Aprons

Anne here, considering the humble apron. RegencyApron

When I was a kid, pretty much every woman I knew wore an apron when in the kitchen or elsewhere in the home. My maternal grandmother wore one almost all the time.  The apron wasn't just to protect her dress and to wipe her hands on, it carried all sorts of things; fruit and vegetables from the garden, fresh-laid eggs, pegs from the line, wood chips for the fire. When visitors came the apron would be whipped off, or if it was dirty, she'd pop on a fresh one. She had maybe a dozen aprons, some workaday, some pretty.

My mother, who was a professional woman, would get home from work, walk into the kitchen, put on an apron and get to work. She also had a number of different aprons, from the ones that covered her dress well, to pretty ones made from worn-out old dresses.  

Me? The truth is, I hardly ever put on an apron from one month to another.

SizzlersI own precisely three aprons — one of mum's, a pretty flowered thing that I remember her wearing and keep for sentimental reasons, one an apron—more like a pinafore, actually—that my sister sewed for me many years ago and which I actually use when I do use an apron, because it covers me from neck to mid-skirt length. The third apron is one a group of us had made up for a book launch of a collection of short stories that included recipes. Here we all are in our Sizzle, Seduce and Simmer aprons.

Is the apron a dying artefact? Apron&chook

For centuries, aprons have been an essential piece of clothing not only for women, but for anyone doing a messy job and needing their clothing to be protected. Butcher's apron anyone? Mostly they'd be made from some sturdy and practical fabric. 

BlacksilkapronsMostly aprons were woking women's garments, made of sturdy, washable linen or cotton, but for fine ladies who passed their time in craftwork—embroidery for instance—or for working women who worked in fashion but in the public eye (as in this picture of a millinery shop) the apron might be made of silk, often black silk, which showed up all the colorful little snipped-off threads, and which slipped easily off silk, instead of clinging to the fabric of their day clothes. EmbroideredApron

But for women, aprons have never been purely practical. Even when an apron was made from recycled fabric, like an old dress, women still wanted to look pretty, so some were embroidered and made with fancy edging and frills and whatnot.  Here's a pretty, embroidered vintage apron from this site.

WhimsicalApronSome aprons were made purely for decorative purposes — a fashion statement. Consider this 18th century dainty muslin and lace apron — it wouldn't protect her from a fly. It's there to look pretty and whimsical and fun.  VictorianMaid'sLace (1)

The classic white-over-black maid's uniform came in during the Victorian era — before that servants wore ordinary clothes, and a lady's maid would wear her mistresses cast-offs.

The lovely white lace-trimmed apron over the black maid's uniform shown at right was designed as much to show off that she was an upstairs maid and a status symbol to her employers as it was to protect her clothing.

If you look back through the decades, you can see the apron wax and wane in popularity through the 19th and 20th century.

UniformAs women took up professions such as nursing, the apron became an intrinsic part of their uniform, or the apron grew to become an overall, and eventually, a uniform.

Women in hospitality trades were sometimes dressed to look a bit like the maidservants of old, in aprons, and that too, grew to become a kind of uniform. EdwardianAprons

And aprons for housewives followed fashion. Compare these elegant Edwardian-era aprons with their 1920's counterparts.

1920'sApronsAfter WW2, when women who'd been working outside the home were being encouraged to go back to their kitchens and become domestic goddesses, the apron became tremendously elegant and fashionable and even sexy, and sewing patterns were designed and promoted. GlamorAprons

These days? I still see aprons for sale in shops occasionally, and I suppose there are people who buy them. I suspect they're often bought as gifts. Men get given barbecue aprons with funny or cheeky slogans and images on them, and brides might get an apron or two if they have a kitchen tea, but that's pretty rare now. I can't think when I last saw someone wearing an apron — unless it was a man in charge of a barbecue.

Is it because our clothes are not so precious now, and it's so easy to just toss them in the washing machine if they get soiled? Or throw them out and buy new ones? I think that's partly it. Though I think I'd happily wear one of those gorgeous 1920's aprons. Only maybe not as an apron.

So what about you? Do you wear aprons or not? Do you have memories of your mother or grandmother wearing them? Do you think there will be a time when the apron is just a historical artefact.

300 thoughts on “Aprons”

  1. What a lovely post. It makes me feel nostalgic. Aprons were common when I was young. Made me think of my mother, my grandma and my great aunt (like another grandma) who wore them. I even made one in high school but never wore it. By then we had an automatic washer and dryer and clothes were more plentiful.
    I’m old enough to remember a time when you did more with less. You had maybe only two real nice outfits and several everyday outfits so you wanted to keep them as nice as possible. We actually had a day that was devoted to wash. We had an electric washer but it was not automatic and, of course, no dryer. There was a lot of manual labor involved with doing a family wash. The next day was devoted to ironing.
    But oh, the aprons. I especially remember my aunt who lived on a farm. Hers were very utilitarian – lot of pockets. I remember she would hastily remove her apron if company came.
    Lovely post.

    Reply
  2. What a lovely post. It makes me feel nostalgic. Aprons were common when I was young. Made me think of my mother, my grandma and my great aunt (like another grandma) who wore them. I even made one in high school but never wore it. By then we had an automatic washer and dryer and clothes were more plentiful.
    I’m old enough to remember a time when you did more with less. You had maybe only two real nice outfits and several everyday outfits so you wanted to keep them as nice as possible. We actually had a day that was devoted to wash. We had an electric washer but it was not automatic and, of course, no dryer. There was a lot of manual labor involved with doing a family wash. The next day was devoted to ironing.
    But oh, the aprons. I especially remember my aunt who lived on a farm. Hers were very utilitarian – lot of pockets. I remember she would hastily remove her apron if company came.
    Lovely post.

    Reply
  3. What a lovely post. It makes me feel nostalgic. Aprons were common when I was young. Made me think of my mother, my grandma and my great aunt (like another grandma) who wore them. I even made one in high school but never wore it. By then we had an automatic washer and dryer and clothes were more plentiful.
    I’m old enough to remember a time when you did more with less. You had maybe only two real nice outfits and several everyday outfits so you wanted to keep them as nice as possible. We actually had a day that was devoted to wash. We had an electric washer but it was not automatic and, of course, no dryer. There was a lot of manual labor involved with doing a family wash. The next day was devoted to ironing.
    But oh, the aprons. I especially remember my aunt who lived on a farm. Hers were very utilitarian – lot of pockets. I remember she would hastily remove her apron if company came.
    Lovely post.

    Reply
  4. What a lovely post. It makes me feel nostalgic. Aprons were common when I was young. Made me think of my mother, my grandma and my great aunt (like another grandma) who wore them. I even made one in high school but never wore it. By then we had an automatic washer and dryer and clothes were more plentiful.
    I’m old enough to remember a time when you did more with less. You had maybe only two real nice outfits and several everyday outfits so you wanted to keep them as nice as possible. We actually had a day that was devoted to wash. We had an electric washer but it was not automatic and, of course, no dryer. There was a lot of manual labor involved with doing a family wash. The next day was devoted to ironing.
    But oh, the aprons. I especially remember my aunt who lived on a farm. Hers were very utilitarian – lot of pockets. I remember she would hastily remove her apron if company came.
    Lovely post.

    Reply
  5. What a lovely post. It makes me feel nostalgic. Aprons were common when I was young. Made me think of my mother, my grandma and my great aunt (like another grandma) who wore them. I even made one in high school but never wore it. By then we had an automatic washer and dryer and clothes were more plentiful.
    I’m old enough to remember a time when you did more with less. You had maybe only two real nice outfits and several everyday outfits so you wanted to keep them as nice as possible. We actually had a day that was devoted to wash. We had an electric washer but it was not automatic and, of course, no dryer. There was a lot of manual labor involved with doing a family wash. The next day was devoted to ironing.
    But oh, the aprons. I especially remember my aunt who lived on a farm. Hers were very utilitarian – lot of pockets. I remember she would hastily remove her apron if company came.
    Lovely post.

    Reply
  6. Thanks, Mary. I must confess I enjoy tales of everyday life in the past, and the details about ordinary things like aprons, and washing day, and the sheer amount of work that went into keeping clean and well dressed, let alone fed, that people in the past experienced. When I was little I used to pester Nan and Pop and my parents and older relatives for stories about the olden days. No wonder I became a writer of historicals. But I do enjoy feeding some of these small details in.

    Reply
  7. Thanks, Mary. I must confess I enjoy tales of everyday life in the past, and the details about ordinary things like aprons, and washing day, and the sheer amount of work that went into keeping clean and well dressed, let alone fed, that people in the past experienced. When I was little I used to pester Nan and Pop and my parents and older relatives for stories about the olden days. No wonder I became a writer of historicals. But I do enjoy feeding some of these small details in.

    Reply
  8. Thanks, Mary. I must confess I enjoy tales of everyday life in the past, and the details about ordinary things like aprons, and washing day, and the sheer amount of work that went into keeping clean and well dressed, let alone fed, that people in the past experienced. When I was little I used to pester Nan and Pop and my parents and older relatives for stories about the olden days. No wonder I became a writer of historicals. But I do enjoy feeding some of these small details in.

    Reply
  9. Thanks, Mary. I must confess I enjoy tales of everyday life in the past, and the details about ordinary things like aprons, and washing day, and the sheer amount of work that went into keeping clean and well dressed, let alone fed, that people in the past experienced. When I was little I used to pester Nan and Pop and my parents and older relatives for stories about the olden days. No wonder I became a writer of historicals. But I do enjoy feeding some of these small details in.

    Reply
  10. Thanks, Mary. I must confess I enjoy tales of everyday life in the past, and the details about ordinary things like aprons, and washing day, and the sheer amount of work that went into keeping clean and well dressed, let alone fed, that people in the past experienced. When I was little I used to pester Nan and Pop and my parents and older relatives for stories about the olden days. No wonder I became a writer of historicals. But I do enjoy feeding some of these small details in.

    Reply
  11. My mom and I sewed a couple of aprons about 15 years ago. I’ve hardly used them, except when I’ve dressed up as Amelia Bedelia for literacy day at school! My little boy (6) gets a little subscription box of trinkets for kids, mostly superheroes and Star Wars toys. In one box he got a Jedi in Training apron. He loved it. He insisted on wearing it while we did our Christmas baking, but that’s the only apron I’ve seen in use in years!

    Reply
  12. My mom and I sewed a couple of aprons about 15 years ago. I’ve hardly used them, except when I’ve dressed up as Amelia Bedelia for literacy day at school! My little boy (6) gets a little subscription box of trinkets for kids, mostly superheroes and Star Wars toys. In one box he got a Jedi in Training apron. He loved it. He insisted on wearing it while we did our Christmas baking, but that’s the only apron I’ve seen in use in years!

    Reply
  13. My mom and I sewed a couple of aprons about 15 years ago. I’ve hardly used them, except when I’ve dressed up as Amelia Bedelia for literacy day at school! My little boy (6) gets a little subscription box of trinkets for kids, mostly superheroes and Star Wars toys. In one box he got a Jedi in Training apron. He loved it. He insisted on wearing it while we did our Christmas baking, but that’s the only apron I’ve seen in use in years!

    Reply
  14. My mom and I sewed a couple of aprons about 15 years ago. I’ve hardly used them, except when I’ve dressed up as Amelia Bedelia for literacy day at school! My little boy (6) gets a little subscription box of trinkets for kids, mostly superheroes and Star Wars toys. In one box he got a Jedi in Training apron. He loved it. He insisted on wearing it while we did our Christmas baking, but that’s the only apron I’ve seen in use in years!

    Reply
  15. My mom and I sewed a couple of aprons about 15 years ago. I’ve hardly used them, except when I’ve dressed up as Amelia Bedelia for literacy day at school! My little boy (6) gets a little subscription box of trinkets for kids, mostly superheroes and Star Wars toys. In one box he got a Jedi in Training apron. He loved it. He insisted on wearing it while we did our Christmas baking, but that’s the only apron I’ve seen in use in years!

    Reply
  16. Hi Jana. I love the sound of your little boy in his jedi apron. Youve reminded me — I made a lovely cross-stitched apron at school the year we went to live in Scotland. I still have it somewhere, but Ive never worn it.

    Reply
  17. Hi Jana. I love the sound of your little boy in his jedi apron. Youve reminded me — I made a lovely cross-stitched apron at school the year we went to live in Scotland. I still have it somewhere, but Ive never worn it.

    Reply
  18. Hi Jana. I love the sound of your little boy in his jedi apron. Youve reminded me — I made a lovely cross-stitched apron at school the year we went to live in Scotland. I still have it somewhere, but Ive never worn it.

