Ask a Wench — What’s it like to create an interwoven anthology?

RednecklacesJo here, pulling together a group post.

We had fun creating The Last Chance Christmas Ball. At times it was the sort of fun you get from a camping holiday with unpredictable weather and odd creatures invading the tent.*G*

After all, the Wenches are eight strong minded women living around the world. Even within the US we have east coast and west coast, but add in England, which is  five hours ahead of the east coast and eight hours ahead of California. Pat was getting up when Nicola and I were thinking about dinner, and Anne, down in Australia goes to bed round about the times America wakes up! Even in this modern age we often had to wait many hours for the answer to a continuity query.

But we did have fun, and as you'll see, we all love Christmas stories.

I posted about the prologue on Sunday, but if you missed that, you can read it here.

LccbSo here are the Wenchly answers to the question: What's it like to create an interwoven anthology?

Joanna: My True Love Hath My Heart.

Read an excerpt here.

I wanted to write Christmas Eve turning into Christmas Day. I wanted that moment of change. I wanted lights. I know it's not the solstice, but for me midnight on Christmas Eve feels like the old is going out and the new is coming in. That was very much the 'feeling' I wanted for my story. It's a 'Second Chance at Love' tale and my hero and heroine have to change. So this felt like the right time and place

Also, decorations. And plum pudding. And holly. All the Right Stuff. I ended up a little surprised I didn't overlap with anybody else. I feel like I grabbed the best date and ran off with it.

Susan: A Scottish Carol Monet,_Lavacourt-Sunshine-and-Snow

(Jo.Susan shares a picture which is not of the Scottish borders in the snow, but has the right feel.)

Read an excerpt here.
Oh I just adore Christmas, Christmas love stories, winter and snow, Scotland, Scottish Regency settings — so it was a no-brainer for me to wrap those elements into a story when we Wenches began talking about writing another holiday anthology. When Alicia Condon suggested that we interweave our novellas and focus on the same Christmas ball, suddenly we had a lot of details to work out – the central location, the occasion, the hostess and her ties to each of our characters and their past and present circumstances. Jo Beverley created a Wiki page where we shared our details, and as we asked questions and figured out solutions, helping each other, the stories began to work together. The extra effort by all the Wenches as well as our editor and copy editor in making sure all the puzzle pieces fit perfectly was worth it – I think this is a very special Christmas collection! 

(Jo. We set the story in Northumberland to make it close enough to the Scottish border for Susan's characters to plan to attend.)

With my story set in Scotland in the midst of a snowstorm that affected more than one of the guests attending Lady Holly's Last Chance Christmas Ball, it didn't seem likely that my characters – Dr. Henry Seton, Laird of Cranshaw, and Clarinda Douglas, Lady Hay, the widowed daughter of Henry's old mentor – could safely arrive at the ball in northern England. So they became stranded in a blizzard, alone and cozy inside Cranshaw Castle — where Clary yearned to go to the grand ball, Henry was secretly relieved to miss it, and both had to face their shared past of first love, heartbreak, and the fear of starting over. With a little help from Dickens and a nod to Scrooge, Tiny Tim and a some other Christmas characters, I loved writing this story – and I hope you all will love reading our latest Wench venture, The Last Chance Christmas Ball! 

Pat: Christmas Larks.

Read an excerpt here.

I’ve always loved Christmas stories and the chance to break the routine  by writing a novella. I have missed the collections my former publisher used to do, so I eagerly agreed when the wenches decided to pull together another anthology.

But I knew my ability to organize anything so complicated as a story interwoven with characters from seven other people would most likely explode my overworked brain. I happily followed all the give-and-take about what kind of town, what kind of history, how does the ball come about, and loved that Jo Beverley and Nicola could pull up real towns and castles we could rework to suit ourselves.

Staircase Hall, Belton(Jo. We took as very loose inspiration Belsay House in Northumberland. The picture is of the main staircase. To learn more about it, click on the link.)

Once all the setting was developed though, I took a story that was already in my head and adjusted it to fit into the overall motif. Christmas mice, after all, can fit anywhere! Once everyone had their characters and stories settled, I could use their names where it made sense, and they could borrow mine to set around the dinner table. I’m utterly amazed how well it all worked out, and a lot of that is owed to the amazing Alicia Condon, our editor, who figured out what order all these stories needed to follow!      

Mary Jo: In The Bleak Midwinter.

We'd had so much fun with our first Word Wenches  Christmas anthology, Mischief and  Mistletoe, that we thought it would be rather fun to do another. Since that first anthology was bought by  my Kensington editor, it was logical that I act as liaison.  So I had my agent ask if they'd be  interested, and indeed they were! My editor suggested that it might be fun to do an  anthology built around a Christmas ball with stories intersecting.  We talked about it (we Wenches work by consensus) and then said sure!  And  lived to regret it. <G>

I love writing short stories, I love Christmas themed books and I love writing with the other Wenches so the Last Chance Christmas Ball anthology was always going to be the best of all possible worlds. That said, I'd written linked stories before with other writers and it hadn't always been easy; there were so many opportunities to get the details wrong in terms of the house, the servants, the other characters. However, we Wenches talk a lot amongst ourselves generally so I was confident that we would we be able to communicate successfully over the anthology! Candles

Cara/Andrea: Old Flames Dance.

Read an excerpt here.

All eight of us all loved the idea of linked stories centered around a Christmas ball. I mean, piece of (fruit)cake, right? Ha! Getting in synch on the descriptions of the Abbey, the names of servants, what guests were appearing at which meal, etc. took the construction of a Wiki page for all of us to consult as we worked on our individual stories. Still, question flew fast and furious, like “Um, Nicola does Piers arrive before or after supper on the 28th.”

Mary Jo and I took it one step further by deciding to make the two sons of the house have VERY intertwined stories, and talk about things getting complicated!

We had to understand not only the motivations of our own characters, but also those of the linked story. Suffice it to say, there were several VERY long plotting phone calls, filled with brainstorming, sketching out the personalities, the sequence of events—and the occasional tactful “noooo, my heroine wouldn’t react that way.” Getting all the little details entwined just right took a lot of planning, but it was such fun when we finished and read each other’s final drafts—seeing our heroes and heroines weave through two different narratives was really lovely. (Note to self—brainstorm with Mary Jo more often!) We are both delighted with how all the stories fit together, and I think readers will really enjoy Christmas at Holbourne Abbey!

Nicola: A Season for Marriage.
I knew from the start that I wanted to write a story where Lady Holly's Christmas Ball, and all it stands for in terms of joy, belonging and the spirit of Christmas, was a turning point for my characters. It was lovely to be able to weave Caro and Piers' story in with those of the other family members and guests. The most difficult part for me was making the other Wenches' characters feel authentic in my story. No way did I want someone saying "but he would never behave like that!" Happily I think we were all able to get the stories to fit together beautifully, a tribute to all the hard work and some very good editing! It's been fun and a huge pleasure to be part of the anthology!
Medi

Jo ie me: Miss Finch and the Angel.

Read an excerpt here.

As the other Wenches began to toss out story ideas I had nothing particular in mind, but then one day I said, "What we need in the mix is a carefree rake!" And thus, Lord Gabriel Quinfroy was born, the younger son of a duke and very glad to be so. When his godmother, Lady Holly, summons him to flirt with the wallflowers at her ball he's very happy to escape his fractious family.

