Armchair Adventuring

Eygpt-small
Oma in dusterAndrea here
, As the first day of Spring creeps closer, I’m also musing on a far more sobering mark on the calendar. For me, this week marks the one year anniversary of start of the pandemic lockdown in my local area. And though there are now some glimmers of light—there’s limited indoor dining, schools have re-opened for hybrid learning—most of us still feel restricted in the things we can do.

One of the things I miss most is traveling, especially as the days grow longer and weather warms up, inviting one to get up and go explore! But as hopping on a plane to some faraway place doesn’t yet feel like a good plan, I’ve been doing some fun armchair adventuring instead, traveling to exotic destinations. So, I thought I’d invite to take trip with me down the Nile!

Steam yachtI’m lucky enough to have some wonderful scrapbooks that my mother put together of old family photographs. Great and Great-Great Grandfathers and Grandmothers . . .who apparently enjoyed exploring the world. (I guess I come by my curiosity naturally!) One of my favorites is of a trip my forbearers made to Egypt in 1910. (All the photos shown here are from the family trip, except for the Rosetta Stone) What strikes me is how alone they were at the famous sites, which really emphasizes the grandeur of the Pyramid and vastness of the desert.

Big sphinx
The photos are particularly enjoyable to me because I’m a huge fangirl of Elizabeth Peters and her delightful Amelia Peabody mystery series, which is set in Egypt in the late 1800s-early 1900s. I keep expecting to see Peabody and Emerson peeking out from behind a camel or pyramid in my family photos (Amelia, of course, would be shaking her parasol at the tourists and telling them to stay clear of her husband’s excavation trenches!)

Grand hotel cairoAmelia and her sexy husband are archeologists, as is their precocious son, Ramses and their beautiful ward Nefret. (Though I confess, I have a tendre for the Master Criminal—aka Sethos.) The series, which runs for 20 books, provides Menunot only wonderful characters and twisty mysteries but also give a fascinating travelogue of the upper Nile. Peters takes you through the souks of Cairo, the splendor of luxury landmarks like Shepheards Hotel and Mena House, and the stark beauty of the great Pyramid and the Valley of the Kings.

If you’re a fan of the series, you probably know that Peters—her real name was Barbara Mertz—was not just a novelist. She had a PhD in Egyptology, and wrote serious scholarly articles on the subject. So she knew her stuff, and worked it in to her books!

1200px-Rosetta_StonePeabody and Emerson are British, and I think Mertz tipping her pith helmet at the fact that the British played a key role in sparking a fascination with ancient Egypt. When Napoleon invaded Egypt in the late 1700’s—part of the global chess game with Britain for who would be the top world power—he brought with him a cadre of scientist who discovered the Rosetta Stone 1799. British forces came to stop the French sweep through the Middle east and ended capturing the Stone in 1801 and taking it back to the London.

Pyramids

Sphinx-memphisIn 1822, the Rosetta Stone was finally decoded, allowing scholars to begin to read hieroglyphs— and that’s considered the birth Egyptology. With their magnificent art, massive sculptures and awe-inspiring pyramids, painted murals and mysterious mummies, the ancient civilizations of Egypt fascinated the West, drawing scholars, adventurers . . . and hordes of tourists. Umm, like my family!

Large pyramidThe most prominent archeologist of Amelia’s era was Sir William Matthew Flinders Petrie (who is often mentioned in the novels.) Known as Flinders Petrie, he is credited with innovating professional techniques of field preservation, excavation methods, and recording data. His wife Hilda Petrie worked with at the sites . . . and I can’t help but think they may serve as inspiration for Peters!

A trip down the Nile is high on my World Travel List, and I would love to follow in my forbearers’ footsteps and visit the Sphinx, the Great Pyramid, the Valley of Kings and Luxor . . . with a lunch at Mena House, What about you? Would you like to visit historical treasures of Egypt? Or do you have another Dream Trip? Please share!

150 thoughts on “Armchair Adventuring”

  1. I am with you down the Nile all the way!! It is something I have always wanted to do. And I am fascinated with anything Egyptian. I missed it when the King Tut exhibition came to Toronto Canada. I love the books with Peabody and Emerson and when Poirot went down the Nile to solve a murder, I was thrilled. Thank you for a wonderful post and those photos are amazing!

    Reply
  2. I am with you down the Nile all the way!! It is something I have always wanted to do. And I am fascinated with anything Egyptian. I missed it when the King Tut exhibition came to Toronto Canada. I love the books with Peabody and Emerson and when Poirot went down the Nile to solve a murder, I was thrilled. Thank you for a wonderful post and those photos are amazing!

    Reply
  3. I am with you down the Nile all the way!! It is something I have always wanted to do. And I am fascinated with anything Egyptian. I missed it when the King Tut exhibition came to Toronto Canada. I love the books with Peabody and Emerson and when Poirot went down the Nile to solve a murder, I was thrilled. Thank you for a wonderful post and those photos are amazing!

    Reply
  4. I am with you down the Nile all the way!! It is something I have always wanted to do. And I am fascinated with anything Egyptian. I missed it when the King Tut exhibition came to Toronto Canada. I love the books with Peabody and Emerson and when Poirot went down the Nile to solve a murder, I was thrilled. Thank you for a wonderful post and those photos are amazing!

