Anne Gracie visits from Down Under

Cat_243_dover_3by Mary Jo

Today we’re joined by Anne Gracie, an Australian writer of Regency historicals. (Visit her site at http://www.annegracie.com/ ) Her latest Regency historical, The Stolen Princess, was a January release.

Anne’s humor, innovative plot twists, and characters have made her a reader favorite.  She has been a Rita finalist and has won numerous awards in both the U. S. and Australia.  Anne has done all kinds of interesting things, and she’s going to share some of them with us now. 

From Anne Gracie:  Mary Jo and Wenches, thanks so much for inviting me. I’m delighted to be here.

MJP:  How did you start writing?  Were you making up stories in kindergarten with a pencil clutched in one chubby fist, or did you come to the trade later?

Anne_gracie_2  Anne Gracie: As a toddler I told our animals stories — the poor creatures had to pay attention. I can’t remember if I wrote stories or not: we moved all the time and a lot of stuff was tossed out with each move, so I have very little from my childhood, just my old teddy and a few beloved books.

In high school, I remember thinking I was hopeless at "creative writing" as they gave us strange literary exercises that had nothing to do with stories. I don’t remember ever being asked to write a story. Essays, yes, by the hundreds.

I’ve always had stories in my head, though. I started writing them down when I took a year off work and went backpacking around the world on my own. Travel gives you lots of  alone time, so as well as writing in my travel journal, I wrote the stories down — and was hooked.

(Note from MJP: On my first trip to Europe, when I stayed in hostels, I met any number of young women from Australia and New Zealand who were hitching their way around the world.  Intrepid Antipodeans!)

MJP:   What was the biggest mistake you made when you first began writing?      

Perfect_stranger_2  AG: I think I made every mistake in the book. πŸ˜‰ One was writing to US publishers offering them "my regency novel, Gallant Waif," and they all turned it down unseen, assuming it was a traditional regency. In Australia "a regency" is any book set in that period, so I didn’t know to call mine a regency historical. I cut 40,000 words off it and sold it to Mills and Boon. And though M&B were wonderful to me, the sad fact is that my books with them were pulped after a month on the shelves, and I wish they’d lived a bit longer 

  MJP:  You’re our first Australian guest.  Why do you think we independent, republican colonials, whether Australian, Canadian, or Americans, love Regency historicals so much?  Despite the glut of Regencies, predictions of the death of historicals, and now an expanding range of settings, the Regency historical subgenre is still doing just fine.  Do you think this will continue?

AG:  I think "our" Regency era is, in a way, a fictional world loosely created from history by a whole body of marvelous fiction. And the more good books and movies set in that era are published, the more that world becomes real and beloved and familiar to more people, so it’s very easy to step into it.

Perfect_rake I suspect the subgenre faltered when that world became too rigid and limited, but once people stepped outside of Almacks etc, it got a whole new lease of life. The actual Regency era has everything any novelist could want – glamour, war, lords and ladies, rituals, poverty, social climbing, great art and architecture, exclusivity, technological innovation, revolutions — there’s no end to the fodder –and we can approach it as an insular society or in the wider world context. I believe that as long as people bring their own unique take on it and write fabulous new stories, the subgenre will continue to flourish. I certainly hope so.

MJP: Your January novel, the delicious THE STOLEN PRINCESS, is the first of your new Devil Riders series.  Why a princess?

AG: The princess was actually my editor’s idea. I wanted to start with a story she thought was a bit "gritty" so she asked for something a little more glamorous for the first story — I so often stick my hero Stolen20princess_2 and heroine in some run-down castle or country house with almost no staff.

So I took a princess … and stuck her in a run down country house with almost no staff. She does have a tiara, though. πŸ˜‰

MJP:  Some authors find that collaging is a creative aid when developing a new story.  Despite my years as a professional designer, the idea sooo doesn’t work for me, but you’re an advocate. How does the process work for you?

AG: Partly it’s that I enjoy the process (legitimate procrastination) and partly it’s Harlequin_tender_2 inspiration. I only have to look at the collage and I’m plunged into the world and the mood of my book. It also helps keep my initial excitement about the story alive. That’s really important to me — I often hit the doldrums and wonder why I ever thought this idea would fly.

MJP:  Media tie-in books that are connected to movies or tv shows are common in science fiction and fantasy, but rare in romance.  You’re one of the few who has done this, with your novelization of THE TUDORS, which came out in the U. S. this past November.   How did you get the job, and what was the process like?  What was it like to follow a screenplay where the emphasis was more on drama than historical accuracy?

AG:  I got into it simply because my agent asked me if I’d like to do it. My initial reaction was to say no — I’ve always written my own stuff — but  it was an opportunity to expand my skills, so I agreed. I was given the scripts, and that was it. The series was still in production so I couldn’t see the show. After I’d sent in the book, they sent me DVDs of the first 6 episodes. I still haven’t seen the whole show.

I found it much more difficult than I’d first imagined, partly because of the departures the script writer Tudors1 had made from history. I could see why he’d done that — it made for a smoother, more dramatic story that would be easier for a TV audience to follow — but it made the research a bit tricky. But it was his story, not mine, and that’s how I approached it.

I learned a lot from the novelization process, and ended up enjoying it, but decided I prefer writing my own stories.

MJP: My mother was a teacher and a literacy volunteer.  So are you.  As a writer, I think that giving someone the gift of reading is one of the best things anyone can do.  Do you care to expand on that?

AG: Reading has been a huge joy to me and I love to share that.  I try to show my students the fun of reading, as well as the practical use of it. We did read-along plays and simplified novels and my "book club" used to be standing room only — anyone could come, even if they could only read three words, and the women sobbed for Jane Eyre and the men yo-ho-hoed for a bottle of rum, and they all adored A Christmas Carol. The joy and the power of stories. I love it.