However, I began to realize that I'd given myself a challenge. Gabriel has spent a lot of time with the family, so when he's there he's going to interact with all of them and be concerned about their problems. I had to keep a lot of balls in the air!

Sometimes there are characters and situation that call for a light, fun story, and Lord Gabriel was one. I find such stories a delight to write, which is why it's lovely to have an occasional anthology such as this one. Despite the challenges! (And Gabriel wouldn't appreciate that representation of him!) Mistlebuffcolsm

Anne: Mistletoe Kisses

You can read an excerpt here.

I love Christmas stories, and was happy to jump at the  chance to write one, especially a linked one with a group of friends.  There was a lot of discussion around the setting, the situation, the  characters we would have in common, etc — and given that we're all  pretty independent people, used to deciding all that by ourselves –  it wasn't easy. <g> But it was fun.

When it came to my story, I was tossing around Christmas themes –  meaning themes that symbolized the Christmas spirit — and the story  that I came up with meant that most of my story would happen away from  Lady Holly's Christmas Ball. But even with a small amount of overlap,  when writing our own stories we still had to be very careful not to  give away important parts of other people's stories. We all read each  other's drafts and I distinctly remember at least one heartfelt wail  of "Noooo, if you include that bit, it will totally ruin the surprise  in my story!" LOL — and then negotiations would follow. But while  collaboration on a linked story wasn't easy, I think we're all really  happy with the final result. Certainly I'm very proud to be a part of  this anthology.

(Jo: Are you seeing the pattern of the Nooooo!?)

I'm not going to ask if you like Christmas stories, because most of you do, I'm sure. But is there anyone here who doesn't? Or are there types of Christmas stories you don't care for? If your culture doesn't celebrate Christmas as a religious festival, do you still like the ambience?

What are the classic Christmas themes you most like to see explored in fiction? Are there any that you rarely see?

You can preorder your copy now.

One commenter will win a copy of The Last Chance Christmas Ball, so have your say.

 Jo

210 thoughts on “Ask a Wench — What’s it like to create an interwoven anthology?”

  1. Christmas is my favorite time of year. We have so many traditions at our house about cooking, decorating, table setting, themes etc etc the list is endless. We start planning for next Christmas on Boxing Day!
    I love reading about historical traditions surrounding the Christmas period and like those ones that celebrate strong family bonds and connections. Christmas is usually a time when family and friends that might not have see each other for long periods of time get together and strong traditions strengthen those bonds through generations. We have 52 members of our family gather together over that period….babies to great great grandparents and everyone contributes and is involved but not everything goes to plan and there is always a family stouthearted at some point. Which makes for family stokes to pass on. I like reading stories where there are layers and multiple threads as it mirrors my own family situation.
    Can’t wait to read the last chance Christmas ball, your comments have me intrigued.

    Reply
  2. Christmas is my favorite time of year. We have so many traditions at our house about cooking, decorating, table setting, themes etc etc the list is endless. We start planning for next Christmas on Boxing Day!
    I love reading about historical traditions surrounding the Christmas period and like those ones that celebrate strong family bonds and connections. Christmas is usually a time when family and friends that might not have see each other for long periods of time get together and strong traditions strengthen those bonds through generations. We have 52 members of our family gather together over that period….babies to great great grandparents and everyone contributes and is involved but not everything goes to plan and there is always a family stouthearted at some point. Which makes for family stokes to pass on. I like reading stories where there are layers and multiple threads as it mirrors my own family situation.
    Can’t wait to read the last chance Christmas ball, your comments have me intrigued.

    Reply
  3. Christmas is my favorite time of year. We have so many traditions at our house about cooking, decorating, table setting, themes etc etc the list is endless. We start planning for next Christmas on Boxing Day!
    I love reading about historical traditions surrounding the Christmas period and like those ones that celebrate strong family bonds and connections. Christmas is usually a time when family and friends that might not have see each other for long periods of time get together and strong traditions strengthen those bonds through generations. We have 52 members of our family gather together over that period….babies to great great grandparents and everyone contributes and is involved but not everything goes to plan and there is always a family stouthearted at some point. Which makes for family stokes to pass on. I like reading stories where there are layers and multiple threads as it mirrors my own family situation.
    Can’t wait to read the last chance Christmas ball, your comments have me intrigued.

    Reply
  4. Christmas is my favorite time of year. We have so many traditions at our house about cooking, decorating, table setting, themes etc etc the list is endless. We start planning for next Christmas on Boxing Day!
    I love reading about historical traditions surrounding the Christmas period and like those ones that celebrate strong family bonds and connections. Christmas is usually a time when family and friends that might not have see each other for long periods of time get together and strong traditions strengthen those bonds through generations. We have 52 members of our family gather together over that period….babies to great great grandparents and everyone contributes and is involved but not everything goes to plan and there is always a family stouthearted at some point. Which makes for family stokes to pass on. I like reading stories where there are layers and multiple threads as it mirrors my own family situation.
    Can’t wait to read the last chance Christmas ball, your comments have me intrigued.

    Reply
  5. Christmas is my favorite time of year. We have so many traditions at our house about cooking, decorating, table setting, themes etc etc the list is endless. We start planning for next Christmas on Boxing Day!
    I love reading about historical traditions surrounding the Christmas period and like those ones that celebrate strong family bonds and connections. Christmas is usually a time when family and friends that might not have see each other for long periods of time get together and strong traditions strengthen those bonds through generations. We have 52 members of our family gather together over that period….babies to great great grandparents and everyone contributes and is involved but not everything goes to plan and there is always a family stouthearted at some point. Which makes for family stokes to pass on. I like reading stories where there are layers and multiple threads as it mirrors my own family situation.
    Can’t wait to read the last chance Christmas ball, your comments have me intrigued.

    Reply
  6. My daughters and I have a tradition every year we get a wooden nutcrackers and a crochet Angel we done this ever since they were 2 and 3 years old now they are 20 and 21 years old. I love reading the Historical romances especially at Christmas time I love reading how they celabrate it. I’m looking forward to reading this, thanks,
    Penney

    Reply
  7. My daughters and I have a tradition every year we get a wooden nutcrackers and a crochet Angel we done this ever since they were 2 and 3 years old now they are 20 and 21 years old. I love reading the Historical romances especially at Christmas time I love reading how they celabrate it. I’m looking forward to reading this, thanks,
    Penney

    Reply
  8. My daughters and I have a tradition every year we get a wooden nutcrackers and a crochet Angel we done this ever since they were 2 and 3 years old now they are 20 and 21 years old. I love reading the Historical romances especially at Christmas time I love reading how they celabrate it. I’m looking forward to reading this, thanks,
    Penney

    Reply
  9. My daughters and I have a tradition every year we get a wooden nutcrackers and a crochet Angel we done this ever since they were 2 and 3 years old now they are 20 and 21 years old. I love reading the Historical romances especially at Christmas time I love reading how they celabrate it. I’m looking forward to reading this, thanks,
    Penney

    Reply
  10. My daughters and I have a tradition every year we get a wooden nutcrackers and a crochet Angel we done this ever since they were 2 and 3 years old now they are 20 and 21 years old. I love reading the Historical romances especially at Christmas time I love reading how they celabrate it. I’m looking forward to reading this, thanks,
    Penney

    Reply
  11. The setting up of the Christmas tree with lights and decorations, the hanging of holly and mistletoe and the Christmas cooking are my favorite parts of a Christmas story.