    Reply
  5. I am with you down the Nile all the way!! It is something I have always wanted to do. And I am fascinated with anything Egyptian. I missed it when the King Tut exhibition came to Toronto Canada. I love the books with Peabody and Emerson and when Poirot went down the Nile to solve a murder, I was thrilled. Thank you for a wonderful post and those photos are amazing!

    Reply
  6. What a wonderful trove of family pictures, Andrea! My mother’s family were also great travelers, but they were more East Asia than Middle East. I’ve actually been to Egypt and cruised down the Nile, seeing many of the great sites! Enough years have passed that if I made that trip again, I’d have a whole new appreciation of the history and grandeur.

    Reply
  7. What a wonderful trove of family pictures, Andrea! My mother’s family were also great travelers, but they were more East Asia than Middle East. I’ve actually been to Egypt and cruised down the Nile, seeing many of the great sites! Enough years have passed that if I made that trip again, I’d have a whole new appreciation of the history and grandeur.

    Reply
  8. What a wonderful trove of family pictures, Andrea! My mother’s family were also great travelers, but they were more East Asia than Middle East. I’ve actually been to Egypt and cruised down the Nile, seeing many of the great sites! Enough years have passed that if I made that trip again, I’d have a whole new appreciation of the history and grandeur.

    Reply
  9. What a wonderful trove of family pictures, Andrea! My mother’s family were also great travelers, but they were more East Asia than Middle East. I’ve actually been to Egypt and cruised down the Nile, seeing many of the great sites! Enough years have passed that if I made that trip again, I’d have a whole new appreciation of the history and grandeur.

    Reply
  10. What a wonderful trove of family pictures, Andrea! My mother’s family were also great travelers, but they were more East Asia than Middle East. I’ve actually been to Egypt and cruised down the Nile, seeing many of the great sites! Enough years have passed that if I made that trip again, I’d have a whole new appreciation of the history and grandeur.

    Reply
  11. I first became fascinated with Egypt when I was elementary school age and we studied Akhenaten in Sunday school. I remember we made large plaster casts with symbols of Egypt carved and painted into them. I wanted to travel there, but alas, never made it.
    I love the photographs. It is how I pictured it would be. However, with all the tourism now, I fear I might be disappointed. I remember my first trip to Europe, in the mid 1960s, when there was little traffic and very few tourists. Going there now, or anywhere really, is like night and day.

    Reply
  12. I first became fascinated with Egypt when I was elementary school age and we studied Akhenaten in Sunday school. I remember we made large plaster casts with symbols of Egypt carved and painted into them. I wanted to travel there, but alas, never made it.
    I love the photographs. It is how I pictured it would be. However, with all the tourism now, I fear I might be disappointed. I remember my first trip to Europe, in the mid 1960s, when there was little traffic and very few tourists. Going there now, or anywhere really, is like night and day.

    Reply
  13. I first became fascinated with Egypt when I was elementary school age and we studied Akhenaten in Sunday school. I remember we made large plaster casts with symbols of Egypt carved and painted into them. I wanted to travel there, but alas, never made it.
    I love the photographs. It is how I pictured it would be. However, with all the tourism now, I fear I might be disappointed. I remember my first trip to Europe, in the mid 1960s, when there was little traffic and very few tourists. Going there now, or anywhere really, is like night and day.

    Reply
  14. I first became fascinated with Egypt when I was elementary school age and we studied Akhenaten in Sunday school. I remember we made large plaster casts with symbols of Egypt carved and painted into them. I wanted to travel there, but alas, never made it.
    I love the photographs. It is how I pictured it would be. However, with all the tourism now, I fear I might be disappointed. I remember my first trip to Europe, in the mid 1960s, when there was little traffic and very few tourists. Going there now, or anywhere really, is like night and day.

    Reply
  15. I first became fascinated with Egypt when I was elementary school age and we studied Akhenaten in Sunday school. I remember we made large plaster casts with symbols of Egypt carved and painted into them. I wanted to travel there, but alas, never made it.
    I love the photographs. It is how I pictured it would be. However, with all the tourism now, I fear I might be disappointed. I remember my first trip to Europe, in the mid 1960s, when there was little traffic and very few tourists. Going there now, or anywhere really, is like night and day.

    Reply
  16. Thank you for a fascinating post, Andrea, and for sharing your family memorabilia. I see that the menu is dated February 1914 so not long before the start of world war one and all the changes that wrought.

    Reply
  17. Thank you for a fascinating post, Andrea, and for sharing your family memorabilia. I see that the menu is dated February 1914 so not long before the start of world war one and all the changes that wrought.

    Reply
  18. Thank you for a fascinating post, Andrea, and for sharing your family memorabilia. I see that the menu is dated February 1914 so not long before the start of world war one and all the changes that wrought.

    Reply
  19. Thank you for a fascinating post, Andrea, and for sharing your family memorabilia. I see that the menu is dated February 1914 so not long before the start of world war one and all the changes that wrought.

    Reply
  20. Thank you for a fascinating post, Andrea, and for sharing your family memorabilia. I see that the menu is dated February 1914 so not long before the start of world war one and all the changes that wrought.