Mizuri_the_cat I also write little beginner literacy books for adults, with very simple stories and funny cartoons. They’ve been amazingly successful, I guess because they’re fun and also because there’s so few absolute beginner level books around. They’re in every public library in Canada, I believe.  (Above, an illustration from Mizuri the Cat, by Anne.)

http://pageturners.prace.vic.edu.au/

Many, many thanks for joining us.  Anne has generously agreed to donate a copy of The Stolen Princess to someone who leaves a comment here between now and Sunday night. 

Thank you, Mary Jo and wenches. It’s been wonderful.

Annes_valentine_dog

Anne is giving us a special Valentine’s image of her dog! 

Best,

Mary Jo

295 thoughts on “Anne Gracie visits from Down Under”

  1. Great interview–very informing. πŸ™‚ Congratultions on the novelization of The Tudors, a daunting task, and thank you for all your work in adult literacy. Nothing like creating a whole new set of readers!

    Reply
  2. Great interview–very informing. πŸ™‚ Congratultions on the novelization of The Tudors, a daunting task, and thank you for all your work in adult literacy. Nothing like creating a whole new set of readers!

    Reply
  3. Great interview–very informing. πŸ™‚ Congratultions on the novelization of The Tudors, a daunting task, and thank you for all your work in adult literacy. Nothing like creating a whole new set of readers!

    Reply
  4. Great interview–very informing. πŸ™‚ Congratultions on the novelization of The Tudors, a daunting task, and thank you for all your work in adult literacy. Nothing like creating a whole new set of readers!

    Reply
  5. Great interview–very informing. πŸ™‚ Congratultions on the novelization of The Tudors, a daunting task, and thank you for all your work in adult literacy. Nothing like creating a whole new set of readers!

    Reply
  6. Thanks Jacquie and Judith.
    Jacquie, I have written a very simple romance for literacy students – maybe that will start them on the road to our books. And they did love Jane Eyre…but then, who wouldn’t?
    By the way, I’ve just put the collage of the Stolen Princess up on my website. The one above is actually a contemporary one done by a friend of mine.
    http://www.annegracie.com/books/Princess.html
    scroll to the bottom of the page.

    Reply
  7. Thanks Jacquie and Judith.
    Jacquie, I have written a very simple romance for literacy students – maybe that will start them on the road to our books. And they did love Jane Eyre…but then, who wouldn’t?
    By the way, I’ve just put the collage of the Stolen Princess up on my website. The one above is actually a contemporary one done by a friend of mine.
    http://www.annegracie.com/books/Princess.html
    scroll to the bottom of the page.

    Reply
  8. Thanks Jacquie and Judith.
    Jacquie, I have written a very simple romance for literacy students – maybe that will start them on the road to our books. And they did love Jane Eyre…but then, who wouldn’t?
    By the way, I’ve just put the collage of the Stolen Princess up on my website. The one above is actually a contemporary one done by a friend of mine.
    http://www.annegracie.com/books/Princess.html
    scroll to the bottom of the page.

    Reply
  9. Thanks Jacquie and Judith.
    Jacquie, I have written a very simple romance for literacy students – maybe that will start them on the road to our books. And they did love Jane Eyre…but then, who wouldn’t?
    By the way, I’ve just put the collage of the Stolen Princess up on my website. The one above is actually a contemporary one done by a friend of mine.
    http://www.annegracie.com/books/Princess.html
    scroll to the bottom of the page.

    Reply
  10. Thanks Jacquie and Judith.
    Jacquie, I have written a very simple romance for literacy students – maybe that will start them on the road to our books. And they did love Jane Eyre…but then, who wouldn’t?
    By the way, I’ve just put the collage of the Stolen Princess up on my website. The one above is actually a contemporary one done by a friend of mine.
    http://www.annegracie.com/books/Princess.html
    scroll to the bottom of the page.

    Reply
  11. Don’t need to be entered in the drawing/contest, as I have already purchased and read Stolen Princess, but had to let you know how thrilled I was to hear on Gather.com that these two wonderful authors were doing a chat here. You are both real favorites of mine. In fact, I avoid all imaginary kingdom books EXCEPT Ms. Gracie’s new series, because I know her stories are stillreal enough to draw in my emotions. Ms. Putney, I have loved your books for years, and re-read the older ones often. Thank you both for your contributions to my life. And thank you for your contributions to literacy!

    Reply
  12. Don’t need to be entered in the drawing/contest, as I have already purchased and read Stolen Princess, but had to let you know how thrilled I was to hear on Gather.com that these two wonderful authors were doing a chat here. You are both real favorites of mine. In fact, I avoid all imaginary kingdom books EXCEPT Ms. Gracie’s new series, because I know her stories are stillreal enough to draw in my emotions. Ms. Putney, I have loved your books for years, and re-read the older ones often. Thank you both for your contributions to my life. And thank you for your contributions to literacy!

    Reply
  13. Don’t need to be entered in the drawing/contest, as I have already purchased and read Stolen Princess, but had to let you know how thrilled I was to hear on Gather.com that these two wonderful authors were doing a chat here. You are both real favorites of mine. In fact, I avoid all imaginary kingdom books EXCEPT Ms. Gracie’s new series, because I know her stories are stillreal enough to draw in my emotions. Ms. Putney, I have loved your books for years, and re-read the older ones often. Thank you both for your contributions to my life. And thank you for your contributions to literacy!

