A few responses. The age at which people died in the past wasn’t so drastically different from today. The statistics saying life expectancy was 35 or such come from taking all people born. However, large numbers died in infancy. By some studies, once a person in the past reached 20 their life expectancy was closer to 60,leaving aside being unlucky enough to encounter plague or famine.
    There are plenty of records of people reaching 70, 80, and even 100. 100 was a huge achievement, but it wasn’t beyond belief.
    So our historical heroine of 25 could well have 50 years ahead of her, and might even be childbearing for 20 of them. Probably 15, at least.
    It’s a mystery to me why there are so many small families, especially among the rich, when plenty of poorer families were large.
    I’ll write another post in a moment.
    Jo

    Reply
  75. Interesting comments, everyone.
    A few responses. The age at which people died in the past wasn’t so drastically different from today. The statistics saying life expectancy was 35 or such come from taking all people born. However, large numbers died in infancy. By some studies, once a person in the past reached 20 their life expectancy was closer to 60,leaving aside being unlucky enough to encounter plague or famine.
    There are plenty of records of people reaching 70, 80, and even 100. 100 was a huge achievement, but it wasn’t beyond belief.
    So our historical heroine of 25 could well have 50 years ahead of her, and might even be childbearing for 20 of them. Probably 15, at least.
    It’s a mystery to me why there are so many small families, especially among the rich, when plenty of poorer families were large.
    I’ll write another post in a moment.
    Jo

    Reply
  76. Thank you so much for picking my question. I do like to know the age of the hero and heroine at the beginning of the book and when it’s not made clear it can annoy me because then I can’t get a clear picture of their personality. I don’t think I have a preference for a particular age but I know that I am more forgiving to younger characters since I expect them to have less life experience and it makes sense that they would make some stupid mistakes.

    Reply
  77. Thank you so much for picking my question. I do like to know the age of the hero and heroine at the beginning of the book and when it’s not made clear it can annoy me because then I can’t get a clear picture of their personality. I don’t think I have a preference for a particular age but I know that I am more forgiving to younger characters since I expect them to have less life experience and it makes sense that they would make some stupid mistakes.

    Reply
  78. Thank you so much for picking my question. I do like to know the age of the hero and heroine at the beginning of the book and when it’s not made clear it can annoy me because then I can’t get a clear picture of their personality. I don’t think I have a preference for a particular age but I know that I am more forgiving to younger characters since I expect them to have less life experience and it makes sense that they would make some stupid mistakes.

    Reply
  79. Thank you so much for picking my question. I do like to know the age of the hero and heroine at the beginning of the book and when it’s not made clear it can annoy me because then I can’t get a clear picture of their personality. I don’t think I have a preference for a particular age but I know that I am more forgiving to younger characters since I expect them to have less life experience and it makes sense that they would make some stupid mistakes.

    Reply
  80. Thank you so much for picking my question. I do like to know the age of the hero and heroine at the beginning of the book and when it’s not made clear it can annoy me because then I can’t get a clear picture of their personality. I don’t think I have a preference for a particular age but I know that I am more forgiving to younger characters since I expect them to have less life experience and it makes sense that they would make some stupid mistakes.

    Reply
  81. That was an interesting post and an even more interesting (sorry Jo) series of reader responses. As an author I learned a lot from them, so thank you everyone. Also, I hadn’t thought out the implications of the life expectancy stuff ie a large percentage of the deaths occurring to the young meaning a longer life expectancy for those who survived childhood.
    Thanks you

    Reply
  82. That was an interesting post and an even more interesting (sorry Jo) series of reader responses. As an author I learned a lot from them, so thank you everyone. Also, I hadn’t thought out the implications of the life expectancy stuff ie a large percentage of the deaths occurring to the young meaning a longer life expectancy for those who survived childhood.
    Thanks you

    Reply
  83. That was an interesting post and an even more interesting (sorry Jo) series of reader responses. As an author I learned a lot from them, so thank you everyone. Also, I hadn’t thought out the implications of the life expectancy stuff ie a large percentage of the deaths occurring to the young meaning a longer life expectancy for those who survived childhood.
    Thanks you

    Reply
  84. That was an interesting post and an even more interesting (sorry Jo) series of reader responses. As an author I learned a lot from them, so thank you everyone. Also, I hadn’t thought out the implications of the life expectancy stuff ie a large percentage of the deaths occurring to the young meaning a longer life expectancy for those who survived childhood.
    Thanks you

    Reply
  85. That was an interesting post and an even more interesting (sorry Jo) series of reader responses. As an author I learned a lot from them, so thank you everyone. Also, I hadn’t thought out the implications of the life expectancy stuff ie a large percentage of the deaths occurring to the young meaning a longer life expectancy for those who survived childhood.
    Thanks you

    Reply

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