    Reply
  12. The setting up of the Christmas tree with lights and decorations, the hanging of holly and mistletoe and the Christmas cooking are my favorite parts of a Christmas story.

    Reply
  13. The setting up of the Christmas tree with lights and decorations, the hanging of holly and mistletoe and the Christmas cooking are my favorite parts of a Christmas story.

    Reply
  14. The setting up of the Christmas tree with lights and decorations, the hanging of holly and mistletoe and the Christmas cooking are my favorite parts of a Christmas story.

    Reply
  15. The setting up of the Christmas tree with lights and decorations, the hanging of holly and mistletoe and the Christmas cooking are my favorite parts of a Christmas story.

    Reply
  16. I don’t have a favorite time-period or location for Christmas stories; with a good writer ANY location works.
    I do have two “non-favorite” Christmas Stories; two well-written very good stories to which I have been so over-exposed that I almost hate them. I don’t want to be a Scrooge about this, BUT “The Christmas Carol” is the first of these. When I was in elementary school I loved it, but 88 years of the same story over and over again, and now I run in the opposite direction as fast as I can. I don’t mind references to the story, but I do not wish to endure the entire story ever again!
    The other story is no longer so popular. I’m not sure the readers here will recognize it, but O. Henry’s “The Gift of the Magi” has often been told way too often for me to continue to treasure it. Again, In elementary years I enjoyed it, but I am so tired of it today, that I don’t ever want to hear it or read it again.

    Reply
  17. I don’t have a favorite time-period or location for Christmas stories; with a good writer ANY location works.
    I do have two “non-favorite” Christmas Stories; two well-written very good stories to which I have been so over-exposed that I almost hate them. I don’t want to be a Scrooge about this, BUT “The Christmas Carol” is the first of these. When I was in elementary school I loved it, but 88 years of the same story over and over again, and now I run in the opposite direction as fast as I can. I don’t mind references to the story, but I do not wish to endure the entire story ever again!
    The other story is no longer so popular. I’m not sure the readers here will recognize it, but O. Henry’s “The Gift of the Magi” has often been told way too often for me to continue to treasure it. Again, In elementary years I enjoyed it, but I am so tired of it today, that I don’t ever want to hear it or read it again.

    Reply
  18. I don’t have a favorite time-period or location for Christmas stories; with a good writer ANY location works.
    I do have two “non-favorite” Christmas Stories; two well-written very good stories to which I have been so over-exposed that I almost hate them. I don’t want to be a Scrooge about this, BUT “The Christmas Carol” is the first of these. When I was in elementary school I loved it, but 88 years of the same story over and over again, and now I run in the opposite direction as fast as I can. I don’t mind references to the story, but I do not wish to endure the entire story ever again!
    The other story is no longer so popular. I’m not sure the readers here will recognize it, but O. Henry’s “The Gift of the Magi” has often been told way too often for me to continue to treasure it. Again, In elementary years I enjoyed it, but I am so tired of it today, that I don’t ever want to hear it or read it again.

    Reply
  19. I don’t have a favorite time-period or location for Christmas stories; with a good writer ANY location works.
    I do have two “non-favorite” Christmas Stories; two well-written very good stories to which I have been so over-exposed that I almost hate them. I don’t want to be a Scrooge about this, BUT “The Christmas Carol” is the first of these. When I was in elementary school I loved it, but 88 years of the same story over and over again, and now I run in the opposite direction as fast as I can. I don’t mind references to the story, but I do not wish to endure the entire story ever again!
    The other story is no longer so popular. I’m not sure the readers here will recognize it, but O. Henry’s “The Gift of the Magi” has often been told way too often for me to continue to treasure it. Again, In elementary years I enjoyed it, but I am so tired of it today, that I don’t ever want to hear it or read it again.

    Reply
  20. I don’t have a favorite time-period or location for Christmas stories; with a good writer ANY location works.
    I do have two “non-favorite” Christmas Stories; two well-written very good stories to which I have been so over-exposed that I almost hate them. I don’t want to be a Scrooge about this, BUT “The Christmas Carol” is the first of these. When I was in elementary school I loved it, but 88 years of the same story over and over again, and now I run in the opposite direction as fast as I can. I don’t mind references to the story, but I do not wish to endure the entire story ever again!
    The other story is no longer so popular. I’m not sure the readers here will recognize it, but O. Henry’s “The Gift of the Magi” has often been told way too often for me to continue to treasure it. Again, In elementary years I enjoyed it, but I am so tired of it today, that I don’t ever want to hear it or read it again.

    Reply
  21. I love Christmas, and Christmas anthologies. Family and healing relationships. It’s the people that make a difference, not the time period or location

    Reply
  22. I love Christmas, and Christmas anthologies. Family and healing relationships. It’s the people that make a difference, not the time period or location

    Reply
  23. I love Christmas, and Christmas anthologies. Family and healing relationships. It’s the people that make a difference, not the time period or location

    Reply
  24. I love Christmas, and Christmas anthologies. Family and healing relationships. It’s the people that make a difference, not the time period or location

    Reply
  25. I love Christmas, and Christmas anthologies. Family and healing relationships. It’s the people that make a difference, not the time period or location

    Reply
  26. I love Christmas. Since I do not have a large family, and we are scattered so it is very difficult for us all to get together, I love Christmas stories that include large family gatherings, large family meals, lots of activities. Not having to do the cooking and cleaning up, also makes these stories more fun when I transport myself into the mix.

    Reply
  27. I love Christmas. Since I do not have a large family, and we are scattered so it is very difficult for us all to get together, I love Christmas stories that include large family gatherings, large family meals, lots of activities. Not having to do the cooking and cleaning up, also makes these stories more fun when I transport myself into the mix.

    Reply
  28. I love Christmas. Since I do not have a large family, and we are scattered so it is very difficult for us all to get together, I love Christmas stories that include large family gatherings, large family meals, lots of activities. Not having to do the cooking and cleaning up, also makes these stories more fun when I transport myself into the mix.

    Reply
  29. I love Christmas. Since I do not have a large family, and we are scattered so it is very difficult for us all to get together, I love Christmas stories that include large family gatherings, large family meals, lots of activities. Not having to do the cooking and cleaning up, also makes these stories more fun when I transport myself into the mix.

    Reply
  30. I love Christmas. Since I do not have a large family, and we are scattered so it is very difficult for us all to get together, I love Christmas stories that include large family gatherings, large family meals, lots of activities. Not having to do the cooking and cleaning up, also makes these stories more fun when I transport myself into the mix.

    Reply
  31. I love reading anthologies. It’s really fun to read the same scene from different perspectives. For example, someone is entering a room as another character is exiting and their paths cross.
    As far as Christmas goes I love reading about different traditions. I have no idea what boxing day is or a Christmas pudding!!!!