    Reply
  21. Crocodile on the Sandbank started my love for Egypt when I was a kid. Going to Egypt had been on my bucket list for years. It was probably the very first country I even put on my list. Last February I finally got to go. I got home on March 8 and consider myself very lucky that I made it home before all the travel problems really happened and things shut down.
    It truly was an amazing experience, but I have to say that the great pyramids and the Sphinx were my least favorite part, even though they are the most iconic. I really loved the Valley of the Kings and the temples at Abydos and Dendera. I think it’s amazing that they are still finding incredible things buried in the desert.

    Reply
  22. Crocodile on the Sandbank started my love for Egypt when I was a kid. Going to Egypt had been on my bucket list for years. It was probably the very first country I even put on my list. Last February I finally got to go. I got home on March 8 and consider myself very lucky that I made it home before all the travel problems really happened and things shut down.
    It truly was an amazing experience, but I have to say that the great pyramids and the Sphinx were my least favorite part, even though they are the most iconic. I really loved the Valley of the Kings and the temples at Abydos and Dendera. I think it’s amazing that they are still finding incredible things buried in the desert.

    Reply
  23. Crocodile on the Sandbank started my love for Egypt when I was a kid. Going to Egypt had been on my bucket list for years. It was probably the very first country I even put on my list. Last February I finally got to go. I got home on March 8 and consider myself very lucky that I made it home before all the travel problems really happened and things shut down.
    It truly was an amazing experience, but I have to say that the great pyramids and the Sphinx were my least favorite part, even though they are the most iconic. I really loved the Valley of the Kings and the temples at Abydos and Dendera. I think it’s amazing that they are still finding incredible things buried in the desert.

    Reply
  24. Crocodile on the Sandbank started my love for Egypt when I was a kid. Going to Egypt had been on my bucket list for years. It was probably the very first country I even put on my list. Last February I finally got to go. I got home on March 8 and consider myself very lucky that I made it home before all the travel problems really happened and things shut down.
    It truly was an amazing experience, but I have to say that the great pyramids and the Sphinx were my least favorite part, even though they are the most iconic. I really loved the Valley of the Kings and the temples at Abydos and Dendera. I think it’s amazing that they are still finding incredible things buried in the desert.

    Reply
  25. Crocodile on the Sandbank started my love for Egypt when I was a kid. Going to Egypt had been on my bucket list for years. It was probably the very first country I even put on my list. Last February I finally got to go. I got home on March 8 and consider myself very lucky that I made it home before all the travel problems really happened and things shut down.
    It truly was an amazing experience, but I have to say that the great pyramids and the Sphinx were my least favorite part, even though they are the most iconic. I really loved the Valley of the Kings and the temples at Abydos and Dendera. I think it’s amazing that they are still finding incredible things buried in the desert.

    Reply
  26. I loved the Pyramids and the boat museum they have of an ancient Egyptian vessel found in a pyramid, and put together from bits of wood.
    I am going to stay in the US and take a tour of National Parks.
    When it is safer after so many of us receive the vaccine, it will be easier to see the way more clearly to schedule this vacation.

    Reply
  27. I loved the Pyramids and the boat museum they have of an ancient Egyptian vessel found in a pyramid, and put together from bits of wood.
    I am going to stay in the US and take a tour of National Parks.
    When it is safer after so many of us receive the vaccine, it will be easier to see the way more clearly to schedule this vacation.

    Reply
  28. I loved the Pyramids and the boat museum they have of an ancient Egyptian vessel found in a pyramid, and put together from bits of wood.
    I am going to stay in the US and take a tour of National Parks.
    When it is safer after so many of us receive the vaccine, it will be easier to see the way more clearly to schedule this vacation.

    Reply
  29. I loved the Pyramids and the boat museum they have of an ancient Egyptian vessel found in a pyramid, and put together from bits of wood.
    I am going to stay in the US and take a tour of National Parks.
    When it is safer after so many of us receive the vaccine, it will be easier to see the way more clearly to schedule this vacation.

    Reply
  30. I loved the Pyramids and the boat museum they have of an ancient Egyptian vessel found in a pyramid, and put together from bits of wood.
    I am going to stay in the US and take a tour of National Parks.
    When it is safer after so many of us receive the vaccine, it will be easier to see the way more clearly to schedule this vacation.

    Reply
  31. When I was in school I ran across the book Mara Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw, and later her book Pharaoh – I read them both many times. When I got to university I signed up for Egyptian history and archaeology courses, even though I knew I didn’t have a prayer of ever getting to see Egypt in person. But it has been a lifelong interest for me, albeit an armchair one. They were a fascinating people, not least because in their culture women had property rights and priestesses wielded as much power as priests did.
    I suspect that Elizabeth Peters started off another generation of wannabe archaeologists. Novels are good for that 🙂

    Reply
  32. When I was in school I ran across the book Mara Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw, and later her book Pharaoh – I read them both many times. When I got to university I signed up for Egyptian history and archaeology courses, even though I knew I didn’t have a prayer of ever getting to see Egypt in person. But it has been a lifelong interest for me, albeit an armchair one. They were a fascinating people, not least because in their culture women had property rights and priestesses wielded as much power as priests did.
    I suspect that Elizabeth Peters started off another generation of wannabe archaeologists. Novels are good for that 🙂

