Ask A Wench!

With_Lawrence_in_ArabiaAndrea/Cara here, seeing as August is a lazy month with people here in the northern hemisphere making the most of the last few weeks of summer by kicking back and just hanging out with friends and family—and good books (and you where it's still winter are curling up by the fire) I thought I'd have a little fun by throwing out this question to the Wenches about what author from history they'd like to hang out with:

If you could sit down for tea and a comfortable tell-all “coze" with one author from history, who would it be? And what questions would you want to ask? (Or want things would you want to talk about.)

Peter_O'TooleMary Jo:
Forget tea with Jane Austen! I'd like to have a ride with Lawrence of Arabia, both of us ambling along on camels and admiring the scenery. I'd ask him about being a love child whose father abandoned his wife and children in Ireland to live with Lawrence's mother, a governess. And what was it like being an archeologist in Syria before WWI, and his dashing activities in the war, and the Arab Revolt.  And what did he think of Peter O'Toole playing him in the classic movie, LAWRENCE OF ARABIA. I thought O'Toole did a very good job, other than being about a foot taller than the real Lawrence. <G>
 



Anne bronteNicola:

I think there is always a danger in meeting your heroes in case they aren’t as you imagine them to be, so I’m going to decline the opportunity to chat with Shakespeare, Jane Austen or Daphne Du Maurier, for example, and choose Anne Bronte instead. She is the Bronte sister who has always intrigued me; her writing is as shrewd and observant as Charlotte’s and I prefer her quieter style to Emily’s more melodramatic prose. Plus she has such clear-sighted and interesting insights into the status of women in Victorian society, and as a writer she shows how characters change and grow. Oh, and she was apparently an animal-lover so I’m sure we will get on!  



Agnes GreyWe’ll go to the Yorkshire seaside together and eat ice cream on the promenade (let’s not go to the moors!) and I’ll ask her whether she, Emily and Charlotte fulfilled the roles of responsible eldest, difficult middle and spoilt youngest child (although the fact that Branwell was around and seemed to be both difficult and spoilt probably confuses the stereotype!) I’ll also ask her how she feels about being the most overlooked of the three of them and how she feels about the endless remakes of her sisters’ books in film and TV!

Pat:
Hmm, I’m not much of a person for asking people questions. I was taught it was rude. And being the heavy duty introvert that I am, I’m much more likely to listen than ask. I mean, do I really want to sit down with Joseph Heller or Ken Kesey and ask them what possessed them to write Catch 22 and One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest? I don’t think so. And I see Austen and the Brontes as being as cautious about speaking as I am. What about Carolyn Keene? Could I ask her how she knew how to connect with millions of kids over the years with her Nancy Drew stories? Even if she explained in detail, I could never do what she did. And even if I could breach the language barrier, I don’t know that I could handle the passionate dialogue of Dostoevsky or Tolstoy, although I’m guessing I could sit back and listen for a long time! So I’ll just hope the wenches invite me to tea, and I’ll happily listen as they talk.

TownLikeAliceSusanna:
I would give anything to have a chance to sit down for a glass of Scotch with the late Nevil Shute. After I’d made an idiot of myself telling him how much his book A Town Like Alice meant to me, and how it played a subtle hand in steering me towards twin-stranded storylines in my own novels, I would want to simply sit and listen to him talk about his travels and experiences, not only as an engineer, a pilot, and a military man, but as a quiet, keen observer of his fellow humans. I think any afternoon spent in his company would have been one to savour and remember.

Susan:

Sir_Henry_Raeburn_-_Portrait_of_Sir_Walter_ScottS
uch an easy choice! I'd give anything for an invitation from Sir Walter Scott to Abbotsford, where we could have tea in his library and chat about Scottish history, his books and stories, and his role in helping create the romantic historic Scotland that so many of us love today. I would tell him how much I love his house (each time I've visited there, I have to be dragged out), and how I've collected very old editions of many of his books. I'd ask about his research, his collections, his love of Scotland, and about some of his theories regarding certain episodes in Scottish history–especially some areas of history that I'm researching at the moment… It would be a great little coze with my secret author crush! 

AustenAndrea/Cara:

Okay, well unlike Mary Jo and Nicola, I won’t shy away from Jane Austen. I’d love to spend the afternoon sitting at a café in the Pump House at Bath, listening to her pithy commentary on the people parading through the halls. I’d just like to hear the sound of her voice and how impressions pop into her head.

 But most of all, I’d like to talk with her about Love—not only the many ways it weaves through her stories, but how she felt personally about its power. For me, Persuasion has such a poignant ring concerning second chances. It’s hard to believe it wasn’t written from somewhere deep in her heart. Yes, we’ve all read about her short-lived engagement (one day!) to Harris Bigg-Wither. Her relationship with Tom Lefroy (which is the basis for the movie, Becoming Jane) seems a little more complicated Persuasionbut nobody really knows for sure about her innermost feelings. So I’d love to know if she ever met her own Mr. Darcy. I’d like to think she did. She wrote so beautifully about the human heart and all its complexities—it seems only right that she had the chance to experience that elemental joy in her all-too-short life.

But then, again, maybe she’d simply deflect my probing with one of her sly quips. After all, Elizabeth Bennet and Anne Eliot didn’t wear their hearts on their sleeve.

 Now it's your turn, Dear Readers! Please share YOUR answer to the same question. (I can't wait to see all your choices!)

205 thoughts on “Ask A Wench!”

  1. I’d love to spend time with Dorothy Dunnett. What a mind that woman must have had to weave such complex plots and keep everything straight through multiple books. If I could work up the courage, I’d ask her if she always knew where Lymond would end up and whether she knew everything he would learn about himself from the time she started writing about him or if it was a journey of discovery for her too.

    Reply
  2. I’d love to spend time with Dorothy Dunnett. What a mind that woman must have had to weave such complex plots and keep everything straight through multiple books. If I could work up the courage, I’d ask her if she always knew where Lymond would end up and whether she knew everything he would learn about himself from the time she started writing about him or if it was a journey of discovery for her too.

    Reply
  3. I’d love to spend time with Dorothy Dunnett. What a mind that woman must have had to weave such complex plots and keep everything straight through multiple books. If I could work up the courage, I’d ask her if she always knew where Lymond would end up and whether she knew everything he would learn about himself from the time she started writing about him or if it was a journey of discovery for her too.