    Reply
  14. Don’t need to be entered in the drawing/contest, as I have already purchased and read Stolen Princess, but had to let you know how thrilled I was to hear on Gather.com that these two wonderful authors were doing a chat here. You are both real favorites of mine. In fact, I avoid all imaginary kingdom books EXCEPT Ms. Gracie’s new series, because I know her stories are stillreal enough to draw in my emotions. Ms. Putney, I have loved your books for years, and re-read the older ones often. Thank you both for your contributions to my life. And thank you for your contributions to literacy!

    Reply
  15. Don’t need to be entered in the drawing/contest, as I have already purchased and read Stolen Princess, but had to let you know how thrilled I was to hear on Gather.com that these two wonderful authors were doing a chat here. You are both real favorites of mine. In fact, I avoid all imaginary kingdom books EXCEPT Ms. Gracie’s new series, because I know her stories are stillreal enough to draw in my emotions. Ms. Putney, I have loved your books for years, and re-read the older ones often. Thank you both for your contributions to my life. And thank you for your contributions to literacy!

    Reply
  16. You (along with the Wenches) are an auto-buy for me. Your heroes are absolutely wonderful, and your heroines aren’t too shabby either!
    There’s nothing more meaningful than teaching a child to read. I still follow the progress of a little boy I tutored in his second attempt at kindergarten and first grade. He’s now in middle school on the honor roll and an avid reader. It just tickles me I was with him when he turned himself around.

    Reply
  17. You (along with the Wenches) are an auto-buy for me. Your heroes are absolutely wonderful, and your heroines aren’t too shabby either!
    There’s nothing more meaningful than teaching a child to read. I still follow the progress of a little boy I tutored in his second attempt at kindergarten and first grade. He’s now in middle school on the honor roll and an avid reader. It just tickles me I was with him when he turned himself around.

    Reply
  18. You (along with the Wenches) are an auto-buy for me. Your heroes are absolutely wonderful, and your heroines aren’t too shabby either!
    There’s nothing more meaningful than teaching a child to read. I still follow the progress of a little boy I tutored in his second attempt at kindergarten and first grade. He’s now in middle school on the honor roll and an avid reader. It just tickles me I was with him when he turned himself around.

    Reply
  19. You (along with the Wenches) are an auto-buy for me. Your heroes are absolutely wonderful, and your heroines aren’t too shabby either!
    There’s nothing more meaningful than teaching a child to read. I still follow the progress of a little boy I tutored in his second attempt at kindergarten and first grade. He’s now in middle school on the honor roll and an avid reader. It just tickles me I was with him when he turned himself around.

    Reply
  20. You (along with the Wenches) are an auto-buy for me. Your heroes are absolutely wonderful, and your heroines aren’t too shabby either!
    There’s nothing more meaningful than teaching a child to read. I still follow the progress of a little boy I tutored in his second attempt at kindergarten and first grade. He’s now in middle school on the honor roll and an avid reader. It just tickles me I was with him when he turned himself around.

    Reply
  21. Paula and Maggie, thanks so much for your comments.
    Paula, stay in the draw — if anyone already has The Stolen Pincess and wants another of my books, I’ll put that in instead — if I have a copy, that is. I don’t have copies of them all.
    Maggie, that’s wonderful. I think it’s so important to make sure the young ones pick up reading quickly — a sense of failure can set in so quickly and it can last a lifetime. I teach adults to read — people who’ve either never been to school, or those who’ve fallen through the cracks of the school system. I’m really fond of my students — it takes courage to return to class when schooling has failed you before, so it’s wonderfully satisfying to watch them achieve success the second time around.

    Reply
  22. Paula and Maggie, thanks so much for your comments.
    Paula, stay in the draw — if anyone already has The Stolen Pincess and wants another of my books, I’ll put that in instead — if I have a copy, that is. I don’t have copies of them all.
    Maggie, that’s wonderful. I think it’s so important to make sure the young ones pick up reading quickly — a sense of failure can set in so quickly and it can last a lifetime. I teach adults to read — people who’ve either never been to school, or those who’ve fallen through the cracks of the school system. I’m really fond of my students — it takes courage to return to class when schooling has failed you before, so it’s wonderfully satisfying to watch them achieve success the second time around.

    Reply
  23. Paula and Maggie, thanks so much for your comments.
    Paula, stay in the draw — if anyone already has The Stolen Pincess and wants another of my books, I’ll put that in instead — if I have a copy, that is. I don’t have copies of them all.
    Maggie, that’s wonderful. I think it’s so important to make sure the young ones pick up reading quickly — a sense of failure can set in so quickly and it can last a lifetime. I teach adults to read — people who’ve either never been to school, or those who’ve fallen through the cracks of the school system. I’m really fond of my students — it takes courage to return to class when schooling has failed you before, so it’s wonderfully satisfying to watch them achieve success the second time around.

    Reply
  24. Paula and Maggie, thanks so much for your comments.
    Paula, stay in the draw — if anyone already has The Stolen Pincess and wants another of my books, I’ll put that in instead — if I have a copy, that is. I don’t have copies of them all.
    Maggie, that’s wonderful. I think it’s so important to make sure the young ones pick up reading quickly — a sense of failure can set in so quickly and it can last a lifetime. I teach adults to read — people who’ve either never been to school, or those who’ve fallen through the cracks of the school system. I’m really fond of my students — it takes courage to return to class when schooling has failed you before, so it’s wonderfully satisfying to watch them achieve success the second time around.

    Reply
  25. Paula and Maggie, thanks so much for your comments.
    Paula, stay in the draw — if anyone already has The Stolen Pincess and wants another of my books, I’ll put that in instead — if I have a copy, that is. I don’t have copies of them all.
    Maggie, that’s wonderful. I think it’s so important to make sure the young ones pick up reading quickly — a sense of failure can set in so quickly and it can last a lifetime. I teach adults to read — people who’ve either never been to school, or those who’ve fallen through the cracks of the school system. I’m really fond of my students — it takes courage to return to class when schooling has failed you before, so it’s wonderfully satisfying to watch them achieve success the second time around.