    Reply
  19. Hi Jana. I love the sound of your little boy in his jedi apron. Youve reminded me — I made a lovely cross-stitched apron at school the year we went to live in Scotland. I still have it somewhere, but Ive never worn it.

    Reply
  20. Hi Jana. I love the sound of your little boy in his jedi apron. Youve reminded me — I made a lovely cross-stitched apron at school the year we went to live in Scotland. I still have it somewhere, but Ive never worn it.

    Reply
  21. Thanks for a wonderful post. My main character (an elderly woman) will now be donning an apron. Faded from memory, but all the women in my family tree wore them – and I suspect if I had one which was amazing enough, I might wear it.

    Reply
  22. Thanks for a wonderful post. My main character (an elderly woman) will now be donning an apron. Faded from memory, but all the women in my family tree wore them – and I suspect if I had one which was amazing enough, I might wear it.

    Reply
  23. Thanks for a wonderful post. My main character (an elderly woman) will now be donning an apron. Faded from memory, but all the women in my family tree wore them – and I suspect if I had one which was amazing enough, I might wear it.

    Reply
  24. Thanks for a wonderful post. My main character (an elderly woman) will now be donning an apron. Faded from memory, but all the women in my family tree wore them – and I suspect if I had one which was amazing enough, I might wear it.

    Reply
  25. Thanks for a wonderful post. My main character (an elderly woman) will now be donning an apron. Faded from memory, but all the women in my family tree wore them – and I suspect if I had one which was amazing enough, I might wear it.

    Reply
  26. How well I recall my struggle to sew an apron, the first-semester project in the requisite (for girls, of course) seventh-grade sewing class, along with matching quilted potholders. The teacher had to help me finish on the last day of class. I have no recollection of ever wearing the thing, though. I eventually sewed well enough to make my daughter’s baby clothes, even an Easter dress and coat. Nowadays, sewing seems to have gone the way of the apron. Last year I tried to give a sewing machine to a women’s shelter, and no one wanted it!

    Reply
  27. How well I recall my struggle to sew an apron, the first-semester project in the requisite (for girls, of course) seventh-grade sewing class, along with matching quilted potholders. The teacher had to help me finish on the last day of class. I have no recollection of ever wearing the thing, though. I eventually sewed well enough to make my daughter’s baby clothes, even an Easter dress and coat. Nowadays, sewing seems to have gone the way of the apron. Last year I tried to give a sewing machine to a women’s shelter, and no one wanted it!

    Reply
  28. How well I recall my struggle to sew an apron, the first-semester project in the requisite (for girls, of course) seventh-grade sewing class, along with matching quilted potholders. The teacher had to help me finish on the last day of class. I have no recollection of ever wearing the thing, though. I eventually sewed well enough to make my daughter’s baby clothes, even an Easter dress and coat. Nowadays, sewing seems to have gone the way of the apron. Last year I tried to give a sewing machine to a women’s shelter, and no one wanted it!

    Reply
  29. How well I recall my struggle to sew an apron, the first-semester project in the requisite (for girls, of course) seventh-grade sewing class, along with matching quilted potholders. The teacher had to help me finish on the last day of class. I have no recollection of ever wearing the thing, though. I eventually sewed well enough to make my daughter’s baby clothes, even an Easter dress and coat. Nowadays, sewing seems to have gone the way of the apron. Last year I tried to give a sewing machine to a women’s shelter, and no one wanted it!

    Reply
  30. How well I recall my struggle to sew an apron, the first-semester project in the requisite (for girls, of course) seventh-grade sewing class, along with matching quilted potholders. The teacher had to help me finish on the last day of class. I have no recollection of ever wearing the thing, though. I eventually sewed well enough to make my daughter’s baby clothes, even an Easter dress and coat. Nowadays, sewing seems to have gone the way of the apron. Last year I tried to give a sewing machine to a women’s shelter, and no one wanted it!

    Reply
  31. I seem to be in the minority here since I frequently wear an apron. I think I learned this from my grandmother who had all those wonderful old aprons you mentioned. A lot of hers were made from flour sacks. She’s also the person who taught me to embroider on a gingham apron that she had made. It is one of my prized possessions. To me, aprons are almost a fashion accessory, even though they are functional.

    Reply
  32. I seem to be in the minority here since I frequently wear an apron. I think I learned this from my grandmother who had all those wonderful old aprons you mentioned. A lot of hers were made from flour sacks. She’s also the person who taught me to embroider on a gingham apron that she had made. It is one of my prized possessions. To me, aprons are almost a fashion accessory, even though they are functional.

    Reply
  33. I seem to be in the minority here since I frequently wear an apron. I think I learned this from my grandmother who had all those wonderful old aprons you mentioned. A lot of hers were made from flour sacks. She’s also the person who taught me to embroider on a gingham apron that she had made. It is one of my prized possessions. To me, aprons are almost a fashion accessory, even though they are functional.

    Reply
  34. I seem to be in the minority here since I frequently wear an apron. I think I learned this from my grandmother who had all those wonderful old aprons you mentioned. A lot of hers were made from flour sacks. She’s also the person who taught me to embroider on a gingham apron that she had made. It is one of my prized possessions. To me, aprons are almost a fashion accessory, even though they are functional.

    Reply
  35. I seem to be in the minority here since I frequently wear an apron. I think I learned this from my grandmother who had all those wonderful old aprons you mentioned. A lot of hers were made from flour sacks. She’s also the person who taught me to embroider on a gingham apron that she had made. It is one of my prized possessions. To me, aprons are almost a fashion accessory, even though they are functional.

    Reply
  36. I too (tried to) learn to sew in 7th grade. I never got as far as the apron. In 8th grade, for our cooking class, I brought one of my many aprons from home. (Actually, an apron in cooking class, when you return to regular classes later in the day, or ride public transportation home after class is over makes lots of sense. Kitchens DO equal spills, and why stay spattered the rest of the day?)
    But home, even back in the 1940s, I seldom wore aprons. And the older I get the less I wear them. I have two, one a black twill cooks apron I wear when kitchen work is apt to be messy; the other the tie-around-the-waist type I wear tied around the neck as a bib, when I’m eating spill-able meals on shaky hands days. I wear them so seldom, I only remember to launder them when I see they have gotten dusty.!

    Reply
  37. I too (tried to) learn to sew in 7th grade. I never got as far as the apron. In 8th grade, for our cooking class, I brought one of my many aprons from home. (Actually, an apron in cooking class, when you return to regular classes later in the day, or ride public transportation home after class is over makes lots of sense. Kitchens DO equal spills, and why stay spattered the rest of the day?)
    But home, even back in the 1940s, I seldom wore aprons. And the older I get the less I wear them. I have two, one a black twill cooks apron I wear when kitchen work is apt to be messy; the other the tie-around-the-waist type I wear tied around the neck as a bib, when I’m eating spill-able meals on shaky hands days. I wear them so seldom, I only remember to launder them when I see they have gotten dusty.!

    Reply
  38. I too (tried to) learn to sew in 7th grade. I never got as far as the apron. In 8th grade, for our cooking class, I brought one of my many aprons from home. (Actually, an apron in cooking class, when you return to regular classes later in the day, or ride public transportation home after class is over makes lots of sense. Kitchens DO equal spills, and why stay spattered the rest of the day?)
    But home, even back in the 1940s, I seldom wore aprons. And the older I get the less I wear them. I have two, one a black twill cooks apron I wear when kitchen work is apt to be messy; the other the tie-around-the-waist type I wear tied around the neck as a bib, when I’m eating spill-able meals on shaky hands days. I wear them so seldom, I only remember to launder them when I see they have gotten dusty.!

    Reply
  39. I too (tried to) learn to sew in 7th grade. I never got as far as the apron. In 8th grade, for our cooking class, I brought one of my many aprons from home. (Actually, an apron in cooking class, when you return to regular classes later in the day, or ride public transportation home after class is over makes lots of sense. Kitchens DO equal spills, and why stay spattered the rest of the day?)
    But home, even back in the 1940s, I seldom wore aprons. And the older I get the less I wear them. I have two, one a black twill cooks apron I wear when kitchen work is apt to be messy; the other the tie-around-the-waist type I wear tied around the neck as a bib, when I’m eating spill-able meals on shaky hands days. I wear them so seldom, I only remember to launder them when I see they have gotten dusty.!

    Reply
  40. I too (tried to) learn to sew in 7th grade. I never got as far as the apron. In 8th grade, for our cooking class, I brought one of my many aprons from home. (Actually, an apron in cooking class, when you return to regular classes later in the day, or ride public transportation home after class is over makes lots of sense. Kitchens DO equal spills, and why stay spattered the rest of the day?)
    But home, even back in the 1940s, I seldom wore aprons. And the older I get the less I wear them. I have two, one a black twill cooks apron I wear when kitchen work is apt to be messy; the other the tie-around-the-waist type I wear tied around the neck as a bib, when I’m eating spill-able meals on shaky hands days. I wear them so seldom, I only remember to launder them when I see they have gotten dusty.!

    Reply
  41. I love aprons, I still wear them. I grew up with my Mom, Aunts and Grandmother all wearing aprons. I love vintage aprons but wear plain with pockets. I know the apron is a relic of the past, but I still hold on to them.

    Reply
  42. I love aprons, I still wear them. I grew up with my Mom, Aunts and Grandmother all wearing aprons. I love vintage aprons but wear plain with pockets. I know the apron is a relic of the past, but I still hold on to them.

    Reply
  43. I love aprons, I still wear them. I grew up with my Mom, Aunts and Grandmother all wearing aprons. I love vintage aprons but wear plain with pockets. I know the apron is a relic of the past, but I still hold on to them.

    Reply
  44. I love aprons, I still wear them. I grew up with my Mom, Aunts and Grandmother all wearing aprons. I love vintage aprons but wear plain with pockets. I know the apron is a relic of the past, but I still hold on to them.

    Reply
  45. I love aprons, I still wear them. I grew up with my Mom, Aunts and Grandmother all wearing aprons. I love vintage aprons but wear plain with pockets. I know the apron is a relic of the past, but I still hold on to them.

    Reply
  46. In my family we definitely wear aprons when making Ukrainian food, or just baking in general. A lot of Ukrainian food uses heaps of flour (and then you have borscht, inconveniently made of bright red beetroot!), and the last time I went apron-free I made such a mess of my clothes they were unsalvageable!

    Reply
  47. In my family we definitely wear aprons when making Ukrainian food, or just baking in general. A lot of Ukrainian food uses heaps of flour (and then you have borscht, inconveniently made of bright red beetroot!), and the last time I went apron-free I made such a mess of my clothes they were unsalvageable!

    Reply
  48. In my family we definitely wear aprons when making Ukrainian food, or just baking in general. A lot of Ukrainian food uses heaps of flour (and then you have borscht, inconveniently made of bright red beetroot!), and the last time I went apron-free I made such a mess of my clothes they were unsalvageable!

    Reply
  49. In my family we definitely wear aprons when making Ukrainian food, or just baking in general. A lot of Ukrainian food uses heaps of flour (and then you have borscht, inconveniently made of bright red beetroot!), and the last time I went apron-free I made such a mess of my clothes they were unsalvageable!

    Reply
  50. In my family we definitely wear aprons when making Ukrainian food, or just baking in general. A lot of Ukrainian food uses heaps of flour (and then you have borscht, inconveniently made of bright red beetroot!), and the last time I went apron-free I made such a mess of my clothes they were unsalvageable!

    Reply
  51. I haven’t worn an apron since Home Economics in school (it was mandatory). My mother never wore an apron which is strange thinking back because every woman wore one. My aunt wore a cross over type of overall. I seldom saw her without it on. It was a navy blue flowery print and a lot of women wore them at the time.
    I too love looking at the history of social times. I always learn lots here.

    Reply
  52. I haven’t worn an apron since Home Economics in school (it was mandatory). My mother never wore an apron which is strange thinking back because every woman wore one. My aunt wore a cross over type of overall. I seldom saw her without it on. It was a navy blue flowery print and a lot of women wore them at the time.
    I too love looking at the history of social times. I always learn lots here.

    Reply
  53. I haven’t worn an apron since Home Economics in school (it was mandatory). My mother never wore an apron which is strange thinking back because every woman wore one. My aunt wore a cross over type of overall. I seldom saw her without it on. It was a navy blue flowery print and a lot of women wore them at the time.
    I too love looking at the history of social times. I always learn lots here.

