Anne Stuart


Hi, this is Jo, delighted to be hosting my friend Anne Stuart at the Word Wenches. Anne is a bestselling romance author who's won many awards over a very long career. (She was first published at a very early age, she will assure you!) Though she is perhaps best known recently for her gritty contemporary romance, her earliest books were historicals,Lord Satan's Bride- Dell Candlelight – April 1981 and The Spinster and the Rake Dell Candlelight – July 1982

I think we can see that she was already exploring the challenging, dark-and-dangerous heroes back then. And now she's returning to historical romance — hurrah! — with a new trilogy set in the deliciously decadent Georgian age. Now here, in her own words, is Anne Stuart.

Annestuart

HEROES AND HEROINES

I
have three very beloved books, The House of Rohan trilogy, coming out this
summer and fall (plus a free, very short prequel, THE WICKED HOUSE OF ROHAN,
available for free download from Amazon, Harlequin, etc.)

(Click here to download and enjoy.)

Ruthless
RUTHLESS is already out and doing well, and
the second, RECKLESS,is just about to be released, with the final one,
BREATHLESS, comes out a month later, and then I can breathe again.  

Usually I’m off in another world by the time
books come out, but this time I’m still living and breathing the wicked Rohan
family, unwilling to let them go.  I recently did an
interview for an Italian website and one of their questions got me to thinking.

The question? 

What characteristics define your heroes and
heroines?

So here’s what I came up with:

For heroes:  

Self-honesty.  

No illusions about who and what he is.  I want a hero who’s
willing to look into the deepest, darkest part of his soul and not make
excuses.  He might think he’s worse than he
really is, but he doesn’t need the illusion that what he’s doing is necessarily
right and good in order for him to do it. 

My historical heroes are usually aristocrats (though one of my
favorites, Simon of Navarre, was a medieval wizard).  They have the money and position to do
exactly as they please, and society was less stringent in the Georgian
period.  They will seduce a woman simply
because they want her, with no concern as to how it might affect her in the
long run, ruined and possibly pregnant. 

In the trilogy, all three of my heroes are members of the Heavenly Host,
a fictionalized version of the Hellfire Club, where the motto is “do what thou
wilt.”  If it feels good, do it, and make
no excuses.

A willingness to
do whatever needs to be done if it's something he believes in or wants.

If he’s a jaded aristocrat who wants revenge and finds the heroine
to be the perfect vessel, he’ll do it, as The Scorpion does in BREATHLESS.  If he’s enraged on behalf on the woman he
loves he’ll kill whoever hurt her without a second thought.  He does what he believes in and the
consequences be damned.

A total unconcern
for society's rules
.  

My hero tends to live outside of society, and he doesn’t care in the
slightest if he’s ostracized.  Quite
often society, in the form of his family or the political climate has betrayed
him in the past, leaving him angry and wounded. 
He wouldn’t care what other people think.  Francis is a survivor of Culloden.  Adrian’s beloved brother
died.  The Scorpion is scarred, crippled
and lost everything.  Ina world where
what they loved most was taken away from them, they don’t care what they do.
Reckless

A black sense of
humor.

 

My heroes tend to find humor in unexpected things.  In a heroine’s determined resistance.  In his own contradictory behavior.  My hero is always capable of laughing at himself.

His own particular
sense of honor, which can be different from anyone else's.

Jo and I go back and forth on this.  I find some of the worst behavior acceptable
in a hero if it’s true to who and what he is. 
Some heroes will kill in cold blood, particularly someone who has hurt
their heroine. (Francis in RUTHLESS). 
They will conceivably run off with the stolen money if they want it and
they decide that people who were robbed either don’t need it or don’t deserve
it. (The Scorpion and his friend Jacob in BREATHLESS).  It goes back to the unconcern for society’s
rules.  They don’t care much for
society’s laws either.

A tendency to be
solitary.

My hero tends to start out solitary and to stay fairly isolated by
the end.  He will allow, no, welcome, the
heroine into his narrow existence, and he will slowly start to allow
others.  The heroine’s friends and family
may be admitted, as well as people he’s known for years and is finally ready to
accept as a friend.  But my heroes will
never live in London or give speeches
in the House of Lords, and any Regency houseparties they throw will either be
grudging or have an ulterior motive.

 In other words, my heroes tend to be fairly uncivilized.

Queenanne 

(Anne likes to think she might be descended from another Anne Stuart — Queen Anne.)

 


As for the heroine:

She needs to be
smart.
 

In fact, the hero, heroine, mentor and villain need to be highly
intelligent.  My stories are about
complex games people play, and the smarter the players, the better.  All three of the Rohan heroines, Elinor,
Charlotte, and Miranda are too smart for their own good.

Forgiving

Obviously.  Anyone attached to my
kind of hero needs to be able to overlook and forgive all sorts of bad
behavior.  She can and should call the
hero to task over things, but holding grudges, no matter how tempting, would
destroy the relationship.  If you fall in
love with a Very Bad Man then you have no choice but to forgive him for the
Very Bad Things he does.  Even as you do
your best to stop him from doing Very Bad Things.

Someone who
adheres more to society's rules and understands why they're necessary.
 

My heroine tends to start out on the more conventional side of the
story.  Women in past times are more
vulnerable – it’s a lot harder to ignore the rules and get away with it.  Once she’s paired with her hero she can
slowly begin to bring him back, at least to the edges of society, so that he
can survive in normal situations as well as dire ones.

Strong-minded but
vulnerable
.

I know, my heroines tend to be too vulnerable.  I can’t help it, it’s my particular
fantasy.  I’m a powerhouse who secretly
can feel very fragile, and it’s what I respond to in my heroines.  Strength and vulnerability.

Adapability.

Probably the most important thing my heroines need.  The ability to adapt to extreme situations,
solitude, orgies, kidnapping.  (Damn – I
just realized I have some form of kidnapping in all three Rohan books.  Must be another basic fantasy of mine).  All three of them face orgies as the
basically silly things they are, and survive kidnapping with annoyance.  They face danger with aplomb (locked in a
burning church, threatened by a madman) and do their best to save
themselves.

(New to Anne Stuart, and want to try a sample? There's the free story above, and also an excerpt from Ruthless here.)

And after my heroine is happily bonded with her hero things don’t
necessarily get much better.  She needs
to be able to face things without falling apart, turn on a dime if the
situation calls for it (what the hell does turn on a dime mean?), let go when
she needs to, hold on when necessary.

Some see my heroines as weak. 
I see them as Superwomen, able to deal with the mad, bad, dangerous
heroes I write.

So what characteristics make up my characters?  Apart from exceptional good looks,
astonishing sexual prowess, charisma, intelligence, and strength, and all of
the above? Breathless


 The ability to love, of
course.  But the true redemption, for
both broken hero and heroine, is the ability to accept love.  Then, no matter how bad the Very Bad Man is,
or how vulnerable the heroine is, they can find a real Happy Ever After that
nothing can take away.

Jo: I think that's one of the most interesting and provocative guest posts we've had in Word Wenches, and now it's your chance to respond.

There's a prize, of course, to one commenter, and a very nice one, too. Anne will send the first two books in the trilogy to a randomly picked winner, but the random pick will be from posts that add something to this discussion. The "add something" is at Anne's discretion, but you can guess what it means.

Give us your thoughts. Agree, disagree, debate, chew over. If you're an Anne Stuart fan you'll probably have your favorite books to bring to the discussion. And don't forget, the third book, Breathless, will be out in October.

Over to you, folks! We'll draw the winner on Saturday, noon, eastern time.

Jo

PS, here's Anne's gift for her wonderful visit. Hail to the queen!

Crown.

170 thoughts on “Anne Stuart”

  1. Lovely to have you dropping into wenchdom, Anne. Loved the interview, not sure about conscienceless heroes, though it depends on the situation, I suppose. Can’t wait to read the new book

    Reply
  2. Lovely to have you dropping into wenchdom, Anne. Loved the interview, not sure about conscienceless heroes, though it depends on the situation, I suppose. Can’t wait to read the new book

    Reply
  3. Lovely to have you dropping into wenchdom, Anne. Loved the interview, not sure about conscienceless heroes, though it depends on the situation, I suppose. Can’t wait to read the new book

    Reply
  4. Lovely to have you dropping into wenchdom, Anne. Loved the interview, not sure about conscienceless heroes, though it depends on the situation, I suppose. Can’t wait to read the new book

    Reply
  5. Lovely to have you dropping into wenchdom, Anne. Loved the interview, not sure about conscienceless heroes, though it depends on the situation, I suppose. Can’t wait to read the new book

    Reply
  6. Jo – Thanks for having Anne here.
    Anne – Some of the reviews (both from readers and critics) have said that Ruthless is a bit too hard-edged to be a real romance. Did you deliberately push the boundaries on this historical romance? Or is it that these folks just don’t “get” you?

    Reply
  7. Jo – Thanks for having Anne here.
    Anne – Some of the reviews (both from readers and critics) have said that Ruthless is a bit too hard-edged to be a real romance. Did you deliberately push the boundaries on this historical romance? Or is it that these folks just don’t “get” you?

    Reply
  8. Jo – Thanks for having Anne here.
    Anne – Some of the reviews (both from readers and critics) have said that Ruthless is a bit too hard-edged to be a real romance. Did you deliberately push the boundaries on this historical romance? Or is it that these folks just don’t “get” you?

    Reply
  9. Jo – Thanks for having Anne here.
    Anne – Some of the reviews (both from readers and critics) have said that Ruthless is a bit too hard-edged to be a real romance. Did you deliberately push the boundaries on this historical romance? Or is it that these folks just don’t “get” you?

    Reply
  10. Jo – Thanks for having Anne here.
    Anne – Some of the reviews (both from readers and critics) have said that Ruthless is a bit too hard-edged to be a real romance. Did you deliberately push the boundaries on this historical romance? Or is it that these folks just don’t “get” you?

    Reply
  11. Anne Stuart, welcome, nice to “see” you again! We’re so happy that you could spend some time here with us Wenches.
    And thanks for a very thought-provoking post! You always create strong heroes and heroines, with strengths that are not necessarily based on the noblest qualities, and that makes them particularly delicious — these heroes are true challenges for their heroines, and everyone steps up their game to meet the challenge – characters, author and readers too. I’m looking forward to reading the new series!!
    Susan

    Reply
  12. Anne Stuart, welcome, nice to “see” you again! We’re so happy that you could spend some time here with us Wenches.
    And thanks for a very thought-provoking post! You always create strong heroes and heroines, with strengths that are not necessarily based on the noblest qualities, and that makes them particularly delicious — these heroes are true challenges for their heroines, and everyone steps up their game to meet the challenge – characters, author and readers too. I’m looking forward to reading the new series!!
    Susan

    Reply
  13. Anne Stuart, welcome, nice to “see” you again! We’re so happy that you could spend some time here with us Wenches.
    And thanks for a very thought-provoking post! You always create strong heroes and heroines, with strengths that are not necessarily based on the noblest qualities, and that makes them particularly delicious — these heroes are true challenges for their heroines, and everyone steps up their game to meet the challenge – characters, author and readers too. I’m looking forward to reading the new series!!
    Susan

    Reply
  14. Anne Stuart, welcome, nice to “see” you again! We’re so happy that you could spend some time here with us Wenches.
    And thanks for a very thought-provoking post! You always create strong heroes and heroines, with strengths that are not necessarily based on the noblest qualities, and that makes them particularly delicious — these heroes are true challenges for their heroines, and everyone steps up their game to meet the challenge – characters, author and readers too. I’m looking forward to reading the new series!!
    Susan

    Reply
  15. Anne Stuart, welcome, nice to “see” you again! We’re so happy that you could spend some time here with us Wenches.
    And thanks for a very thought-provoking post! You always create strong heroes and heroines, with strengths that are not necessarily based on the noblest qualities, and that makes them particularly delicious — these heroes are true challenges for their heroines, and everyone steps up their game to meet the challenge – characters, author and readers too. I’m looking forward to reading the new series!!
    Susan

    Reply
  16. One of the ways I judge a book is if it stays with me after I’ve finished reading it. I’ve finished Ruthless, and it’s still with me. It has definitely earned a spot on my Keeper Shelf. I find myself wondering if Francis will ever be “forgiven” for Culloden and be able to return to England in safety. This is important because the French Revolution is only 20 years off for these characters, and that got me to thinking how well they would fare then and how much they’d need to get back to England. How much did the history influence you with their stories? And thank you for returning to historicals with such a story.