    Reply
  4. I’d love to spend time with Dorothy Dunnett. What a mind that woman must have had to weave such complex plots and keep everything straight through multiple books. If I could work up the courage, I’d ask her if she always knew where Lymond would end up and whether she knew everything he would learn about himself from the time she started writing about him or if it was a journey of discovery for her too.

    Reply
  5. I’d love to spend time with Dorothy Dunnett. What a mind that woman must have had to weave such complex plots and keep everything straight through multiple books. If I could work up the courage, I’d ask her if she always knew where Lymond would end up and whether she knew everything he would learn about himself from the time she started writing about him or if it was a journey of discovery for her too.

    Reply
  6. Susanna, I’m another fan of Nevil Shute novels, in particular A TOWN LIKE ALICE which covers so many different lives the heroine is forced to live, and her strength an resilience in meeting all of them.
    As for Jane Austen–PERSUASION is my favorite, too, Andrea.

    Reply
  7. Susanna, I’m another fan of Nevil Shute novels, in particular A TOWN LIKE ALICE which covers so many different lives the heroine is forced to live, and her strength an resilience in meeting all of them.
    As for Jane Austen–PERSUASION is my favorite, too, Andrea.

    Reply
  8. Susanna, I’m another fan of Nevil Shute novels, in particular A TOWN LIKE ALICE which covers so many different lives the heroine is forced to live, and her strength an resilience in meeting all of them.
    As for Jane Austen–PERSUASION is my favorite, too, Andrea.

    Reply
  9. Susanna, I’m another fan of Nevil Shute novels, in particular A TOWN LIKE ALICE which covers so many different lives the heroine is forced to live, and her strength an resilience in meeting all of them.
    As for Jane Austen–PERSUASION is my favorite, too, Andrea.

    Reply
  10. Susanna, I’m another fan of Nevil Shute novels, in particular A TOWN LIKE ALICE which covers so many different lives the heroine is forced to live, and her strength an resilience in meeting all of them.
    As for Jane Austen–PERSUASION is my favorite, too, Andrea.

    Reply
  11. I would choose to speak to Georgette Heyer.
    It fascinates me how well she wrote medieval war scenes. She captured the frantic and terrible death of it.
    Her Regency novels step right into the time as if she lived in it like Austen.

    Reply
  12. I would choose to speak to Georgette Heyer.
    It fascinates me how well she wrote medieval war scenes. She captured the frantic and terrible death of it.
    Her Regency novels step right into the time as if she lived in it like Austen.

    Reply
  13. I would choose to speak to Georgette Heyer.
    It fascinates me how well she wrote medieval war scenes. She captured the frantic and terrible death of it.
    Her Regency novels step right into the time as if she lived in it like Austen.

    Reply
  14. I would choose to speak to Georgette Heyer.
    It fascinates me how well she wrote medieval war scenes. She captured the frantic and terrible death of it.
    Her Regency novels step right into the time as if she lived in it like Austen.

    Reply
  15. I would choose to speak to Georgette Heyer.
    It fascinates me how well she wrote medieval war scenes. She captured the frantic and terrible death of it.
    Her Regency novels step right into the time as if she lived in it like Austen.

    Reply
  16. Fannie Flagg! She makes me laugh out loud! I’ve always enjoyed her books! They are full of quirky characters & interesting descriptions of small town life! As I get older, I aspire to BE Elner Shimfissle!!

    Reply
  17. Fannie Flagg! She makes me laugh out loud! I’ve always enjoyed her books! They are full of quirky characters & interesting descriptions of small town life! As I get older, I aspire to BE Elner Shimfissle!!

    Reply
  18. Fannie Flagg! She makes me laugh out loud! I’ve always enjoyed her books! They are full of quirky characters & interesting descriptions of small town life! As I get older, I aspire to BE Elner Shimfissle!!

    Reply
  19. Fannie Flagg! She makes me laugh out loud! I’ve always enjoyed her books! They are full of quirky characters & interesting descriptions of small town life! As I get older, I aspire to BE Elner Shimfissle!!

    Reply
  20. Fannie Flagg! She makes me laugh out loud! I’ve always enjoyed her books! They are full of quirky characters & interesting descriptions of small town life! As I get older, I aspire to BE Elner Shimfissle!!

    Reply
  21. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert mater. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  22. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert mater. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  23. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert mater. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  24. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert mater. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  25. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert mater. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  26. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening

    Reply
  27. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening

    Reply
  28. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening

    Reply
  29. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening

    Reply
  30. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening

    Reply
  31. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening

    Reply
  32. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening

    Reply
  33. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening

    Reply
  34. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening

    Reply
  35. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening

    Reply
  36. It would have to be Mark Twain. It’s not just his literary accomplishments – his books, essays and travels – that I find so interesting. I think it is his sense of humor that draws me to him. I love people who think funny.
    I think I might be too tongue tied to ask him anything. But I maybe after a couple of whiskeys we would have a pretty good time (smile).

    Reply
  37. It would have to be Mark Twain. It’s not just his literary accomplishments – his books, essays and travels – that I find so interesting. I think it is his sense of humor that draws me to him. I love people who think funny.
    I think I might be too tongue tied to ask him anything. But I maybe after a couple of whiskeys we would have a pretty good time (smile).

    Reply
  38. It would have to be Mark Twain. It’s not just his literary accomplishments – his books, essays and travels – that I find so interesting. I think it is his sense of humor that draws me to him. I love people who think funny.
    I think I might be too tongue tied to ask him anything. But I maybe after a couple of whiskeys we would have a pretty good time (smile).

    Reply
  39. It would have to be Mark Twain. It’s not just his literary accomplishments – his books, essays and travels – that I find so interesting. I think it is his sense of humor that draws me to him. I love people who think funny.
    I think I might be too tongue tied to ask him anything. But I maybe after a couple of whiskeys we would have a pretty good time (smile).

    Reply
  40. It would have to be Mark Twain. It’s not just his literary accomplishments – his books, essays and travels – that I find so interesting. I think it is his sense of humor that draws me to him. I love people who think funny.
    I think I might be too tongue tied to ask him anything. But I maybe after a couple of whiskeys we would have a pretty good time (smile).

    Reply
  41. T. E.Lawrence is a great choice!! A dashing character I am sure he would be a man of many secrets and plots. Loved Peter O’Toole playing him.