    Reply
  33. When I was in school I ran across the book Mara Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw, and later her book Pharaoh – I read them both many times. When I got to university I signed up for Egyptian history and archaeology courses, even though I knew I didn’t have a prayer of ever getting to see Egypt in person. But it has been a lifelong interest for me, albeit an armchair one. They were a fascinating people, not least because in their culture women had property rights and priestesses wielded as much power as priests did.
    I suspect that Elizabeth Peters started off another generation of wannabe archaeologists. Novels are good for that 🙂

    Reply
  34. When I was in school I ran across the book Mara Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw, and later her book Pharaoh – I read them both many times. When I got to university I signed up for Egyptian history and archaeology courses, even though I knew I didn’t have a prayer of ever getting to see Egypt in person. But it has been a lifelong interest for me, albeit an armchair one. They were a fascinating people, not least because in their culture women had property rights and priestesses wielded as much power as priests did.
    I suspect that Elizabeth Peters started off another generation of wannabe archaeologists. Novels are good for that 🙂

    Reply
  35. When I was in school I ran across the book Mara Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw, and later her book Pharaoh – I read them both many times. When I got to university I signed up for Egyptian history and archaeology courses, even though I knew I didn’t have a prayer of ever getting to see Egypt in person. But it has been a lifelong interest for me, albeit an armchair one. They were a fascinating people, not least because in their culture women had property rights and priestesses wielded as much power as priests did.
    I suspect that Elizabeth Peters started off another generation of wannabe archaeologists. Novels are good for that 🙂

    Reply
  36. I’m having a little lol at myself. I saw the photo of the women next to the sphinx and thought, “Wait, Is the sphinx really that small? Have I missed something?” I of course hopped over to Google, which told me it’s 240 ft long. So, was it a matter of perspective? I came back to the photograph and went, “Doh! THIS sphinx has a nose. THE Sphinx does NOT have a nose.” Small copy! Problem solved! Haha on me.
    I passed up a chance to go to Egypt around 2009, probably because I have a sun allergy and am not very physical. Also, like Mary Jo, it’s east Asia that calls to me. But if I’d read the wonderful Amelia Peabidy adventures back then, I might have chosen differently. Too late now. I traveled till it wore me down and out. I should start younger in my next incarnation.

    Reply
  37. I’m having a little lol at myself. I saw the photo of the women next to the sphinx and thought, “Wait, Is the sphinx really that small? Have I missed something?” I of course hopped over to Google, which told me it’s 240 ft long. So, was it a matter of perspective? I came back to the photograph and went, “Doh! THIS sphinx has a nose. THE Sphinx does NOT have a nose.” Small copy! Problem solved! Haha on me.
    I passed up a chance to go to Egypt around 2009, probably because I have a sun allergy and am not very physical. Also, like Mary Jo, it’s east Asia that calls to me. But if I’d read the wonderful Amelia Peabidy adventures back then, I might have chosen differently. Too late now. I traveled till it wore me down and out. I should start younger in my next incarnation.

    Reply
  38. I’m having a little lol at myself. I saw the photo of the women next to the sphinx and thought, “Wait, Is the sphinx really that small? Have I missed something?” I of course hopped over to Google, which told me it’s 240 ft long. So, was it a matter of perspective? I came back to the photograph and went, “Doh! THIS sphinx has a nose. THE Sphinx does NOT have a nose.” Small copy! Problem solved! Haha on me.
    I passed up a chance to go to Egypt around 2009, probably because I have a sun allergy and am not very physical. Also, like Mary Jo, it’s east Asia that calls to me. But if I’d read the wonderful Amelia Peabidy adventures back then, I might have chosen differently. Too late now. I traveled till it wore me down and out. I should start younger in my next incarnation.

    Reply
  39. I’m having a little lol at myself. I saw the photo of the women next to the sphinx and thought, “Wait, Is the sphinx really that small? Have I missed something?” I of course hopped over to Google, which told me it’s 240 ft long. So, was it a matter of perspective? I came back to the photograph and went, “Doh! THIS sphinx has a nose. THE Sphinx does NOT have a nose.” Small copy! Problem solved! Haha on me.
    I passed up a chance to go to Egypt around 2009, probably because I have a sun allergy and am not very physical. Also, like Mary Jo, it’s east Asia that calls to me. But if I’d read the wonderful Amelia Peabidy adventures back then, I might have chosen differently. Too late now. I traveled till it wore me down and out. I should start younger in my next incarnation.

    Reply
  40. I’m having a little lol at myself. I saw the photo of the women next to the sphinx and thought, “Wait, Is the sphinx really that small? Have I missed something?” I of course hopped over to Google, which told me it’s 240 ft long. So, was it a matter of perspective? I came back to the photograph and went, “Doh! THIS sphinx has a nose. THE Sphinx does NOT have a nose.” Small copy! Problem solved! Haha on me.
    I passed up a chance to go to Egypt around 2009, probably because I have a sun allergy and am not very physical. Also, like Mary Jo, it’s east Asia that calls to me. But if I’d read the wonderful Amelia Peabidy adventures back then, I might have chosen differently. Too late now. I traveled till it wore me down and out. I should start younger in my next incarnation.