    Reply
  17. One of the ways I judge a book is if it stays with me after I’ve finished reading it. I’ve finished Ruthless, and it’s still with me. It has definitely earned a spot on my Keeper Shelf. I find myself wondering if Francis will ever be “forgiven” for Culloden and be able to return to England in safety. This is important because the French Revolution is only 20 years off for these characters, and that got me to thinking how well they would fare then and how much they’d need to get back to England. How much did the history influence you with their stories? And thank you for returning to historicals with such a story.

    Reply
  18. One of the ways I judge a book is if it stays with me after I’ve finished reading it. I’ve finished Ruthless, and it’s still with me. It has definitely earned a spot on my Keeper Shelf. I find myself wondering if Francis will ever be “forgiven” for Culloden and be able to return to England in safety. This is important because the French Revolution is only 20 years off for these characters, and that got me to thinking how well they would fare then and how much they’d need to get back to England. How much did the history influence you with their stories? And thank you for returning to historicals with such a story.

    Reply
  19. One of the ways I judge a book is if it stays with me after I’ve finished reading it. I’ve finished Ruthless, and it’s still with me. It has definitely earned a spot on my Keeper Shelf. I find myself wondering if Francis will ever be “forgiven” for Culloden and be able to return to England in safety. This is important because the French Revolution is only 20 years off for these characters, and that got me to thinking how well they would fare then and how much they’d need to get back to England. How much did the history influence you with their stories? And thank you for returning to historicals with such a story.

    Reply
  20. One of the ways I judge a book is if it stays with me after I’ve finished reading it. I’ve finished Ruthless, and it’s still with me. It has definitely earned a spot on my Keeper Shelf. I find myself wondering if Francis will ever be “forgiven” for Culloden and be able to return to England in safety. This is important because the French Revolution is only 20 years off for these characters, and that got me to thinking how well they would fare then and how much they’d need to get back to England. How much did the history influence you with their stories? And thank you for returning to historicals with such a story.

    Reply
  21. Anne, delighted to have you here, thanks for coming!
    Since I’ve made no secret about my being a nambie-pambie wimp, I’ll admit your heroes give me heebie-jeebies. (Do I spell those with “y” or “ie”? “G”)
    But after reading your interview, I want to know how a strong woman just doesn’t kill them and put them out of their misery? That was my essential thought when I was nine and read Bronte. Are the Brontes your inspiration?

    Reply
  22. Anne, delighted to have you here, thanks for coming!
    Since I’ve made no secret about my being a nambie-pambie wimp, I’ll admit your heroes give me heebie-jeebies. (Do I spell those with “y” or “ie”? “G”)
    But after reading your interview, I want to know how a strong woman just doesn’t kill them and put them out of their misery? That was my essential thought when I was nine and read Bronte. Are the Brontes your inspiration?

    Reply
  23. Anne, delighted to have you here, thanks for coming!
    Since I’ve made no secret about my being a nambie-pambie wimp, I’ll admit your heroes give me heebie-jeebies. (Do I spell those with “y” or “ie”? “G”)
    But after reading your interview, I want to know how a strong woman just doesn’t kill them and put them out of their misery? That was my essential thought when I was nine and read Bronte. Are the Brontes your inspiration?

    Reply
  24. Anne, delighted to have you here, thanks for coming!
    Since I’ve made no secret about my being a nambie-pambie wimp, I’ll admit your heroes give me heebie-jeebies. (Do I spell those with “y” or “ie”? “G”)
    But after reading your interview, I want to know how a strong woman just doesn’t kill them and put them out of their misery? That was my essential thought when I was nine and read Bronte. Are the Brontes your inspiration?

    Reply
  25. Anne, delighted to have you here, thanks for coming!
    Since I’ve made no secret about my being a nambie-pambie wimp, I’ll admit your heroes give me heebie-jeebies. (Do I spell those with “y” or “ie”? “G”)
    But after reading your interview, I want to know how a strong woman just doesn’t kill them and put them out of their misery? That was my essential thought when I was nine and read Bronte. Are the Brontes your inspiration?

    Reply
  26. Anne, it was good to hear what your books are like. I have never read one, and from what I have learned about them here from you, I doubt I ever will. I think you must write of fantasies where one can do whatever one likes without thought of the consequences for others, not in line with what I believe of kindness and love and adulthood. (I have been reading Anne Perry mysteries this summer, and her approach is just the opposite: that actions have consequences for others and can cause unbelievable suffering.) I don’t think I would enjoy reading your books and I think I would suffer if I did, but then, I am only one of millions, and unfortunately there are many people who undoubtedly like to read of people escaping consequences for their legal or illegal acts.
    Do you ever wonder if your books cause pain or distress directly or indirectly to others?

    Reply
  27. Anne, it was good to hear what your books are like. I have never read one, and from what I have learned about them here from you, I doubt I ever will. I think you must write of fantasies where one can do whatever one likes without thought of the consequences for others, not in line with what I believe of kindness and love and adulthood. (I have been reading Anne Perry mysteries this summer, and her approach is just the opposite: that actions have consequences for others and can cause unbelievable suffering.) I don’t think I would enjoy reading your books and I think I would suffer if I did, but then, I am only one of millions, and unfortunately there are many people who undoubtedly like to read of people escaping consequences for their legal or illegal acts.
    Do you ever wonder if your books cause pain or distress directly or indirectly to others?

    Reply
  28. Anne, it was good to hear what your books are like. I have never read one, and from what I have learned about them here from you, I doubt I ever will. I think you must write of fantasies where one can do whatever one likes without thought of the consequences for others, not in line with what I believe of kindness and love and adulthood. (I have been reading Anne Perry mysteries this summer, and her approach is just the opposite: that actions have consequences for others and can cause unbelievable suffering.) I don’t think I would enjoy reading your books and I think I would suffer if I did, but then, I am only one of millions, and unfortunately there are many people who undoubtedly like to read of people escaping consequences for their legal or illegal acts.
    Do you ever wonder if your books cause pain or distress directly or indirectly to others?

    Reply
  29. Anne, it was good to hear what your books are like. I have never read one, and from what I have learned about them here from you, I doubt I ever will. I think you must write of fantasies where one can do whatever one likes without thought of the consequences for others, not in line with what I believe of kindness and love and adulthood. (I have been reading Anne Perry mysteries this summer, and her approach is just the opposite: that actions have consequences for others and can cause unbelievable suffering.) I don’t think I would enjoy reading your books and I think I would suffer if I did, but then, I am only one of millions, and unfortunately there are many people who undoubtedly like to read of people escaping consequences for their legal or illegal acts.
    Do you ever wonder if your books cause pain or distress directly or indirectly to others?

    Reply
  30. Anne, it was good to hear what your books are like. I have never read one, and from what I have learned about them here from you, I doubt I ever will. I think you must write of fantasies where one can do whatever one likes without thought of the consequences for others, not in line with what I believe of kindness and love and adulthood. (I have been reading Anne Perry mysteries this summer, and her approach is just the opposite: that actions have consequences for others and can cause unbelievable suffering.) I don’t think I would enjoy reading your books and I think I would suffer if I did, but then, I am only one of millions, and unfortunately there are many people who undoubtedly like to read of people escaping consequences for their legal or illegal acts.
    Do you ever wonder if your books cause pain or distress directly or indirectly to others?

    Reply
  31. Hello, Anne. Welcome to Word Wenches! I can see where your type of hero may initially turn off some readers, but I have to look at your track record. You are a VERY popular writer, and since you write romance, I’m assuming your stories end HEA. This means your heroes must have redeeming qualities. As for the edgy character of your heroes–it makes me think you must be one heck of a writer to redeem them, and that same edgy quality intrigues me as a reader. I’ll admit I’ve not read you yet, but based on this interview, that will change. While I love romances that follow the “rules,” I also like the occasional shake-up, the book that treads different ground. Ruthless heroes have always intrigued me, and there is often a good reason they are ruthless. What’s fun is watching their journey to salvation, usually at the hands of a strong woman!

    Reply
  32. Hello, Anne. Welcome to Word Wenches! I can see where your type of hero may initially turn off some readers, but I have to look at your track record. You are a VERY popular writer, and since you write romance, I’m assuming your stories end HEA. This means your heroes must have redeeming qualities. As for the edgy character of your heroes–it makes me think you must be one heck of a writer to redeem them, and that same edgy quality intrigues me as a reader. I’ll admit I’ve not read you yet, but based on this interview, that will change. While I love romances that follow the “rules,” I also like the occasional shake-up, the book that treads different ground. Ruthless heroes have always intrigued me, and there is often a good reason they are ruthless. What’s fun is watching their journey to salvation, usually at the hands of a strong woman!

    Reply
  33. Hello, Anne. Welcome to Word Wenches! I can see where your type of hero may initially turn off some readers, but I have to look at your track record. You are a VERY popular writer, and since you write romance, I’m assuming your stories end HEA. This means your heroes must have redeeming qualities. As for the edgy character of your heroes–it makes me think you must be one heck of a writer to redeem them, and that same edgy quality intrigues me as a reader. I’ll admit I’ve not read you yet, but based on this interview, that will change. While I love romances that follow the “rules,” I also like the occasional shake-up, the book that treads different ground. Ruthless heroes have always intrigued me, and there is often a good reason they are ruthless. What’s fun is watching their journey to salvation, usually at the hands of a strong woman!

    Reply
  34. Hello, Anne. Welcome to Word Wenches! I can see where your type of hero may initially turn off some readers, but I have to look at your track record. You are a VERY popular writer, and since you write romance, I’m assuming your stories end HEA. This means your heroes must have redeeming qualities. As for the edgy character of your heroes–it makes me think you must be one heck of a writer to redeem them, and that same edgy quality intrigues me as a reader. I’ll admit I’ve not read you yet, but based on this interview, that will change. While I love romances that follow the “rules,” I also like the occasional shake-up, the book that treads different ground. Ruthless heroes have always intrigued me, and there is often a good reason they are ruthless. What’s fun is watching their journey to salvation, usually at the hands of a strong woman!

    Reply
  35. Hello, Anne. Welcome to Word Wenches! I can see where your type of hero may initially turn off some readers, but I have to look at your track record. You are a VERY popular writer, and since you write romance, I’m assuming your stories end HEA. This means your heroes must have redeeming qualities. As for the edgy character of your heroes–it makes me think you must be one heck of a writer to redeem them, and that same edgy quality intrigues me as a reader. I’ll admit I’ve not read you yet, but based on this interview, that will change. While I love romances that follow the “rules,” I also like the occasional shake-up, the book that treads different ground. Ruthless heroes have always intrigued me, and there is often a good reason they are ruthless. What’s fun is watching their journey to salvation, usually at the hands of a strong woman!