    Reply
  42. T. E.Lawrence is a great choice!! A dashing character I am sure he would be a man of many secrets and plots. Loved Peter O’Toole playing him.

    Reply
  43. T. E.Lawrence is a great choice!! A dashing character I am sure he would be a man of many secrets and plots. Loved Peter O’Toole playing him.

    Reply
  44. T. E.Lawrence is a great choice!! A dashing character I am sure he would be a man of many secrets and plots. Loved Peter O’Toole playing him.

    Reply
  45. T. E.Lawrence is a great choice!! A dashing character I am sure he would be a man of many secrets and plots. Loved Peter O’Toole playing him.

    Reply
  46. Laura Ingalls Wilder — Not romance in the usual sense. But her books are so full of history. My sister and I devoured all the books as soon as they appeared on the library shelves. We soon discovered that Laura was pretty much the same age as our grandmother, so that made her even more interesting to usQ

    Reply
  47. Laura Ingalls Wilder — Not romance in the usual sense. But her books are so full of history. My sister and I devoured all the books as soon as they appeared on the library shelves. We soon discovered that Laura was pretty much the same age as our grandmother, so that made her even more interesting to usQ

    Reply
  48. Laura Ingalls Wilder — Not romance in the usual sense. But her books are so full of history. My sister and I devoured all the books as soon as they appeared on the library shelves. We soon discovered that Laura was pretty much the same age as our grandmother, so that made her even more interesting to usQ

    Reply
  49. Laura Ingalls Wilder — Not romance in the usual sense. But her books are so full of history. My sister and I devoured all the books as soon as they appeared on the library shelves. We soon discovered that Laura was pretty much the same age as our grandmother, so that made her even more interesting to usQ

    Reply
  50. Laura Ingalls Wilder — Not romance in the usual sense. But her books are so full of history. My sister and I devoured all the books as soon as they appeared on the library shelves. We soon discovered that Laura was pretty much the same age as our grandmother, so that made her even more interesting to usQ

    Reply
  51. Today, I would pick Aola Vandergriff, whose last book, I believe, was published in the mid to late 1980s, but wrote amazing historical and gothic romances, that I did not get my hands on until after she had passed away. Her “Daughters of” historical romance series followed three sisters from the day their father abandoned them and their wagon -but no horses- on the trail west, and their loves and descendants up until the early days of silent movies, and wow, what a ride. Her Wyndspelle gothic trilogy gave me physical chills when I first read it, and each one of her books that I have read, so far, has had at least one “I can’t believe she did that” moment. She wrote beautifully, with vivid detail, and took some gutsy risks. I would have loved the chance to pick her brain, or even let her know how much her books have meant to me, as a reader and a writer.

    Reply
  52. Today, I would pick Aola Vandergriff, whose last book, I believe, was published in the mid to late 1980s, but wrote amazing historical and gothic romances, that I did not get my hands on until after she had passed away. Her “Daughters of” historical romance series followed three sisters from the day their father abandoned them and their wagon -but no horses- on the trail west, and their loves and descendants up until the early days of silent movies, and wow, what a ride. Her Wyndspelle gothic trilogy gave me physical chills when I first read it, and each one of her books that I have read, so far, has had at least one “I can’t believe she did that” moment. She wrote beautifully, with vivid detail, and took some gutsy risks. I would have loved the chance to pick her brain, or even let her know how much her books have meant to me, as a reader and a writer.

    Reply
  53. Today, I would pick Aola Vandergriff, whose last book, I believe, was published in the mid to late 1980s, but wrote amazing historical and gothic romances, that I did not get my hands on until after she had passed away. Her “Daughters of” historical romance series followed three sisters from the day their father abandoned them and their wagon -but no horses- on the trail west, and their loves and descendants up until the early days of silent movies, and wow, what a ride. Her Wyndspelle gothic trilogy gave me physical chills when I first read it, and each one of her books that I have read, so far, has had at least one “I can’t believe she did that” moment. She wrote beautifully, with vivid detail, and took some gutsy risks. I would have loved the chance to pick her brain, or even let her know how much her books have meant to me, as a reader and a writer.

    Reply
  54. Today, I would pick Aola Vandergriff, whose last book, I believe, was published in the mid to late 1980s, but wrote amazing historical and gothic romances, that I did not get my hands on until after she had passed away. Her “Daughters of” historical romance series followed three sisters from the day their father abandoned them and their wagon -but no horses- on the trail west, and their loves and descendants up until the early days of silent movies, and wow, what a ride. Her Wyndspelle gothic trilogy gave me physical chills when I first read it, and each one of her books that I have read, so far, has had at least one “I can’t believe she did that” moment. She wrote beautifully, with vivid detail, and took some gutsy risks. I would have loved the chance to pick her brain, or even let her know how much her books have meant to me, as a reader and a writer.

    Reply
  55. Today, I would pick Aola Vandergriff, whose last book, I believe, was published in the mid to late 1980s, but wrote amazing historical and gothic romances, that I did not get my hands on until after she had passed away. Her “Daughters of” historical romance series followed three sisters from the day their father abandoned them and their wagon -but no horses- on the trail west, and their loves and descendants up until the early days of silent movies, and wow, what a ride. Her Wyndspelle gothic trilogy gave me physical chills when I first read it, and each one of her books that I have read, so far, has had at least one “I can’t believe she did that” moment. She wrote beautifully, with vivid detail, and took some gutsy risks. I would have loved the chance to pick her brain, or even let her know how much her books have meant to me, as a reader and a writer.

    Reply
  56. I will have to take my place on the sofa next to Pat Rice. Like her, I am more of a listener and observer. I have to feel really at ease with someone before I ask questions. I do have a story about Laura Ingalls Wilder. When I was in high school my agri teacher, Mr. Beale, had an old dropped leaf table in the shop that I adored. I asked him about it and he told me that his wife’s family crossed the prairie with the Ingalls family and that table had been on the wagon. He had it there so he could refinish it. I just cringe now when I think about him refinishing that table. Oh, and Jane Austen is my nighttime story teller. I go to sleep listening to one her books.