    Reply
  54. I haven’t worn an apron since Home Economics in school (it was mandatory). My mother never wore an apron which is strange thinking back because every woman wore one. My aunt wore a cross over type of overall. I seldom saw her without it on. It was a navy blue flowery print and a lot of women wore them at the time.
    I too love looking at the history of social times. I always learn lots here.

    Reply
  55. I haven’t worn an apron since Home Economics in school (it was mandatory). My mother never wore an apron which is strange thinking back because every woman wore one. My aunt wore a cross over type of overall. I seldom saw her without it on. It was a navy blue flowery print and a lot of women wore them at the time.
    I too love looking at the history of social times. I always learn lots here.

    Reply
  56. My mother had an apron hanging in the pantry. I made a cobblers apron in Home eck. I used it when I baked bread until it fell apart. I have a barbecue apron that I got from my employer that I use now for messy cooking jobs.
    I can relate to the comment about laundry day also. I remember my mother setting the ironing board up in the kitchen by the door [catch a breeze in the summer] and doing the ironing while listening to a baseball game in the afternoon before starting dinner. [how long has it been since day baseball games were standard?]

    Reply
  57. My mother had an apron hanging in the pantry. I made a cobblers apron in Home eck. I used it when I baked bread until it fell apart. I have a barbecue apron that I got from my employer that I use now for messy cooking jobs.
    I can relate to the comment about laundry day also. I remember my mother setting the ironing board up in the kitchen by the door [catch a breeze in the summer] and doing the ironing while listening to a baseball game in the afternoon before starting dinner. [how long has it been since day baseball games were standard?]

    Reply
  58. My mother had an apron hanging in the pantry. I made a cobblers apron in Home eck. I used it when I baked bread until it fell apart. I have a barbecue apron that I got from my employer that I use now for messy cooking jobs.
    I can relate to the comment about laundry day also. I remember my mother setting the ironing board up in the kitchen by the door [catch a breeze in the summer] and doing the ironing while listening to a baseball game in the afternoon before starting dinner. [how long has it been since day baseball games were standard?]

    Reply
  59. My mother had an apron hanging in the pantry. I made a cobblers apron in Home eck. I used it when I baked bread until it fell apart. I have a barbecue apron that I got from my employer that I use now for messy cooking jobs.
    I can relate to the comment about laundry day also. I remember my mother setting the ironing board up in the kitchen by the door [catch a breeze in the summer] and doing the ironing while listening to a baseball game in the afternoon before starting dinner. [how long has it been since day baseball games were standard?]

    Reply
  60. My mother had an apron hanging in the pantry. I made a cobblers apron in Home eck. I used it when I baked bread until it fell apart. I have a barbecue apron that I got from my employer that I use now for messy cooking jobs.
    I can relate to the comment about laundry day also. I remember my mother setting the ironing board up in the kitchen by the door [catch a breeze in the summer] and doing the ironing while listening to a baseball game in the afternoon before starting dinner. [how long has it been since day baseball games were standard?]

    Reply
  61. Not just aprons—I can remember one of my great-aunts wearing house dresses, as opposed to “good” clothes for cleaning and all the other messy chores around the house. These weren’t necessarily ugly. Hers were made of Liberty of London lawn!
    As for aprons themselves, I always were one in the kitchen. I love to cook, but I manage to splatter and splash all the time, and every drop of grease that flies out of the frying m=pan aims straight for me. Since I don’t want to have to change my clothes every time I enter and leave the kitchen, I consider aprons a necessity.

    Reply
  62. Not just aprons—I can remember one of my great-aunts wearing house dresses, as opposed to “good” clothes for cleaning and all the other messy chores around the house. These weren’t necessarily ugly. Hers were made of Liberty of London lawn!
    As for aprons themselves, I always were one in the kitchen. I love to cook, but I manage to splatter and splash all the time, and every drop of grease that flies out of the frying m=pan aims straight for me. Since I don’t want to have to change my clothes every time I enter and leave the kitchen, I consider aprons a necessity.

    Reply
  63. Not just aprons—I can remember one of my great-aunts wearing house dresses, as opposed to “good” clothes for cleaning and all the other messy chores around the house. These weren’t necessarily ugly. Hers were made of Liberty of London lawn!
    As for aprons themselves, I always were one in the kitchen. I love to cook, but I manage to splatter and splash all the time, and every drop of grease that flies out of the frying m=pan aims straight for me. Since I don’t want to have to change my clothes every time I enter and leave the kitchen, I consider aprons a necessity.

    Reply
  64. Not just aprons—I can remember one of my great-aunts wearing house dresses, as opposed to “good” clothes for cleaning and all the other messy chores around the house. These weren’t necessarily ugly. Hers were made of Liberty of London lawn!
    As for aprons themselves, I always were one in the kitchen. I love to cook, but I manage to splatter and splash all the time, and every drop of grease that flies out of the frying m=pan aims straight for me. Since I don’t want to have to change my clothes every time I enter and leave the kitchen, I consider aprons a necessity.

    Reply
  65. Not just aprons—I can remember one of my great-aunts wearing house dresses, as opposed to “good” clothes for cleaning and all the other messy chores around the house. These weren’t necessarily ugly. Hers were made of Liberty of London lawn!
    As for aprons themselves, I always were one in the kitchen. I love to cook, but I manage to splatter and splash all the time, and every drop of grease that flies out of the frying m=pan aims straight for me. Since I don’t want to have to change my clothes every time I enter and leave the kitchen, I consider aprons a necessity.

    Reply
  66. I frequently wear an apron in the kitchen – I’m a messy cook! My most recent apron purchase was in the Pennsylvania Amish country where I bought a lovely black-and-white one with a patchwork square pocket. It coordinates with my black-and-white striped oven mitts.

    Reply
  67. I frequently wear an apron in the kitchen – I’m a messy cook! My most recent apron purchase was in the Pennsylvania Amish country where I bought a lovely black-and-white one with a patchwork square pocket. It coordinates with my black-and-white striped oven mitts.

    Reply
  68. I frequently wear an apron in the kitchen – I’m a messy cook! My most recent apron purchase was in the Pennsylvania Amish country where I bought a lovely black-and-white one with a patchwork square pocket. It coordinates with my black-and-white striped oven mitts.

    Reply
  69. I frequently wear an apron in the kitchen – I’m a messy cook! My most recent apron purchase was in the Pennsylvania Amish country where I bought a lovely black-and-white one with a patchwork square pocket. It coordinates with my black-and-white striped oven mitts.

    Reply
  70. I frequently wear an apron in the kitchen – I’m a messy cook! My most recent apron purchase was in the Pennsylvania Amish country where I bought a lovely black-and-white one with a patchwork square pocket. It coordinates with my black-and-white striped oven mitts.

    Reply
  71. I, too, made one, but for 4-H. I think I got a blue on it. I know I wore them a lot when I was a girl. Saturday was baking day. With a father and two brothers, I made a lot of goodies: usually two batches of cookies, a cake, and a pie. If I felt ambitious, I would make a batch of bread–some for bread and some for cinnamon rolls. I still would have flour on my backside where the apron didn’t cover. One of these days, I’m going to bake again. It’s just not the same when there’s not an appreciative, hungry audience.

    Reply
  72. I, too, made one, but for 4-H. I think I got a blue on it. I know I wore them a lot when I was a girl. Saturday was baking day. With a father and two brothers, I made a lot of goodies: usually two batches of cookies, a cake, and a pie. If I felt ambitious, I would make a batch of bread–some for bread and some for cinnamon rolls. I still would have flour on my backside where the apron didn’t cover. One of these days, I’m going to bake again. It’s just not the same when there’s not an appreciative, hungry audience.

    Reply
  73. I, too, made one, but for 4-H. I think I got a blue on it. I know I wore them a lot when I was a girl. Saturday was baking day. With a father and two brothers, I made a lot of goodies: usually two batches of cookies, a cake, and a pie. If I felt ambitious, I would make a batch of bread–some for bread and some for cinnamon rolls. I still would have flour on my backside where the apron didn’t cover. One of these days, I’m going to bake again. It’s just not the same when there’s not an appreciative, hungry audience.

    Reply
  74. I, too, made one, but for 4-H. I think I got a blue on it. I know I wore them a lot when I was a girl. Saturday was baking day. With a father and two brothers, I made a lot of goodies: usually two batches of cookies, a cake, and a pie. If I felt ambitious, I would make a batch of bread–some for bread and some for cinnamon rolls. I still would have flour on my backside where the apron didn’t cover. One of these days, I’m going to bake again. It’s just not the same when there’s not an appreciative, hungry audience.

    Reply
  75. I, too, made one, but for 4-H. I think I got a blue on it. I know I wore them a lot when I was a girl. Saturday was baking day. With a father and two brothers, I made a lot of goodies: usually two batches of cookies, a cake, and a pie. If I felt ambitious, I would make a batch of bread–some for bread and some for cinnamon rolls. I still would have flour on my backside where the apron didn’t cover. One of these days, I’m going to bake again. It’s just not the same when there’s not an appreciative, hungry audience.

    Reply
  76. I am a book sale volunteer and couldn’t function without my sturdy blue apron with two sturdy pockets for my tape, scissors, marker, glue,rubber bands, reading glasses and the other necessities. Almost forgot the candy bar. It has my name stitched on the bib. The last apron/paint rag before this was art class.

    Reply
  77. I am a book sale volunteer and couldn’t function without my sturdy blue apron with two sturdy pockets for my tape, scissors, marker, glue,rubber bands, reading glasses and the other necessities. Almost forgot the candy bar. It has my name stitched on the bib. The last apron/paint rag before this was art class.

    Reply
  78. I am a book sale volunteer and couldn’t function without my sturdy blue apron with two sturdy pockets for my tape, scissors, marker, glue,rubber bands, reading glasses and the other necessities. Almost forgot the candy bar. It has my name stitched on the bib. The last apron/paint rag before this was art class.

    Reply
  79. I am a book sale volunteer and couldn’t function without my sturdy blue apron with two sturdy pockets for my tape, scissors, marker, glue,rubber bands, reading glasses and the other necessities. Almost forgot the candy bar. It has my name stitched on the bib. The last apron/paint rag before this was art class.

    Reply
  80. I am a book sale volunteer and couldn’t function without my sturdy blue apron with two sturdy pockets for my tape, scissors, marker, glue,rubber bands, reading glasses and the other necessities. Almost forgot the candy bar. It has my name stitched on the bib. The last apron/paint rag before this was art class.

    Reply
  81. My Mom wore aprons a lot. I wear them sometimes, when I have company & am wearing better clothes. But most of the time I’m in clothes that have already met food stains.

    Reply
  82. My Mom wore aprons a lot. I wear them sometimes, when I have company & am wearing better clothes. But most of the time I’m in clothes that have already met food stains.

    Reply
  83. My Mom wore aprons a lot. I wear them sometimes, when I have company & am wearing better clothes. But most of the time I’m in clothes that have already met food stains.

    Reply
  84. My Mom wore aprons a lot. I wear them sometimes, when I have company & am wearing better clothes. But most of the time I’m in clothes that have already met food stains.

    Reply
  85. My Mom wore aprons a lot. I wear them sometimes, when I have company & am wearing better clothes. But most of the time I’m in clothes that have already met food stains.

    Reply
  86. Just remembering my country-town grandmother’s fabulous collection of beautiful, practical aprons. I’d forgotten about the ‘good apron’ business. The only times I ever saw my grandmother without an apron were when she went to the shops, went to get her hair done, or went ‘Visiting’ (the apron stayed firmly in place for casual visits to near neighbours on the same street)
    I hadn’t used aprons until Small Child came along – although I had used ‘art smocks’ in various forms quite a bit (usually sturdy, oversized t-shirts). Art smocks and aprons that go all around the body are essential items at our house now – they help stop the laundry basket from exploding!

    Reply
  87. Just remembering my country-town grandmother’s fabulous collection of beautiful, practical aprons. I’d forgotten about the ‘good apron’ business. The only times I ever saw my grandmother without an apron were when she went to the shops, went to get her hair done, or went ‘Visiting’ (the apron stayed firmly in place for casual visits to near neighbours on the same street)
    I hadn’t used aprons until Small Child came along – although I had used ‘art smocks’ in various forms quite a bit (usually sturdy, oversized t-shirts). Art smocks and aprons that go all around the body are essential items at our house now – they help stop the laundry basket from exploding!