    Reply
  36. Hello, Anne! Wicked…Ruthless…Breathless…Reckless! Are you writing about my “Family Tree”? If so, let me “branch out” and add: Incorrigible…Inappropriate…Inadvertent…and Imperfect : )
    A hero can be a rascally rogue, but he must still have a deep-seated respect for women–even if it takes a while to surface. A heroine may be “flustered” by the masculinity of the hero, but she must never, ever be a “ninny”! Ideally, the woman will be strong and intelligent, and those will be the characteristics which the hero finds hardest to resist! That’s not to say that the man and woman should be “perfect”. Idiosyncrasies are much more attractive and endearing than perfection. The supporting characters can be the nasties and the ninnies : )

    Reply
  37. Hello, Anne! Wicked…Ruthless…Breathless…Reckless! Are you writing about my “Family Tree”? If so, let me “branch out” and add: Incorrigible…Inappropriate…Inadvertent…and Imperfect : )
    A hero can be a rascally rogue, but he must still have a deep-seated respect for women–even if it takes a while to surface. A heroine may be “flustered” by the masculinity of the hero, but she must never, ever be a “ninny”! Ideally, the woman will be strong and intelligent, and those will be the characteristics which the hero finds hardest to resist! That’s not to say that the man and woman should be “perfect”. Idiosyncrasies are much more attractive and endearing than perfection. The supporting characters can be the nasties and the ninnies : )

    Reply
  38. Hello, Anne! Wicked…Ruthless…Breathless…Reckless! Are you writing about my “Family Tree”? If so, let me “branch out” and add: Incorrigible…Inappropriate…Inadvertent…and Imperfect : )
    A hero can be a rascally rogue, but he must still have a deep-seated respect for women–even if it takes a while to surface. A heroine may be “flustered” by the masculinity of the hero, but she must never, ever be a “ninny”! Ideally, the woman will be strong and intelligent, and those will be the characteristics which the hero finds hardest to resist! That’s not to say that the man and woman should be “perfect”. Idiosyncrasies are much more attractive and endearing than perfection. The supporting characters can be the nasties and the ninnies : )

    Reply
  39. Hello, Anne! Wicked…Ruthless…Breathless…Reckless! Are you writing about my “Family Tree”? If so, let me “branch out” and add: Incorrigible…Inappropriate…Inadvertent…and Imperfect : )
    A hero can be a rascally rogue, but he must still have a deep-seated respect for women–even if it takes a while to surface. A heroine may be “flustered” by the masculinity of the hero, but she must never, ever be a “ninny”! Ideally, the woman will be strong and intelligent, and those will be the characteristics which the hero finds hardest to resist! That’s not to say that the man and woman should be “perfect”. Idiosyncrasies are much more attractive and endearing than perfection. The supporting characters can be the nasties and the ninnies : )

    Reply
  40. Hello, Anne! Wicked…Ruthless…Breathless…Reckless! Are you writing about my “Family Tree”? If so, let me “branch out” and add: Incorrigible…Inappropriate…Inadvertent…and Imperfect : )
    A hero can be a rascally rogue, but he must still have a deep-seated respect for women–even if it takes a while to surface. A heroine may be “flustered” by the masculinity of the hero, but she must never, ever be a “ninny”! Ideally, the woman will be strong and intelligent, and those will be the characteristics which the hero finds hardest to resist! That’s not to say that the man and woman should be “perfect”. Idiosyncrasies are much more attractive and endearing than perfection. The supporting characters can be the nasties and the ninnies : )

    Reply
  41. WElcome to Wenchdom, Anne! Really, if anyone was every born to hang out with the Wenches…. *g*
    It’s about time you returned to writing historicals! Your deep dark heroes are a perfect fit for the bawdy Georgian era. *g*

    Reply
  42. WElcome to Wenchdom, Anne! Really, if anyone was every born to hang out with the Wenches…. *g*
    It’s about time you returned to writing historicals! Your deep dark heroes are a perfect fit for the bawdy Georgian era. *g*

    Reply
  43. WElcome to Wenchdom, Anne! Really, if anyone was every born to hang out with the Wenches…. *g*
    It’s about time you returned to writing historicals! Your deep dark heroes are a perfect fit for the bawdy Georgian era. *g*

    Reply
  44. WElcome to Wenchdom, Anne! Really, if anyone was every born to hang out with the Wenches…. *g*
    It’s about time you returned to writing historicals! Your deep dark heroes are a perfect fit for the bawdy Georgian era. *g*

    Reply
  45. WElcome to Wenchdom, Anne! Really, if anyone was every born to hang out with the Wenches…. *g*
    It’s about time you returned to writing historicals! Your deep dark heroes are a perfect fit for the bawdy Georgian era. *g*

    Reply
  46. with due respect to the Wenches..Your historical book are EXACTLY the kind of books I LOVE, LOVE,LOVE… your heros are always outside the box bad boys.. its your heroines that keep me coming back.. they are smart without being annoying… I also enjoy the fact that they admit the are in love and not wait to the last paragraph..they are do not to be ‘fiesty and beautiful’… heroine make the book.. the most memorable seen to me is your book Devil’s Waltz, when Annalise tells Christian in French she loves himn and can’t live without him.. then he turns and walks away.. that part still gives my stomach butterflies.. it just touched me.. PLease continue with your historicals, the romance industry can use a voice as unique and wonderful as yours.. Taline J.

    Reply
  47. with due respect to the Wenches..Your historical book are EXACTLY the kind of books I LOVE, LOVE,LOVE… your heros are always outside the box bad boys.. its your heroines that keep me coming back.. they are smart without being annoying… I also enjoy the fact that they admit the are in love and not wait to the last paragraph..they are do not to be ‘fiesty and beautiful’… heroine make the book.. the most memorable seen to me is your book Devil’s Waltz, when Annalise tells Christian in French she loves himn and can’t live without him.. then he turns and walks away.. that part still gives my stomach butterflies.. it just touched me.. PLease continue with your historicals, the romance industry can use a voice as unique and wonderful as yours.. Taline J.

    Reply
  48. with due respect to the Wenches..Your historical book are EXACTLY the kind of books I LOVE, LOVE,LOVE… your heros are always outside the box bad boys.. its your heroines that keep me coming back.. they are smart without being annoying… I also enjoy the fact that they admit the are in love and not wait to the last paragraph..they are do not to be ‘fiesty and beautiful’… heroine make the book.. the most memorable seen to me is your book Devil’s Waltz, when Annalise tells Christian in French she loves himn and can’t live without him.. then he turns and walks away.. that part still gives my stomach butterflies.. it just touched me.. PLease continue with your historicals, the romance industry can use a voice as unique and wonderful as yours.. Taline J.

    Reply
  49. with due respect to the Wenches..Your historical book are EXACTLY the kind of books I LOVE, LOVE,LOVE… your heros are always outside the box bad boys.. its your heroines that keep me coming back.. they are smart without being annoying… I also enjoy the fact that they admit the are in love and not wait to the last paragraph..they are do not to be ‘fiesty and beautiful’… heroine make the book.. the most memorable seen to me is your book Devil’s Waltz, when Annalise tells Christian in French she loves himn and can’t live without him.. then he turns and walks away.. that part still gives my stomach butterflies.. it just touched me.. PLease continue with your historicals, the romance industry can use a voice as unique and wonderful as yours.. Taline J.

    Reply
  50. with due respect to the Wenches..Your historical book are EXACTLY the kind of books I LOVE, LOVE,LOVE… your heros are always outside the box bad boys.. its your heroines that keep me coming back.. they are smart without being annoying… I also enjoy the fact that they admit the are in love and not wait to the last paragraph..they are do not to be ‘fiesty and beautiful’… heroine make the book.. the most memorable seen to me is your book Devil’s Waltz, when Annalise tells Christian in French she loves himn and can’t live without him.. then he turns and walks away.. that part still gives my stomach butterflies.. it just touched me.. PLease continue with your historicals, the romance industry can use a voice as unique and wonderful as yours.. Taline J.

    Reply
  51. I do enjoy your books but think if I met one of your heroes in “real life” I would be struck dumb and try to hide in a corner. Think the same hero would not care to chat with me either.

    Reply
  52. I do enjoy your books but think if I met one of your heroes in “real life” I would be struck dumb and try to hide in a corner. Think the same hero would not care to chat with me either.

    Reply
  53. I do enjoy your books but think if I met one of your heroes in “real life” I would be struck dumb and try to hide in a corner. Think the same hero would not care to chat with me either.

    Reply
  54. I do enjoy your books but think if I met one of your heroes in “real life” I would be struck dumb and try to hide in a corner. Think the same hero would not care to chat with me either.

    Reply
  55. I do enjoy your books but think if I met one of your heroes in “real life” I would be struck dumb and try to hide in a corner. Think the same hero would not care to chat with me either.

    Reply
  56. Hi, guys. No, MJ, I don’t try to push the envelope at all, or see how far I can go. My characters are simply who they are, and it’s not so much that people don’t “get” me — I think they’d rather have ten foot pole between us. Either it works for a reader or it doesn’t.
    Valerie — don’t worry, Francis gets reprieved and even a better title. Of course, I forgot to mention why. I guess I figured the readers would take it on faith.
    Patricia — in BREATHLESS my heroine has finally had enough of my hero, and Takes Steps. It really tickled me. The only attempted murder in that book is when the heroine tries to kill the hero, who was asking for it.
    Diane — in general my books don’t cause pain to people. They’re either turned off early on or they go with the fantasy. And this is probably a terrible thing to say, but I would rather upset a reader than leave them bored. Which is odd, because in real life I’m a very nice person. I hate hurting people. But art is different, and sometimes what you’re called to write isn’t what’s easiest or most saleable. But not to listen to your muse would be the worst betrayal of all.
    Thanks so much, Taline and everyone else. I really appreciate the kind and/or thoughtful words.

    Reply
  57. Hi, guys. No, MJ, I don’t try to push the envelope at all, or see how far I can go. My characters are simply who they are, and it’s not so much that people don’t “get” me — I think they’d rather have ten foot pole between us. Either it works for a reader or it doesn’t.
    Valerie — don’t worry, Francis gets reprieved and even a better title. Of course, I forgot to mention why. I guess I figured the readers would take it on faith.
    Patricia — in BREATHLESS my heroine has finally had enough of my hero, and Takes Steps. It really tickled me. The only attempted murder in that book is when the heroine tries to kill the hero, who was asking for it.
    Diane — in general my books don’t cause pain to people. They’re either turned off early on or they go with the fantasy. And this is probably a terrible thing to say, but I would rather upset a reader than leave them bored. Which is odd, because in real life I’m a very nice person. I hate hurting people. But art is different, and sometimes what you’re called to write isn’t what’s easiest or most saleable. But not to listen to your muse would be the worst betrayal of all.
    Thanks so much, Taline and everyone else. I really appreciate the kind and/or thoughtful words.

    Reply
  58. Hi, guys. No, MJ, I don’t try to push the envelope at all, or see how far I can go. My characters are simply who they are, and it’s not so much that people don’t “get” me — I think they’d rather have ten foot pole between us. Either it works for a reader or it doesn’t.
    Valerie — don’t worry, Francis gets reprieved and even a better title. Of course, I forgot to mention why. I guess I figured the readers would take it on faith.
    Patricia — in BREATHLESS my heroine has finally had enough of my hero, and Takes Steps. It really tickled me. The only attempted murder in that book is when the heroine tries to kill the hero, who was asking for it.
    Diane — in general my books don’t cause pain to people. They’re either turned off early on or they go with the fantasy. And this is probably a terrible thing to say, but I would rather upset a reader than leave them bored. Which is odd, because in real life I’m a very nice person. I hate hurting people. But art is different, and sometimes what you’re called to write isn’t what’s easiest or most saleable. But not to listen to your muse would be the worst betrayal of all.
    Thanks so much, Taline and everyone else. I really appreciate the kind and/or thoughtful words.