    Reply
  57. I will have to take my place on the sofa next to Pat Rice. Like her, I am more of a listener and observer. I have to feel really at ease with someone before I ask questions. I do have a story about Laura Ingalls Wilder. When I was in high school my agri teacher, Mr. Beale, had an old dropped leaf table in the shop that I adored. I asked him about it and he told me that his wife’s family crossed the prairie with the Ingalls family and that table had been on the wagon. He had it there so he could refinish it. I just cringe now when I think about him refinishing that table. Oh, and Jane Austen is my nighttime story teller. I go to sleep listening to one her books.

    Reply
  58. I will have to take my place on the sofa next to Pat Rice. Like her, I am more of a listener and observer. I have to feel really at ease with someone before I ask questions. I do have a story about Laura Ingalls Wilder. When I was in high school my agri teacher, Mr. Beale, had an old dropped leaf table in the shop that I adored. I asked him about it and he told me that his wife’s family crossed the prairie with the Ingalls family and that table had been on the wagon. He had it there so he could refinish it. I just cringe now when I think about him refinishing that table. Oh, and Jane Austen is my nighttime story teller. I go to sleep listening to one her books.

    Reply
  59. I will have to take my place on the sofa next to Pat Rice. Like her, I am more of a listener and observer. I have to feel really at ease with someone before I ask questions. I do have a story about Laura Ingalls Wilder. When I was in high school my agri teacher, Mr. Beale, had an old dropped leaf table in the shop that I adored. I asked him about it and he told me that his wife’s family crossed the prairie with the Ingalls family and that table had been on the wagon. He had it there so he could refinish it. I just cringe now when I think about him refinishing that table. Oh, and Jane Austen is my nighttime story teller. I go to sleep listening to one her books.

    Reply
  60. I will have to take my place on the sofa next to Pat Rice. Like her, I am more of a listener and observer. I have to feel really at ease with someone before I ask questions. I do have a story about Laura Ingalls Wilder. When I was in high school my agri teacher, Mr. Beale, had an old dropped leaf table in the shop that I adored. I asked him about it and he told me that his wife’s family crossed the prairie with the Ingalls family and that table had been on the wagon. He had it there so he could refinish it. I just cringe now when I think about him refinishing that table. Oh, and Jane Austen is my nighttime story teller. I go to sleep listening to one her books.

    Reply
  61. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is now beginning to waver a little. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  62. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is now beginning to waver a little. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  63. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is now beginning to waver a little. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  64. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is now beginning to waver a little. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  65. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is now beginning to waver a little. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  66. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is now beginning to waver a little. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  67. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is now beginning to waver a little. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  68. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is now beginning to waver a little. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  69. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is now beginning to waver a little. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  70. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is now beginning to waver a little. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  71. There really isn’t an author I’d like to meet because I’d be too flattering (true feelings) toward them (boring) or I’d be terrified if he/she didn’t like me, so I’d sound like an idiot.
    But I would like to be a fly on the wall for one of their dinner parties with their friends. I’d pick Oscar Wilde at various times of his life, Byron at his height of fame, Charlotte Bronte, Dickens (I’m curious about his side of the story of his marriage), and, of course, Shakespeare. Oh, and Churchill (although I doubt I’d like him personally).

    Reply
  72. There really isn’t an author I’d like to meet because I’d be too flattering (true feelings) toward them (boring) or I’d be terrified if he/she didn’t like me, so I’d sound like an idiot.
    But I would like to be a fly on the wall for one of their dinner parties with their friends. I’d pick Oscar Wilde at various times of his life, Byron at his height of fame, Charlotte Bronte, Dickens (I’m curious about his side of the story of his marriage), and, of course, Shakespeare. Oh, and Churchill (although I doubt I’d like him personally).

    Reply
  73. There really isn’t an author I’d like to meet because I’d be too flattering (true feelings) toward them (boring) or I’d be terrified if he/she didn’t like me, so I’d sound like an idiot.
    But I would like to be a fly on the wall for one of their dinner parties with their friends. I’d pick Oscar Wilde at various times of his life, Byron at his height of fame, Charlotte Bronte, Dickens (I’m curious about his side of the story of his marriage), and, of course, Shakespeare. Oh, and Churchill (although I doubt I’d like him personally).

    Reply
  74. There really isn’t an author I’d like to meet because I’d be too flattering (true feelings) toward them (boring) or I’d be terrified if he/she didn’t like me, so I’d sound like an idiot.
    But I would like to be a fly on the wall for one of their dinner parties with their friends. I’d pick Oscar Wilde at various times of his life, Byron at his height of fame, Charlotte Bronte, Dickens (I’m curious about his side of the story of his marriage), and, of course, Shakespeare. Oh, and Churchill (although I doubt I’d like him personally).

    Reply
  75. There really isn’t an author I’d like to meet because I’d be too flattering (true feelings) toward them (boring) or I’d be terrified if he/she didn’t like me, so I’d sound like an idiot.
    But I would like to be a fly on the wall for one of their dinner parties with their friends. I’d pick Oscar Wilde at various times of his life, Byron at his height of fame, Charlotte Bronte, Dickens (I’m curious about his side of the story of his marriage), and, of course, Shakespeare. Oh, and Churchill (although I doubt I’d like him personally).

    Reply
  76. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  77. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  78. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  79. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  80. I leave the literary giants to you ladies. Instead I would like to have a chat with the French philosopher Henri Bergson. I read his 1907 book ‘Creative Evolution’ as a student and was very impressed. He introduced the idea of Vital Forces that supposedly distinguished living from inert material. Vitalism went out of fashion for many years as scientists believed that life could be explained by physics and chemistry alone. I think that maybe this belief is beginning to waver a little now. A chat with the master should be very enlightening!

    Reply
  81. Anna, I’m not familiar with Vandergriff but she sounds like a wonderful writer. Anyone who can inspire a “wow” with a reader is doing something special. I love your saying you’d like to tell her how much you enjoyed her books. There are SO many authors I’d like to meet, just to let them know the same thing. I know how much time is spent in the solitary writing cave, struggling to make a story really come to life . . .hearing the end result brings pleasure means a lot!

    Reply
  82. Anna, I’m not familiar with Vandergriff but she sounds like a wonderful writer. Anyone who can inspire a “wow” with a reader is doing something special. I love your saying you’d like to tell her how much you enjoyed her books. There are SO many authors I’d like to meet, just to let them know the same thing. I know how much time is spent in the solitary writing cave, struggling to make a story really come to life . . .hearing the end result brings pleasure means a lot!