    Reply
  32. I love reading anthologies. It’s really fun to read the same scene from different perspectives. For example, someone is entering a room as another character is exiting and their paths cross.
    As far as Christmas goes I love reading about different traditions. I have no idea what boxing day is or a Christmas pudding!!!!

    Reply
  33. I love reading anthologies. It’s really fun to read the same scene from different perspectives. For example, someone is entering a room as another character is exiting and their paths cross.
    As far as Christmas goes I love reading about different traditions. I have no idea what boxing day is or a Christmas pudding!!!!

    Reply
  34. I love reading anthologies. It’s really fun to read the same scene from different perspectives. For example, someone is entering a room as another character is exiting and their paths cross.
    As far as Christmas goes I love reading about different traditions. I have no idea what boxing day is or a Christmas pudding!!!!

    Reply
  35. I love reading anthologies. It’s really fun to read the same scene from different perspectives. For example, someone is entering a room as another character is exiting and their paths cross.
    As far as Christmas goes I love reading about different traditions. I have no idea what boxing day is or a Christmas pudding!!!!

    Reply
  36. I love Christmas stories….definitely a time of rebirth for many. I have a shelf filled with just Christmas stories and pull out a few every year to re-read as well as add any new ones I enjoy. Excited to read this one!

    Reply
  37. I love Christmas stories….definitely a time of rebirth for many. I have a shelf filled with just Christmas stories and pull out a few every year to re-read as well as add any new ones I enjoy. Excited to read this one!

    Reply
  38. I love Christmas stories….definitely a time of rebirth for many. I have a shelf filled with just Christmas stories and pull out a few every year to re-read as well as add any new ones I enjoy. Excited to read this one!

    Reply
  39. I love Christmas stories….definitely a time of rebirth for many. I have a shelf filled with just Christmas stories and pull out a few every year to re-read as well as add any new ones I enjoy. Excited to read this one!

    Reply
  40. I love Christmas stories….definitely a time of rebirth for many. I have a shelf filled with just Christmas stories and pull out a few every year to re-read as well as add any new ones I enjoy. Excited to read this one!

    Reply
  41. I am serious about the Yule tree and about holiday baking. Exhibit A was a post I did for Book View Cafe last December, about my own collecting of “things to put on a tree” and getting other members of the group to join me. I also used to be a serious Christmas cookie baker.
    Then I lost gluten/wheat as a food group. 🙁
    But I enjoy so much the traditions that people carry down, or that people create for themselves, adding themselves to the story woven in their families. Christmas is actually a sad, lonely, and tense time for a lot of people. I appreciate any writer who can create a story that embraces people and takes them to the best of the holidays. Add in romance, and a theme anthology, and I’ll be checking it out!
    http://bookviewcafe.com/blog/2014/12/25/more-than-decoration/

    Reply
  42. I am serious about the Yule tree and about holiday baking. Exhibit A was a post I did for Book View Cafe last December, about my own collecting of “things to put on a tree” and getting other members of the group to join me. I also used to be a serious Christmas cookie baker.
    Then I lost gluten/wheat as a food group. 🙁
    But I enjoy so much the traditions that people carry down, or that people create for themselves, adding themselves to the story woven in their families. Christmas is actually a sad, lonely, and tense time for a lot of people. I appreciate any writer who can create a story that embraces people and takes them to the best of the holidays. Add in romance, and a theme anthology, and I’ll be checking it out!
    http://bookviewcafe.com/blog/2014/12/25/more-than-decoration/

    Reply
  43. I am serious about the Yule tree and about holiday baking. Exhibit A was a post I did for Book View Cafe last December, about my own collecting of “things to put on a tree” and getting other members of the group to join me. I also used to be a serious Christmas cookie baker.
    Then I lost gluten/wheat as a food group. 🙁
    But I enjoy so much the traditions that people carry down, or that people create for themselves, adding themselves to the story woven in their families. Christmas is actually a sad, lonely, and tense time for a lot of people. I appreciate any writer who can create a story that embraces people and takes them to the best of the holidays. Add in romance, and a theme anthology, and I’ll be checking it out!
    http://bookviewcafe.com/blog/2014/12/25/more-than-decoration/

    Reply
  44. I am serious about the Yule tree and about holiday baking. Exhibit A was a post I did for Book View Cafe last December, about my own collecting of “things to put on a tree” and getting other members of the group to join me. I also used to be a serious Christmas cookie baker.
    Then I lost gluten/wheat as a food group. 🙁
    But I enjoy so much the traditions that people carry down, or that people create for themselves, adding themselves to the story woven in their families. Christmas is actually a sad, lonely, and tense time for a lot of people. I appreciate any writer who can create a story that embraces people and takes them to the best of the holidays. Add in romance, and a theme anthology, and I’ll be checking it out!
    http://bookviewcafe.com/blog/2014/12/25/more-than-decoration/

    Reply
  45. I am serious about the Yule tree and about holiday baking. Exhibit A was a post I did for Book View Cafe last December, about my own collecting of “things to put on a tree” and getting other members of the group to join me. I also used to be a serious Christmas cookie baker.
    Then I lost gluten/wheat as a food group. 🙁
    But I enjoy so much the traditions that people carry down, or that people create for themselves, adding themselves to the story woven in their families. Christmas is actually a sad, lonely, and tense time for a lot of people. I appreciate any writer who can create a story that embraces people and takes them to the best of the holidays. Add in romance, and a theme anthology, and I’ll be checking it out!
    http://bookviewcafe.com/blog/2014/12/25/more-than-decoration/

    Reply
  46. A lovely post about tree decorations, Cat. I like the sort with memories rather than perfectly coordinated ones. We still have some the children made, and bought ones with particular memories from the past.

    Reply
  47. A lovely post about tree decorations, Cat. I like the sort with memories rather than perfectly coordinated ones. We still have some the children made, and bought ones with particular memories from the past.

    Reply
  48. A lovely post about tree decorations, Cat. I like the sort with memories rather than perfectly coordinated ones. We still have some the children made, and bought ones with particular memories from the past.

    Reply
  49. A lovely post about tree decorations, Cat. I like the sort with memories rather than perfectly coordinated ones. We still have some the children made, and bought ones with particular memories from the past.

    Reply
  50. A lovely post about tree decorations, Cat. I like the sort with memories rather than perfectly coordinated ones. We still have some the children made, and bought ones with particular memories from the past.

    Reply
  51. Sue, I feel a bit that way, too, but I’ve read both these stories with adults learning to read, and the Christmas Carol especially just blows them away, because they’ve all known bits of the story, and references like Scrooge are part of everyday language, but they’d never heard the full story and marveled that it was a story written two hundred years ago.
    The Gift of the Magi is also one that touched these readers hearts — especially the women in the classes. So reading them with adult literacy students gave me a fresh appreciation of both stories.

    Reply
  52. Sue, I feel a bit that way, too, but I’ve read both these stories with adults learning to read, and the Christmas Carol especially just blows them away, because they’ve all known bits of the story, and references like Scrooge are part of everyday language, but they’d never heard the full story and marveled that it was a story written two hundred years ago.
    The Gift of the Magi is also one that touched these readers hearts — especially the women in the classes. So reading them with adult literacy students gave me a fresh appreciation of both stories.