    Reply
  59. Hi, guys. No, MJ, I don’t try to push the envelope at all, or see how far I can go. My characters are simply who they are, and it’s not so much that people don’t “get” me — I think they’d rather have ten foot pole between us. Either it works for a reader or it doesn’t.
    Valerie — don’t worry, Francis gets reprieved and even a better title. Of course, I forgot to mention why. I guess I figured the readers would take it on faith.
    Patricia — in BREATHLESS my heroine has finally had enough of my hero, and Takes Steps. It really tickled me. The only attempted murder in that book is when the heroine tries to kill the hero, who was asking for it.
    Diane — in general my books don’t cause pain to people. They’re either turned off early on or they go with the fantasy. And this is probably a terrible thing to say, but I would rather upset a reader than leave them bored. Which is odd, because in real life I’m a very nice person. I hate hurting people. But art is different, and sometimes what you’re called to write isn’t what’s easiest or most saleable. But not to listen to your muse would be the worst betrayal of all.
    Thanks so much, Taline and everyone else. I really appreciate the kind and/or thoughtful words.

    Reply
  60. Hi, guys. No, MJ, I don’t try to push the envelope at all, or see how far I can go. My characters are simply who they are, and it’s not so much that people don’t “get” me — I think they’d rather have ten foot pole between us. Either it works for a reader or it doesn’t.
    Valerie — don’t worry, Francis gets reprieved and even a better title. Of course, I forgot to mention why. I guess I figured the readers would take it on faith.
    Patricia — in BREATHLESS my heroine has finally had enough of my hero, and Takes Steps. It really tickled me. The only attempted murder in that book is when the heroine tries to kill the hero, who was asking for it.
    Diane — in general my books don’t cause pain to people. They’re either turned off early on or they go with the fantasy. And this is probably a terrible thing to say, but I would rather upset a reader than leave them bored. Which is odd, because in real life I’m a very nice person. I hate hurting people. But art is different, and sometimes what you’re called to write isn’t what’s easiest or most saleable. But not to listen to your muse would be the worst betrayal of all.
    Thanks so much, Taline and everyone else. I really appreciate the kind and/or thoughtful words.

    Reply
  61. Hello Anne !!
    LOVED your workshop at Nationals !! You truly inspired me to stick to my guns on some of the things I’ve written a bit outside the box because I felt the characters wouldn’t have it any other way. Do you ever have that moment where you argue with the character “Hey, you can’t do that!” or “Are you SURE you want to do that?”
    I write Regency set historicals and I think the reason some of my heroes come off as a bit “unsympathetic” is that I truly try to get into the head of an alpha male born in privilege and raised to think his word is law, at least in the venue of his own little kingdom. It isn’t much of a stretch to think this guy might come off as a bit of, well, for lack of a better word, an ass! He’d be arrogant, nasty at times and very used to getting his way. Very few things he did would be censured by law and why would he care what anyone else thought? I would imagine his reality would be tough, hard-hearted sex-crazed women who would crawl into bed with him at the drop of a hat and raise the roof when he kicked her out.
    On the other hand, his FANTASY might be that quiet, serene woman who isn’t impressed by him at all. She doesn’t have sharp edges. She’s soft and gentle and caring and after years of crawling in bed with all those sharp edges he longs to get lost in the arms of something soft and giving and forgiving.
    And frankly, while being that type of woman might make her appear weak to the majority of society, for him, she is the most powerful thing on earth – redemption.
    So, if that is what you have written, let me at it !! Not to mention, I LOVE a man with a wicked sense of humor or a wicked anything else for that matter!!
    Saving this interview to my files for some fabulous insight into the character of a real bad boy hero! Thanks!

    Reply
  62. Hello Anne !!
    LOVED your workshop at Nationals !! You truly inspired me to stick to my guns on some of the things I’ve written a bit outside the box because I felt the characters wouldn’t have it any other way. Do you ever have that moment where you argue with the character “Hey, you can’t do that!” or “Are you SURE you want to do that?”
    I write Regency set historicals and I think the reason some of my heroes come off as a bit “unsympathetic” is that I truly try to get into the head of an alpha male born in privilege and raised to think his word is law, at least in the venue of his own little kingdom. It isn’t much of a stretch to think this guy might come off as a bit of, well, for lack of a better word, an ass! He’d be arrogant, nasty at times and very used to getting his way. Very few things he did would be censured by law and why would he care what anyone else thought? I would imagine his reality would be tough, hard-hearted sex-crazed women who would crawl into bed with him at the drop of a hat and raise the roof when he kicked her out.
    On the other hand, his FANTASY might be that quiet, serene woman who isn’t impressed by him at all. She doesn’t have sharp edges. She’s soft and gentle and caring and after years of crawling in bed with all those sharp edges he longs to get lost in the arms of something soft and giving and forgiving.
    And frankly, while being that type of woman might make her appear weak to the majority of society, for him, she is the most powerful thing on earth – redemption.
    So, if that is what you have written, let me at it !! Not to mention, I LOVE a man with a wicked sense of humor or a wicked anything else for that matter!!
    Saving this interview to my files for some fabulous insight into the character of a real bad boy hero! Thanks!

    Reply
  63. Hello Anne !!
    LOVED your workshop at Nationals !! You truly inspired me to stick to my guns on some of the things I’ve written a bit outside the box because I felt the characters wouldn’t have it any other way. Do you ever have that moment where you argue with the character “Hey, you can’t do that!” or “Are you SURE you want to do that?”
    I write Regency set historicals and I think the reason some of my heroes come off as a bit “unsympathetic” is that I truly try to get into the head of an alpha male born in privilege and raised to think his word is law, at least in the venue of his own little kingdom. It isn’t much of a stretch to think this guy might come off as a bit of, well, for lack of a better word, an ass! He’d be arrogant, nasty at times and very used to getting his way. Very few things he did would be censured by law and why would he care what anyone else thought? I would imagine his reality would be tough, hard-hearted sex-crazed women who would crawl into bed with him at the drop of a hat and raise the roof when he kicked her out.
    On the other hand, his FANTASY might be that quiet, serene woman who isn’t impressed by him at all. She doesn’t have sharp edges. She’s soft and gentle and caring and after years of crawling in bed with all those sharp edges he longs to get lost in the arms of something soft and giving and forgiving.
    And frankly, while being that type of woman might make her appear weak to the majority of society, for him, she is the most powerful thing on earth – redemption.
    So, if that is what you have written, let me at it !! Not to mention, I LOVE a man with a wicked sense of humor or a wicked anything else for that matter!!
    Saving this interview to my files for some fabulous insight into the character of a real bad boy hero! Thanks!

    Reply
  64. Hello Anne !!
    LOVED your workshop at Nationals !! You truly inspired me to stick to my guns on some of the things I’ve written a bit outside the box because I felt the characters wouldn’t have it any other way. Do you ever have that moment where you argue with the character “Hey, you can’t do that!” or “Are you SURE you want to do that?”
    I write Regency set historicals and I think the reason some of my heroes come off as a bit “unsympathetic” is that I truly try to get into the head of an alpha male born in privilege and raised to think his word is law, at least in the venue of his own little kingdom. It isn’t much of a stretch to think this guy might come off as a bit of, well, for lack of a better word, an ass! He’d be arrogant, nasty at times and very used to getting his way. Very few things he did would be censured by law and why would he care what anyone else thought? I would imagine his reality would be tough, hard-hearted sex-crazed women who would crawl into bed with him at the drop of a hat and raise the roof when he kicked her out.
    On the other hand, his FANTASY might be that quiet, serene woman who isn’t impressed by him at all. She doesn’t have sharp edges. She’s soft and gentle and caring and after years of crawling in bed with all those sharp edges he longs to get lost in the arms of something soft and giving and forgiving.
    And frankly, while being that type of woman might make her appear weak to the majority of society, for him, she is the most powerful thing on earth – redemption.
    So, if that is what you have written, let me at it !! Not to mention, I LOVE a man with a wicked sense of humor or a wicked anything else for that matter!!
    Saving this interview to my files for some fabulous insight into the character of a real bad boy hero! Thanks!

    Reply
  65. Hello Anne !!
    LOVED your workshop at Nationals !! You truly inspired me to stick to my guns on some of the things I’ve written a bit outside the box because I felt the characters wouldn’t have it any other way. Do you ever have that moment where you argue with the character “Hey, you can’t do that!” or “Are you SURE you want to do that?”
    I write Regency set historicals and I think the reason some of my heroes come off as a bit “unsympathetic” is that I truly try to get into the head of an alpha male born in privilege and raised to think his word is law, at least in the venue of his own little kingdom. It isn’t much of a stretch to think this guy might come off as a bit of, well, for lack of a better word, an ass! He’d be arrogant, nasty at times and very used to getting his way. Very few things he did would be censured by law and why would he care what anyone else thought? I would imagine his reality would be tough, hard-hearted sex-crazed women who would crawl into bed with him at the drop of a hat and raise the roof when he kicked her out.
    On the other hand, his FANTASY might be that quiet, serene woman who isn’t impressed by him at all. She doesn’t have sharp edges. She’s soft and gentle and caring and after years of crawling in bed with all those sharp edges he longs to get lost in the arms of something soft and giving and forgiving.
    And frankly, while being that type of woman might make her appear weak to the majority of society, for him, she is the most powerful thing on earth – redemption.
    So, if that is what you have written, let me at it !! Not to mention, I LOVE a man with a wicked sense of humor or a wicked anything else for that matter!!
    Saving this interview to my files for some fabulous insight into the character of a real bad boy hero! Thanks!

    Reply
  66. Then it sounds like you’ll like my stuff, Louisa. Some people think my heroines are too weak, but I think they’ve got a quiet strength that complements my mad, bad dangerous heroes.

    Reply
  67. Then it sounds like you’ll like my stuff, Louisa. Some people think my heroines are too weak, but I think they’ve got a quiet strength that complements my mad, bad dangerous heroes.

    Reply
  68. Then it sounds like you’ll like my stuff, Louisa. Some people think my heroines are too weak, but I think they’ve got a quiet strength that complements my mad, bad dangerous heroes.

    Reply
  69. Then it sounds like you’ll like my stuff, Louisa. Some people think my heroines are too weak, but I think they’ve got a quiet strength that complements my mad, bad dangerous heroes.

    Reply
  70. Then it sounds like you’ll like my stuff, Louisa. Some people think my heroines are too weak, but I think they’ve got a quiet strength that complements my mad, bad dangerous heroes.

    Reply
  71. Love that we’ve stirred this discussion! And thank you for the heroine almost killing the hero. I’m reading that one.
    And yes, Anne is one heckuva writer (see I wuss out on everything), for anyone who hasn’t tried her. If you haven’t read her, try, if only to see how she pulls off what she does. Readers should push their own comfort zones too!

    Reply
  72. Love that we’ve stirred this discussion! And thank you for the heroine almost killing the hero. I’m reading that one.
    And yes, Anne is one heckuva writer (see I wuss out on everything), for anyone who hasn’t tried her. If you haven’t read her, try, if only to see how she pulls off what she does. Readers should push their own comfort zones too!

    Reply
  73. Love that we’ve stirred this discussion! And thank you for the heroine almost killing the hero. I’m reading that one.
    And yes, Anne is one heckuva writer (see I wuss out on everything), for anyone who hasn’t tried her. If you haven’t read her, try, if only to see how she pulls off what she does. Readers should push their own comfort zones too!