    Reply
  83. Anna, I’m not familiar with Vandergriff but she sounds like a wonderful writer. Anyone who can inspire a “wow” with a reader is doing something special. I love your saying you’d like to tell her how much you enjoyed her books. There are SO many authors I’d like to meet, just to let them know the same thing. I know how much time is spent in the solitary writing cave, struggling to make a story really come to life . . .hearing the end result brings pleasure means a lot!

    Reply
  84. Anna, I’m not familiar with Vandergriff but she sounds like a wonderful writer. Anyone who can inspire a “wow” with a reader is doing something special. I love your saying you’d like to tell her how much you enjoyed her books. There are SO many authors I’d like to meet, just to let them know the same thing. I know how much time is spent in the solitary writing cave, struggling to make a story really come to life . . .hearing the end result brings pleasure means a lot!

    Reply
  85. Anna, I’m not familiar with Vandergriff but she sounds like a wonderful writer. Anyone who can inspire a “wow” with a reader is doing something special. I love your saying you’d like to tell her how much you enjoyed her books. There are SO many authors I’d like to meet, just to let them know the same thing. I know how much time is spent in the solitary writing cave, struggling to make a story really come to life . . .hearing the end result brings pleasure means a lot!

    Reply
  86. Wonderful story about the Ingalls, but “Oh, no!” on the refinishing! Sad to think of all that history sanded away. The nicks and dents are what give character and personality.
    (And I agree that in rel-life I’d never ask impertinent questions, but it’s fun to think about what we’d like to know.)

    Reply
  87. Wonderful story about the Ingalls, but “Oh, no!” on the refinishing! Sad to think of all that history sanded away. The nicks and dents are what give character and personality.
    (And I agree that in rel-life I’d never ask impertinent questions, but it’s fun to think about what we’d like to know.)

    Reply
  88. Wonderful story about the Ingalls, but “Oh, no!” on the refinishing! Sad to think of all that history sanded away. The nicks and dents are what give character and personality.
    (And I agree that in rel-life I’d never ask impertinent questions, but it’s fun to think about what we’d like to know.)

    Reply
  89. Wonderful story about the Ingalls, but “Oh, no!” on the refinishing! Sad to think of all that history sanded away. The nicks and dents are what give character and personality.
    (And I agree that in rel-life I’d never ask impertinent questions, but it’s fun to think about what we’d like to know.)

    Reply
  90. Wonderful story about the Ingalls, but “Oh, no!” on the refinishing! Sad to think of all that history sanded away. The nicks and dents are what give character and personality.
    (And I agree that in rel-life I’d never ask impertinent questions, but it’s fun to think about what we’d like to know.)

    Reply
  91. A fascinating choice, Quantum! I’ve read a little about Vitalism, and I can see how you’d find his concepts really intriguing. Given all the ongoing discoveries of particles, dark matter, etc. and the fact that there is so much in physics these days we can’t “rationalize”(or at least not in ways that our brains can currently articulate) maybe Bergson was on to something! (I like to sit in on your chat with him!)

    Reply
  92. A fascinating choice, Quantum! I’ve read a little about Vitalism, and I can see how you’d find his concepts really intriguing. Given all the ongoing discoveries of particles, dark matter, etc. and the fact that there is so much in physics these days we can’t “rationalize”(or at least not in ways that our brains can currently articulate) maybe Bergson was on to something! (I like to sit in on your chat with him!)

    Reply
  93. A fascinating choice, Quantum! I’ve read a little about Vitalism, and I can see how you’d find his concepts really intriguing. Given all the ongoing discoveries of particles, dark matter, etc. and the fact that there is so much in physics these days we can’t “rationalize”(or at least not in ways that our brains can currently articulate) maybe Bergson was on to something! (I like to sit in on your chat with him!)

    Reply
  94. A fascinating choice, Quantum! I’ve read a little about Vitalism, and I can see how you’d find his concepts really intriguing. Given all the ongoing discoveries of particles, dark matter, etc. and the fact that there is so much in physics these days we can’t “rationalize”(or at least not in ways that our brains can currently articulate) maybe Bergson was on to something! (I like to sit in on your chat with him!)

    Reply
  95. A fascinating choice, Quantum! I’ve read a little about Vitalism, and I can see how you’d find his concepts really intriguing. Given all the ongoing discoveries of particles, dark matter, etc. and the fact that there is so much in physics these days we can’t “rationalize”(or at least not in ways that our brains can currently articulate) maybe Bergson was on to something! (I like to sit in on your chat with him!)

    Reply
  96. I’d like to be a companion fly on the wall for all those conversations, Lynda! All your choices are absolutely fascinating. I wouldn’t particularly like Churchill personally either, but I greatly admire his mind and his courage. Byron would be intriguing. but oh, talk about a piece of work . . .

    Reply
  97. I’d like to be a companion fly on the wall for all those conversations, Lynda! All your choices are absolutely fascinating. I wouldn’t particularly like Churchill personally either, but I greatly admire his mind and his courage. Byron would be intriguing. but oh, talk about a piece of work . . .

    Reply
  98. I’d like to be a companion fly on the wall for all those conversations, Lynda! All your choices are absolutely fascinating. I wouldn’t particularly like Churchill personally either, but I greatly admire his mind and his courage. Byron would be intriguing. but oh, talk about a piece of work . . .

    Reply
  99. I’d like to be a companion fly on the wall for all those conversations, Lynda! All your choices are absolutely fascinating. I wouldn’t particularly like Churchill personally either, but I greatly admire his mind and his courage. Byron would be intriguing. but oh, talk about a piece of work . . .

    Reply
  100. I’d like to be a companion fly on the wall for all those conversations, Lynda! All your choices are absolutely fascinating. I wouldn’t particularly like Churchill personally either, but I greatly admire his mind and his courage. Byron would be intriguing. but oh, talk about a piece of work . . .

    Reply
  101. I, too, have just added the previously unknown A Town Like Alice to my to be read mountain – thanks, Susanna! I’m just a bit embarrassed to say that I think I’d like to meet and thank Frances Hodgson Burnett. Like so many of us, she started writing to earn money, and she succeeded and went on to live a peripatetic lifestyle with a strong social presence. But she gave me The Little Princess, which I read, read, and reread, throughout my childhood. It taught me that things were never quite as bad as they seemed, and cemented my love for a happily ever after. I’d love to hear about her life from her personal perspective and of course, say thank you!