    Reply
  26. MJP said: “On my first trip to Europe, when I stayed in hostels, I met any number of young women from Australia and New Zealand who were hitching their way around the world. Intrepid Antipodeans!”
    I think it’s a rite of passage for many of us downunder – the big world trip, particularly to Europe where so many of us have emotional roots, if not actual relatives. And traveling alone is not as scary as you might imagine – you meet so many people along the way that you probably wouldn’t if you were already with people you know. It’s a wonderfully confidence-building thing to do, too.

    Reply
  27. MJP said: “On my first trip to Europe, when I stayed in hostels, I met any number of young women from Australia and New Zealand who were hitching their way around the world. Intrepid Antipodeans!”
    I think it’s a rite of passage for many of us downunder – the big world trip, particularly to Europe where so many of us have emotional roots, if not actual relatives. And traveling alone is not as scary as you might imagine – you meet so many people along the way that you probably wouldn’t if you were already with people you know. It’s a wonderfully confidence-building thing to do, too.

    Reply
  28. MJP said: “On my first trip to Europe, when I stayed in hostels, I met any number of young women from Australia and New Zealand who were hitching their way around the world. Intrepid Antipodeans!”
    I think it’s a rite of passage for many of us downunder – the big world trip, particularly to Europe where so many of us have emotional roots, if not actual relatives. And traveling alone is not as scary as you might imagine – you meet so many people along the way that you probably wouldn’t if you were already with people you know. It’s a wonderfully confidence-building thing to do, too.

    Reply
  29. MJP said: “On my first trip to Europe, when I stayed in hostels, I met any number of young women from Australia and New Zealand who were hitching their way around the world. Intrepid Antipodeans!”
    I think it’s a rite of passage for many of us downunder – the big world trip, particularly to Europe where so many of us have emotional roots, if not actual relatives. And traveling alone is not as scary as you might imagine – you meet so many people along the way that you probably wouldn’t if you were already with people you know. It’s a wonderfully confidence-building thing to do, too.

    Reply
  30. MJP said: “On my first trip to Europe, when I stayed in hostels, I met any number of young women from Australia and New Zealand who were hitching their way around the world. Intrepid Antipodeans!”
    I think it’s a rite of passage for many of us downunder – the big world trip, particularly to Europe where so many of us have emotional roots, if not actual relatives. And traveling alone is not as scary as you might imagine – you meet so many people along the way that you probably wouldn’t if you were already with people you know. It’s a wonderfully confidence-building thing to do, too.

    Reply
  31. Hi, Anne, It’s always great to “see” you on the blogs and the boards. Each time I learn something new about you. Your work with literacy sounds so rewarding. You really are engaged in life-transforming experiences.
    Like Maggie, I number you among my autobuys. I have been recommending Anne Gracie books to other romance readers ever since I first read Gallant Waif, which remains my favorite of your books and one of my all-time favorite romances.
    You always do such wonderful, memorable ballroom scenes (although there too, Gallant Waif is my favorite). Will there be a ballroom scene in Harry’s book? And do you know when Harry’s book will be on bookstore shelves?

    Reply
  32. Hi, Anne, It’s always great to “see” you on the blogs and the boards. Each time I learn something new about you. Your work with literacy sounds so rewarding. You really are engaged in life-transforming experiences.
    Like Maggie, I number you among my autobuys. I have been recommending Anne Gracie books to other romance readers ever since I first read Gallant Waif, which remains my favorite of your books and one of my all-time favorite romances.
    You always do such wonderful, memorable ballroom scenes (although there too, Gallant Waif is my favorite). Will there be a ballroom scene in Harry’s book? And do you know when Harry’s book will be on bookstore shelves?

    Reply
  33. Hi, Anne, It’s always great to “see” you on the blogs and the boards. Each time I learn something new about you. Your work with literacy sounds so rewarding. You really are engaged in life-transforming experiences.
    Like Maggie, I number you among my autobuys. I have been recommending Anne Gracie books to other romance readers ever since I first read Gallant Waif, which remains my favorite of your books and one of my all-time favorite romances.
    You always do such wonderful, memorable ballroom scenes (although there too, Gallant Waif is my favorite). Will there be a ballroom scene in Harry’s book? And do you know when Harry’s book will be on bookstore shelves?

    Reply
  34. Hi, Anne, It’s always great to “see” you on the blogs and the boards. Each time I learn something new about you. Your work with literacy sounds so rewarding. You really are engaged in life-transforming experiences.
    Like Maggie, I number you among my autobuys. I have been recommending Anne Gracie books to other romance readers ever since I first read Gallant Waif, which remains my favorite of your books and one of my all-time favorite romances.
    You always do such wonderful, memorable ballroom scenes (although there too, Gallant Waif is my favorite). Will there be a ballroom scene in Harry’s book? And do you know when Harry’s book will be on bookstore shelves?

    Reply
  35. Hi, Anne, It’s always great to “see” you on the blogs and the boards. Each time I learn something new about you. Your work with literacy sounds so rewarding. You really are engaged in life-transforming experiences.
    Like Maggie, I number you among my autobuys. I have been recommending Anne Gracie books to other romance readers ever since I first read Gallant Waif, which remains my favorite of your books and one of my all-time favorite romances.
    You always do such wonderful, memorable ballroom scenes (although there too, Gallant Waif is my favorite). Will there be a ballroom scene in Harry’s book? And do you know when Harry’s book will be on bookstore shelves?