    Reply
  74. Love that we’ve stirred this discussion! And thank you for the heroine almost killing the hero. I’m reading that one.
    And yes, Anne is one heckuva writer (see I wuss out on everything), for anyone who hasn’t tried her. If you haven’t read her, try, if only to see how she pulls off what she does. Readers should push their own comfort zones too!

    Reply
  75. Love that we’ve stirred this discussion! And thank you for the heroine almost killing the hero. I’m reading that one.
    And yes, Anne is one heckuva writer (see I wuss out on everything), for anyone who hasn’t tried her. If you haven’t read her, try, if only to see how she pulls off what she does. Readers should push their own comfort zones too!

    Reply
  76. I haven’t read any of your books yet, but I may have to check this one out.
    I like reading about alpha heroes, but I usually like the heroine to have a positive effect on the hero over the course of the book. So he may be selfish and arrogant in the beginning, but by the end, he should respect the heroine enough not to be disrespectful or domineering. Or if he’s still domineering, then the heroine should be able to stand up to him and not cower. His interpersonal relationship with outsiders is one thing, but I like the h/h to have mutual respect.
    I give more leeway with the hero in a historical setting. A rule breaker and selfish hero may work in the 19th Century, but I’d have more trouble with it in a contempoarary setting.
    Finally, I think the test for a great story is if at the end of the novel, the plot and characters stay with you and you want to read it again.

    Reply
  77. I haven’t read any of your books yet, but I may have to check this one out.
    I like reading about alpha heroes, but I usually like the heroine to have a positive effect on the hero over the course of the book. So he may be selfish and arrogant in the beginning, but by the end, he should respect the heroine enough not to be disrespectful or domineering. Or if he’s still domineering, then the heroine should be able to stand up to him and not cower. His interpersonal relationship with outsiders is one thing, but I like the h/h to have mutual respect.
    I give more leeway with the hero in a historical setting. A rule breaker and selfish hero may work in the 19th Century, but I’d have more trouble with it in a contempoarary setting.
    Finally, I think the test for a great story is if at the end of the novel, the plot and characters stay with you and you want to read it again.

    Reply
  78. I haven’t read any of your books yet, but I may have to check this one out.
    I like reading about alpha heroes, but I usually like the heroine to have a positive effect on the hero over the course of the book. So he may be selfish and arrogant in the beginning, but by the end, he should respect the heroine enough not to be disrespectful or domineering. Or if he’s still domineering, then the heroine should be able to stand up to him and not cower. His interpersonal relationship with outsiders is one thing, but I like the h/h to have mutual respect.
    I give more leeway with the hero in a historical setting. A rule breaker and selfish hero may work in the 19th Century, but I’d have more trouble with it in a contempoarary setting.
    Finally, I think the test for a great story is if at the end of the novel, the plot and characters stay with you and you want to read it again.

    Reply
  79. I haven’t read any of your books yet, but I may have to check this one out.
    I like reading about alpha heroes, but I usually like the heroine to have a positive effect on the hero over the course of the book. So he may be selfish and arrogant in the beginning, but by the end, he should respect the heroine enough not to be disrespectful or domineering. Or if he’s still domineering, then the heroine should be able to stand up to him and not cower. His interpersonal relationship with outsiders is one thing, but I like the h/h to have mutual respect.
    I give more leeway with the hero in a historical setting. A rule breaker and selfish hero may work in the 19th Century, but I’d have more trouble with it in a contempoarary setting.
    Finally, I think the test for a great story is if at the end of the novel, the plot and characters stay with you and you want to read it again.

    Reply
  80. I haven’t read any of your books yet, but I may have to check this one out.
    I like reading about alpha heroes, but I usually like the heroine to have a positive effect on the hero over the course of the book. So he may be selfish and arrogant in the beginning, but by the end, he should respect the heroine enough not to be disrespectful or domineering. Or if he’s still domineering, then the heroine should be able to stand up to him and not cower. His interpersonal relationship with outsiders is one thing, but I like the h/h to have mutual respect.
    I give more leeway with the hero in a historical setting. A rule breaker and selfish hero may work in the 19th Century, but I’d have more trouble with it in a contempoarary setting.
    Finally, I think the test for a great story is if at the end of the novel, the plot and characters stay with you and you want to read it again.

    Reply
  81. Society and societal expectations play a strong role in traditional historical romances. The sexy and strong, but morally ambiguous gentlemen seem to be acceptable. But a strong heroine? I like a writer that lets her heroine be as strong as the men. In fact, I think it’s the very strength of these women that allows them to fall in love with a non-traditional and possibly dangerous man.

    Reply
  82. Society and societal expectations play a strong role in traditional historical romances. The sexy and strong, but morally ambiguous gentlemen seem to be acceptable. But a strong heroine? I like a writer that lets her heroine be as strong as the men. In fact, I think it’s the very strength of these women that allows them to fall in love with a non-traditional and possibly dangerous man.

    Reply
  83. Society and societal expectations play a strong role in traditional historical romances. The sexy and strong, but morally ambiguous gentlemen seem to be acceptable. But a strong heroine? I like a writer that lets her heroine be as strong as the men. In fact, I think it’s the very strength of these women that allows them to fall in love with a non-traditional and possibly dangerous man.

    Reply
  84. Society and societal expectations play a strong role in traditional historical romances. The sexy and strong, but morally ambiguous gentlemen seem to be acceptable. But a strong heroine? I like a writer that lets her heroine be as strong as the men. In fact, I think it’s the very strength of these women that allows them to fall in love with a non-traditional and possibly dangerous man.

    Reply
  85. Society and societal expectations play a strong role in traditional historical romances. The sexy and strong, but morally ambiguous gentlemen seem to be acceptable. But a strong heroine? I like a writer that lets her heroine be as strong as the men. In fact, I think it’s the very strength of these women that allows them to fall in love with a non-traditional and possibly dangerous man.

    Reply
  86. Anne,
    Your heroes are the kind of men who could tell you to go to hell and you’d actually look forward to the trip.
    Keep writing. We need you.

    Reply
  87. Anne,
    Your heroes are the kind of men who could tell you to go to hell and you’d actually look forward to the trip.
    Keep writing. We need you.

    Reply
  88. Anne,
    Your heroes are the kind of men who could tell you to go to hell and you’d actually look forward to the trip.
    Keep writing. We need you.

    Reply
  89. Anne,
    Your heroes are the kind of men who could tell you to go to hell and you’d actually look forward to the trip.
    Keep writing. We need you.

    Reply
  90. Anne,
    Your heroes are the kind of men who could tell you to go to hell and you’d actually look forward to the trip.
    Keep writing. We need you.

    Reply
  91. Anne, you have truly molded my view of the perfect romance. After twenty years of being a fan (more than half my life), nobody can touch me the way your books do. I love your heroes and I love your heroines’ capacity to love them and save them. They define the depths of what love can do in this world. Thank you so much for writing your wonderful books. I will always love them!

    Reply
  92. Anne, you have truly molded my view of the perfect romance. After twenty years of being a fan (more than half my life), nobody can touch me the way your books do. I love your heroes and I love your heroines’ capacity to love them and save them. They define the depths of what love can do in this world. Thank you so much for writing your wonderful books. I will always love them!

    Reply
  93. Anne, you have truly molded my view of the perfect romance. After twenty years of being a fan (more than half my life), nobody can touch me the way your books do. I love your heroes and I love your heroines’ capacity to love them and save them. They define the depths of what love can do in this world. Thank you so much for writing your wonderful books. I will always love them!

    Reply
  94. Anne, you have truly molded my view of the perfect romance. After twenty years of being a fan (more than half my life), nobody can touch me the way your books do. I love your heroes and I love your heroines’ capacity to love them and save them. They define the depths of what love can do in this world. Thank you so much for writing your wonderful books. I will always love them!

    Reply
  95. Anne, you have truly molded my view of the perfect romance. After twenty years of being a fan (more than half my life), nobody can touch me the way your books do. I love your heroes and I love your heroines’ capacity to love them and save them. They define the depths of what love can do in this world. Thank you so much for writing your wonderful books. I will always love them!

    Reply
  96. Wonderful post, Anne.
    The characters who captivate me the most are ones who push the boundaries, who delve into those dark places that frighten us all. That emotional intensity adds the sort of depth and gritty texture to a story that I find fascinating.
    That’s not to say I don’t enjoy light and frothy humor too. I do—very much But there’s something about a hero who grabs you by the throat . . .
    As a last note, having spent a semester this spring analyzing character and motivation with 18 college students, I have to say your explanation of your elemental hero and heroine is beautifully articulated, I’m copying it and saving it for future reference!

    Reply
  97. Wonderful post, Anne.
    The characters who captivate me the most are ones who push the boundaries, who delve into those dark places that frighten us all. That emotional intensity adds the sort of depth and gritty texture to a story that I find fascinating.
    That’s not to say I don’t enjoy light and frothy humor too. I do—very much But there’s something about a hero who grabs you by the throat . . .
    As a last note, having spent a semester this spring analyzing character and motivation with 18 college students, I have to say your explanation of your elemental hero and heroine is beautifully articulated, I’m copying it and saving it for future reference!

    Reply
  98. Wonderful post, Anne.
    The characters who captivate me the most are ones who push the boundaries, who delve into those dark places that frighten us all. That emotional intensity adds the sort of depth and gritty texture to a story that I find fascinating.
    That’s not to say I don’t enjoy light and frothy humor too. I do—very much But there’s something about a hero who grabs you by the throat . . .
    As a last note, having spent a semester this spring analyzing character and motivation with 18 college students, I have to say your explanation of your elemental hero and heroine is beautifully articulated, I’m copying it and saving it for future reference!

    Reply
  99. Wonderful post, Anne.
    The characters who captivate me the most are ones who push the boundaries, who delve into those dark places that frighten us all. That emotional intensity adds the sort of depth and gritty texture to a story that I find fascinating.
    That’s not to say I don’t enjoy light and frothy humor too. I do—very much But there’s something about a hero who grabs you by the throat . . .
    As a last note, having spent a semester this spring analyzing character and motivation with 18 college students, I have to say your explanation of your elemental hero and heroine is beautifully articulated, I’m copying it and saving it for future reference!

    Reply
  100. Wonderful post, Anne.
    The characters who captivate me the most are ones who push the boundaries, who delve into those dark places that frighten us all. That emotional intensity adds the sort of depth and gritty texture to a story that I find fascinating.
    That’s not to say I don’t enjoy light and frothy humor too. I do—very much But there’s something about a hero who grabs you by the throat . . .
    As a last note, having spent a semester this spring analyzing character and motivation with 18 college students, I have to say your explanation of your elemental hero and heroine is beautifully articulated, I’m copying it and saving it for future reference!