    Reply
  88. Just remembering my country-town grandmother’s fabulous collection of beautiful, practical aprons. I’d forgotten about the ‘good apron’ business. The only times I ever saw my grandmother without an apron were when she went to the shops, went to get her hair done, or went ‘Visiting’ (the apron stayed firmly in place for casual visits to near neighbours on the same street)
    I hadn’t used aprons until Small Child came along – although I had used ‘art smocks’ in various forms quite a bit (usually sturdy, oversized t-shirts). Art smocks and aprons that go all around the body are essential items at our house now – they help stop the laundry basket from exploding!

    Reply
  89. Just remembering my country-town grandmother’s fabulous collection of beautiful, practical aprons. I’d forgotten about the ‘good apron’ business. The only times I ever saw my grandmother without an apron were when she went to the shops, went to get her hair done, or went ‘Visiting’ (the apron stayed firmly in place for casual visits to near neighbours on the same street)
    I hadn’t used aprons until Small Child came along – although I had used ‘art smocks’ in various forms quite a bit (usually sturdy, oversized t-shirts). Art smocks and aprons that go all around the body are essential items at our house now – they help stop the laundry basket from exploding!

    Reply
  90. Just remembering my country-town grandmother’s fabulous collection of beautiful, practical aprons. I’d forgotten about the ‘good apron’ business. The only times I ever saw my grandmother without an apron were when she went to the shops, went to get her hair done, or went ‘Visiting’ (the apron stayed firmly in place for casual visits to near neighbours on the same street)
    I hadn’t used aprons until Small Child came along – although I had used ‘art smocks’ in various forms quite a bit (usually sturdy, oversized t-shirts). Art smocks and aprons that go all around the body are essential items at our house now – they help stop the laundry basket from exploding!

    Reply
  91. Gail, I think my nana had some made from flour sacks, too. I love recycled things like that. I think if flour came in cloth bags, Id be making something out of them today. And how lovely to have the gingham apron you made together.

    Reply
  92. Gail, I think my nana had some made from flour sacks, too. I love recycled things like that. I think if flour came in cloth bags, Id be making something out of them today. And how lovely to have the gingham apron you made together.

    Reply
  93. Gail, I think my nana had some made from flour sacks, too. I love recycled things like that. I think if flour came in cloth bags, Id be making something out of them today. And how lovely to have the gingham apron you made together.

    Reply
  94. Gail, I think my nana had some made from flour sacks, too. I love recycled things like that. I think if flour came in cloth bags, Id be making something out of them today. And how lovely to have the gingham apron you made together.

    Reply
  95. Gail, I think my nana had some made from flour sacks, too. I love recycled things like that. I think if flour came in cloth bags, Id be making something out of them today. And how lovely to have the gingham apron you made together.

    Reply
  96. Sue, the apron I made in school in Scotland –a checked gingham apron with a Scottish thistle embroidered in cross stitch — and I was eight! Nobody in Australia believed Id made it when we came back — kids in Australia dont learn sewing at school until they start high school. And yes, I prefer an all-over apron, too — the only one I ever use is the one my sister made for me for a Christmas present many years ago.

    Reply
  97. Sue, the apron I made in school in Scotland –a checked gingham apron with a Scottish thistle embroidered in cross stitch — and I was eight! Nobody in Australia believed Id made it when we came back — kids in Australia dont learn sewing at school until they start high school. And yes, I prefer an all-over apron, too — the only one I ever use is the one my sister made for me for a Christmas present many years ago.

    Reply
  98. Sue, the apron I made in school in Scotland –a checked gingham apron with a Scottish thistle embroidered in cross stitch — and I was eight! Nobody in Australia believed Id made it when we came back — kids in Australia dont learn sewing at school until they start high school. And yes, I prefer an all-over apron, too — the only one I ever use is the one my sister made for me for a Christmas present many years ago.

    Reply
  99. Sue, the apron I made in school in Scotland –a checked gingham apron with a Scottish thistle embroidered in cross stitch — and I was eight! Nobody in Australia believed Id made it when we came back — kids in Australia dont learn sewing at school until they start high school. And yes, I prefer an all-over apron, too — the only one I ever use is the one my sister made for me for a Christmas present many years ago.

    Reply
  100. Sue, the apron I made in school in Scotland –a checked gingham apron with a Scottish thistle embroidered in cross stitch — and I was eight! Nobody in Australia believed Id made it when we came back — kids in Australia dont learn sewing at school until they start high school. And yes, I prefer an all-over apron, too — the only one I ever use is the one my sister made for me for a Christmas present many years ago.

    Reply
  101. Roseanna, I know I wondered if the apron was becoming a relic of the past, but I hope they dont die out. Im going to wear mine more often from now on — after Ive washed the dust of neglect off them. *g*

    Reply
  102. Roseanna, I know I wondered if the apron was becoming a relic of the past, but I hope they dont die out. Im going to wear mine more often from now on — after Ive washed the dust of neglect off them. *g*

    Reply
  103. Roseanna, I know I wondered if the apron was becoming a relic of the past, but I hope they dont die out. Im going to wear mine more often from now on — after Ive washed the dust of neglect off them. *g*

    Reply
  104. Roseanna, I know I wondered if the apron was becoming a relic of the past, but I hope they dont die out. Im going to wear mine more often from now on — after Ive washed the dust of neglect off them. *g*

    Reply
  105. Roseanna, I know I wondered if the apron was becoming a relic of the past, but I hope they dont die out. Im going to wear mine more often from now on — after Ive washed the dust of neglect off them. *g*

    Reply
  106. Mmmm borscht — yum. It is, of course, perfectly sensible to wear aprons — so its odd that people tend not to wear them nearly as much as in the past. For my grandmother and mother, an apron was an everyday necessity, for me, its more of an occasional thing. Pretty much the only time I wear mine is when Im preparing for a dinner party and have my good clothes underneath the apron.

    Reply
  107. Mmmm borscht — yum. It is, of course, perfectly sensible to wear aprons — so its odd that people tend not to wear them nearly as much as in the past. For my grandmother and mother, an apron was an everyday necessity, for me, its more of an occasional thing. Pretty much the only time I wear mine is when Im preparing for a dinner party and have my good clothes underneath the apron.

    Reply
  108. Mmmm borscht — yum. It is, of course, perfectly sensible to wear aprons — so its odd that people tend not to wear them nearly as much as in the past. For my grandmother and mother, an apron was an everyday necessity, for me, its more of an occasional thing. Pretty much the only time I wear mine is when Im preparing for a dinner party and have my good clothes underneath the apron.

    Reply
  109. Mmmm borscht — yum. It is, of course, perfectly sensible to wear aprons — so its odd that people tend not to wear them nearly as much as in the past. For my grandmother and mother, an apron was an everyday necessity, for me, its more of an occasional thing. Pretty much the only time I wear mine is when Im preparing for a dinner party and have my good clothes underneath the apron.

    Reply
  110. Mmmm borscht — yum. It is, of course, perfectly sensible to wear aprons — so its odd that people tend not to wear them nearly as much as in the past. For my grandmother and mother, an apron was an everyday necessity, for me, its more of an occasional thing. Pretty much the only time I wear mine is when Im preparing for a dinner party and have my good clothes underneath the apron.

    Reply
  111. Mary, I loved sewing my cross-stitched gingham Scottish thistle apron, but I struggled with knitting at school. I hated it. But Im shocked at the refusal of your sewing machine gift. I took Mums sewing machine to a community education group that I used to work at — still do a few things there — and which runs classes and groups for young people, immigrants, refugees, women etc — and the sewing machine was snapped up, and then shared around.

    Reply
  112. Mary, I loved sewing my cross-stitched gingham Scottish thistle apron, but I struggled with knitting at school. I hated it. But Im shocked at the refusal of your sewing machine gift. I took Mums sewing machine to a community education group that I used to work at — still do a few things there — and which runs classes and groups for young people, immigrants, refugees, women etc — and the sewing machine was snapped up, and then shared around.

    Reply
  113. Mary, I loved sewing my cross-stitched gingham Scottish thistle apron, but I struggled with knitting at school. I hated it. But Im shocked at the refusal of your sewing machine gift. I took Mums sewing machine to a community education group that I used to work at — still do a few things there — and which runs classes and groups for young people, immigrants, refugees, women etc — and the sewing machine was snapped up, and then shared around.

    Reply
  114. Mary, I loved sewing my cross-stitched gingham Scottish thistle apron, but I struggled with knitting at school. I hated it. But Im shocked at the refusal of your sewing machine gift. I took Mums sewing machine to a community education group that I used to work at — still do a few things there — and which runs classes and groups for young people, immigrants, refugees, women etc — and the sewing machine was snapped up, and then shared around.

    Reply
  115. Mary, I loved sewing my cross-stitched gingham Scottish thistle apron, but I struggled with knitting at school. I hated it. But Im shocked at the refusal of your sewing machine gift. I took Mums sewing machine to a community education group that I used to work at — still do a few things there — and which runs classes and groups for young people, immigrants, refugees, women etc — and the sewing machine was snapped up, and then shared around.

    Reply
  116. Teresa, I think if I had something as pretty and comfortable as those 1920s aprons, I might wear them — theyre almost overalls, I think. But maybe too pretty to get messed up with food stains and grease.

    Reply
  117. Teresa, I think if I had something as pretty and comfortable as those 1920s aprons, I might wear them — theyre almost overalls, I think. But maybe too pretty to get messed up with food stains and grease.

    Reply
  118. Teresa, I think if I had something as pretty and comfortable as those 1920s aprons, I might wear them — theyre almost overalls, I think. But maybe too pretty to get messed up with food stains and grease.

    Reply
  119. Teresa, I think if I had something as pretty and comfortable as those 1920s aprons, I might wear them — theyre almost overalls, I think. But maybe too pretty to get messed up with food stains and grease.

    Reply
  120. Teresa, I think if I had something as pretty and comfortable as those 1920s aprons, I might wear them — theyre almost overalls, I think. But maybe too pretty to get messed up with food stains and grease.

    Reply
  121. Anne, I suspect ironing is becoming, if not a thing of the past, a much less frequent domestic task. So many things are drip dry or perma press, or dont really need ironing unless youre going out — Im thinking t-shirts and similar garments here — not that we wear them to go out, I suppose.

    Reply
  122. Anne, I suspect ironing is becoming, if not a thing of the past, a much less frequent domestic task. So many things are drip dry or perma press, or dont really need ironing unless youre going out — Im thinking t-shirts and similar garments here — not that we wear them to go out, I suppose.

    Reply
  123. Anne, I suspect ironing is becoming, if not a thing of the past, a much less frequent domestic task. So many things are drip dry or perma press, or dont really need ironing unless youre going out — Im thinking t-shirts and similar garments here — not that we wear them to go out, I suppose.

    Reply
  124. Anne, I suspect ironing is becoming, if not a thing of the past, a much less frequent domestic task. So many things are drip dry or perma press, or dont really need ironing unless youre going out — Im thinking t-shirts and similar garments here — not that we wear them to go out, I suppose.

    Reply
  125. Anne, I suspect ironing is becoming, if not a thing of the past, a much less frequent domestic task. So many things are drip dry or perma press, or dont really need ironing unless youre going out — Im thinking t-shirts and similar garments here — not that we wear them to go out, I suppose.

    Reply
  126. Lillian, I’m a bit of a splatterer, too, but I usually wear a ratty old t-shirt when Im doing a messy job, and if it gets irretrievably stained it’s no big deal. Grease I can easily get out by tipping some pure eucalyptus oil on it, then some woolly wash liquid and into the machine in a hot wash. Works a treat.

    Reply
  127. Lillian, I’m a bit of a splatterer, too, but I usually wear a ratty old t-shirt when Im doing a messy job, and if it gets irretrievably stained it’s no big deal. Grease I can easily get out by tipping some pure eucalyptus oil on it, then some woolly wash liquid and into the machine in a hot wash. Works a treat.

    Reply
  128. Lillian, I’m a bit of a splatterer, too, but I usually wear a ratty old t-shirt when Im doing a messy job, and if it gets irretrievably stained it’s no big deal. Grease I can easily get out by tipping some pure eucalyptus oil on it, then some woolly wash liquid and into the machine in a hot wash. Works a treat.

    Reply
  129. Lillian, I’m a bit of a splatterer, too, but I usually wear a ratty old t-shirt when Im doing a messy job, and if it gets irretrievably stained it’s no big deal. Grease I can easily get out by tipping some pure eucalyptus oil on it, then some woolly wash liquid and into the machine in a hot wash. Works a treat.