    Reply
  36. Welcome to the Wenches, Anne!
    I remember when our then-mutual-editor Tracy Farrell sent me a copy of “Gallant Waif”, telling me I HAD to read it. She was right; it’s an absolutely wonderful book, and a promise of the many splendid Ann Gracie books that followed (and will, I hope, still follow!) I’ve been a fan of yours ever since.
    As you say, however, it’s the cruel curse of Harlequin/Mills&Boone that they keep their titles in print for only thirty days, then tie up the rights forever. Do they have any plans to reprint your earlier titles?
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  37. Welcome to the Wenches, Anne!
    I remember when our then-mutual-editor Tracy Farrell sent me a copy of “Gallant Waif”, telling me I HAD to read it. She was right; it’s an absolutely wonderful book, and a promise of the many splendid Ann Gracie books that followed (and will, I hope, still follow!) I’ve been a fan of yours ever since.
    As you say, however, it’s the cruel curse of Harlequin/Mills&Boone that they keep their titles in print for only thirty days, then tie up the rights forever. Do they have any plans to reprint your earlier titles?
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  38. Welcome to the Wenches, Anne!
    I remember when our then-mutual-editor Tracy Farrell sent me a copy of “Gallant Waif”, telling me I HAD to read it. She was right; it’s an absolutely wonderful book, and a promise of the many splendid Ann Gracie books that followed (and will, I hope, still follow!) I’ve been a fan of yours ever since.
    As you say, however, it’s the cruel curse of Harlequin/Mills&Boone that they keep their titles in print for only thirty days, then tie up the rights forever. Do they have any plans to reprint your earlier titles?
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  39. Welcome to the Wenches, Anne!
    I remember when our then-mutual-editor Tracy Farrell sent me a copy of “Gallant Waif”, telling me I HAD to read it. She was right; it’s an absolutely wonderful book, and a promise of the many splendid Ann Gracie books that followed (and will, I hope, still follow!) I’ve been a fan of yours ever since.
    As you say, however, it’s the cruel curse of Harlequin/Mills&Boone that they keep their titles in print for only thirty days, then tie up the rights forever. Do they have any plans to reprint your earlier titles?
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  40. Welcome to the Wenches, Anne!
    I remember when our then-mutual-editor Tracy Farrell sent me a copy of “Gallant Waif”, telling me I HAD to read it. She was right; it’s an absolutely wonderful book, and a promise of the many splendid Ann Gracie books that followed (and will, I hope, still follow!) I’ve been a fan of yours ever since.
    As you say, however, it’s the cruel curse of Harlequin/Mills&Boone that they keep their titles in print for only thirty days, then tie up the rights forever. Do they have any plans to reprint your earlier titles?
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  41. Just had to comment on how I love your books!
    I do confess to not needing a copy of Stolen Princess either – but I have to ask – is there a happy ending for Tibby and Ethan somewhere? They are definitely two souls looking for a happy ending.
    And then there are Gabe’s other brothers – they don’t seem too bad, either! (Well, at least not the one we’ve met…)

    Reply
  42. Just had to comment on how I love your books!
    I do confess to not needing a copy of Stolen Princess either – but I have to ask – is there a happy ending for Tibby and Ethan somewhere? They are definitely two souls looking for a happy ending.
    And then there are Gabe’s other brothers – they don’t seem too bad, either! (Well, at least not the one we’ve met…)

    Reply
  43. Just had to comment on how I love your books!
    I do confess to not needing a copy of Stolen Princess either – but I have to ask – is there a happy ending for Tibby and Ethan somewhere? They are definitely two souls looking for a happy ending.
    And then there are Gabe’s other brothers – they don’t seem too bad, either! (Well, at least not the one we’ve met…)

    Reply
  44. Just had to comment on how I love your books!
    I do confess to not needing a copy of Stolen Princess either – but I have to ask – is there a happy ending for Tibby and Ethan somewhere? They are definitely two souls looking for a happy ending.
    And then there are Gabe’s other brothers – they don’t seem too bad, either! (Well, at least not the one we’ve met…)

    Reply
  45. Just had to comment on how I love your books!
    I do confess to not needing a copy of Stolen Princess either – but I have to ask – is there a happy ending for Tibby and Ethan somewhere? They are definitely two souls looking for a happy ending.
    And then there are Gabe’s other brothers – they don’t seem too bad, either! (Well, at least not the one we’ve met…)

    Reply
  46. Haven’t read Stolen Princess yet as it hasn’t arrived in our library system yet. As a public librarian I read most of my books from the library collection and recommend to patrons. Love your other books and all the authors that make up the panel.

    Reply
  47. Haven’t read Stolen Princess yet as it hasn’t arrived in our library system yet. As a public librarian I read most of my books from the library collection and recommend to patrons. Love your other books and all the authors that make up the panel.

    Reply
  48. Haven’t read Stolen Princess yet as it hasn’t arrived in our library system yet. As a public librarian I read most of my books from the library collection and recommend to patrons. Love your other books and all the authors that make up the panel.

    Reply
  49. Haven’t read Stolen Princess yet as it hasn’t arrived in our library system yet. As a public librarian I read most of my books from the library collection and recommend to patrons. Love your other books and all the authors that make up the panel.

    Reply
  50. Haven’t read Stolen Princess yet as it hasn’t arrived in our library system yet. As a public librarian I read most of my books from the library collection and recommend to patrons. Love your other books and all the authors that make up the panel.

    Reply
  51. Anne, how delightful to (virtually) meet you! Your books are wonderful reads and I am looking forward to the Stolen Princess.
    Back in college days I went on a complete Australian-movie jag and loved the setting (Gallipoli, My Brilliant Career, Man from Snowy River, etc). So here’s a question: are there any Australian-set historical romance novels you could recommend? I would love to read one. . .
    Blessings to you!