    Reply
  53. Sue, I feel a bit that way, too, but I’ve read both these stories with adults learning to read, and the Christmas Carol especially just blows them away, because they’ve all known bits of the story, and references like Scrooge are part of everyday language, but they’d never heard the full story and marveled that it was a story written two hundred years ago.
    The Gift of the Magi is also one that touched these readers hearts — especially the women in the classes. So reading them with adult literacy students gave me a fresh appreciation of both stories.

    Reply
  54. Sue, I feel a bit that way, too, but I’ve read both these stories with adults learning to read, and the Christmas Carol especially just blows them away, because they’ve all known bits of the story, and references like Scrooge are part of everyday language, but they’d never heard the full story and marveled that it was a story written two hundred years ago.
    The Gift of the Magi is also one that touched these readers hearts — especially the women in the classes. So reading them with adult literacy students gave me a fresh appreciation of both stories.

    Reply
  55. Sue, I feel a bit that way, too, but I’ve read both these stories with adults learning to read, and the Christmas Carol especially just blows them away, because they’ve all known bits of the story, and references like Scrooge are part of everyday language, but they’d never heard the full story and marveled that it was a story written two hundred years ago.
    The Gift of the Magi is also one that touched these readers hearts — especially the women in the classes. So reading them with adult literacy students gave me a fresh appreciation of both stories.

    Reply
  56. Cat thank you for including that link — as I was reading your comment I was already planning to search for the post. I love making and collecting things to put on the tree, too, and though the heroine in my story doesn’t have a tree, she does have her own special things that are part of her Christmas.

    Reply
  57. Cat thank you for including that link — as I was reading your comment I was already planning to search for the post. I love making and collecting things to put on the tree, too, and though the heroine in my story doesn’t have a tree, she does have her own special things that are part of her Christmas.

    Reply
  58. Cat thank you for including that link — as I was reading your comment I was already planning to search for the post. I love making and collecting things to put on the tree, too, and though the heroine in my story doesn’t have a tree, she does have her own special things that are part of her Christmas.

    Reply
  59. Cat thank you for including that link — as I was reading your comment I was already planning to search for the post. I love making and collecting things to put on the tree, too, and though the heroine in my story doesn’t have a tree, she does have her own special things that are part of her Christmas.

    Reply
  60. Cat thank you for including that link — as I was reading your comment I was already planning to search for the post. I love making and collecting things to put on the tree, too, and though the heroine in my story doesn’t have a tree, she does have her own special things that are part of her Christmas.

    Reply
  61. I absolutely love Christmas anthologies, and re-read them every year. I usually start reading them around September, just to get a bit of the spirit before I start seriously decorating the house for the season (around November 15th).
    My favorite tradition is one I started when I was about 15, though I didn’t realize it would become a tradition until much later. Every year I buy an ornament, sometimes one that signifies a special event that particular year (my kids, a new house, etc.), or one that I’ve found on vacation (the Claddagh symbol from my vacation in Ireland) and sometimes just one that I saw and happened to like. It’s fun to trim the Christmas tree each year and remember when and why each ornament was bought!

    Reply
  62. I absolutely love Christmas anthologies, and re-read them every year. I usually start reading them around September, just to get a bit of the spirit before I start seriously decorating the house for the season (around November 15th).
    My favorite tradition is one I started when I was about 15, though I didn’t realize it would become a tradition until much later. Every year I buy an ornament, sometimes one that signifies a special event that particular year (my kids, a new house, etc.), or one that I’ve found on vacation (the Claddagh symbol from my vacation in Ireland) and sometimes just one that I saw and happened to like. It’s fun to trim the Christmas tree each year and remember when and why each ornament was bought!

    Reply
  63. I absolutely love Christmas anthologies, and re-read them every year. I usually start reading them around September, just to get a bit of the spirit before I start seriously decorating the house for the season (around November 15th).
    My favorite tradition is one I started when I was about 15, though I didn’t realize it would become a tradition until much later. Every year I buy an ornament, sometimes one that signifies a special event that particular year (my kids, a new house, etc.), or one that I’ve found on vacation (the Claddagh symbol from my vacation in Ireland) and sometimes just one that I saw and happened to like. It’s fun to trim the Christmas tree each year and remember when and why each ornament was bought!

    Reply
  64. I absolutely love Christmas anthologies, and re-read them every year. I usually start reading them around September, just to get a bit of the spirit before I start seriously decorating the house for the season (around November 15th).
    My favorite tradition is one I started when I was about 15, though I didn’t realize it would become a tradition until much later. Every year I buy an ornament, sometimes one that signifies a special event that particular year (my kids, a new house, etc.), or one that I’ve found on vacation (the Claddagh symbol from my vacation in Ireland) and sometimes just one that I saw and happened to like. It’s fun to trim the Christmas tree each year and remember when and why each ornament was bought!

    Reply
  65. I absolutely love Christmas anthologies, and re-read them every year. I usually start reading them around September, just to get a bit of the spirit before I start seriously decorating the house for the season (around November 15th).
    My favorite tradition is one I started when I was about 15, though I didn’t realize it would become a tradition until much later. Every year I buy an ornament, sometimes one that signifies a special event that particular year (my kids, a new house, etc.), or one that I’ve found on vacation (the Claddagh symbol from my vacation in Ireland) and sometimes just one that I saw and happened to like. It’s fun to trim the Christmas tree each year and remember when and why each ornament was bought!

    Reply
  66. I no longer follow any Christmas traditions except for giving gifts and some slight decorating. I collect( small collection) Nativity scenes and Wisemen which I have out all year long– why enjoy them for only 4 weeks a year? Small collection because books take up what room there is in the condo. I like Christmas stories. I still like the Christmas classics.
    I also think of a young lady named Geneva and her nativity scene she set out each year. I would like to add that set to my collection.

    Reply
  67. I no longer follow any Christmas traditions except for giving gifts and some slight decorating. I collect( small collection) Nativity scenes and Wisemen which I have out all year long– why enjoy them for only 4 weeks a year? Small collection because books take up what room there is in the condo. I like Christmas stories. I still like the Christmas classics.
    I also think of a young lady named Geneva and her nativity scene she set out each year. I would like to add that set to my collection.

    Reply
  68. I no longer follow any Christmas traditions except for giving gifts and some slight decorating. I collect( small collection) Nativity scenes and Wisemen which I have out all year long– why enjoy them for only 4 weeks a year? Small collection because books take up what room there is in the condo. I like Christmas stories. I still like the Christmas classics.
    I also think of a young lady named Geneva and her nativity scene she set out each year. I would like to add that set to my collection.

    Reply
  69. I no longer follow any Christmas traditions except for giving gifts and some slight decorating. I collect( small collection) Nativity scenes and Wisemen which I have out all year long– why enjoy them for only 4 weeks a year? Small collection because books take up what room there is in the condo. I like Christmas stories. I still like the Christmas classics.
    I also think of a young lady named Geneva and her nativity scene she set out each year. I would like to add that set to my collection.

    Reply
  70. I no longer follow any Christmas traditions except for giving gifts and some slight decorating. I collect( small collection) Nativity scenes and Wisemen which I have out all year long– why enjoy them for only 4 weeks a year? Small collection because books take up what room there is in the condo. I like Christmas stories. I still like the Christmas classics.
    I also think of a young lady named Geneva and her nativity scene she set out each year. I would like to add that set to my collection.