    Reply
  101. Hi, Jo here. I see Anne has stimulated just the sort of interesting discussion I anticipated.Thanks, Anne, and thank you all for your interesting comments.
    As she said, we disagree at times about how bad a hero can be, but only in terms of my reading tastes.I can see the appeal of the really bad man, and I think we agree on the appeal of one — Vidal, in Heyer’s Devil’s Cub.
    Perhaps the nuance there is that he still has a dominant father, so there’s someone he has to be wary of. It’s good for a bad man to have challenging limits on his behaviour, IMO. (Lucien in my Unwilling Bride also has a dominant father.)
    Vidal also has that element of “spoiled boy”, which leaves scope for improvement, though judging from the glimpse in Infamous Army, he didn’t improve much. Poor Mary!
    I love to live through the battle between a powerful, dangerous man and a woman up to the challenge, but at the end I need to feel that she’s won, and that her prize is a happy, unshadowed future with a devoted, loving, sexy-as-hell happy man.
    Feel free to comment on comments.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  102. Hi, Jo here. I see Anne has stimulated just the sort of interesting discussion I anticipated.Thanks, Anne, and thank you all for your interesting comments.
    As she said, we disagree at times about how bad a hero can be, but only in terms of my reading tastes.I can see the appeal of the really bad man, and I think we agree on the appeal of one — Vidal, in Heyer’s Devil’s Cub.
    Perhaps the nuance there is that he still has a dominant father, so there’s someone he has to be wary of. It’s good for a bad man to have challenging limits on his behaviour, IMO. (Lucien in my Unwilling Bride also has a dominant father.)
    Vidal also has that element of “spoiled boy”, which leaves scope for improvement, though judging from the glimpse in Infamous Army, he didn’t improve much. Poor Mary!
    I love to live through the battle between a powerful, dangerous man and a woman up to the challenge, but at the end I need to feel that she’s won, and that her prize is a happy, unshadowed future with a devoted, loving, sexy-as-hell happy man.
    Feel free to comment on comments.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  103. Hi, Jo here. I see Anne has stimulated just the sort of interesting discussion I anticipated.Thanks, Anne, and thank you all for your interesting comments.
    As she said, we disagree at times about how bad a hero can be, but only in terms of my reading tastes.I can see the appeal of the really bad man, and I think we agree on the appeal of one — Vidal, in Heyer’s Devil’s Cub.
    Perhaps the nuance there is that he still has a dominant father, so there’s someone he has to be wary of. It’s good for a bad man to have challenging limits on his behaviour, IMO. (Lucien in my Unwilling Bride also has a dominant father.)
    Vidal also has that element of “spoiled boy”, which leaves scope for improvement, though judging from the glimpse in Infamous Army, he didn’t improve much. Poor Mary!
    I love to live through the battle between a powerful, dangerous man and a woman up to the challenge, but at the end I need to feel that she’s won, and that her prize is a happy, unshadowed future with a devoted, loving, sexy-as-hell happy man.
    Feel free to comment on comments.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  104. Hi, Jo here. I see Anne has stimulated just the sort of interesting discussion I anticipated.Thanks, Anne, and thank you all for your interesting comments.
    As she said, we disagree at times about how bad a hero can be, but only in terms of my reading tastes.I can see the appeal of the really bad man, and I think we agree on the appeal of one — Vidal, in Heyer’s Devil’s Cub.
    Perhaps the nuance there is that he still has a dominant father, so there’s someone he has to be wary of. It’s good for a bad man to have challenging limits on his behaviour, IMO. (Lucien in my Unwilling Bride also has a dominant father.)
    Vidal also has that element of “spoiled boy”, which leaves scope for improvement, though judging from the glimpse in Infamous Army, he didn’t improve much. Poor Mary!
    I love to live through the battle between a powerful, dangerous man and a woman up to the challenge, but at the end I need to feel that she’s won, and that her prize is a happy, unshadowed future with a devoted, loving, sexy-as-hell happy man.
    Feel free to comment on comments.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  105. Hi, Jo here. I see Anne has stimulated just the sort of interesting discussion I anticipated.Thanks, Anne, and thank you all for your interesting comments.
    As she said, we disagree at times about how bad a hero can be, but only in terms of my reading tastes.I can see the appeal of the really bad man, and I think we agree on the appeal of one — Vidal, in Heyer’s Devil’s Cub.
    Perhaps the nuance there is that he still has a dominant father, so there’s someone he has to be wary of. It’s good for a bad man to have challenging limits on his behaviour, IMO. (Lucien in my Unwilling Bride also has a dominant father.)
    Vidal also has that element of “spoiled boy”, which leaves scope for improvement, though judging from the glimpse in Infamous Army, he didn’t improve much. Poor Mary!
    I love to live through the battle between a powerful, dangerous man and a woman up to the challenge, but at the end I need to feel that she’s won, and that her prize is a happy, unshadowed future with a devoted, loving, sexy-as-hell happy man.
    Feel free to comment on comments.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  106. Kim — absolutely he must be (mostly) redeemed by the end of the book and by the heroine’s entry into his life. And if he’s naughty, domineering, etc. she’d be able to slap him down. Once the heroine understands how much he loves her she’ll have no qualms about calling him out on his behavior.
    Kat – I think my heroines are strong in quieter ways. For some people their strength is too subtle, but I see them as very powerful.
    Jen — LOL!
    Jo — you bet we agree on Vidal. Sigh. And Avon — he’s the kind of man who’s tamed but still dangerous. Love him to pieces.
    In fact, Adrian, the hero of RECKLESS, the second book in The House of Rohan, has a lot in common with Vidal, though in fact he’s a lot more cheerful.
    Thanks so much for all the kind words, guys. I really appreciate it.

    Reply
  107. Kim — absolutely he must be (mostly) redeemed by the end of the book and by the heroine’s entry into his life. And if he’s naughty, domineering, etc. she’d be able to slap him down. Once the heroine understands how much he loves her she’ll have no qualms about calling him out on his behavior.
    Kat – I think my heroines are strong in quieter ways. For some people their strength is too subtle, but I see them as very powerful.
    Jen — LOL!
    Jo — you bet we agree on Vidal. Sigh. And Avon — he’s the kind of man who’s tamed but still dangerous. Love him to pieces.
    In fact, Adrian, the hero of RECKLESS, the second book in The House of Rohan, has a lot in common with Vidal, though in fact he’s a lot more cheerful.
    Thanks so much for all the kind words, guys. I really appreciate it.

    Reply
  108. Kim — absolutely he must be (mostly) redeemed by the end of the book and by the heroine’s entry into his life. And if he’s naughty, domineering, etc. she’d be able to slap him down. Once the heroine understands how much he loves her she’ll have no qualms about calling him out on his behavior.
    Kat – I think my heroines are strong in quieter ways. For some people their strength is too subtle, but I see them as very powerful.
    Jen — LOL!
    Jo — you bet we agree on Vidal. Sigh. And Avon — he’s the kind of man who’s tamed but still dangerous. Love him to pieces.
    In fact, Adrian, the hero of RECKLESS, the second book in The House of Rohan, has a lot in common with Vidal, though in fact he’s a lot more cheerful.
    Thanks so much for all the kind words, guys. I really appreciate it.

    Reply
  109. Kim — absolutely he must be (mostly) redeemed by the end of the book and by the heroine’s entry into his life. And if he’s naughty, domineering, etc. she’d be able to slap him down. Once the heroine understands how much he loves her she’ll have no qualms about calling him out on his behavior.
    Kat – I think my heroines are strong in quieter ways. For some people their strength is too subtle, but I see them as very powerful.
    Jen — LOL!
    Jo — you bet we agree on Vidal. Sigh. And Avon — he’s the kind of man who’s tamed but still dangerous. Love him to pieces.
    In fact, Adrian, the hero of RECKLESS, the second book in The House of Rohan, has a lot in common with Vidal, though in fact he’s a lot more cheerful.
    Thanks so much for all the kind words, guys. I really appreciate it.

    Reply
  110. Kim — absolutely he must be (mostly) redeemed by the end of the book and by the heroine’s entry into his life. And if he’s naughty, domineering, etc. she’d be able to slap him down. Once the heroine understands how much he loves her she’ll have no qualms about calling him out on his behavior.
    Kat – I think my heroines are strong in quieter ways. For some people their strength is too subtle, but I see them as very powerful.
    Jen — LOL!
    Jo — you bet we agree on Vidal. Sigh. And Avon — he’s the kind of man who’s tamed but still dangerous. Love him to pieces.
    In fact, Adrian, the hero of RECKLESS, the second book in The House of Rohan, has a lot in common with Vidal, though in fact he’s a lot more cheerful.
    Thanks so much for all the kind words, guys. I really appreciate it.

    Reply
  111. Anne, a friend read an eARC of Ruthless and emailed me when she finished saying, “You’ll want to read this one. It reminded me of The Devil’s Waltz.” Once she said that, of course, I couldn’t wait to read the book, and I’m so happy I did.
    Reckless is already on shelves here. My copy is on the top of my TBR stack, just waiting for life to give me several hours of reading time. I cannot read your books in small increments. Yay for your return to historicals!

    Reply
  112. Anne, a friend read an eARC of Ruthless and emailed me when she finished saying, “You’ll want to read this one. It reminded me of The Devil’s Waltz.” Once she said that, of course, I couldn’t wait to read the book, and I’m so happy I did.
    Reckless is already on shelves here. My copy is on the top of my TBR stack, just waiting for life to give me several hours of reading time. I cannot read your books in small increments. Yay for your return to historicals!

    Reply
  113. Anne, a friend read an eARC of Ruthless and emailed me when she finished saying, “You’ll want to read this one. It reminded me of The Devil’s Waltz.” Once she said that, of course, I couldn’t wait to read the book, and I’m so happy I did.
    Reckless is already on shelves here. My copy is on the top of my TBR stack, just waiting for life to give me several hours of reading time. I cannot read your books in small increments. Yay for your return to historicals!

    Reply
  114. Anne, a friend read an eARC of Ruthless and emailed me when she finished saying, “You’ll want to read this one. It reminded me of The Devil’s Waltz.” Once she said that, of course, I couldn’t wait to read the book, and I’m so happy I did.
    Reckless is already on shelves here. My copy is on the top of my TBR stack, just waiting for life to give me several hours of reading time. I cannot read your books in small increments. Yay for your return to historicals!

    Reply
  115. Anne, a friend read an eARC of Ruthless and emailed me when she finished saying, “You’ll want to read this one. It reminded me of The Devil’s Waltz.” Once she said that, of course, I couldn’t wait to read the book, and I’m so happy I did.
    Reckless is already on shelves here. My copy is on the top of my TBR stack, just waiting for life to give me several hours of reading time. I cannot read your books in small increments. Yay for your return to historicals!

    Reply
  116. Loved your post! You’re one of the few authors that writes truly ‘bad’ heroes and I just love them. Your books RITUAL SINS is a huge favorite of mine, and I know it’s a controversial one for many people. Can’t wait to read these new stories!

    Reply
  117. Loved your post! You’re one of the few authors that writes truly ‘bad’ heroes and I just love them. Your books RITUAL SINS is a huge favorite of mine, and I know it’s a controversial one for many people. Can’t wait to read these new stories!

    Reply
  118. Loved your post! You’re one of the few authors that writes truly ‘bad’ heroes and I just love them. Your books RITUAL SINS is a huge favorite of mine, and I know it’s a controversial one for many people. Can’t wait to read these new stories!

    Reply
  119. Loved your post! You’re one of the few authors that writes truly ‘bad’ heroes and I just love them. Your books RITUAL SINS is a huge favorite of mine, and I know it’s a controversial one for many people. Can’t wait to read these new stories!

    Reply
  120. Loved your post! You’re one of the few authors that writes truly ‘bad’ heroes and I just love them. Your books RITUAL SINS is a huge favorite of mine, and I know it’s a controversial one for many people. Can’t wait to read these new stories!

    Reply
  121. What rock have I been hiding under? I must find these books IMMEDIATELY–it’s like someone asked me what are all my favorite things in heroes and heroines and then put them in a story. (Okay, I do tend to get annoyed if there is a kidnapping in EVERY book, esp if it’s thrown in at the end and there’s yet another duke involved, but if it adds to the story and the heroine is ANNOYED–well, that’s just funny. That’s my kind of heroine. I love the unflappable heroine.)
    What draws me to the story is the heroes–because clearly there is not a “fake rake” to be found in your toy box. No sheep in wolves clothing–they are who they are, and while the heroine who loves them might put a civilized veneer on them and they might rein themselves in a bit where the heroine is concerned (or so we hope, I mean THAT’s the fantasy), they’re still very, very BAD.