    Reply
  52. Anne, how delightful to (virtually) meet you! Your books are wonderful reads and I am looking forward to the Stolen Princess.
    Back in college days I went on a complete Australian-movie jag and loved the setting (Gallipoli, My Brilliant Career, Man from Snowy River, etc). So here’s a question: are there any Australian-set historical romance novels you could recommend? I would love to read one. . .
    Blessings to you!

    Reply
  53. Anne, how delightful to (virtually) meet you! Your books are wonderful reads and I am looking forward to the Stolen Princess.
    Back in college days I went on a complete Australian-movie jag and loved the setting (Gallipoli, My Brilliant Career, Man from Snowy River, etc). So here’s a question: are there any Australian-set historical romance novels you could recommend? I would love to read one. . .
    Blessings to you!

    Reply
  54. Anne, how delightful to (virtually) meet you! Your books are wonderful reads and I am looking forward to the Stolen Princess.
    Back in college days I went on a complete Australian-movie jag and loved the setting (Gallipoli, My Brilliant Career, Man from Snowy River, etc). So here’s a question: are there any Australian-set historical romance novels you could recommend? I would love to read one. . .
    Blessings to you!

    Reply
  55. Anne, how delightful to (virtually) meet you! Your books are wonderful reads and I am looking forward to the Stolen Princess.
    Back in college days I went on a complete Australian-movie jag and loved the setting (Gallipoli, My Brilliant Career, Man from Snowy River, etc). So here’s a question: are there any Australian-set historical romance novels you could recommend? I would love to read one. . .
    Blessings to you!

    Reply
  56. Hi,
    I just wanted to say that my absolute favorite book of yours is The Perfect Rake, In fact I was re-reading it a few weeks ago and laughing at the the rake joke (rakes can be so useful) when my husband looked at me laughing looked at the book title and started to discuss what a perfect rake is, and then of course I had to say that the joke had already been made in the book.

    Reply
  57. Hi,
    I just wanted to say that my absolute favorite book of yours is The Perfect Rake, In fact I was re-reading it a few weeks ago and laughing at the the rake joke (rakes can be so useful) when my husband looked at me laughing looked at the book title and started to discuss what a perfect rake is, and then of course I had to say that the joke had already been made in the book.

    Reply
  58. Hi,
    I just wanted to say that my absolute favorite book of yours is The Perfect Rake, In fact I was re-reading it a few weeks ago and laughing at the the rake joke (rakes can be so useful) when my husband looked at me laughing looked at the book title and started to discuss what a perfect rake is, and then of course I had to say that the joke had already been made in the book.

    Reply
  59. Hi,
    I just wanted to say that my absolute favorite book of yours is The Perfect Rake, In fact I was re-reading it a few weeks ago and laughing at the the rake joke (rakes can be so useful) when my husband looked at me laughing looked at the book title and started to discuss what a perfect rake is, and then of course I had to say that the joke had already been made in the book.

    Reply
  60. Hi,
    I just wanted to say that my absolute favorite book of yours is The Perfect Rake, In fact I was re-reading it a few weeks ago and laughing at the the rake joke (rakes can be so useful) when my husband looked at me laughing looked at the book title and started to discuss what a perfect rake is, and then of course I had to say that the joke had already been made in the book.

    Reply
  61. I too have lovely moments from Ms. Gracie’s books that remain in my memory: the opening scene of “Tallie’s Knight” when Magnus realizes that he does indeed want children or when Tallie remembers her cousin Laetitia’s advice and thinks of the times table while Magnus makes love to her. When Gideon is gobsmacked by Prudence and can’t understand why others don’t see her as beautiful. When Kit discovers the truth about her family. The list goes on.
    I noticed that Jason Isaacs is in the collage for “The Stolen Princess”. If he is the model for the hero, then I’m completely on board. The man can play a thorough-going villain and yet be compelling and sexy at the same time — it’s fun to imagine just how far his appeal can go as the hero.

    Reply
  62. I too have lovely moments from Ms. Gracie’s books that remain in my memory: the opening scene of “Tallie’s Knight” when Magnus realizes that he does indeed want children or when Tallie remembers her cousin Laetitia’s advice and thinks of the times table while Magnus makes love to her. When Gideon is gobsmacked by Prudence and can’t understand why others don’t see her as beautiful. When Kit discovers the truth about her family. The list goes on.
    I noticed that Jason Isaacs is in the collage for “The Stolen Princess”. If he is the model for the hero, then I’m completely on board. The man can play a thorough-going villain and yet be compelling and sexy at the same time — it’s fun to imagine just how far his appeal can go as the hero.

    Reply
  63. I too have lovely moments from Ms. Gracie’s books that remain in my memory: the opening scene of “Tallie’s Knight” when Magnus realizes that he does indeed want children or when Tallie remembers her cousin Laetitia’s advice and thinks of the times table while Magnus makes love to her. When Gideon is gobsmacked by Prudence and can’t understand why others don’t see her as beautiful. When Kit discovers the truth about her family. The list goes on.
    I noticed that Jason Isaacs is in the collage for “The Stolen Princess”. If he is the model for the hero, then I’m completely on board. The man can play a thorough-going villain and yet be compelling and sexy at the same time — it’s fun to imagine just how far his appeal can go as the hero.

    Reply
  64. I too have lovely moments from Ms. Gracie’s books that remain in my memory: the opening scene of “Tallie’s Knight” when Magnus realizes that he does indeed want children or when Tallie remembers her cousin Laetitia’s advice and thinks of the times table while Magnus makes love to her. When Gideon is gobsmacked by Prudence and can’t understand why others don’t see her as beautiful. When Kit discovers the truth about her family. The list goes on.
    I noticed that Jason Isaacs is in the collage for “The Stolen Princess”. If he is the model for the hero, then I’m completely on board. The man can play a thorough-going villain and yet be compelling and sexy at the same time — it’s fun to imagine just how far his appeal can go as the hero.