    Reply
  130. Lillian, I’m a bit of a splatterer, too, but I usually wear a ratty old t-shirt when Im doing a messy job, and if it gets irretrievably stained it’s no big deal. Grease I can easily get out by tipping some pure eucalyptus oil on it, then some woolly wash liquid and into the machine in a hot wash. Works a treat.

    Reply
  131. Yes, some of those old-fashioned aprons were truly beautiful, Shannon. And of course, with an energetic littlie, and many fun, creative projects to be tackled, there is bound to be lots of mess — and fun — and smocks and coveralls and aprons become a necessity.

    Reply
  132. Yes, some of those old-fashioned aprons were truly beautiful, Shannon. And of course, with an energetic littlie, and many fun, creative projects to be tackled, there is bound to be lots of mess — and fun — and smocks and coveralls and aprons become a necessity.

    Reply
  133. Yes, some of those old-fashioned aprons were truly beautiful, Shannon. And of course, with an energetic littlie, and many fun, creative projects to be tackled, there is bound to be lots of mess — and fun — and smocks and coveralls and aprons become a necessity.

    Reply
  134. Yes, some of those old-fashioned aprons were truly beautiful, Shannon. And of course, with an energetic littlie, and many fun, creative projects to be tackled, there is bound to be lots of mess — and fun — and smocks and coveralls and aprons become a necessity.

    Reply
  135. Yes, some of those old-fashioned aprons were truly beautiful, Shannon. And of course, with an energetic littlie, and many fun, creative projects to be tackled, there is bound to be lots of mess — and fun — and smocks and coveralls and aprons become a necessity.

    Reply
  136. Shannon, I used to make bread a lot when I was in a student share house, but I got sick of hours of work being gobbled down in a few minutes. Recently I’ve taken bread baking up again and am enjoying it. I just tried a no-knead recipe that was easy and delicious.

    Reply
  137. Shannon, I used to make bread a lot when I was in a student share house, but I got sick of hours of work being gobbled down in a few minutes. Recently I’ve taken bread baking up again and am enjoying it. I just tried a no-knead recipe that was easy and delicious.

    Reply
  138. Shannon, I used to make bread a lot when I was in a student share house, but I got sick of hours of work being gobbled down in a few minutes. Recently I’ve taken bread baking up again and am enjoying it. I just tried a no-knead recipe that was easy and delicious.

    Reply
  139. Shannon, I used to make bread a lot when I was in a student share house, but I got sick of hours of work being gobbled down in a few minutes. Recently I’ve taken bread baking up again and am enjoying it. I just tried a no-knead recipe that was easy and delicious.

    Reply
  140. Shannon, I used to make bread a lot when I was in a student share house, but I got sick of hours of work being gobbled down in a few minutes. Recently I’ve taken bread baking up again and am enjoying it. I just tried a no-knead recipe that was easy and delicious.

    Reply
  141. Definitely use aprons. I can’t cook without them. Okay I can but then…I’m a mess. Even moving dishes from the sink to the dishwasher frequently requires an apron.
    I have a LOVELY selection of aprons and actually had to tell myself no more aprons for awhile. There are 8 that I use in rotation. During Christmas baking season, I can go through 1 a day.
    The one I made in 7th grade home Ec was one of those half aprons so I don’t really use it. I need a full bib one.
    My mom and grandmom’s didn’t use aprons as far as I know. I know I didn’t growing up. Not sure why or when I started wearing aprons. So does one sister and one niece.
    Aprons are still around – I see them at the fair (got several from different fairs.) I’ve seen them at JoAnn’s (craft and fabric store). Also, in catalogs and at one of the Super Kroger’s (grocery store) I go to. I also see them in museums in the gift shop and in the Antique/Junk mall places I go to from time to time.
    Maybe it is a more regional kind of thing? Because my sister, niece and I all live in Georgia and all of the places I’ve see aprons on a regular basis are in Georgia as well. Hmm…..interesting thought!
    Oh and love the post and all the comments as well.

    Reply
  142. Definitely use aprons. I can’t cook without them. Okay I can but then…I’m a mess. Even moving dishes from the sink to the dishwasher frequently requires an apron.
    I have a LOVELY selection of aprons and actually had to tell myself no more aprons for awhile. There are 8 that I use in rotation. During Christmas baking season, I can go through 1 a day.
    The one I made in 7th grade home Ec was one of those half aprons so I don’t really use it. I need a full bib one.
    My mom and grandmom’s didn’t use aprons as far as I know. I know I didn’t growing up. Not sure why or when I started wearing aprons. So does one sister and one niece.
    Aprons are still around – I see them at the fair (got several from different fairs.) I’ve seen them at JoAnn’s (craft and fabric store). Also, in catalogs and at one of the Super Kroger’s (grocery store) I go to. I also see them in museums in the gift shop and in the Antique/Junk mall places I go to from time to time.
    Maybe it is a more regional kind of thing? Because my sister, niece and I all live in Georgia and all of the places I’ve see aprons on a regular basis are in Georgia as well. Hmm…..interesting thought!
    Oh and love the post and all the comments as well.

    Reply
  143. Definitely use aprons. I can’t cook without them. Okay I can but then…I’m a mess. Even moving dishes from the sink to the dishwasher frequently requires an apron.
    I have a LOVELY selection of aprons and actually had to tell myself no more aprons for awhile. There are 8 that I use in rotation. During Christmas baking season, I can go through 1 a day.
    The one I made in 7th grade home Ec was one of those half aprons so I don’t really use it. I need a full bib one.
    My mom and grandmom’s didn’t use aprons as far as I know. I know I didn’t growing up. Not sure why or when I started wearing aprons. So does one sister and one niece.
    Aprons are still around – I see them at the fair (got several from different fairs.) I’ve seen them at JoAnn’s (craft and fabric store). Also, in catalogs and at one of the Super Kroger’s (grocery store) I go to. I also see them in museums in the gift shop and in the Antique/Junk mall places I go to from time to time.
    Maybe it is a more regional kind of thing? Because my sister, niece and I all live in Georgia and all of the places I’ve see aprons on a regular basis are in Georgia as well. Hmm…..interesting thought!
    Oh and love the post and all the comments as well.

    Reply
  144. Definitely use aprons. I can’t cook without them. Okay I can but then…I’m a mess. Even moving dishes from the sink to the dishwasher frequently requires an apron.
    I have a LOVELY selection of aprons and actually had to tell myself no more aprons for awhile. There are 8 that I use in rotation. During Christmas baking season, I can go through 1 a day.
    The one I made in 7th grade home Ec was one of those half aprons so I don’t really use it. I need a full bib one.
    My mom and grandmom’s didn’t use aprons as far as I know. I know I didn’t growing up. Not sure why or when I started wearing aprons. So does one sister and one niece.
    Aprons are still around – I see them at the fair (got several from different fairs.) I’ve seen them at JoAnn’s (craft and fabric store). Also, in catalogs and at one of the Super Kroger’s (grocery store) I go to. I also see them in museums in the gift shop and in the Antique/Junk mall places I go to from time to time.
    Maybe it is a more regional kind of thing? Because my sister, niece and I all live in Georgia and all of the places I’ve see aprons on a regular basis are in Georgia as well. Hmm…..interesting thought!
    Oh and love the post and all the comments as well.

    Reply
  145. Definitely use aprons. I can’t cook without them. Okay I can but then…I’m a mess. Even moving dishes from the sink to the dishwasher frequently requires an apron.
    I have a LOVELY selection of aprons and actually had to tell myself no more aprons for awhile. There are 8 that I use in rotation. During Christmas baking season, I can go through 1 a day.
    The one I made in 7th grade home Ec was one of those half aprons so I don’t really use it. I need a full bib one.
    My mom and grandmom’s didn’t use aprons as far as I know. I know I didn’t growing up. Not sure why or when I started wearing aprons. So does one sister and one niece.
    Aprons are still around – I see them at the fair (got several from different fairs.) I’ve seen them at JoAnn’s (craft and fabric store). Also, in catalogs and at one of the Super Kroger’s (grocery store) I go to. I also see them in museums in the gift shop and in the Antique/Junk mall places I go to from time to time.
    Maybe it is a more regional kind of thing? Because my sister, niece and I all live in Georgia and all of the places I’ve see aprons on a regular basis are in Georgia as well. Hmm…..interesting thought!
    Oh and love the post and all the comments as well.

    Reply
  146. Vicki, I wish I could see all your beautiful aprons, and I love that you love them. I think all these comments are renewing my appreciation of aprons in all their variety. My aprons are currently hanging on the line, drifting in the wind.

    Reply
  147. Vicki, I wish I could see all your beautiful aprons, and I love that you love them. I think all these comments are renewing my appreciation of aprons in all their variety. My aprons are currently hanging on the line, drifting in the wind.

    Reply
  148. Vicki, I wish I could see all your beautiful aprons, and I love that you love them. I think all these comments are renewing my appreciation of aprons in all their variety. My aprons are currently hanging on the line, drifting in the wind.

    Reply
  149. Vicki, I wish I could see all your beautiful aprons, and I love that you love them. I think all these comments are renewing my appreciation of aprons in all their variety. My aprons are currently hanging on the line, drifting in the wind.

    Reply
  150. Vicki, I wish I could see all your beautiful aprons, and I love that you love them. I think all these comments are renewing my appreciation of aprons in all their variety. My aprons are currently hanging on the line, drifting in the wind.

    Reply
  151. My first apron was one I made in 8th grade homemaking class. I still have it. It was made out of feed sack material. I had skirts made out of feed sacks too. The fabric was sturdy cotton and the patterns were generally attractive.
    I think it would be nice if we had aprons to put on and take off to show where we were and what we might be doing. Anne could have an apron with a pattern of type face.

    Reply
  152. My first apron was one I made in 8th grade homemaking class. I still have it. It was made out of feed sack material. I had skirts made out of feed sacks too. The fabric was sturdy cotton and the patterns were generally attractive.
    I think it would be nice if we had aprons to put on and take off to show where we were and what we might be doing. Anne could have an apron with a pattern of type face.

    Reply
  153. My first apron was one I made in 8th grade homemaking class. I still have it. It was made out of feed sack material. I had skirts made out of feed sacks too. The fabric was sturdy cotton and the patterns were generally attractive.
    I think it would be nice if we had aprons to put on and take off to show where we were and what we might be doing. Anne could have an apron with a pattern of type face.

    Reply
  154. My first apron was one I made in 8th grade homemaking class. I still have it. It was made out of feed sack material. I had skirts made out of feed sacks too. The fabric was sturdy cotton and the patterns were generally attractive.
    I think it would be nice if we had aprons to put on and take off to show where we were and what we might be doing. Anne could have an apron with a pattern of type face.

    Reply
  155. My first apron was one I made in 8th grade homemaking class. I still have it. It was made out of feed sack material. I had skirts made out of feed sacks too. The fabric was sturdy cotton and the patterns were generally attractive.
    I think it would be nice if we had aprons to put on and take off to show where we were and what we might be doing. Anne could have an apron with a pattern of type face.