    Reply
  102. I, too, have just added the previously unknown A Town Like Alice to my to be read mountain – thanks, Susanna! I’m just a bit embarrassed to say that I think I’d like to meet and thank Frances Hodgson Burnett. Like so many of us, she started writing to earn money, and she succeeded and went on to live a peripatetic lifestyle with a strong social presence. But she gave me The Little Princess, which I read, read, and reread, throughout my childhood. It taught me that things were never quite as bad as they seemed, and cemented my love for a happily ever after. I’d love to hear about her life from her personal perspective and of course, say thank you!

    Reply
  103. I, too, have just added the previously unknown A Town Like Alice to my to be read mountain – thanks, Susanna! I’m just a bit embarrassed to say that I think I’d like to meet and thank Frances Hodgson Burnett. Like so many of us, she started writing to earn money, and she succeeded and went on to live a peripatetic lifestyle with a strong social presence. But she gave me The Little Princess, which I read, read, and reread, throughout my childhood. It taught me that things were never quite as bad as they seemed, and cemented my love for a happily ever after. I’d love to hear about her life from her personal perspective and of course, say thank you!

    Reply
  104. I, too, have just added the previously unknown A Town Like Alice to my to be read mountain – thanks, Susanna! I’m just a bit embarrassed to say that I think I’d like to meet and thank Frances Hodgson Burnett. Like so many of us, she started writing to earn money, and she succeeded and went on to live a peripatetic lifestyle with a strong social presence. But she gave me The Little Princess, which I read, read, and reread, throughout my childhood. It taught me that things were never quite as bad as they seemed, and cemented my love for a happily ever after. I’d love to hear about her life from her personal perspective and of course, say thank you!

    Reply
  105. I, too, have just added the previously unknown A Town Like Alice to my to be read mountain – thanks, Susanna! I’m just a bit embarrassed to say that I think I’d like to meet and thank Frances Hodgson Burnett. Like so many of us, she started writing to earn money, and she succeeded and went on to live a peripatetic lifestyle with a strong social presence. But she gave me The Little Princess, which I read, read, and reread, throughout my childhood. It taught me that things were never quite as bad as they seemed, and cemented my love for a happily ever after. I’d love to hear about her life from her personal perspective and of course, say thank you!

    Reply
  106. There was a time when I was a teenager when I would have loved to met John Keats. I was sure I could make him forget Fanny Brawn, and I’d have made sure he ate right and got plenty of fresh air and sunshine so he might have recovered from TB.
    But now I keep thinking about this question, and I’ve decided I wouldn’t actually like to meet any author of books I’ve loved. Suppose I didn’t like him/her. That might ruin the books for me. And if the author didn’t like me, it would feel pretty humiliating.
    However, from time to time I do sent thank you notes to authors for the pleasure their books have given me. Not nearly as often as I should, but I try.

    Reply
  107. There was a time when I was a teenager when I would have loved to met John Keats. I was sure I could make him forget Fanny Brawn, and I’d have made sure he ate right and got plenty of fresh air and sunshine so he might have recovered from TB.
    But now I keep thinking about this question, and I’ve decided I wouldn’t actually like to meet any author of books I’ve loved. Suppose I didn’t like him/her. That might ruin the books for me. And if the author didn’t like me, it would feel pretty humiliating.
    However, from time to time I do sent thank you notes to authors for the pleasure their books have given me. Not nearly as often as I should, but I try.

    Reply
  108. There was a time when I was a teenager when I would have loved to met John Keats. I was sure I could make him forget Fanny Brawn, and I’d have made sure he ate right and got plenty of fresh air and sunshine so he might have recovered from TB.
    But now I keep thinking about this question, and I’ve decided I wouldn’t actually like to meet any author of books I’ve loved. Suppose I didn’t like him/her. That might ruin the books for me. And if the author didn’t like me, it would feel pretty humiliating.
    However, from time to time I do sent thank you notes to authors for the pleasure their books have given me. Not nearly as often as I should, but I try.

    Reply
  109. There was a time when I was a teenager when I would have loved to met John Keats. I was sure I could make him forget Fanny Brawn, and I’d have made sure he ate right and got plenty of fresh air and sunshine so he might have recovered from TB.
    But now I keep thinking about this question, and I’ve decided I wouldn’t actually like to meet any author of books I’ve loved. Suppose I didn’t like him/her. That might ruin the books for me. And if the author didn’t like me, it would feel pretty humiliating.
    However, from time to time I do sent thank you notes to authors for the pleasure their books have given me. Not nearly as often as I should, but I try.

    Reply
  110. There was a time when I was a teenager when I would have loved to met John Keats. I was sure I could make him forget Fanny Brawn, and I’d have made sure he ate right and got plenty of fresh air and sunshine so he might have recovered from TB.
    But now I keep thinking about this question, and I’ve decided I wouldn’t actually like to meet any author of books I’ve loved. Suppose I didn’t like him/her. That might ruin the books for me. And if the author didn’t like me, it would feel pretty humiliating.
    However, from time to time I do sent thank you notes to authors for the pleasure their books have given me. Not nearly as often as I should, but I try.

    Reply
  111. I would like to meet Enid Blyton. I’d love to ask her ‘how did she write all those stories!!’. She saved my rather lonely childhood. I grew up with her books and loved them all. The Famous Five and Mallory Towers were my stand out favorites but I read an awful lot of what she wrote. She must have had an amazing imagination.
    Of course Jane Austen would be my first choice but for a change I thought I’d pick my second choice for variety.

    Reply
  112. I would like to meet Enid Blyton. I’d love to ask her ‘how did she write all those stories!!’. She saved my rather lonely childhood. I grew up with her books and loved them all. The Famous Five and Mallory Towers were my stand out favorites but I read an awful lot of what she wrote. She must have had an amazing imagination.
    Of course Jane Austen would be my first choice but for a change I thought I’d pick my second choice for variety.

    Reply
  113. I would like to meet Enid Blyton. I’d love to ask her ‘how did she write all those stories!!’. She saved my rather lonely childhood. I grew up with her books and loved them all. The Famous Five and Mallory Towers were my stand out favorites but I read an awful lot of what she wrote. She must have had an amazing imagination.
    Of course Jane Austen would be my first choice but for a change I thought I’d pick my second choice for variety.