    Reply
  41. Janice, it’s really interesting how many of us were captivated by ancient Egypt when young. The pyramids and mummies appeal to youthful imagination, but it’s also very interesting that you point out how women had power. Maybe that appealed to us as we grew older.
    I totally agree that Elizabeth Peters got many readers interested in archeology. It’s like Queen’s Gambit—I bet a lot of young people have taken up chess!

    Reply
  42. Janice, it’s really interesting how many of us were captivated by ancient Egypt when young. The pyramids and mummies appeal to youthful imagination, but it’s also very interesting that you point out how women had power. Maybe that appealed to us as we grew older.
    I totally agree that Elizabeth Peters got many readers interested in archeology. It’s like Queen’s Gambit—I bet a lot of young people have taken up chess!

    Reply
  43. Janice, it’s really interesting how many of us were captivated by ancient Egypt when young. The pyramids and mummies appeal to youthful imagination, but it’s also very interesting that you point out how women had power. Maybe that appealed to us as we grew older.
    I totally agree that Elizabeth Peters got many readers interested in archeology. It’s like Queen’s Gambit—I bet a lot of young people have taken up chess!

    Reply
  44. Janice, it’s really interesting how many of us were captivated by ancient Egypt when young. The pyramids and mummies appeal to youthful imagination, but it’s also very interesting that you point out how women had power. Maybe that appealed to us as we grew older.
    I totally agree that Elizabeth Peters got many readers interested in archeology. It’s like Queen’s Gambit—I bet a lot of young people have taken up chess!

    Reply
  45. Janice, it’s really interesting how many of us were captivated by ancient Egypt when young. The pyramids and mummies appeal to youthful imagination, but it’s also very interesting that you point out how women had power. Maybe that appealed to us as we grew older.
    I totally agree that Elizabeth Peters got many readers interested in archeology. It’s like Queen’s Gambit—I bet a lot of young people have taken up chess!

    Reply
  46. Ha, ha, Mary. Yes, the little sphinx is quite little! The real one is pretty majestic.
    I can see skipping Egypt if you have a sun allergy. It’s not for the faint of heart. There are SO many amazing places to see—Asia is a whole other realm of Wish List visits.
    We all will need to do a lot of running around in our next incarnation!

    Reply
  47. Ha, ha, Mary. Yes, the little sphinx is quite little! The real one is pretty majestic.
    I can see skipping Egypt if you have a sun allergy. It’s not for the faint of heart. There are SO many amazing places to see—Asia is a whole other realm of Wish List visits.
    We all will need to do a lot of running around in our next incarnation!

    Reply
  48. Ha, ha, Mary. Yes, the little sphinx is quite little! The real one is pretty majestic.
    I can see skipping Egypt if you have a sun allergy. It’s not for the faint of heart. There are SO many amazing places to see—Asia is a whole other realm of Wish List visits.
    We all will need to do a lot of running around in our next incarnation!

    Reply
  49. Ha, ha, Mary. Yes, the little sphinx is quite little! The real one is pretty majestic.
    I can see skipping Egypt if you have a sun allergy. It’s not for the faint of heart. There are SO many amazing places to see—Asia is a whole other realm of Wish List visits.
    We all will need to do a lot of running around in our next incarnation!

    Reply
  50. Ha, ha, Mary. Yes, the little sphinx is quite little! The real one is pretty majestic.
    I can see skipping Egypt if you have a sun allergy. It’s not for the faint of heart. There are SO many amazing places to see—Asia is a whole other realm of Wish List visits.
    We all will need to do a lot of running around in our next incarnation!

    Reply
  51. Inexplicably, our local historical society in Cleveland had a mummy on display for generations. He was relocated to another museum as not fitting into the mission of the museum (and being a bit grim), but I miss him.
    I have some fascinating photos from my grandmother’s favorite uncle who was in the Navy during the Spanish-American War era. I was told they were in China, but I do wonder they are from the Philippines. Now I am feeling motivated to try to figure out more about them. One is rather gruesome – not sure if it was an official execution or a murder victim.
    A lady would never have taken that shot (but apparently one preserved it since many of the other shots in the album are cute pictures of my grandmother as an infant and little girl.) Perhaps keeping that photo was related to the historic fascination with mummies.

    Reply
  52. Inexplicably, our local historical society in Cleveland had a mummy on display for generations. He was relocated to another museum as not fitting into the mission of the museum (and being a bit grim), but I miss him.
    I have some fascinating photos from my grandmother’s favorite uncle who was in the Navy during the Spanish-American War era. I was told they were in China, but I do wonder they are from the Philippines. Now I am feeling motivated to try to figure out more about them. One is rather gruesome – not sure if it was an official execution or a murder victim.
    A lady would never have taken that shot (but apparently one preserved it since many of the other shots in the album are cute pictures of my grandmother as an infant and little girl.) Perhaps keeping that photo was related to the historic fascination with mummies.