    Reply
  156. Annette, I love that idea. I think I’d have a collage kind of apron, on a background of typeface, with other things collaged over it to reflect a range of interests — flowers, my dog, beads, friends, and books — lots of books. And then, of course, I would love my apron too much to ever wear it where it would get dirty. 😉

    Reply
  157. Annette, I love that idea. I think I’d have a collage kind of apron, on a background of typeface, with other things collaged over it to reflect a range of interests — flowers, my dog, beads, friends, and books — lots of books. And then, of course, I would love my apron too much to ever wear it where it would get dirty. 😉

    Reply
  158. Annette, I love that idea. I think I’d have a collage kind of apron, on a background of typeface, with other things collaged over it to reflect a range of interests — flowers, my dog, beads, friends, and books — lots of books. And then, of course, I would love my apron too much to ever wear it where it would get dirty. 😉

    Reply
  159. Annette, I love that idea. I think I’d have a collage kind of apron, on a background of typeface, with other things collaged over it to reflect a range of interests — flowers, my dog, beads, friends, and books — lots of books. And then, of course, I would love my apron too much to ever wear it where it would get dirty. 😉

    Reply
  160. Annette, I love that idea. I think I’d have a collage kind of apron, on a background of typeface, with other things collaged over it to reflect a range of interests — flowers, my dog, beads, friends, and books — lots of books. And then, of course, I would love my apron too much to ever wear it where it would get dirty. 😉

    Reply
  161. I have a couple of aprons that I will pull out for a long cooking session if it’s going to be messy or if I’m wearing something nice (ie for last minute things before a party) but I think you’re right Anne about it being much easier to wash clothes now. If I’m at home and dressed in at home clothes, the thought of getting a bit of flour on them doesn’t bother me. Though I have often wished I’d put one one when I get oil splatters. I need to hang one in the kitchen like my mum does. Though I suspect right now, dangling apron strings would be too much of a temptation for the new kitten. Mine aren’t very exciting ones…maybe we need to bring back pretty ones. With pockets 🙂

    Reply
  162. I have a couple of aprons that I will pull out for a long cooking session if it’s going to be messy or if I’m wearing something nice (ie for last minute things before a party) but I think you’re right Anne about it being much easier to wash clothes now. If I’m at home and dressed in at home clothes, the thought of getting a bit of flour on them doesn’t bother me. Though I have often wished I’d put one one when I get oil splatters. I need to hang one in the kitchen like my mum does. Though I suspect right now, dangling apron strings would be too much of a temptation for the new kitten. Mine aren’t very exciting ones…maybe we need to bring back pretty ones. With pockets 🙂

    Reply
  163. I have a couple of aprons that I will pull out for a long cooking session if it’s going to be messy or if I’m wearing something nice (ie for last minute things before a party) but I think you’re right Anne about it being much easier to wash clothes now. If I’m at home and dressed in at home clothes, the thought of getting a bit of flour on them doesn’t bother me. Though I have often wished I’d put one one when I get oil splatters. I need to hang one in the kitchen like my mum does. Though I suspect right now, dangling apron strings would be too much of a temptation for the new kitten. Mine aren’t very exciting ones…maybe we need to bring back pretty ones. With pockets 🙂

    Reply
  164. I have a couple of aprons that I will pull out for a long cooking session if it’s going to be messy or if I’m wearing something nice (ie for last minute things before a party) but I think you’re right Anne about it being much easier to wash clothes now. If I’m at home and dressed in at home clothes, the thought of getting a bit of flour on them doesn’t bother me. Though I have often wished I’d put one one when I get oil splatters. I need to hang one in the kitchen like my mum does. Though I suspect right now, dangling apron strings would be too much of a temptation for the new kitten. Mine aren’t very exciting ones…maybe we need to bring back pretty ones. With pockets 🙂

    Reply
  165. I have a couple of aprons that I will pull out for a long cooking session if it’s going to be messy or if I’m wearing something nice (ie for last minute things before a party) but I think you’re right Anne about it being much easier to wash clothes now. If I’m at home and dressed in at home clothes, the thought of getting a bit of flour on them doesn’t bother me. Though I have often wished I’d put one one when I get oil splatters. I need to hang one in the kitchen like my mum does. Though I suspect right now, dangling apron strings would be too much of a temptation for the new kitten. Mine aren’t very exciting ones…maybe we need to bring back pretty ones. With pockets 🙂

    Reply
  166. I recently bought two aprons because I’m a messy cook especially when cooking cakes or pastry. I like using them. Somehow they give me more confidence when cooking.

    Reply
  167. I recently bought two aprons because I’m a messy cook especially when cooking cakes or pastry. I like using them. Somehow they give me more confidence when cooking.

    Reply
  168. I recently bought two aprons because I’m a messy cook especially when cooking cakes or pastry. I like using them. Somehow they give me more confidence when cooking.

    Reply
  169. I recently bought two aprons because I’m a messy cook especially when cooking cakes or pastry. I like using them. Somehow they give me more confidence when cooking.

    Reply
  170. I recently bought two aprons because I’m a messy cook especially when cooking cakes or pastry. I like using them. Somehow they give me more confidence when cooking.

    Reply
  171. Loved this post and all the responses. Brought back all sorts of memories of baking days, wash day, ironing day and of people. My neighbor across the road growing up was more of a grandmother than either of mine – one died when I was very young and the other lived some distance away. Lydia and I shared a love of reading even though she was many, many years older. She would check with my mom about whether she should let me read some of the “sexy” stuff. Kisses were about it. But my mind is full of memories of her now – always in her apron which she used as hot pad, towel, basket, whatever. My first thought as I began to read and noted the question of what other types of aprons are used – our farrier always wears a leather apron whether he is shoeing horses or just trimming. Thanks so much for such an interesting read.

    Reply
  172. Loved this post and all the responses. Brought back all sorts of memories of baking days, wash day, ironing day and of people. My neighbor across the road growing up was more of a grandmother than either of mine – one died when I was very young and the other lived some distance away. Lydia and I shared a love of reading even though she was many, many years older. She would check with my mom about whether she should let me read some of the “sexy” stuff. Kisses were about it. But my mind is full of memories of her now – always in her apron which she used as hot pad, towel, basket, whatever. My first thought as I began to read and noted the question of what other types of aprons are used – our farrier always wears a leather apron whether he is shoeing horses or just trimming. Thanks so much for such an interesting read.

    Reply
  173. Loved this post and all the responses. Brought back all sorts of memories of baking days, wash day, ironing day and of people. My neighbor across the road growing up was more of a grandmother than either of mine – one died when I was very young and the other lived some distance away. Lydia and I shared a love of reading even though she was many, many years older. She would check with my mom about whether she should let me read some of the “sexy” stuff. Kisses were about it. But my mind is full of memories of her now – always in her apron which she used as hot pad, towel, basket, whatever. My first thought as I began to read and noted the question of what other types of aprons are used – our farrier always wears a leather apron whether he is shoeing horses or just trimming. Thanks so much for such an interesting read.

    Reply
  174. Loved this post and all the responses. Brought back all sorts of memories of baking days, wash day, ironing day and of people. My neighbor across the road growing up was more of a grandmother than either of mine – one died when I was very young and the other lived some distance away. Lydia and I shared a love of reading even though she was many, many years older. She would check with my mom about whether she should let me read some of the “sexy” stuff. Kisses were about it. But my mind is full of memories of her now – always in her apron which she used as hot pad, towel, basket, whatever. My first thought as I began to read and noted the question of what other types of aprons are used – our farrier always wears a leather apron whether he is shoeing horses or just trimming. Thanks so much for such an interesting read.

    Reply
  175. Loved this post and all the responses. Brought back all sorts of memories of baking days, wash day, ironing day and of people. My neighbor across the road growing up was more of a grandmother than either of mine – one died when I was very young and the other lived some distance away. Lydia and I shared a love of reading even though she was many, many years older. She would check with my mom about whether she should let me read some of the “sexy” stuff. Kisses were about it. But my mind is full of memories of her now – always in her apron which she used as hot pad, towel, basket, whatever. My first thought as I began to read and noted the question of what other types of aprons are used – our farrier always wears a leather apron whether he is shoeing horses or just trimming. Thanks so much for such an interesting read.

    Reply
  176. Lovely, fun post Anne. I’m just adding more of the same most people are saying. Made me think of my darling Grandma, who always wore an apron. She made hers from old dresses, a cross-over design edged in bias tape (which always coordinated with the print. Those aprons were always worn over another print so the effect could sometimes be jarring, yet I think I must have gotten my love of mixing patterns from her when I was younger. In her day it was a day each for washing and ironing, and when I was quite young I loved helping with this. Her washing machine fascinated me, and I loved hanging clothes out on the line to dry….the smell!!! Ahhh.
    I am a dreadfully messy (or maybe enthusiastic?) cook and always wear an apron, it’s just a useful habit I enjoy I guess. But washing THOSE are a nightmare unless you put them in a sweater-sized washing bag before you toss them in the laundry, those darn ties! 🙂

    Reply
  177. Lovely, fun post Anne. I’m just adding more of the same most people are saying. Made me think of my darling Grandma, who always wore an apron. She made hers from old dresses, a cross-over design edged in bias tape (which always coordinated with the print. Those aprons were always worn over another print so the effect could sometimes be jarring, yet I think I must have gotten my love of mixing patterns from her when I was younger. In her day it was a day each for washing and ironing, and when I was quite young I loved helping with this. Her washing machine fascinated me, and I loved hanging clothes out on the line to dry….the smell!!! Ahhh.
    I am a dreadfully messy (or maybe enthusiastic?) cook and always wear an apron, it’s just a useful habit I enjoy I guess. But washing THOSE are a nightmare unless you put them in a sweater-sized washing bag before you toss them in the laundry, those darn ties! 🙂

    Reply
  178. Lovely, fun post Anne. I’m just adding more of the same most people are saying. Made me think of my darling Grandma, who always wore an apron. She made hers from old dresses, a cross-over design edged in bias tape (which always coordinated with the print. Those aprons were always worn over another print so the effect could sometimes be jarring, yet I think I must have gotten my love of mixing patterns from her when I was younger. In her day it was a day each for washing and ironing, and when I was quite young I loved helping with this. Her washing machine fascinated me, and I loved hanging clothes out on the line to dry….the smell!!! Ahhh.
    I am a dreadfully messy (or maybe enthusiastic?) cook and always wear an apron, it’s just a useful habit I enjoy I guess. But washing THOSE are a nightmare unless you put them in a sweater-sized washing bag before you toss them in the laundry, those darn ties! 🙂

    Reply
  179. Lovely, fun post Anne. I’m just adding more of the same most people are saying. Made me think of my darling Grandma, who always wore an apron. She made hers from old dresses, a cross-over design edged in bias tape (which always coordinated with the print. Those aprons were always worn over another print so the effect could sometimes be jarring, yet I think I must have gotten my love of mixing patterns from her when I was younger. In her day it was a day each for washing and ironing, and when I was quite young I loved helping with this. Her washing machine fascinated me, and I loved hanging clothes out on the line to dry….the smell!!! Ahhh.
    I am a dreadfully messy (or maybe enthusiastic?) cook and always wear an apron, it’s just a useful habit I enjoy I guess. But washing THOSE are a nightmare unless you put them in a sweater-sized washing bag before you toss them in the laundry, those darn ties! 🙂

    Reply
  180. Lovely, fun post Anne. I’m just adding more of the same most people are saying. Made me think of my darling Grandma, who always wore an apron. She made hers from old dresses, a cross-over design edged in bias tape (which always coordinated with the print. Those aprons were always worn over another print so the effect could sometimes be jarring, yet I think I must have gotten my love of mixing patterns from her when I was younger. In her day it was a day each for washing and ironing, and when I was quite young I loved helping with this. Her washing machine fascinated me, and I loved hanging clothes out on the line to dry….the smell!!! Ahhh.
    I am a dreadfully messy (or maybe enthusiastic?) cook and always wear an apron, it’s just a useful habit I enjoy I guess. But washing THOSE are a nightmare unless you put them in a sweater-sized washing bag before you toss them in the laundry, those darn ties! 🙂

    Reply
  181. Mum wore an apron for many, many years. It always had pockets and we never knew what would appear out of those pockets…hankies, string, band-aids, buttons and anything that a kid needed. One of the things that we all did was pull the apron strings open as we slipped past or if we snuck up on her to give her a surprise, like an unexpected visit. One day when she was well into her 80’s, I asked her why she never wore an apron any more. She looked at me, laughed and said, I don’t need anywhere to keep my tobacco, papers and matches anymore, so I don’t need to wear an apron.

    Reply
  182. Mum wore an apron for many, many years. It always had pockets and we never knew what would appear out of those pockets…hankies, string, band-aids, buttons and anything that a kid needed. One of the things that we all did was pull the apron strings open as we slipped past or if we snuck up on her to give her a surprise, like an unexpected visit. One day when she was well into her 80’s, I asked her why she never wore an apron any more. She looked at me, laughed and said, I don’t need anywhere to keep my tobacco, papers and matches anymore, so I don’t need to wear an apron.

    Reply
  183. Mum wore an apron for many, many years. It always had pockets and we never knew what would appear out of those pockets…hankies, string, band-aids, buttons and anything that a kid needed. One of the things that we all did was pull the apron strings open as we slipped past or if we snuck up on her to give her a surprise, like an unexpected visit. One day when she was well into her 80’s, I asked her why she never wore an apron any more. She looked at me, laughed and said, I don’t need anywhere to keep my tobacco, papers and matches anymore, so I don’t need to wear an apron.

    Reply
  184. Mum wore an apron for many, many years. It always had pockets and we never knew what would appear out of those pockets…hankies, string, band-aids, buttons and anything that a kid needed. One of the things that we all did was pull the apron strings open as we slipped past or if we snuck up on her to give her a surprise, like an unexpected visit. One day when she was well into her 80’s, I asked her why she never wore an apron any more. She looked at me, laughed and said, I don’t need anywhere to keep my tobacco, papers and matches anymore, so I don’t need to wear an apron.