    Reply
  65. I too have lovely moments from Ms. Gracie’s books that remain in my memory: the opening scene of “Tallie’s Knight” when Magnus realizes that he does indeed want children or when Tallie remembers her cousin Laetitia’s advice and thinks of the times table while Magnus makes love to her. When Gideon is gobsmacked by Prudence and can’t understand why others don’t see her as beautiful. When Kit discovers the truth about her family. The list goes on.
    I noticed that Jason Isaacs is in the collage for “The Stolen Princess”. If he is the model for the hero, then I’m completely on board. The man can play a thorough-going villain and yet be compelling and sexy at the same time — it’s fun to imagine just how far his appeal can go as the hero.

    Reply
  66. I, too, met hundreds of intrepid Aussies travelling across Africa. I always wondered why so many? It’s also quite handy when asked just to say you’re from Australia, as they’re so beloved all over the world! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  67. I, too, met hundreds of intrepid Aussies travelling across Africa. I always wondered why so many? It’s also quite handy when asked just to say you’re from Australia, as they’re so beloved all over the world! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  68. I, too, met hundreds of intrepid Aussies travelling across Africa. I always wondered why so many? It’s also quite handy when asked just to say you’re from Australia, as they’re so beloved all over the world! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  69. I, too, met hundreds of intrepid Aussies travelling across Africa. I always wondered why so many? It’s also quite handy when asked just to say you’re from Australia, as they’re so beloved all over the world! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  70. I, too, met hundreds of intrepid Aussies travelling across Africa. I always wondered why so many? It’s also quite handy when asked just to say you’re from Australia, as they’re so beloved all over the world! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  71. Hi, Anne, I’m so glad you’ve come to visit with us! I do admire your literacy efforts and wish I had your patience to try it. Guess for now I’ll just have to be satisfied introducing new readers to favorite authors. Hope you’re not burning the midnight oil to be here!

    Reply
  72. Hi, Anne, I’m so glad you’ve come to visit with us! I do admire your literacy efforts and wish I had your patience to try it. Guess for now I’ll just have to be satisfied introducing new readers to favorite authors. Hope you’re not burning the midnight oil to be here!

    Reply
  73. Hi, Anne, I’m so glad you’ve come to visit with us! I do admire your literacy efforts and wish I had your patience to try it. Guess for now I’ll just have to be satisfied introducing new readers to favorite authors. Hope you’re not burning the midnight oil to be here!

    Reply
  74. Hi, Anne, I’m so glad you’ve come to visit with us! I do admire your literacy efforts and wish I had your patience to try it. Guess for now I’ll just have to be satisfied introducing new readers to favorite authors. Hope you’re not burning the midnight oil to be here!

    Reply
  75. Hi, Anne, I’m so glad you’ve come to visit with us! I do admire your literacy efforts and wish I had your patience to try it. Guess for now I’ll just have to be satisfied introducing new readers to favorite authors. Hope you’re not burning the midnight oil to be here!

    Reply
  76. Janga, it’s lovely to see you here. Thank you for recommending my books. I realy appreciate it.
    That scene in Gallant Waif was a scene that came as a gift to a beginner, I think. I’m delighted you still remember it. Alas, there’s no ballroom scene in Harry’s book, His Captive Lady
    Susan/Miranda, thank you for your kind words, too. I remember meeting Tracy Farrell at the Washington RWA national and she told me that book was coming out at a Har.l Historical. It was such a thrill – the UK edited books normally didn’t. And BTW, we shared a novella collection once – Gifts of the Season.
    I don’t know if there are any plans to reprint my Harlequin titles – as you no doubt know, Harlequin moves in mysterious ways. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  77. Janga, it’s lovely to see you here. Thank you for recommending my books. I realy appreciate it.
    That scene in Gallant Waif was a scene that came as a gift to a beginner, I think. I’m delighted you still remember it. Alas, there’s no ballroom scene in Harry’s book, His Captive Lady
    Susan/Miranda, thank you for your kind words, too. I remember meeting Tracy Farrell at the Washington RWA national and she told me that book was coming out at a Har.l Historical. It was such a thrill – the UK edited books normally didn’t. And BTW, we shared a novella collection once – Gifts of the Season.
    I don’t know if there are any plans to reprint my Harlequin titles – as you no doubt know, Harlequin moves in mysterious ways. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  78. Janga, it’s lovely to see you here. Thank you for recommending my books. I realy appreciate it.
    That scene in Gallant Waif was a scene that came as a gift to a beginner, I think. I’m delighted you still remember it. Alas, there’s no ballroom scene in Harry’s book, His Captive Lady
    Susan/Miranda, thank you for your kind words, too. I remember meeting Tracy Farrell at the Washington RWA national and she told me that book was coming out at a Har.l Historical. It was such a thrill – the UK edited books normally didn’t. And BTW, we shared a novella collection once – Gifts of the Season.
    I don’t know if there are any plans to reprint my Harlequin titles – as you no doubt know, Harlequin moves in mysterious ways. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  79. Janga, it’s lovely to see you here. Thank you for recommending my books. I realy appreciate it.
    That scene in Gallant Waif was a scene that came as a gift to a beginner, I think. I’m delighted you still remember it. Alas, there’s no ballroom scene in Harry’s book, His Captive Lady
    Susan/Miranda, thank you for your kind words, too. I remember meeting Tracy Farrell at the Washington RWA national and she told me that book was coming out at a Har.l Historical. It was such a thrill – the UK edited books normally didn’t. And BTW, we shared a novella collection once – Gifts of the Season.
    I don’t know if there are any plans to reprint my Harlequin titles – as you no doubt know, Harlequin moves in mysterious ways. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  80. Janga, it’s lovely to see you here. Thank you for recommending my books. I realy appreciate it.
    That scene in Gallant Waif was a scene that came as a gift to a beginner, I think. I’m delighted you still remember it. Alas, there’s no ballroom scene in Harry’s book, His Captive Lady
    Susan/Miranda, thank you for your kind words, too. I remember meeting Tracy Farrell at the Washington RWA national and she told me that book was coming out at a Har.l Historical. It was such a thrill – the UK edited books normally didn’t. And BTW, we shared a novella collection once – Gifts of the Season.
    I don’t know if there are any plans to reprint my Harlequin titles – as you no doubt know, Harlequin moves in mysterious ways. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  81. Piper asked : ” is there a happy ending for Tibby and Ethan somewhere?”
    Yes, there is indeed, in the next book, His Captive Lady – which I *think* comes out in September (but don’t quote me.) I tried to fit it into the Princess book, but couldn’t do it justice. I hope you like the way it happens in the next book.