    Reply
  53. Inexplicably, our local historical society in Cleveland had a mummy on display for generations. He was relocated to another museum as not fitting into the mission of the museum (and being a bit grim), but I miss him.
    I have some fascinating photos from my grandmother’s favorite uncle who was in the Navy during the Spanish-American War era. I was told they were in China, but I do wonder they are from the Philippines. Now I am feeling motivated to try to figure out more about them. One is rather gruesome – not sure if it was an official execution or a murder victim.
    A lady would never have taken that shot (but apparently one preserved it since many of the other shots in the album are cute pictures of my grandmother as an infant and little girl.) Perhaps keeping that photo was related to the historic fascination with mummies.

    Reply
  54. Inexplicably, our local historical society in Cleveland had a mummy on display for generations. He was relocated to another museum as not fitting into the mission of the museum (and being a bit grim), but I miss him.
    I have some fascinating photos from my grandmother’s favorite uncle who was in the Navy during the Spanish-American War era. I was told they were in China, but I do wonder they are from the Philippines. Now I am feeling motivated to try to figure out more about them. One is rather gruesome – not sure if it was an official execution or a murder victim.
    A lady would never have taken that shot (but apparently one preserved it since many of the other shots in the album are cute pictures of my grandmother as an infant and little girl.) Perhaps keeping that photo was related to the historic fascination with mummies.

    Reply
  55. Inexplicably, our local historical society in Cleveland had a mummy on display for generations. He was relocated to another museum as not fitting into the mission of the museum (and being a bit grim), but I miss him.
    I have some fascinating photos from my grandmother’s favorite uncle who was in the Navy during the Spanish-American War era. I was told they were in China, but I do wonder they are from the Philippines. Now I am feeling motivated to try to figure out more about them. One is rather gruesome – not sure if it was an official execution or a murder victim.
    A lady would never have taken that shot (but apparently one preserved it since many of the other shots in the album are cute pictures of my grandmother as an infant and little girl.) Perhaps keeping that photo was related to the historic fascination with mummies.

    Reply
  56. First, I must thank you for the wonderful post and the marvelous family photos. Y’all must have had wonderful family discussions about all the history.
    If I could have traveled with Amelia, Emerson and their family, I probably would have loved to travel to Egypt.
    When Ms Metz died, I sent a note to her family. I happened to have some hippo stationery. I told them that I used it because I knew Amelia and Ms Metz would have loved it.
    I got a charming response saying that yes, they would have loved it.
    I had a job which gave me the opportunity to travel a lot within the States. I saw areas which were devastated by disasters. But, I also got to meet people. Lots and lots of people. Those were the most wonderful experiences and reminded me how terrific human beings are.
    Thanks again for the post and photos.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  57. First, I must thank you for the wonderful post and the marvelous family photos. Y’all must have had wonderful family discussions about all the history.
    If I could have traveled with Amelia, Emerson and their family, I probably would have loved to travel to Egypt.
    When Ms Metz died, I sent a note to her family. I happened to have some hippo stationery. I told them that I used it because I knew Amelia and Ms Metz would have loved it.
    I got a charming response saying that yes, they would have loved it.
    I had a job which gave me the opportunity to travel a lot within the States. I saw areas which were devastated by disasters. But, I also got to meet people. Lots and lots of people. Those were the most wonderful experiences and reminded me how terrific human beings are.
    Thanks again for the post and photos.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  58. First, I must thank you for the wonderful post and the marvelous family photos. Y’all must have had wonderful family discussions about all the history.
    If I could have traveled with Amelia, Emerson and their family, I probably would have loved to travel to Egypt.
    When Ms Metz died, I sent a note to her family. I happened to have some hippo stationery. I told them that I used it because I knew Amelia and Ms Metz would have loved it.
    I got a charming response saying that yes, they would have loved it.
    I had a job which gave me the opportunity to travel a lot within the States. I saw areas which were devastated by disasters. But, I also got to meet people. Lots and lots of people. Those were the most wonderful experiences and reminded me how terrific human beings are.
    Thanks again for the post and photos.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  59. First, I must thank you for the wonderful post and the marvelous family photos. Y’all must have had wonderful family discussions about all the history.
    If I could have traveled with Amelia, Emerson and their family, I probably would have loved to travel to Egypt.
    When Ms Metz died, I sent a note to her family. I happened to have some hippo stationery. I told them that I used it because I knew Amelia and Ms Metz would have loved it.
    I got a charming response saying that yes, they would have loved it.
    I had a job which gave me the opportunity to travel a lot within the States. I saw areas which were devastated by disasters. But, I also got to meet people. Lots and lots of people. Those were the most wonderful experiences and reminded me how terrific human beings are.
    Thanks again for the post and photos.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  60. First, I must thank you for the wonderful post and the marvelous family photos. Y’all must have had wonderful family discussions about all the history.
    If I could have traveled with Amelia, Emerson and their family, I probably would have loved to travel to Egypt.
    When Ms Metz died, I sent a note to her family. I happened to have some hippo stationery. I told them that I used it because I knew Amelia and Ms Metz would have loved it.
    I got a charming response saying that yes, they would have loved it.
    I had a job which gave me the opportunity to travel a lot within the States. I saw areas which were devastated by disasters. But, I also got to meet people. Lots and lots of people. Those were the most wonderful experiences and reminded me how terrific human beings are.
    Thanks again for the post and photos.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  61. What a wonderful post, Andrea – I adore those old photos! Your ancestors must have been so hot though, they are wearing so many layers of clothes. I am lucky enough to have visited Egypt and it was definitely a lot more crowded (too much so) and unbearably hot. The pyramids and the sphinx are still awesome though, and the Valley of the Kings as well. I hope you get to follow in your great-grandparents’ footsteps soon!