    Reply
  185. Mum wore an apron for many, many years. It always had pockets and we never knew what would appear out of those pockets…hankies, string, band-aids, buttons and anything that a kid needed. One of the things that we all did was pull the apron strings open as we slipped past or if we snuck up on her to give her a surprise, like an unexpected visit. One day when she was well into her 80’s, I asked her why she never wore an apron any more. She looked at me, laughed and said, I don’t need anywhere to keep my tobacco, papers and matches anymore, so I don’t need to wear an apron.

    Reply
  186. …another thing that earlier posts reminded me of was washing day. We never had power on until 1966 when I was 10 years old, so all the washing was done by hand. Always on a Monday. It started early, with the copper being lit and the ‘smalls’ being washed, put through the wringer, rinsed and then put through the wringer again. These were pegged out then the shirts, pants, skirts and larger articles were washed the same way and pegged out. Then the sheets, these were always boiled in the copper with detergent, put through the wringer for first rinse, put back through the wringer and into second rinse which had the ‘blue’ in it. After a final trip through the wringer they were pegged out.
    When it was time for ironing, this was done with a flat iron heated on the top of the wood stove..we always had two, one for heating and one for using and the ironing was done on the kitchen table on an ironing blanket…an old blanket with a bit of old sheet on top.
    All I can say now, is thank heavens for electricity and modern conveniences!

    Reply
  187. …another thing that earlier posts reminded me of was washing day. We never had power on until 1966 when I was 10 years old, so all the washing was done by hand. Always on a Monday. It started early, with the copper being lit and the ‘smalls’ being washed, put through the wringer, rinsed and then put through the wringer again. These were pegged out then the shirts, pants, skirts and larger articles were washed the same way and pegged out. Then the sheets, these were always boiled in the copper with detergent, put through the wringer for first rinse, put back through the wringer and into second rinse which had the ‘blue’ in it. After a final trip through the wringer they were pegged out.
    When it was time for ironing, this was done with a flat iron heated on the top of the wood stove..we always had two, one for heating and one for using and the ironing was done on the kitchen table on an ironing blanket…an old blanket with a bit of old sheet on top.
    All I can say now, is thank heavens for electricity and modern conveniences!

    Reply
  188. …another thing that earlier posts reminded me of was washing day. We never had power on until 1966 when I was 10 years old, so all the washing was done by hand. Always on a Monday. It started early, with the copper being lit and the ‘smalls’ being washed, put through the wringer, rinsed and then put through the wringer again. These were pegged out then the shirts, pants, skirts and larger articles were washed the same way and pegged out. Then the sheets, these were always boiled in the copper with detergent, put through the wringer for first rinse, put back through the wringer and into second rinse which had the ‘blue’ in it. After a final trip through the wringer they were pegged out.
    When it was time for ironing, this was done with a flat iron heated on the top of the wood stove..we always had two, one for heating and one for using and the ironing was done on the kitchen table on an ironing blanket…an old blanket with a bit of old sheet on top.
    All I can say now, is thank heavens for electricity and modern conveniences!

    Reply
  189. …another thing that earlier posts reminded me of was washing day. We never had power on until 1966 when I was 10 years old, so all the washing was done by hand. Always on a Monday. It started early, with the copper being lit and the ‘smalls’ being washed, put through the wringer, rinsed and then put through the wringer again. These were pegged out then the shirts, pants, skirts and larger articles were washed the same way and pegged out. Then the sheets, these were always boiled in the copper with detergent, put through the wringer for first rinse, put back through the wringer and into second rinse which had the ‘blue’ in it. After a final trip through the wringer they were pegged out.
    When it was time for ironing, this was done with a flat iron heated on the top of the wood stove..we always had two, one for heating and one for using and the ironing was done on the kitchen table on an ironing blanket…an old blanket with a bit of old sheet on top.
    All I can say now, is thank heavens for electricity and modern conveniences!

    Reply
  190. …another thing that earlier posts reminded me of was washing day. We never had power on until 1966 when I was 10 years old, so all the washing was done by hand. Always on a Monday. It started early, with the copper being lit and the ‘smalls’ being washed, put through the wringer, rinsed and then put through the wringer again. These were pegged out then the shirts, pants, skirts and larger articles were washed the same way and pegged out. Then the sheets, these were always boiled in the copper with detergent, put through the wringer for first rinse, put back through the wringer and into second rinse which had the ‘blue’ in it. After a final trip through the wringer they were pegged out.
    When it was time for ironing, this was done with a flat iron heated on the top of the wood stove..we always had two, one for heating and one for using and the ironing was done on the kitchen table on an ironing blanket…an old blanket with a bit of old sheet on top.
    All I can say now, is thank heavens for electricity and modern conveniences!

    Reply
  191. I’ve read in so many old accounts that Monday was the traditional washing day. I’ve never understood why. I keep wondering what happened if Monday was rainy. Surely the best washing day would be whatever day the weather was perfect for it. My grandmother used to boil the sheets up in the copper, too. We are so lucky these days with all the modern conveniences.

    Reply
  192. I’ve read in so many old accounts that Monday was the traditional washing day. I’ve never understood why. I keep wondering what happened if Monday was rainy. Surely the best washing day would be whatever day the weather was perfect for it. My grandmother used to boil the sheets up in the copper, too. We are so lucky these days with all the modern conveniences.

    Reply
  193. I’ve read in so many old accounts that Monday was the traditional washing day. I’ve never understood why. I keep wondering what happened if Monday was rainy. Surely the best washing day would be whatever day the weather was perfect for it. My grandmother used to boil the sheets up in the copper, too. We are so lucky these days with all the modern conveniences.

    Reply
  194. I’ve read in so many old accounts that Monday was the traditional washing day. I’ve never understood why. I keep wondering what happened if Monday was rainy. Surely the best washing day would be whatever day the weather was perfect for it. My grandmother used to boil the sheets up in the copper, too. We are so lucky these days with all the modern conveniences.

    Reply
  195. I’ve read in so many old accounts that Monday was the traditional washing day. I’ve never understood why. I keep wondering what happened if Monday was rainy. Surely the best washing day would be whatever day the weather was perfect for it. My grandmother used to boil the sheets up in the copper, too. We are so lucky these days with all the modern conveniences.

    Reply
  196. Mel, the apron my sister made for me has no strings — it fastens over your shoulders, and you can leave it buttoned and just drop it over your head. And it has two big pockets. It’s a winner.

    Reply
  197. Mel, the apron my sister made for me has no strings — it fastens over your shoulders, and you can leave it buttoned and just drop it over your head. And it has two big pockets. It’s a winner.

    Reply
  198. Mel, the apron my sister made for me has no strings — it fastens over your shoulders, and you can leave it buttoned and just drop it over your head. And it has two big pockets. It’s a winner.

    Reply
  199. Mel, the apron my sister made for me has no strings — it fastens over your shoulders, and you can leave it buttoned and just drop it over your head. And it has two big pockets. It’s a winner.

    Reply
  200. Mel, the apron my sister made for me has no strings — it fastens over your shoulders, and you can leave it buttoned and just drop it over your head. And it has two big pockets. It’s a winner.

    Reply
  201. Yes, Jeanette, blacksmiths and farriers wear really heavy duty aprons, don’t they? Thanks for sharing your memories of Lydia in her apron. So nice that you had reading in common, too.

    Reply
  202. Yes, Jeanette, blacksmiths and farriers wear really heavy duty aprons, don’t they? Thanks for sharing your memories of Lydia in her apron. So nice that you had reading in common, too.

    Reply
  203. Yes, Jeanette, blacksmiths and farriers wear really heavy duty aprons, don’t they? Thanks for sharing your memories of Lydia in her apron. So nice that you had reading in common, too.

    Reply
  204. Yes, Jeanette, blacksmiths and farriers wear really heavy duty aprons, don’t they? Thanks for sharing your memories of Lydia in her apron. So nice that you had reading in common, too.

    Reply
  205. Yes, Jeanette, blacksmiths and farriers wear really heavy duty aprons, don’t they? Thanks for sharing your memories of Lydia in her apron. So nice that you had reading in common, too.

    Reply
  206. In my house, if it started raining after the wash had begun, cloth lines were strung all through the house, and the clothes were hung to dry inside. If it looked like rain beforehand, the wash was postponed to another day.
    I don’t know how I can look back so fondly on those days. I hated wash day at the time.

    Reply
  207. In my house, if it started raining after the wash had begun, cloth lines were strung all through the house, and the clothes were hung to dry inside. If it looked like rain beforehand, the wash was postponed to another day.
    I don’t know how I can look back so fondly on those days. I hated wash day at the time.

    Reply
  208. In my house, if it started raining after the wash had begun, cloth lines were strung all through the house, and the clothes were hung to dry inside. If it looked like rain beforehand, the wash was postponed to another day.
    I don’t know how I can look back so fondly on those days. I hated wash day at the time.

    Reply
  209. In my house, if it started raining after the wash had begun, cloth lines were strung all through the house, and the clothes were hung to dry inside. If it looked like rain beforehand, the wash was postponed to another day.
    I don’t know how I can look back so fondly on those days. I hated wash day at the time.

    Reply
  210. In my house, if it started raining after the wash had begun, cloth lines were strung all through the house, and the clothes were hung to dry inside. If it looked like rain beforehand, the wash was postponed to another day.
    I don’t know how I can look back so fondly on those days. I hated wash day at the time.

    Reply
  211. When I’m baking or cooking I most definitely wear an apron. And I wear my grandmother’s scarf, too, since I don’t want to find my own hairs in the food. Occasionally I also use an apron even when I’m making cards. Let’s just say I don’t want to get any ink or glue on my clothes any more than I want to get any flour or spatters from a pan on them.

    Reply
  212. When I’m baking or cooking I most definitely wear an apron. And I wear my grandmother’s scarf, too, since I don’t want to find my own hairs in the food. Occasionally I also use an apron even when I’m making cards. Let’s just say I don’t want to get any ink or glue on my clothes any more than I want to get any flour or spatters from a pan on them.

    Reply
  213. When I’m baking or cooking I most definitely wear an apron. And I wear my grandmother’s scarf, too, since I don’t want to find my own hairs in the food. Occasionally I also use an apron even when I’m making cards. Let’s just say I don’t want to get any ink or glue on my clothes any more than I want to get any flour or spatters from a pan on them.

    Reply
  214. When I’m baking or cooking I most definitely wear an apron. And I wear my grandmother’s scarf, too, since I don’t want to find my own hairs in the food. Occasionally I also use an apron even when I’m making cards. Let’s just say I don’t want to get any ink or glue on my clothes any more than I want to get any flour or spatters from a pan on them.

    Reply
  215. When I’m baking or cooking I most definitely wear an apron. And I wear my grandmother’s scarf, too, since I don’t want to find my own hairs in the food. Occasionally I also use an apron even when I’m making cards. Let’s just say I don’t want to get any ink or glue on my clothes any more than I want to get any flour or spatters from a pan on them.