    Reply
  71. I too like Christmas ornaments with meaning/memories behind them. My mom started giving us all ornaments each year so that when we left home we had a small but wonderful selection.
    When she finally downsized her ornaments, she gave us ones from her tree. One of my favorite ornaments was when she broke up (actually disassembled) the mobile that had hung over the our crib. She made an ornament for all 5 of us.
    Every year we have a day in December where we go to my mom and dad’s at 2:00 and don’t leave until 10:00 or so. Lots of fun and good eats.

    Reply
  72. I too like Christmas ornaments with meaning/memories behind them. My mom started giving us all ornaments each year so that when we left home we had a small but wonderful selection.
    When she finally downsized her ornaments, she gave us ones from her tree. One of my favorite ornaments was when she broke up (actually disassembled) the mobile that had hung over the our crib. She made an ornament for all 5 of us.
    Every year we have a day in December where we go to my mom and dad’s at 2:00 and don’t leave until 10:00 or so. Lots of fun and good eats.

    Reply
  73. I too like Christmas ornaments with meaning/memories behind them. My mom started giving us all ornaments each year so that when we left home we had a small but wonderful selection.
    When she finally downsized her ornaments, she gave us ones from her tree. One of my favorite ornaments was when she broke up (actually disassembled) the mobile that had hung over the our crib. She made an ornament for all 5 of us.
    Every year we have a day in December where we go to my mom and dad’s at 2:00 and don’t leave until 10:00 or so. Lots of fun and good eats.

    Reply
  74. I too like Christmas ornaments with meaning/memories behind them. My mom started giving us all ornaments each year so that when we left home we had a small but wonderful selection.
    When she finally downsized her ornaments, she gave us ones from her tree. One of my favorite ornaments was when she broke up (actually disassembled) the mobile that had hung over the our crib. She made an ornament for all 5 of us.
    Every year we have a day in December where we go to my mom and dad’s at 2:00 and don’t leave until 10:00 or so. Lots of fun and good eats.

    Reply
  75. I too like Christmas ornaments with meaning/memories behind them. My mom started giving us all ornaments each year so that when we left home we had a small but wonderful selection.
    When she finally downsized her ornaments, she gave us ones from her tree. One of my favorite ornaments was when she broke up (actually disassembled) the mobile that had hung over the our crib. She made an ornament for all 5 of us.
    Every year we have a day in December where we go to my mom and dad’s at 2:00 and don’t leave until 10:00 or so. Lots of fun and good eats.

    Reply
  76. I love Christmas anthologies and have several. I think they are part of the reasons I enjoy the season so very much. They get me in the spirit.
    Two things come to mind when I think about Christmas.
    My children make fun of me for hanging paper cups covered in aluminum foil and cookie cutter stars baked in the oven and painted bright and garish colors. They also say I have so many decorations on the tree it is a wonder that tree does not have to lay on its side.
    We have a special Christmas dinner – it is a summer picnic. Always potato salad, ham, and other summer treats. It just seems that after Thanksgiving – a summer picnic is rather nice. And I listen to all types of Christmas music for a long time – I love the sounds and sing along.

    Reply
  77. I love Christmas anthologies and have several. I think they are part of the reasons I enjoy the season so very much. They get me in the spirit.
    Two things come to mind when I think about Christmas.
    My children make fun of me for hanging paper cups covered in aluminum foil and cookie cutter stars baked in the oven and painted bright and garish colors. They also say I have so many decorations on the tree it is a wonder that tree does not have to lay on its side.
    We have a special Christmas dinner – it is a summer picnic. Always potato salad, ham, and other summer treats. It just seems that after Thanksgiving – a summer picnic is rather nice. And I listen to all types of Christmas music for a long time – I love the sounds and sing along.

    Reply
  78. I love Christmas anthologies and have several. I think they are part of the reasons I enjoy the season so very much. They get me in the spirit.
    Two things come to mind when I think about Christmas.
    My children make fun of me for hanging paper cups covered in aluminum foil and cookie cutter stars baked in the oven and painted bright and garish colors. They also say I have so many decorations on the tree it is a wonder that tree does not have to lay on its side.
    We have a special Christmas dinner – it is a summer picnic. Always potato salad, ham, and other summer treats. It just seems that after Thanksgiving – a summer picnic is rather nice. And I listen to all types of Christmas music for a long time – I love the sounds and sing along.

    Reply
  79. I love Christmas anthologies and have several. I think they are part of the reasons I enjoy the season so very much. They get me in the spirit.
    Two things come to mind when I think about Christmas.
    My children make fun of me for hanging paper cups covered in aluminum foil and cookie cutter stars baked in the oven and painted bright and garish colors. They also say I have so many decorations on the tree it is a wonder that tree does not have to lay on its side.
    We have a special Christmas dinner – it is a summer picnic. Always potato salad, ham, and other summer treats. It just seems that after Thanksgiving – a summer picnic is rather nice. And I listen to all types of Christmas music for a long time – I love the sounds and sing along.

    Reply
  80. I love Christmas anthologies and have several. I think they are part of the reasons I enjoy the season so very much. They get me in the spirit.
    Two things come to mind when I think about Christmas.
    My children make fun of me for hanging paper cups covered in aluminum foil and cookie cutter stars baked in the oven and painted bright and garish colors. They also say I have so many decorations on the tree it is a wonder that tree does not have to lay on its side.
    We have a special Christmas dinner – it is a summer picnic. Always potato salad, ham, and other summer treats. It just seems that after Thanksgiving – a summer picnic is rather nice. And I listen to all types of Christmas music for a long time – I love the sounds and sing along.

    Reply
  81. Thank you for the link. Those decorations are all exceptional. Like you and the posters, I like decorations with a personal touch.

    Reply
  82. Thank you for the link. Those decorations are all exceptional. Like you and the posters, I like decorations with a personal touch.

    Reply
  83. Thank you for the link. Those decorations are all exceptional. Like you and the posters, I like decorations with a personal touch.

    Reply
  84. Thank you for the link. Those decorations are all exceptional. Like you and the posters, I like decorations with a personal touch.

    Reply
  85. Thank you for the link. Those decorations are all exceptional. Like you and the posters, I like decorations with a personal touch.

    Reply
  86. I always love interwoven stories – it’s fun to see each author’s different ‘take” and additions to the whole. I look forward to this one!

    Reply
  87. I always love interwoven stories – it’s fun to see each author’s different ‘take” and additions to the whole. I look forward to this one!

    Reply
  88. I always love interwoven stories – it’s fun to see each author’s different ‘take” and additions to the whole. I look forward to this one!

    Reply
  89. I always love interwoven stories – it’s fun to see each author’s different ‘take” and additions to the whole. I look forward to this one!

    Reply
  90. I always love interwoven stories – it’s fun to see each author’s different ‘take” and additions to the whole. I look forward to this one!