    Reply
  62. What a wonderful post, Andrea – I adore those old photos! Your ancestors must have been so hot though, they are wearing so many layers of clothes. I am lucky enough to have visited Egypt and it was definitely a lot more crowded (too much so) and unbearably hot. The pyramids and the sphinx are still awesome though, and the Valley of the Kings as well. I hope you get to follow in your great-grandparents’ footsteps soon!

    Reply
  63. What a wonderful post, Andrea – I adore those old photos! Your ancestors must have been so hot though, they are wearing so many layers of clothes. I am lucky enough to have visited Egypt and it was definitely a lot more crowded (too much so) and unbearably hot. The pyramids and the sphinx are still awesome though, and the Valley of the Kings as well. I hope you get to follow in your great-grandparents’ footsteps soon!

    Reply
  64. What a wonderful post, Andrea – I adore those old photos! Your ancestors must have been so hot though, they are wearing so many layers of clothes. I am lucky enough to have visited Egypt and it was definitely a lot more crowded (too much so) and unbearably hot. The pyramids and the sphinx are still awesome though, and the Valley of the Kings as well. I hope you get to follow in your great-grandparents’ footsteps soon!

    Reply
  65. What a wonderful post, Andrea – I adore those old photos! Your ancestors must have been so hot though, they are wearing so many layers of clothes. I am lucky enough to have visited Egypt and it was definitely a lot more crowded (too much so) and unbearably hot. The pyramids and the sphinx are still awesome though, and the Valley of the Kings as well. I hope you get to follow in your great-grandparents’ footsteps soon!

    Reply
  66. Wow, sounds like you have some really fascinating family photos, too. Your guess about the Philippines is a good one, as the U.S. Navy attacked Manila. And really interesting that the gruesome photos was kept in the scrapbooks. As you say, someone felt it was important to keep the record of history. These sorts of pictures do spark a curiosity to know more about family history.
    I hope the mummy found a good home!

    Reply
  67. Wow, sounds like you have some really fascinating family photos, too. Your guess about the Philippines is a good one, as the U.S. Navy attacked Manila. And really interesting that the gruesome photos was kept in the scrapbooks. As you say, someone felt it was important to keep the record of history. These sorts of pictures do spark a curiosity to know more about family history.
    I hope the mummy found a good home!

    Reply
  68. Wow, sounds like you have some really fascinating family photos, too. Your guess about the Philippines is a good one, as the U.S. Navy attacked Manila. And really interesting that the gruesome photos was kept in the scrapbooks. As you say, someone felt it was important to keep the record of history. These sorts of pictures do spark a curiosity to know more about family history.
    I hope the mummy found a good home!

    Reply
  69. Wow, sounds like you have some really fascinating family photos, too. Your guess about the Philippines is a good one, as the U.S. Navy attacked Manila. And really interesting that the gruesome photos was kept in the scrapbooks. As you say, someone felt it was important to keep the record of history. These sorts of pictures do spark a curiosity to know more about family history.
    I hope the mummy found a good home!

    Reply
  70. Wow, sounds like you have some really fascinating family photos, too. Your guess about the Philippines is a good one, as the U.S. Navy attacked Manila. And really interesting that the gruesome photos was kept in the scrapbooks. As you say, someone felt it was important to keep the record of history. These sorts of pictures do spark a curiosity to know more about family history.
    I hope the mummy found a good home!

    Reply
  71. Thanks, Christina! Yes, Thought about the brutal and those men and women dressed in their formal Western garb. They must have been horribly uncomfortable. (Though I guess the ladies had to wear those dusters to protect themselves from the blowing sand!)
    How lucky that you visited Egypt. I really do hope to make it sometime.

    Reply
  72. Thanks, Christina! Yes, Thought about the brutal and those men and women dressed in their formal Western garb. They must have been horribly uncomfortable. (Though I guess the ladies had to wear those dusters to protect themselves from the blowing sand!)
    How lucky that you visited Egypt. I really do hope to make it sometime.

    Reply
  73. Thanks, Christina! Yes, Thought about the brutal and those men and women dressed in their formal Western garb. They must have been horribly uncomfortable. (Though I guess the ladies had to wear those dusters to protect themselves from the blowing sand!)
    How lucky that you visited Egypt. I really do hope to make it sometime.

    Reply
  74. Thanks, Christina! Yes, Thought about the brutal and those men and women dressed in their formal Western garb. They must have been horribly uncomfortable. (Though I guess the ladies had to wear those dusters to protect themselves from the blowing sand!)
    How lucky that you visited Egypt. I really do hope to make it sometime.

    Reply
  75. Thanks, Christina! Yes, Thought about the brutal and those men and women dressed in their formal Western garb. They must have been horribly uncomfortable. (Though I guess the ladies had to wear those dusters to protect themselves from the blowing sand!)
    How lucky that you visited Egypt. I really do hope to make it sometime.