    Reply
  122. What rock have I been hiding under? I must find these books IMMEDIATELY–it’s like someone asked me what are all my favorite things in heroes and heroines and then put them in a story. (Okay, I do tend to get annoyed if there is a kidnapping in EVERY book, esp if it’s thrown in at the end and there’s yet another duke involved, but if it adds to the story and the heroine is ANNOYED–well, that’s just funny. That’s my kind of heroine. I love the unflappable heroine.)
    What draws me to the story is the heroes–because clearly there is not a “fake rake” to be found in your toy box. No sheep in wolves clothing–they are who they are, and while the heroine who loves them might put a civilized veneer on them and they might rein themselves in a bit where the heroine is concerned (or so we hope, I mean THAT’s the fantasy), they’re still very, very BAD.

    Reply
  123. What rock have I been hiding under? I must find these books IMMEDIATELY–it’s like someone asked me what are all my favorite things in heroes and heroines and then put them in a story. (Okay, I do tend to get annoyed if there is a kidnapping in EVERY book, esp if it’s thrown in at the end and there’s yet another duke involved, but if it adds to the story and the heroine is ANNOYED–well, that’s just funny. That’s my kind of heroine. I love the unflappable heroine.)
    What draws me to the story is the heroes–because clearly there is not a “fake rake” to be found in your toy box. No sheep in wolves clothing–they are who they are, and while the heroine who loves them might put a civilized veneer on them and they might rein themselves in a bit where the heroine is concerned (or so we hope, I mean THAT’s the fantasy), they’re still very, very BAD.

    Reply
  124. What rock have I been hiding under? I must find these books IMMEDIATELY–it’s like someone asked me what are all my favorite things in heroes and heroines and then put them in a story. (Okay, I do tend to get annoyed if there is a kidnapping in EVERY book, esp if it’s thrown in at the end and there’s yet another duke involved, but if it adds to the story and the heroine is ANNOYED–well, that’s just funny. That’s my kind of heroine. I love the unflappable heroine.)
    What draws me to the story is the heroes–because clearly there is not a “fake rake” to be found in your toy box. No sheep in wolves clothing–they are who they are, and while the heroine who loves them might put a civilized veneer on them and they might rein themselves in a bit where the heroine is concerned (or so we hope, I mean THAT’s the fantasy), they’re still very, very BAD.

    Reply
  125. What rock have I been hiding under? I must find these books IMMEDIATELY–it’s like someone asked me what are all my favorite things in heroes and heroines and then put them in a story. (Okay, I do tend to get annoyed if there is a kidnapping in EVERY book, esp if it’s thrown in at the end and there’s yet another duke involved, but if it adds to the story and the heroine is ANNOYED–well, that’s just funny. That’s my kind of heroine. I love the unflappable heroine.)
    What draws me to the story is the heroes–because clearly there is not a “fake rake” to be found in your toy box. No sheep in wolves clothing–they are who they are, and while the heroine who loves them might put a civilized veneer on them and they might rein themselves in a bit where the heroine is concerned (or so we hope, I mean THAT’s the fantasy), they’re still very, very BAD.

    Reply
  126. What a nice birthday present:Anne Stuart chez The Wenches!
    Unlike many other readers, I tend to like the good guy and not the various rakes, rogues and scoundrels, except when it comes to Anne’s heroes: I love them all, bad and cruel as they are! They do produce addiction. I love them so much I honestly have trouble liking Anne’s heroines as well since several of them do not appear to be enough strong, in my opinion, to stand by the hero. Anne’s bad boys are so vivid and intense that overshadow completely the girls on the story. Not that I complain. It is Anne’s unique style and I wouldn’t change a thing. I guess Anne just puts her best energy in male characters, maybe they act the way she would act if she was a man and not the sweet lady we know :). Ms Stuart I am so happy you are back to historicals: it was about time and I have already ordered them!

    Reply
  127. What a nice birthday present:Anne Stuart chez The Wenches!
    Unlike many other readers, I tend to like the good guy and not the various rakes, rogues and scoundrels, except when it comes to Anne’s heroes: I love them all, bad and cruel as they are! They do produce addiction. I love them so much I honestly have trouble liking Anne’s heroines as well since several of them do not appear to be enough strong, in my opinion, to stand by the hero. Anne’s bad boys are so vivid and intense that overshadow completely the girls on the story. Not that I complain. It is Anne’s unique style and I wouldn’t change a thing. I guess Anne just puts her best energy in male characters, maybe they act the way she would act if she was a man and not the sweet lady we know :). Ms Stuart I am so happy you are back to historicals: it was about time and I have already ordered them!

    Reply
  128. What a nice birthday present:Anne Stuart chez The Wenches!
    Unlike many other readers, I tend to like the good guy and not the various rakes, rogues and scoundrels, except when it comes to Anne’s heroes: I love them all, bad and cruel as they are! They do produce addiction. I love them so much I honestly have trouble liking Anne’s heroines as well since several of them do not appear to be enough strong, in my opinion, to stand by the hero. Anne’s bad boys are so vivid and intense that overshadow completely the girls on the story. Not that I complain. It is Anne’s unique style and I wouldn’t change a thing. I guess Anne just puts her best energy in male characters, maybe they act the way she would act if she was a man and not the sweet lady we know :). Ms Stuart I am so happy you are back to historicals: it was about time and I have already ordered them!

    Reply
  129. What a nice birthday present:Anne Stuart chez The Wenches!
    Unlike many other readers, I tend to like the good guy and not the various rakes, rogues and scoundrels, except when it comes to Anne’s heroes: I love them all, bad and cruel as they are! They do produce addiction. I love them so much I honestly have trouble liking Anne’s heroines as well since several of them do not appear to be enough strong, in my opinion, to stand by the hero. Anne’s bad boys are so vivid and intense that overshadow completely the girls on the story. Not that I complain. It is Anne’s unique style and I wouldn’t change a thing. I guess Anne just puts her best energy in male characters, maybe they act the way she would act if she was a man and not the sweet lady we know :). Ms Stuart I am so happy you are back to historicals: it was about time and I have already ordered them!

    Reply
  130. What a nice birthday present:Anne Stuart chez The Wenches!
    Unlike many other readers, I tend to like the good guy and not the various rakes, rogues and scoundrels, except when it comes to Anne’s heroes: I love them all, bad and cruel as they are! They do produce addiction. I love them so much I honestly have trouble liking Anne’s heroines as well since several of them do not appear to be enough strong, in my opinion, to stand by the hero. Anne’s bad boys are so vivid and intense that overshadow completely the girls on the story. Not that I complain. It is Anne’s unique style and I wouldn’t change a thing. I guess Anne just puts her best energy in male characters, maybe they act the way she would act if she was a man and not the sweet lady we know :). Ms Stuart I am so happy you are back to historicals: it was about time and I have already ordered them!

    Reply
  131. Anne, I loved Ruthless (I went through the fires of e-book hell to get it, too, and it was completely worth it).
    Although I do read many “light and frothy” romances and find them entertaining, the ones I find truly engaging and memorable are novels like Ruthless–dark, edgy, thrilling, complex.
    As a professional do-gooder whose main fascination in life is contemplating and making meaning out of the complexities of good and evil, redemption and reconciliation in the world (I’m a minister), I deeply enjoy your “bad-boy” heroes and their struggles with the shadows. I like being able to enter into the mystery and peel back the layers of characters and events little by little–and the more layers of your characters that are peeled away, the more complex they seem to get.
    Perhaps “dark writing” allows writer and reader to explore bigger, more high stakes issues–and to dig deeper psychologically and spiritually into characters and relationships?
    You are incredibly skilled at this kind of high stakes writing, and I can’t wait to follow more Rohans into the shadows!
    Blessings,
    Melinda

    Reply
  132. Anne, I loved Ruthless (I went through the fires of e-book hell to get it, too, and it was completely worth it).
    Although I do read many “light and frothy” romances and find them entertaining, the ones I find truly engaging and memorable are novels like Ruthless–dark, edgy, thrilling, complex.
    As a professional do-gooder whose main fascination in life is contemplating and making meaning out of the complexities of good and evil, redemption and reconciliation in the world (I’m a minister), I deeply enjoy your “bad-boy” heroes and their struggles with the shadows. I like being able to enter into the mystery and peel back the layers of characters and events little by little–and the more layers of your characters that are peeled away, the more complex they seem to get.
    Perhaps “dark writing” allows writer and reader to explore bigger, more high stakes issues–and to dig deeper psychologically and spiritually into characters and relationships?
    You are incredibly skilled at this kind of high stakes writing, and I can’t wait to follow more Rohans into the shadows!
    Blessings,
    Melinda

    Reply
  133. Anne, I loved Ruthless (I went through the fires of e-book hell to get it, too, and it was completely worth it).
    Although I do read many “light and frothy” romances and find them entertaining, the ones I find truly engaging and memorable are novels like Ruthless–dark, edgy, thrilling, complex.
    As a professional do-gooder whose main fascination in life is contemplating and making meaning out of the complexities of good and evil, redemption and reconciliation in the world (I’m a minister), I deeply enjoy your “bad-boy” heroes and their struggles with the shadows. I like being able to enter into the mystery and peel back the layers of characters and events little by little–and the more layers of your characters that are peeled away, the more complex they seem to get.
    Perhaps “dark writing” allows writer and reader to explore bigger, more high stakes issues–and to dig deeper psychologically and spiritually into characters and relationships?
    You are incredibly skilled at this kind of high stakes writing, and I can’t wait to follow more Rohans into the shadows!
    Blessings,
    Melinda

    Reply
  134. Anne, I loved Ruthless (I went through the fires of e-book hell to get it, too, and it was completely worth it).
    Although I do read many “light and frothy” romances and find them entertaining, the ones I find truly engaging and memorable are novels like Ruthless–dark, edgy, thrilling, complex.
    As a professional do-gooder whose main fascination in life is contemplating and making meaning out of the complexities of good and evil, redemption and reconciliation in the world (I’m a minister), I deeply enjoy your “bad-boy” heroes and their struggles with the shadows. I like being able to enter into the mystery and peel back the layers of characters and events little by little–and the more layers of your characters that are peeled away, the more complex they seem to get.
    Perhaps “dark writing” allows writer and reader to explore bigger, more high stakes issues–and to dig deeper psychologically and spiritually into characters and relationships?
    You are incredibly skilled at this kind of high stakes writing, and I can’t wait to follow more Rohans into the shadows!
    Blessings,
    Melinda

    Reply
  135. Anne, I loved Ruthless (I went through the fires of e-book hell to get it, too, and it was completely worth it).
    Although I do read many “light and frothy” romances and find them entertaining, the ones I find truly engaging and memorable are novels like Ruthless–dark, edgy, thrilling, complex.
    As a professional do-gooder whose main fascination in life is contemplating and making meaning out of the complexities of good and evil, redemption and reconciliation in the world (I’m a minister), I deeply enjoy your “bad-boy” heroes and their struggles with the shadows. I like being able to enter into the mystery and peel back the layers of characters and events little by little–and the more layers of your characters that are peeled away, the more complex they seem to get.
    Perhaps “dark writing” allows writer and reader to explore bigger, more high stakes issues–and to dig deeper psychologically and spiritually into characters and relationships?
    You are incredibly skilled at this kind of high stakes writing, and I can’t wait to follow more Rohans into the shadows!
    Blessings,
    Melinda

    Reply
  136. Hi, guys. Again, thanks. Ann — year, RITUAL SINS was where they ran off with the money. Very wicked of them. But then, that was a pretty bad hero.
    RevMelinda — did you have to deal with the Nook mess? My sympathies.

    Reply
  137. Hi, guys. Again, thanks. Ann — year, RITUAL SINS was where they ran off with the money. Very wicked of them. But then, that was a pretty bad hero.
    RevMelinda — did you have to deal with the Nook mess? My sympathies.