    Reply
  91. As for traditions, I do things that my parents did when I was a child, and now my girls, in their 20s, do them too – the same Norwegian butter cookies – Spritz, Sandbakkels, and then lefse for mornings. My mom recently downsized and she sent me the silver nut cups from my childhood that were used at parties, and at Christmas dinner. Now, with her mother’s white damask tablecloths, and my great-aunt’s china, plus some 1920s silver I bought years ago, I can set a nice table. My 21 yr old daughter, who lives in the same city, borrows them for her tables and holidays. To me, the holidays are about family and friends, and parties – my parents always had many – ones for the neighbors, my relatives, and for my dad’s colleagues and grad students. I dressed up and became the little waitress. My ex was never into parties, so my kids don’t have that tradition, but I tried to do parties with just us – still setting the fancy table, and old and new traditions (Christmas Crackers). Christmas music starts after Thanksgiving, and ends on 12th Night. It’s the little things.
    My parens had old metal trunks from their college days that they stored all the ornaments in. After getting our tree, and letting it sit for a day or two (some strange thing my dad the forester knew about for long life), we put the tree up, he put a Christmas album on the stereo, and brought up the trunks from the basement, and out came Christmas. Years ago, when we were grown, they decided to change over to Rubbermaid tubs. They sent the old trunks to Gooodwill. They heard from each of us three kids, independently, about the meaning of Christmas and those trunks. We were NOT happy. After that, all decisions on anything remotely sentimental got run by us all. 😉

    Reply
  92. As for traditions, I do things that my parents did when I was a child, and now my girls, in their 20s, do them too – the same Norwegian butter cookies – Spritz, Sandbakkels, and then lefse for mornings. My mom recently downsized and she sent me the silver nut cups from my childhood that were used at parties, and at Christmas dinner. Now, with her mother’s white damask tablecloths, and my great-aunt’s china, plus some 1920s silver I bought years ago, I can set a nice table. My 21 yr old daughter, who lives in the same city, borrows them for her tables and holidays. To me, the holidays are about family and friends, and parties – my parents always had many – ones for the neighbors, my relatives, and for my dad’s colleagues and grad students. I dressed up and became the little waitress. My ex was never into parties, so my kids don’t have that tradition, but I tried to do parties with just us – still setting the fancy table, and old and new traditions (Christmas Crackers). Christmas music starts after Thanksgiving, and ends on 12th Night. It’s the little things.
    My parens had old metal trunks from their college days that they stored all the ornaments in. After getting our tree, and letting it sit for a day or two (some strange thing my dad the forester knew about for long life), we put the tree up, he put a Christmas album on the stereo, and brought up the trunks from the basement, and out came Christmas. Years ago, when we were grown, they decided to change over to Rubbermaid tubs. They sent the old trunks to Gooodwill. They heard from each of us three kids, independently, about the meaning of Christmas and those trunks. We were NOT happy. After that, all decisions on anything remotely sentimental got run by us all. 😉

    Reply
  93. As for traditions, I do things that my parents did when I was a child, and now my girls, in their 20s, do them too – the same Norwegian butter cookies – Spritz, Sandbakkels, and then lefse for mornings. My mom recently downsized and she sent me the silver nut cups from my childhood that were used at parties, and at Christmas dinner. Now, with her mother’s white damask tablecloths, and my great-aunt’s china, plus some 1920s silver I bought years ago, I can set a nice table. My 21 yr old daughter, who lives in the same city, borrows them for her tables and holidays. To me, the holidays are about family and friends, and parties – my parents always had many – ones for the neighbors, my relatives, and for my dad’s colleagues and grad students. I dressed up and became the little waitress. My ex was never into parties, so my kids don’t have that tradition, but I tried to do parties with just us – still setting the fancy table, and old and new traditions (Christmas Crackers). Christmas music starts after Thanksgiving, and ends on 12th Night. It’s the little things.
    My parens had old metal trunks from their college days that they stored all the ornaments in. After getting our tree, and letting it sit for a day or two (some strange thing my dad the forester knew about for long life), we put the tree up, he put a Christmas album on the stereo, and brought up the trunks from the basement, and out came Christmas. Years ago, when we were grown, they decided to change over to Rubbermaid tubs. They sent the old trunks to Gooodwill. They heard from each of us three kids, independently, about the meaning of Christmas and those trunks. We were NOT happy. After that, all decisions on anything remotely sentimental got run by us all. 😉

    Reply
  94. As for traditions, I do things that my parents did when I was a child, and now my girls, in their 20s, do them too – the same Norwegian butter cookies – Spritz, Sandbakkels, and then lefse for mornings. My mom recently downsized and she sent me the silver nut cups from my childhood that were used at parties, and at Christmas dinner. Now, with her mother’s white damask tablecloths, and my great-aunt’s china, plus some 1920s silver I bought years ago, I can set a nice table. My 21 yr old daughter, who lives in the same city, borrows them for her tables and holidays. To me, the holidays are about family and friends, and parties – my parents always had many – ones for the neighbors, my relatives, and for my dad’s colleagues and grad students. I dressed up and became the little waitress. My ex was never into parties, so my kids don’t have that tradition, but I tried to do parties with just us – still setting the fancy table, and old and new traditions (Christmas Crackers). Christmas music starts after Thanksgiving, and ends on 12th Night. It’s the little things.
    My parens had old metal trunks from their college days that they stored all the ornaments in. After getting our tree, and letting it sit for a day or two (some strange thing my dad the forester knew about for long life), we put the tree up, he put a Christmas album on the stereo, and brought up the trunks from the basement, and out came Christmas. Years ago, when we were grown, they decided to change over to Rubbermaid tubs. They sent the old trunks to Gooodwill. They heard from each of us three kids, independently, about the meaning of Christmas and those trunks. We were NOT happy. After that, all decisions on anything remotely sentimental got run by us all. 😉

    Reply
  95. As for traditions, I do things that my parents did when I was a child, and now my girls, in their 20s, do them too – the same Norwegian butter cookies – Spritz, Sandbakkels, and then lefse for mornings. My mom recently downsized and she sent me the silver nut cups from my childhood that were used at parties, and at Christmas dinner. Now, with her mother’s white damask tablecloths, and my great-aunt’s china, plus some 1920s silver I bought years ago, I can set a nice table. My 21 yr old daughter, who lives in the same city, borrows them for her tables and holidays. To me, the holidays are about family and friends, and parties – my parents always had many – ones for the neighbors, my relatives, and for my dad’s colleagues and grad students. I dressed up and became the little waitress. My ex was never into parties, so my kids don’t have that tradition, but I tried to do parties with just us – still setting the fancy table, and old and new traditions (Christmas Crackers). Christmas music starts after Thanksgiving, and ends on 12th Night. It’s the little things.
    My parens had old metal trunks from their college days that they stored all the ornaments in. After getting our tree, and letting it sit for a day or two (some strange thing my dad the forester knew about for long life), we put the tree up, he put a Christmas album on the stereo, and brought up the trunks from the basement, and out came Christmas. Years ago, when we were grown, they decided to change over to Rubbermaid tubs. They sent the old trunks to Gooodwill. They heard from each of us three kids, independently, about the meaning of Christmas and those trunks. We were NOT happy. After that, all decisions on anything remotely sentimental got run by us all. 😉

    Reply
  96. Nancy, I agree with you about Christmas decorations only for Christmas. I keep out some because I like bright glittery stuff. 🙂
    You remembered the presepe! Winter Fire was fun to write, because it was all about Christmas to the max.