    Reply
  76. You just described my dream trip! I’ve wanted to visit Egypt since I was in elementary school. A Nile cruise, a stay at Mena House, visiting the archeological sites, all of it!

    Reply
  77. You just described my dream trip! I’ve wanted to visit Egypt since I was in elementary school. A Nile cruise, a stay at Mena House, visiting the archeological sites, all of it!

    Reply
  78. You just described my dream trip! I’ve wanted to visit Egypt since I was in elementary school. A Nile cruise, a stay at Mena House, visiting the archeological sites, all of it!

    Reply
  79. You just described my dream trip! I’ve wanted to visit Egypt since I was in elementary school. A Nile cruise, a stay at Mena House, visiting the archeological sites, all of it!

    Reply
  80. You just described my dream trip! I’ve wanted to visit Egypt since I was in elementary school. A Nile cruise, a stay at Mena House, visiting the archeological sites, all of it!

    Reply
  81. I would love to visit Egypt, and especially to sail down the Nile. It’s wonderful that you have such a great piece of family memorabilia. I am amazed at the sophisticated menu at the Mena House in 1914.
    For this year though, my traveling will probably be in the U.S., and maybe Canada if they ever open up the borders to Americans again, lol!

    Reply
  82. I would love to visit Egypt, and especially to sail down the Nile. It’s wonderful that you have such a great piece of family memorabilia. I am amazed at the sophisticated menu at the Mena House in 1914.
    For this year though, my traveling will probably be in the U.S., and maybe Canada if they ever open up the borders to Americans again, lol!

    Reply
  83. I would love to visit Egypt, and especially to sail down the Nile. It’s wonderful that you have such a great piece of family memorabilia. I am amazed at the sophisticated menu at the Mena House in 1914.
    For this year though, my traveling will probably be in the U.S., and maybe Canada if they ever open up the borders to Americans again, lol!

    Reply
  84. I would love to visit Egypt, and especially to sail down the Nile. It’s wonderful that you have such a great piece of family memorabilia. I am amazed at the sophisticated menu at the Mena House in 1914.
    For this year though, my traveling will probably be in the U.S., and maybe Canada if they ever open up the borders to Americans again, lol!

    Reply
  85. I would love to visit Egypt, and especially to sail down the Nile. It’s wonderful that you have such a great piece of family memorabilia. I am amazed at the sophisticated menu at the Mena House in 1914.
    For this year though, my traveling will probably be in the U.S., and maybe Canada if they ever open up the borders to Americans again, lol!

    Reply
  86. I think I must be an anomaly!! Egypt does not appeal to me at all. I’m not a sun person anyway. I do love history but somehow Egypt wouldn’t do it for me.
    One of my daughters LOVES the idea and would love to visit someday.
    Great post Andrea.

    Reply
  87. I think I must be an anomaly!! Egypt does not appeal to me at all. I’m not a sun person anyway. I do love history but somehow Egypt wouldn’t do it for me.
    One of my daughters LOVES the idea and would love to visit someday.
    Great post Andrea.

    Reply
  88. I think I must be an anomaly!! Egypt does not appeal to me at all. I’m not a sun person anyway. I do love history but somehow Egypt wouldn’t do it for me.
    One of my daughters LOVES the idea and would love to visit someday.
    Great post Andrea.

    Reply
  89. I think I must be an anomaly!! Egypt does not appeal to me at all. I’m not a sun person anyway. I do love history but somehow Egypt wouldn’t do it for me.
    One of my daughters LOVES the idea and would love to visit someday.
    Great post Andrea.

    Reply
  90. I think I must be an anomaly!! Egypt does not appeal to me at all. I’m not a sun person anyway. I do love history but somehow Egypt wouldn’t do it for me.
    One of my daughters LOVES the idea and would love to visit someday.
    Great post Andrea.

    Reply
  91. Well, I loved this post & all the pictures. I also love books about Egypt. It always seems so royal and mysterious. It would be so neat to see it in real life. My parents & some close friends have been there. I’ll have to enjoy it in books & pictures for the time being though because I really have no desire to travel these days!

    Reply
  92. Well, I loved this post & all the pictures. I also love books about Egypt. It always seems so royal and mysterious. It would be so neat to see it in real life. My parents & some close friends have been there. I’ll have to enjoy it in books & pictures for the time being though because I really have no desire to travel these days!

    Reply
  93. Well, I loved this post & all the pictures. I also love books about Egypt. It always seems so royal and mysterious. It would be so neat to see it in real life. My parents & some close friends have been there. I’ll have to enjoy it in books & pictures for the time being though because I really have no desire to travel these days!

    Reply
  94. Well, I loved this post & all the pictures. I also love books about Egypt. It always seems so royal and mysterious. It would be so neat to see it in real life. My parents & some close friends have been there. I’ll have to enjoy it in books & pictures for the time being though because I really have no desire to travel these days!

    Reply
  95. Well, I loved this post & all the pictures. I also love books about Egypt. It always seems so royal and mysterious. It would be so neat to see it in real life. My parents & some close friends have been there. I’ll have to enjoy it in books & pictures for the time being though because I really have no desire to travel these days!

    Reply

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