    Reply
  114. I would like to meet Enid Blyton. I’d love to ask her ‘how did she write all those stories!!’. She saved my rather lonely childhood. I grew up with her books and loved them all. The Famous Five and Mallory Towers were my stand out favorites but I read an awful lot of what she wrote. She must have had an amazing imagination.
    Of course Jane Austen would be my first choice but for a change I thought I’d pick my second choice for variety.

    Reply
  115. I would like to meet Enid Blyton. I’d love to ask her ‘how did she write all those stories!!’. She saved my rather lonely childhood. I grew up with her books and loved them all. The Famous Five and Mallory Towers were my stand out favorites but I read an awful lot of what she wrote. She must have had an amazing imagination.
    Of course Jane Austen would be my first choice but for a change I thought I’d pick my second choice for variety.

    Reply
  116. It has been some time since I read A Town Called Alice, and I really enjoyed it very much. So, Shute would be interesting to me too.
    Fanny Flagg is a wonderful writer. Her descriptions of small towns is on the money and I recognize many of her characters. And Elner and all her friends would make me welcome I am sure.
    In short, y’all have mentioned authors that I would love to meet. Spending time with Mark Twain would blow me away, he was a quick wit and I believe that would be a wonderful experience. Elizabeth Peters, she was humorous and informative and her plots were always entertaining.
    Susan Elizabeth Phillips – again – she has made me laugh out loud. The same for early Julie Garwood books.
    Do you see a pattern here? I would love to have time to listen to the authors who wanted to provide their readers with laughter.
    I have been reading books since I was 4 years old. And being able to step away and find humor in a book is one of the most wonderful gifts I have ever received.
    I think that for you authors, it must be a huge burden to realize that your readers love your work so very much.

    Reply
  117. It has been some time since I read A Town Called Alice, and I really enjoyed it very much. So, Shute would be interesting to me too.
    Fanny Flagg is a wonderful writer. Her descriptions of small towns is on the money and I recognize many of her characters. And Elner and all her friends would make me welcome I am sure.
    In short, y’all have mentioned authors that I would love to meet. Spending time with Mark Twain would blow me away, he was a quick wit and I believe that would be a wonderful experience. Elizabeth Peters, she was humorous and informative and her plots were always entertaining.
    Susan Elizabeth Phillips – again – she has made me laugh out loud. The same for early Julie Garwood books.
    Do you see a pattern here? I would love to have time to listen to the authors who wanted to provide their readers with laughter.
    I have been reading books since I was 4 years old. And being able to step away and find humor in a book is one of the most wonderful gifts I have ever received.
    I think that for you authors, it must be a huge burden to realize that your readers love your work so very much.

    Reply
  118. It has been some time since I read A Town Called Alice, and I really enjoyed it very much. So, Shute would be interesting to me too.
    Fanny Flagg is a wonderful writer. Her descriptions of small towns is on the money and I recognize many of her characters. And Elner and all her friends would make me welcome I am sure.
    In short, y’all have mentioned authors that I would love to meet. Spending time with Mark Twain would blow me away, he was a quick wit and I believe that would be a wonderful experience. Elizabeth Peters, she was humorous and informative and her plots were always entertaining.
    Susan Elizabeth Phillips – again – she has made me laugh out loud. The same for early Julie Garwood books.
    Do you see a pattern here? I would love to have time to listen to the authors who wanted to provide their readers with laughter.
    I have been reading books since I was 4 years old. And being able to step away and find humor in a book is one of the most wonderful gifts I have ever received.
    I think that for you authors, it must be a huge burden to realize that your readers love your work so very much.

    Reply
  119. It has been some time since I read A Town Called Alice, and I really enjoyed it very much. So, Shute would be interesting to me too.
    Fanny Flagg is a wonderful writer. Her descriptions of small towns is on the money and I recognize many of her characters. And Elner and all her friends would make me welcome I am sure.
    In short, y’all have mentioned authors that I would love to meet. Spending time with Mark Twain would blow me away, he was a quick wit and I believe that would be a wonderful experience. Elizabeth Peters, she was humorous and informative and her plots were always entertaining.
    Susan Elizabeth Phillips – again – she has made me laugh out loud. The same for early Julie Garwood books.
    Do you see a pattern here? I would love to have time to listen to the authors who wanted to provide their readers with laughter.
    I have been reading books since I was 4 years old. And being able to step away and find humor in a book is one of the most wonderful gifts I have ever received.
    I think that for you authors, it must be a huge burden to realize that your readers love your work so very much.

    Reply
  120. It has been some time since I read A Town Called Alice, and I really enjoyed it very much. So, Shute would be interesting to me too.
    Fanny Flagg is a wonderful writer. Her descriptions of small towns is on the money and I recognize many of her characters. And Elner and all her friends would make me welcome I am sure.
    In short, y’all have mentioned authors that I would love to meet. Spending time with Mark Twain would blow me away, he was a quick wit and I believe that would be a wonderful experience. Elizabeth Peters, she was humorous and informative and her plots were always entertaining.
    Susan Elizabeth Phillips – again – she has made me laugh out loud. The same for early Julie Garwood books.
    Do you see a pattern here? I would love to have time to listen to the authors who wanted to provide their readers with laughter.
    I have been reading books since I was 4 years old. And being able to step away and find humor in a book is one of the most wonderful gifts I have ever received.
    I think that for you authors, it must be a huge burden to realize that your readers love your work so very much.

    Reply
  121. What VERY interesting choices Wenches. Some have already mentioned authors I would have loved to meet, I think. I always think of (because the question comes up often,) a one hour or longer ‘interview’ over tea, coffee, or in some cases Scotch or a beer (ugh.) With that little bit of time it would feel forced and nerve-wracking. Not my glass of iced tea, thanks. I’m with Francie Ceale and Lynda X, it takes awhile to feel comfortable enough to ask questions when you are face to face with someone. I think we may be braver online, though.

    Reply
  122. What VERY interesting choices Wenches. Some have already mentioned authors I would have loved to meet, I think. I always think of (because the question comes up often,) a one hour or longer ‘interview’ over tea, coffee, or in some cases Scotch or a beer (ugh.) With that little bit of time it would feel forced and nerve-wracking. Not my glass of iced tea, thanks. I’m with Francie Ceale and Lynda X, it takes awhile to feel comfortable enough to ask questions when you are face to face with someone. I think we may be braver online, though.