    Reply
  97. Nancy, I agree with you about Christmas decorations only for Christmas. I keep out some because I like bright glittery stuff. 🙂
    You remembered the presepe! Winter Fire was fun to write, because it was all about Christmas to the max.

    Reply
  98. Nancy, I agree with you about Christmas decorations only for Christmas. I keep out some because I like bright glittery stuff. 🙂
    You remembered the presepe! Winter Fire was fun to write, because it was all about Christmas to the max.

    Reply
  99. Nancy, I agree with you about Christmas decorations only for Christmas. I keep out some because I like bright glittery stuff. 🙂
    You remembered the presepe! Winter Fire was fun to write, because it was all about Christmas to the max.

    Reply
  100. Nancy, I agree with you about Christmas decorations only for Christmas. I keep out some because I like bright glittery stuff. 🙂
    You remembered the presepe! Winter Fire was fun to write, because it was all about Christmas to the max.

    Reply
  101. “When she finally downsized her ornaments, she gave us ones from her tree. One of my favorite ornaments was when she broke up (actually disassembled) the mobile that had hung over the our crib. She made an ornament for all 5 of us.”
    That’s lovely, Vicki! As is her gifts of ornaments. Wise mother.

    Reply
  102. “When she finally downsized her ornaments, she gave us ones from her tree. One of my favorite ornaments was when she broke up (actually disassembled) the mobile that had hung over the our crib. She made an ornament for all 5 of us.”
    That’s lovely, Vicki! As is her gifts of ornaments. Wise mother.

    Reply
  103. “When she finally downsized her ornaments, she gave us ones from her tree. One of my favorite ornaments was when she broke up (actually disassembled) the mobile that had hung over the our crib. She made an ornament for all 5 of us.”
    That’s lovely, Vicki! As is her gifts of ornaments. Wise mother.

    Reply
  104. “When she finally downsized her ornaments, she gave us ones from her tree. One of my favorite ornaments was when she broke up (actually disassembled) the mobile that had hung over the our crib. She made an ornament for all 5 of us.”
    That’s lovely, Vicki! As is her gifts of ornaments. Wise mother.

    Reply
  105. “When she finally downsized her ornaments, she gave us ones from her tree. One of my favorite ornaments was when she broke up (actually disassembled) the mobile that had hung over the our crib. She made an ornament for all 5 of us.”
    That’s lovely, Vicki! As is her gifts of ornaments. Wise mother.

    Reply
  106. You certainly have fun with Christmas, Annette. Good for you. I think you’re the first person to mention Christmas music. That’s such a part of it, isn’t it?

    Reply
  107. You certainly have fun with Christmas, Annette. Good for you. I think you’re the first person to mention Christmas music. That’s such a part of it, isn’t it?

    Reply
  108. You certainly have fun with Christmas, Annette. Good for you. I think you’re the first person to mention Christmas music. That’s such a part of it, isn’t it?

    Reply
  109. You certainly have fun with Christmas, Annette. Good for you. I think you’re the first person to mention Christmas music. That’s such a part of it, isn’t it?

    Reply
  110. You certainly have fun with Christmas, Annette. Good for you. I think you’re the first person to mention Christmas music. That’s such a part of it, isn’t it?

    Reply
  111. I’ve always enjoyed Christmas family stories that include children and adults who rediscover the joys of the holidays.
    I’ve seen some reference to authors getting together for fun weekends to plot out connected stories – that’s always sounded like great fun.

    Reply
  112. I’ve always enjoyed Christmas family stories that include children and adults who rediscover the joys of the holidays.
    I’ve seen some reference to authors getting together for fun weekends to plot out connected stories – that’s always sounded like great fun.

    Reply
  113. I’ve always enjoyed Christmas family stories that include children and adults who rediscover the joys of the holidays.
    I’ve seen some reference to authors getting together for fun weekends to plot out connected stories – that’s always sounded like great fun.

    Reply
  114. I’ve always enjoyed Christmas family stories that include children and adults who rediscover the joys of the holidays.
    I’ve seen some reference to authors getting together for fun weekends to plot out connected stories – that’s always sounded like great fun.

    Reply
  115. I’ve always enjoyed Christmas family stories that include children and adults who rediscover the joys of the holidays.
    I’ve seen some reference to authors getting together for fun weekends to plot out connected stories – that’s always sounded like great fun.

    Reply
  116. I’ve had a hectic few days so I didn’t get to buy your anthology until today. I have always loved anthologies, and I’m pretty sure it’s how I discovered Mary Jo and Jo. The connectedness is fun. I’m looking forward to reading it this weekend when I have a (very little) time, as I am working full time and working on a doctoral degree full time. :O Curiously, the Kindle book was more expensive than the paperbook, which I don’t remember seeing before – $9.99 (Kindle) vs $8.75 (paperback). It seems sometimes that book pricing is almost random. I was not deterred. The book is on my Kindle and ready for perusal.

    Reply
  117. I’ve had a hectic few days so I didn’t get to buy your anthology until today. I have always loved anthologies, and I’m pretty sure it’s how I discovered Mary Jo and Jo. The connectedness is fun. I’m looking forward to reading it this weekend when I have a (very little) time, as I am working full time and working on a doctoral degree full time. :O Curiously, the Kindle book was more expensive than the paperbook, which I don’t remember seeing before – $9.99 (Kindle) vs $8.75 (paperback). It seems sometimes that book pricing is almost random. I was not deterred. The book is on my Kindle and ready for perusal.

    Reply
  118. I’ve had a hectic few days so I didn’t get to buy your anthology until today. I have always loved anthologies, and I’m pretty sure it’s how I discovered Mary Jo and Jo. The connectedness is fun. I’m looking forward to reading it this weekend when I have a (very little) time, as I am working full time and working on a doctoral degree full time. :O Curiously, the Kindle book was more expensive than the paperbook, which I don’t remember seeing before – $9.99 (Kindle) vs $8.75 (paperback). It seems sometimes that book pricing is almost random. I was not deterred. The book is on my Kindle and ready for perusal.

    Reply
  119. I’ve had a hectic few days so I didn’t get to buy your anthology until today. I have always loved anthologies, and I’m pretty sure it’s how I discovered Mary Jo and Jo. The connectedness is fun. I’m looking forward to reading it this weekend when I have a (very little) time, as I am working full time and working on a doctoral degree full time. :O Curiously, the Kindle book was more expensive than the paperbook, which I don’t remember seeing before – $9.99 (Kindle) vs $8.75 (paperback). It seems sometimes that book pricing is almost random. I was not deterred. The book is on my Kindle and ready for perusal.

    Reply
  120. I’ve had a hectic few days so I didn’t get to buy your anthology until today. I have always loved anthologies, and I’m pretty sure it’s how I discovered Mary Jo and Jo. The connectedness is fun. I’m looking forward to reading it this weekend when I have a (very little) time, as I am working full time and working on a doctoral degree full time. :O Curiously, the Kindle book was more expensive than the paperbook, which I don’t remember seeing before – $9.99 (Kindle) vs $8.75 (paperback). It seems sometimes that book pricing is almost random. I was not deterred. The book is on my Kindle and ready for perusal.

    Reply

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