    Reply
  138. Hi, guys. Again, thanks. Ann — year, RITUAL SINS was where they ran off with the money. Very wicked of them. But then, that was a pretty bad hero.
    RevMelinda — did you have to deal with the Nook mess? My sympathies.

    Reply
  139. Hi, guys. Again, thanks. Ann — year, RITUAL SINS was where they ran off with the money. Very wicked of them. But then, that was a pretty bad hero.
    RevMelinda — did you have to deal with the Nook mess? My sympathies.

    Reply
  140. Hi, guys. Again, thanks. Ann — year, RITUAL SINS was where they ran off with the money. Very wicked of them. But then, that was a pretty bad hero.
    RevMelinda — did you have to deal with the Nook mess? My sympathies.

    Reply
  141. Your heroes sound like villains to me, and I can’t imagine why any woman would want them.
    I think men get away with that bad behavior because there are women who let them–those “forgiving” (stupid)heroines of yours.
    I notice there aren’t any romances where the good hero loves a bad heroine.

    Reply
  142. Your heroes sound like villains to me, and I can’t imagine why any woman would want them.
    I think men get away with that bad behavior because there are women who let them–those “forgiving” (stupid)heroines of yours.
    I notice there aren’t any romances where the good hero loves a bad heroine.

    Reply
  143. Your heroes sound like villains to me, and I can’t imagine why any woman would want them.
    I think men get away with that bad behavior because there are women who let them–those “forgiving” (stupid)heroines of yours.
    I notice there aren’t any romances where the good hero loves a bad heroine.

    Reply
  144. Your heroes sound like villains to me, and I can’t imagine why any woman would want them.
    I think men get away with that bad behavior because there are women who let them–those “forgiving” (stupid)heroines of yours.
    I notice there aren’t any romances where the good hero loves a bad heroine.

    Reply
  145. Your heroes sound like villains to me, and I can’t imagine why any woman would want them.
    I think men get away with that bad behavior because there are women who let them–those “forgiving” (stupid)heroines of yours.
    I notice there aren’t any romances where the good hero loves a bad heroine.

    Reply
  146. It is not fair to judge a book unless you have read it, unlike you I have read Ms.Stuarts books and LOVED every one them..I hope you know that this is FICTION, you know make believe.. this forum is for FANS, why bother being negative.. you must have some problems…. maybe you would be happy reading one of those christian romance novels instead? BTW, her heroines are the complete opposite, which you would know if you actually read the books.. In case the small town you live in does not have a calender, it is 2010.. Tal J

    Reply
  147. It is not fair to judge a book unless you have read it, unlike you I have read Ms.Stuarts books and LOVED every one them..I hope you know that this is FICTION, you know make believe.. this forum is for FANS, why bother being negative.. you must have some problems…. maybe you would be happy reading one of those christian romance novels instead? BTW, her heroines are the complete opposite, which you would know if you actually read the books.. In case the small town you live in does not have a calender, it is 2010.. Tal J

    Reply
  148. It is not fair to judge a book unless you have read it, unlike you I have read Ms.Stuarts books and LOVED every one them..I hope you know that this is FICTION, you know make believe.. this forum is for FANS, why bother being negative.. you must have some problems…. maybe you would be happy reading one of those christian romance novels instead? BTW, her heroines are the complete opposite, which you would know if you actually read the books.. In case the small town you live in does not have a calender, it is 2010.. Tal J

    Reply
  149. It is not fair to judge a book unless you have read it, unlike you I have read Ms.Stuarts books and LOVED every one them..I hope you know that this is FICTION, you know make believe.. this forum is for FANS, why bother being negative.. you must have some problems…. maybe you would be happy reading one of those christian romance novels instead? BTW, her heroines are the complete opposite, which you would know if you actually read the books.. In case the small town you live in does not have a calender, it is 2010.. Tal J

    Reply
  150. It is not fair to judge a book unless you have read it, unlike you I have read Ms.Stuarts books and LOVED every one them..I hope you know that this is FICTION, you know make believe.. this forum is for FANS, why bother being negative.. you must have some problems…. maybe you would be happy reading one of those christian romance novels instead? BTW, her heroines are the complete opposite, which you would know if you actually read the books.. In case the small town you live in does not have a calender, it is 2010.. Tal J

    Reply
  151. Yes, Anne, I was caught in the Great Nook Debacle, but finally triumphed and was able to read Ruthless as my reward. I hope someone (your agent? your publisher? B&N?) sent you a bucket of margaritas to atone.
    I just preordered Reckless (being a forgiving type and also greedy), so here’s hoping the e-path is smoother this time!

    Reply
  152. Yes, Anne, I was caught in the Great Nook Debacle, but finally triumphed and was able to read Ruthless as my reward. I hope someone (your agent? your publisher? B&N?) sent you a bucket of margaritas to atone.
    I just preordered Reckless (being a forgiving type and also greedy), so here’s hoping the e-path is smoother this time!

    Reply
  153. Yes, Anne, I was caught in the Great Nook Debacle, but finally triumphed and was able to read Ruthless as my reward. I hope someone (your agent? your publisher? B&N?) sent you a bucket of margaritas to atone.
    I just preordered Reckless (being a forgiving type and also greedy), so here’s hoping the e-path is smoother this time!

    Reply
  154. Yes, Anne, I was caught in the Great Nook Debacle, but finally triumphed and was able to read Ruthless as my reward. I hope someone (your agent? your publisher? B&N?) sent you a bucket of margaritas to atone.
    I just preordered Reckless (being a forgiving type and also greedy), so here’s hoping the e-path is smoother this time!

    Reply
  155. Yes, Anne, I was caught in the Great Nook Debacle, but finally triumphed and was able to read Ruthless as my reward. I hope someone (your agent? your publisher? B&N?) sent you a bucket of margaritas to atone.
    I just preordered Reckless (being a forgiving type and also greedy), so here’s hoping the e-path is smoother this time!

    Reply
  156. This certainly has been interesting, and with many great comments. Thank you, Anne, for stirring a wonderful debate.
    Tal,Linda was commenting on Anne’s frank comments here, not her books, so your response to her wasn’t fair at all.
    Linda, good question about good men loving bad women. I think there have been a few. I remember one where the heroine was an assassin. Contemporary, though. I’m sure there are more. Though I don’t write bad heroines (IMO, at least!) I have written books where good men love difficult women, as in Shattered Rose.
    To clarify something. The Word Wenches blog isn’t for _fans_, even of the Wenches; it’s for anyone with an interest in historical fiction and connected subjects.
    Cheers!
    Jo

    Reply
  157. This certainly has been interesting, and with many great comments. Thank you, Anne, for stirring a wonderful debate.
    Tal,Linda was commenting on Anne’s frank comments here, not her books, so your response to her wasn’t fair at all.
    Linda, good question about good men loving bad women. I think there have been a few. I remember one where the heroine was an assassin. Contemporary, though. I’m sure there are more. Though I don’t write bad heroines (IMO, at least!) I have written books where good men love difficult women, as in Shattered Rose.
    To clarify something. The Word Wenches blog isn’t for _fans_, even of the Wenches; it’s for anyone with an interest in historical fiction and connected subjects.
    Cheers!
    Jo

    Reply
  158. This certainly has been interesting, and with many great comments. Thank you, Anne, for stirring a wonderful debate.
    Tal,Linda was commenting on Anne’s frank comments here, not her books, so your response to her wasn’t fair at all.
    Linda, good question about good men loving bad women. I think there have been a few. I remember one where the heroine was an assassin. Contemporary, though. I’m sure there are more. Though I don’t write bad heroines (IMO, at least!) I have written books where good men love difficult women, as in Shattered Rose.
    To clarify something. The Word Wenches blog isn’t for _fans_, even of the Wenches; it’s for anyone with an interest in historical fiction and connected subjects.
    Cheers!
    Jo

    Reply
  159. This certainly has been interesting, and with many great comments. Thank you, Anne, for stirring a wonderful debate.
    Tal,Linda was commenting on Anne’s frank comments here, not her books, so your response to her wasn’t fair at all.
    Linda, good question about good men loving bad women. I think there have been a few. I remember one where the heroine was an assassin. Contemporary, though. I’m sure there are more. Though I don’t write bad heroines (IMO, at least!) I have written books where good men love difficult women, as in Shattered Rose.
    To clarify something. The Word Wenches blog isn’t for _fans_, even of the Wenches; it’s for anyone with an interest in historical fiction and connected subjects.
    Cheers!
    Jo

    Reply
  160. This certainly has been interesting, and with many great comments. Thank you, Anne, for stirring a wonderful debate.
    Tal,Linda was commenting on Anne’s frank comments here, not her books, so your response to her wasn’t fair at all.
    Linda, good question about good men loving bad women. I think there have been a few. I remember one where the heroine was an assassin. Contemporary, though. I’m sure there are more. Though I don’t write bad heroines (IMO, at least!) I have written books where good men love difficult women, as in Shattered Rose.
    To clarify something. The Word Wenches blog isn’t for _fans_, even of the Wenches; it’s for anyone with an interest in historical fiction and connected subjects.
    Cheers!
    Jo

    Reply
  161. As you know, we like to give our guests splendid gifts, and I really thought Anne Stuart needed a crown.
    I’ve attached it to the bottom of the blog, and it’ll appear again on Sunday.
    Hail the queen!
    Jo

    Reply
  162. As you know, we like to give our guests splendid gifts, and I really thought Anne Stuart needed a crown.
    I’ve attached it to the bottom of the blog, and it’ll appear again on Sunday.
    Hail the queen!
    Jo

    Reply
  163. As you know, we like to give our guests splendid gifts, and I really thought Anne Stuart needed a crown.
    I’ve attached it to the bottom of the blog, and it’ll appear again on Sunday.
    Hail the queen!
    Jo

    Reply
  164. As you know, we like to give our guests splendid gifts, and I really thought Anne Stuart needed a crown.
    I’ve attached it to the bottom of the blog, and it’ll appear again on Sunday.
    Hail the queen!
    Jo

    Reply
  165. As you know, we like to give our guests splendid gifts, and I really thought Anne Stuart needed a crown.
    I’ve attached it to the bottom of the blog, and it’ll appear again on Sunday.
    Hail the queen!
    Jo

    Reply
  166. I remember reading Anne’s story with Simon of Navarre, I believe it is Lord of Danger. It was a great story and I can see how the hero and heroine had the characteristics she listed. The other thing I noticed about the story was the intensity of it from the chemistry between the characters to the intrigues of the plot.

    Reply
  167. I remember reading Anne’s story with Simon of Navarre, I believe it is Lord of Danger. It was a great story and I can see how the hero and heroine had the characteristics she listed. The other thing I noticed about the story was the intensity of it from the chemistry between the characters to the intrigues of the plot.

    Reply
  168. I remember reading Anne’s story with Simon of Navarre, I believe it is Lord of Danger. It was a great story and I can see how the hero and heroine had the characteristics she listed. The other thing I noticed about the story was the intensity of it from the chemistry between the characters to the intrigues of the plot.

    Reply
  169. I remember reading Anne’s story with Simon of Navarre, I believe it is Lord of Danger. It was a great story and I can see how the hero and heroine had the characteristics she listed. The other thing I noticed about the story was the intensity of it from the chemistry between the characters to the intrigues of the plot.

    Reply
  170. I remember reading Anne’s story with Simon of Navarre, I believe it is Lord of Danger. It was a great story and I can see how the hero and heroine had the characteristics she listed. The other thing I noticed about the story was the intensity of it from the chemistry between the characters to the intrigues of the plot.

    Reply

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