    Reply
  123. What VERY interesting choices Wenches. Some have already mentioned authors I would have loved to meet, I think. I always think of (because the question comes up often,) a one hour or longer ‘interview’ over tea, coffee, or in some cases Scotch or a beer (ugh.) With that little bit of time it would feel forced and nerve-wracking. Not my glass of iced tea, thanks. I’m with Francie Ceale and Lynda X, it takes awhile to feel comfortable enough to ask questions when you are face to face with someone. I think we may be braver online, though.

    Reply
  124. What VERY interesting choices Wenches. Some have already mentioned authors I would have loved to meet, I think. I always think of (because the question comes up often,) a one hour or longer ‘interview’ over tea, coffee, or in some cases Scotch or a beer (ugh.) With that little bit of time it would feel forced and nerve-wracking. Not my glass of iced tea, thanks. I’m with Francie Ceale and Lynda X, it takes awhile to feel comfortable enough to ask questions when you are face to face with someone. I think we may be braver online, though.

    Reply
  125. What VERY interesting choices Wenches. Some have already mentioned authors I would have loved to meet, I think. I always think of (because the question comes up often,) a one hour or longer ‘interview’ over tea, coffee, or in some cases Scotch or a beer (ugh.) With that little bit of time it would feel forced and nerve-wracking. Not my glass of iced tea, thanks. I’m with Francie Ceale and Lynda X, it takes awhile to feel comfortable enough to ask questions when you are face to face with someone. I think we may be braver online, though.

    Reply
  126. There are so many authors I’d wish to thank. Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer. If I could remember their names, I’d like to thank (embarrassingly) the gothic romance authors I read in the late 60’s. Would anyone know who they were? Plus the authors whose works filled the Readers Digest condensed hardcover collections from back in the 60’s as well. (My Grandmother’s bookshelves.) Those books I read so quickly the titles and author names flew in one side of my brain and right out the other.
    And lastly, I would love to thank (perhaps by letter, again the shyness factor of face to face) the authors my son loved so much growing up: Jean Craighead George, C.S. Lewis, (one of my choices too) E.B. White just to name a few. We needed two copies of ‘The Trumpets of the Swan’ one for the house, one for the car. And Madeleine L’Engle.

    Reply
  127. There are so many authors I’d wish to thank. Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer. If I could remember their names, I’d like to thank (embarrassingly) the gothic romance authors I read in the late 60’s. Would anyone know who they were? Plus the authors whose works filled the Readers Digest condensed hardcover collections from back in the 60’s as well. (My Grandmother’s bookshelves.) Those books I read so quickly the titles and author names flew in one side of my brain and right out the other.
    And lastly, I would love to thank (perhaps by letter, again the shyness factor of face to face) the authors my son loved so much growing up: Jean Craighead George, C.S. Lewis, (one of my choices too) E.B. White just to name a few. We needed two copies of ‘The Trumpets of the Swan’ one for the house, one for the car. And Madeleine L’Engle.

    Reply
  128. There are so many authors I’d wish to thank. Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer. If I could remember their names, I’d like to thank (embarrassingly) the gothic romance authors I read in the late 60’s. Would anyone know who they were? Plus the authors whose works filled the Readers Digest condensed hardcover collections from back in the 60’s as well. (My Grandmother’s bookshelves.) Those books I read so quickly the titles and author names flew in one side of my brain and right out the other.
    And lastly, I would love to thank (perhaps by letter, again the shyness factor of face to face) the authors my son loved so much growing up: Jean Craighead George, C.S. Lewis, (one of my choices too) E.B. White just to name a few. We needed two copies of ‘The Trumpets of the Swan’ one for the house, one for the car. And Madeleine L’Engle.

    Reply
  129. There are so many authors I’d wish to thank. Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer. If I could remember their names, I’d like to thank (embarrassingly) the gothic romance authors I read in the late 60’s. Would anyone know who they were? Plus the authors whose works filled the Readers Digest condensed hardcover collections from back in the 60’s as well. (My Grandmother’s bookshelves.) Those books I read so quickly the titles and author names flew in one side of my brain and right out the other.
    And lastly, I would love to thank (perhaps by letter, again the shyness factor of face to face) the authors my son loved so much growing up: Jean Craighead George, C.S. Lewis, (one of my choices too) E.B. White just to name a few. We needed two copies of ‘The Trumpets of the Swan’ one for the house, one for the car. And Madeleine L’Engle.

    Reply
  130. There are so many authors I’d wish to thank. Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer. If I could remember their names, I’d like to thank (embarrassingly) the gothic romance authors I read in the late 60’s. Would anyone know who they were? Plus the authors whose works filled the Readers Digest condensed hardcover collections from back in the 60’s as well. (My Grandmother’s bookshelves.) Those books I read so quickly the titles and author names flew in one side of my brain and right out the other.
    And lastly, I would love to thank (perhaps by letter, again the shyness factor of face to face) the authors my son loved so much growing up: Jean Craighead George, C.S. Lewis, (one of my choices too) E.B. White just to name a few. We needed two copies of ‘The Trumpets of the Swan’ one for the house, one for the car. And Madeleine L’Engle.

    Reply
  131. So, lastly ladies, (whew!) let me here and now while I can thank you Word Wenches for all the many hours of joy, tears, sighing romance, brave heroines, swoon worthy and honorable heroes, and much needed escape.

    Reply
  132. So, lastly ladies, (whew!) let me here and now while I can thank you Word Wenches for all the many hours of joy, tears, sighing romance, brave heroines, swoon worthy and honorable heroes, and much needed escape.

    Reply
  133. So, lastly ladies, (whew!) let me here and now while I can thank you Word Wenches for all the many hours of joy, tears, sighing romance, brave heroines, swoon worthy and honorable heroes, and much needed escape.

    Reply
  134. So, lastly ladies, (whew!) let me here and now while I can thank you Word Wenches for all the many hours of joy, tears, sighing romance, brave heroines, swoon worthy and honorable heroes, and much needed escape.

    Reply
  135. So, lastly ladies, (whew!) let me here and now while I can thank you Word Wenches for all the many hours of joy, tears, sighing romance, brave heroines, swoon worthy and honorable heroes, and much needed escape.

    Reply

Leave a Comment