    Reply
  216. They made us stitch up an apron in 7th grade, to be worn during cooking class the next semester. It was horrible. I haven’t used an apron since that day. If I felt the need for cover, I’d grab a dish towel.
    I hate aprons because the memory of that class is of a “this is your allotted box in life and you will stay in it or else” feeling, and from what I had seen of marriage, it was great for men but a treadmill trap for women. Now women do without marriage, and I wonder if they — and their children — are that much better off.
    The sf author Steven Barnes once defended the post WW2 “into the kitchen with you, forever” pressure by pointing out that if hundreds of thousands of young men had returned from the wars with no jobs available, there would have been social unrest on a scale theretofore unknown. So the women had to be got out of those jobs. With fewer defense contracts, the factories turned back to making consumer goods and the public was sold on domestic married life as the be-all and end-all of a woman’s life — whether that suited each and every individual woman or not. Or so the man said 🙂 I don’t know that it was a gigantic conspiracy, but that was the way it worked.
    My family were working class — my brother and I were the first to go to university, which we did because in California then it was so inexpensive that even we could afford it. My mother and her friends, and my brothers’ wives and their friends, all thought a woman had to get married to “be somebody” because she could get nowhere on her own (if she weren’t born rich). I remember my mother struggling just to open a department store charge account after she had been widowed. Getting married was what one did. Later on in life they revised their views a bit, when some of them went back to work to make ends meet or pay for their kids’ education.
    The past is a different country 🙂

    Reply
  217. They made us stitch up an apron in 7th grade, to be worn during cooking class the next semester. It was horrible. I haven’t used an apron since that day. If I felt the need for cover, I’d grab a dish towel.
    I hate aprons because the memory of that class is of a “this is your allotted box in life and you will stay in it or else” feeling, and from what I had seen of marriage, it was great for men but a treadmill trap for women. Now women do without marriage, and I wonder if they — and their children — are that much better off.
    The sf author Steven Barnes once defended the post WW2 “into the kitchen with you, forever” pressure by pointing out that if hundreds of thousands of young men had returned from the wars with no jobs available, there would have been social unrest on a scale theretofore unknown. So the women had to be got out of those jobs. With fewer defense contracts, the factories turned back to making consumer goods and the public was sold on domestic married life as the be-all and end-all of a woman’s life — whether that suited each and every individual woman or not. Or so the man said 🙂 I don’t know that it was a gigantic conspiracy, but that was the way it worked.
    My family were working class — my brother and I were the first to go to university, which we did because in California then it was so inexpensive that even we could afford it. My mother and her friends, and my brothers’ wives and their friends, all thought a woman had to get married to “be somebody” because she could get nowhere on her own (if she weren’t born rich). I remember my mother struggling just to open a department store charge account after she had been widowed. Getting married was what one did. Later on in life they revised their views a bit, when some of them went back to work to make ends meet or pay for their kids’ education.
    The past is a different country 🙂

    Reply
  218. They made us stitch up an apron in 7th grade, to be worn during cooking class the next semester. It was horrible. I haven’t used an apron since that day. If I felt the need for cover, I’d grab a dish towel.
    I hate aprons because the memory of that class is of a “this is your allotted box in life and you will stay in it or else” feeling, and from what I had seen of marriage, it was great for men but a treadmill trap for women. Now women do without marriage, and I wonder if they — and their children — are that much better off.
    The sf author Steven Barnes once defended the post WW2 “into the kitchen with you, forever” pressure by pointing out that if hundreds of thousands of young men had returned from the wars with no jobs available, there would have been social unrest on a scale theretofore unknown. So the women had to be got out of those jobs. With fewer defense contracts, the factories turned back to making consumer goods and the public was sold on domestic married life as the be-all and end-all of a woman’s life — whether that suited each and every individual woman or not. Or so the man said 🙂 I don’t know that it was a gigantic conspiracy, but that was the way it worked.
    My family were working class — my brother and I were the first to go to university, which we did because in California then it was so inexpensive that even we could afford it. My mother and her friends, and my brothers’ wives and their friends, all thought a woman had to get married to “be somebody” because she could get nowhere on her own (if she weren’t born rich). I remember my mother struggling just to open a department store charge account after she had been widowed. Getting married was what one did. Later on in life they revised their views a bit, when some of them went back to work to make ends meet or pay for their kids’ education.
    The past is a different country 🙂

    Reply
  219. They made us stitch up an apron in 7th grade, to be worn during cooking class the next semester. It was horrible. I haven’t used an apron since that day. If I felt the need for cover, I’d grab a dish towel.
    I hate aprons because the memory of that class is of a “this is your allotted box in life and you will stay in it or else” feeling, and from what I had seen of marriage, it was great for men but a treadmill trap for women. Now women do without marriage, and I wonder if they — and their children — are that much better off.
    The sf author Steven Barnes once defended the post WW2 “into the kitchen with you, forever” pressure by pointing out that if hundreds of thousands of young men had returned from the wars with no jobs available, there would have been social unrest on a scale theretofore unknown. So the women had to be got out of those jobs. With fewer defense contracts, the factories turned back to making consumer goods and the public was sold on domestic married life as the be-all and end-all of a woman’s life — whether that suited each and every individual woman or not. Or so the man said 🙂 I don’t know that it was a gigantic conspiracy, but that was the way it worked.
    My family were working class — my brother and I were the first to go to university, which we did because in California then it was so inexpensive that even we could afford it. My mother and her friends, and my brothers’ wives and their friends, all thought a woman had to get married to “be somebody” because she could get nowhere on her own (if she weren’t born rich). I remember my mother struggling just to open a department store charge account after she had been widowed. Getting married was what one did. Later on in life they revised their views a bit, when some of them went back to work to make ends meet or pay for their kids’ education.
    The past is a different country 🙂

    Reply
  220. They made us stitch up an apron in 7th grade, to be worn during cooking class the next semester. It was horrible. I haven’t used an apron since that day. If I felt the need for cover, I’d grab a dish towel.
    I hate aprons because the memory of that class is of a “this is your allotted box in life and you will stay in it or else” feeling, and from what I had seen of marriage, it was great for men but a treadmill trap for women. Now women do without marriage, and I wonder if they — and their children — are that much better off.
    The sf author Steven Barnes once defended the post WW2 “into the kitchen with you, forever” pressure by pointing out that if hundreds of thousands of young men had returned from the wars with no jobs available, there would have been social unrest on a scale theretofore unknown. So the women had to be got out of those jobs. With fewer defense contracts, the factories turned back to making consumer goods and the public was sold on domestic married life as the be-all and end-all of a woman’s life — whether that suited each and every individual woman or not. Or so the man said 🙂 I don’t know that it was a gigantic conspiracy, but that was the way it worked.
    My family were working class — my brother and I were the first to go to university, which we did because in California then it was so inexpensive that even we could afford it. My mother and her friends, and my brothers’ wives and their friends, all thought a woman had to get married to “be somebody” because she could get nowhere on her own (if she weren’t born rich). I remember my mother struggling just to open a department store charge account after she had been widowed. Getting married was what one did. Later on in life they revised their views a bit, when some of them went back to work to make ends meet or pay for their kids’ education.
    The past is a different country 🙂

    Reply
  221. It does feel more official somehow, when you’re wearing one to cook. We had to wear them for Home Ec at school, so maybe it’s the ghost of my very strict and cranky Home Ec teacher looking over my shoulder, telling me to read the recipe carefully 😀

    Reply
  222. It does feel more official somehow, when you’re wearing one to cook. We had to wear them for Home Ec at school, so maybe it’s the ghost of my very strict and cranky Home Ec teacher looking over my shoulder, telling me to read the recipe carefully 😀

    Reply
  223. It does feel more official somehow, when you’re wearing one to cook. We had to wear them for Home Ec at school, so maybe it’s the ghost of my very strict and cranky Home Ec teacher looking over my shoulder, telling me to read the recipe carefully 😀

    Reply
  224. It does feel more official somehow, when you’re wearing one to cook. We had to wear them for Home Ec at school, so maybe it’s the ghost of my very strict and cranky Home Ec teacher looking over my shoulder, telling me to read the recipe carefully 😀

    Reply
  225. It does feel more official somehow, when you’re wearing one to cook. We had to wear them for Home Ec at school, so maybe it’s the ghost of my very strict and cranky Home Ec teacher looking over my shoulder, telling me to read the recipe carefully 😀

    Reply
  226. I don’t know why Monday either. Maybe it was after you’d had a ‘rest’ day on Sunday and could tackle a big job? That said, I have particular days of the week when I tend to do certain chores, which are probably mostly the same days of the week as my Mum did them (and her Mum). We always did the big bedding/towels wash on Saturday. Probably because easier to get several loads done and remake all the beds on a day Mum wasn’t working (or we kids were around to help out) 😀

    Reply
  227. I don’t know why Monday either. Maybe it was after you’d had a ‘rest’ day on Sunday and could tackle a big job? That said, I have particular days of the week when I tend to do certain chores, which are probably mostly the same days of the week as my Mum did them (and her Mum). We always did the big bedding/towels wash on Saturday. Probably because easier to get several loads done and remake all the beds on a day Mum wasn’t working (or we kids were around to help out) 😀

    Reply
  228. I don’t know why Monday either. Maybe it was after you’d had a ‘rest’ day on Sunday and could tackle a big job? That said, I have particular days of the week when I tend to do certain chores, which are probably mostly the same days of the week as my Mum did them (and her Mum). We always did the big bedding/towels wash on Saturday. Probably because easier to get several loads done and remake all the beds on a day Mum wasn’t working (or we kids were around to help out) 😀

    Reply
  229. I don’t know why Monday either. Maybe it was after you’d had a ‘rest’ day on Sunday and could tackle a big job? That said, I have particular days of the week when I tend to do certain chores, which are probably mostly the same days of the week as my Mum did them (and her Mum). We always did the big bedding/towels wash on Saturday. Probably because easier to get several loads done and remake all the beds on a day Mum wasn’t working (or we kids were around to help out) 😀

    Reply
  230. I don’t know why Monday either. Maybe it was after you’d had a ‘rest’ day on Sunday and could tackle a big job? That said, I have particular days of the week when I tend to do certain chores, which are probably mostly the same days of the week as my Mum did them (and her Mum). We always did the big bedding/towels wash on Saturday. Probably because easier to get several loads done and remake all the beds on a day Mum wasn’t working (or we kids were around to help out) 😀

    Reply
  231. Anne, did you grow up near Chicago? The Cubs played all home games in the daytime until 1988 when they were the last team to install lights. It took them another 28 years to win the World Series!

    Reply
  232. Anne, did you grow up near Chicago? The Cubs played all home games in the daytime until 1988 when they were the last team to install lights. It took them another 28 years to win the World Series!

    Reply
  233. Anne, did you grow up near Chicago? The Cubs played all home games in the daytime until 1988 when they were the last team to install lights. It took them another 28 years to win the World Series!

    Reply
  234. Anne, did you grow up near Chicago? The Cubs played all home games in the daytime until 1988 when they were the last team to install lights. It took them another 28 years to win the World Series!

    Reply
  235. Anne, did you grow up near Chicago? The Cubs played all home games in the daytime until 1988 when they were the last team to install lights. It took them another 28 years to win the World Series!

    Reply
  236. I wear mine all the time. LOL I have one that was my gram’s and I wear it occasionally for the nostalgia but I have several that cover my clothes, some with very large pockets. Mostly made out of canvas and thick cotton. I bake and cook nearly everything from scratch so I cover my clothes to keep from wearing the ingredients and to keep from staining my clothes. I always have worn them, since my gram taught me to cook. I know it’s not normal anymore, but I’m not sure I know how to cook without them. 😉 I also used to use it when we had a house with a big garden. I could carry shears and gloves and things as I weeded and picked. I think I have 8 or 9. Love this history!

    Reply
  237. I wear mine all the time. LOL I have one that was my gram’s and I wear it occasionally for the nostalgia but I have several that cover my clothes, some with very large pockets. Mostly made out of canvas and thick cotton. I bake and cook nearly everything from scratch so I cover my clothes to keep from wearing the ingredients and to keep from staining my clothes. I always have worn them, since my gram taught me to cook. I know it’s not normal anymore, but I’m not sure I know how to cook without them. 😉 I also used to use it when we had a house with a big garden. I could carry shears and gloves and things as I weeded and picked. I think I have 8 or 9. Love this history!

    Reply
  238. I wear mine all the time. LOL I have one that was my gram’s and I wear it occasionally for the nostalgia but I have several that cover my clothes, some with very large pockets. Mostly made out of canvas and thick cotton. I bake and cook nearly everything from scratch so I cover my clothes to keep from wearing the ingredients and to keep from staining my clothes. I always have worn them, since my gram taught me to cook. I know it’s not normal anymore, but I’m not sure I know how to cook without them. 😉 I also used to use it when we had a house with a big garden. I could carry shears and gloves and things as I weeded and picked. I think I have 8 or 9. Love this history!

    Reply
  239. I wear mine all the time. LOL I have one that was my gram’s and I wear it occasionally for the nostalgia but I have several that cover my clothes, some with very large pockets. Mostly made out of canvas and thick cotton. I bake and cook nearly everything from scratch so I cover my clothes to keep from wearing the ingredients and to keep from staining my clothes. I always have worn them, since my gram taught me to cook. I know it’s not normal anymore, but I’m not sure I know how to cook without them. 😉 I also used to use it when we had a house with a big garden. I could carry shears and gloves and things as I weeded and picked. I think I have 8 or 9. Love this history!

    Reply
  240. I wear mine all the time. LOL I have one that was my gram’s and I wear it occasionally for the nostalgia but I have several that cover my clothes, some with very large pockets. Mostly made out of canvas and thick cotton. I bake and cook nearly everything from scratch so I cover my clothes to keep from wearing the ingredients and to keep from staining my clothes. I always have worn them, since my gram taught me to cook. I know it’s not normal anymore, but I’m not sure I know how to cook without them. 😉 I also used to use it when we had a house with a big garden. I could carry shears and gloves and things as I weeded and picked. I think I have 8 or 9. Love this history!

    Reply

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