    Reply
  82. Piper asked : ” is there a happy ending for Tibby and Ethan somewhere?”
    Yes, there is indeed, in the next book, His Captive Lady – which I *think* comes out in September (but don’t quote me.) I tried to fit it into the Princess book, but couldn’t do it justice. I hope you like the way it happens in the next book.

    Reply
  83. Piper asked : ” is there a happy ending for Tibby and Ethan somewhere?”
    Yes, there is indeed, in the next book, His Captive Lady – which I *think* comes out in September (but don’t quote me.) I tried to fit it into the Princess book, but couldn’t do it justice. I hope you like the way it happens in the next book.

    Reply
  84. Piper asked : ” is there a happy ending for Tibby and Ethan somewhere?”
    Yes, there is indeed, in the next book, His Captive Lady – which I *think* comes out in September (but don’t quote me.) I tried to fit it into the Princess book, but couldn’t do it justice. I hope you like the way it happens in the next book.

    Reply
  85. Piper asked : ” is there a happy ending for Tibby and Ethan somewhere?”
    Yes, there is indeed, in the next book, His Captive Lady – which I *think* comes out in September (but don’t quote me.) I tried to fit it into the Princess book, but couldn’t do it justice. I hope you like the way it happens in the next book.

    Reply
  86. Martha, I think librarians do a wonderful job. I was such a voracious reader as a child and libraries were the best places, especially as we moved frequently. And it was a dare in a library when I was eleven to borrow an adult book that caused me to borrow my first Georgette Heyer – The Old Shades — and not only did that introduce me to my all-time favorite author, it probably made me the writer that I am.
    There’s a wonderful story from Eva Ibbotson about the importance of libraries that I think you’ll enjoy. A true story with a happy ending.
    http://tinyurl.com/qz5cs

    Reply
  87. Martha, I think librarians do a wonderful job. I was such a voracious reader as a child and libraries were the best places, especially as we moved frequently. And it was a dare in a library when I was eleven to borrow an adult book that caused me to borrow my first Georgette Heyer – The Old Shades — and not only did that introduce me to my all-time favorite author, it probably made me the writer that I am.
    There’s a wonderful story from Eva Ibbotson about the importance of libraries that I think you’ll enjoy. A true story with a happy ending.
    http://tinyurl.com/qz5cs

    Reply
  88. Martha, I think librarians do a wonderful job. I was such a voracious reader as a child and libraries were the best places, especially as we moved frequently. And it was a dare in a library when I was eleven to borrow an adult book that caused me to borrow my first Georgette Heyer – The Old Shades — and not only did that introduce me to my all-time favorite author, it probably made me the writer that I am.
    There’s a wonderful story from Eva Ibbotson about the importance of libraries that I think you’ll enjoy. A true story with a happy ending.
    http://tinyurl.com/qz5cs

    Reply
  89. Martha, I think librarians do a wonderful job. I was such a voracious reader as a child and libraries were the best places, especially as we moved frequently. And it was a dare in a library when I was eleven to borrow an adult book that caused me to borrow my first Georgette Heyer – The Old Shades — and not only did that introduce me to my all-time favorite author, it probably made me the writer that I am.
    There’s a wonderful story from Eva Ibbotson about the importance of libraries that I think you’ll enjoy. A true story with a happy ending.
    http://tinyurl.com/qz5cs

    Reply
  90. Martha, I think librarians do a wonderful job. I was such a voracious reader as a child and libraries were the best places, especially as we moved frequently. And it was a dare in a library when I was eleven to borrow an adult book that caused me to borrow my first Georgette Heyer – The Old Shades — and not only did that introduce me to my all-time favorite author, it probably made me the writer that I am.
    There’s a wonderful story from Eva Ibbotson about the importance of libraries that I think you’ll enjoy. A true story with a happy ending.
    http://tinyurl.com/qz5cs

    Reply
  91. RevMelinda asked: “are there any Australian-set historical romance novels you could recommend? I would love to read one. . .”
    That’s a tough question, RevMelinda. The trouble is, there’s very little romance published in Australia, and a lot of it is more the tragic sort than the happy ending kind I love. Like My Brilliant Career – you might know the movie and she should have taken Sam Neil, IMO. πŸ˜‰
    All I can think of at the moment is Sara Dane, by Catherine Gaskin, and that’s an old book and not by an Australian author. I would write them in a heartbeat, but neither my US or my previous UK editors are interested. I’ll give it some thought and get back to you with some names.

    Reply
  92. RevMelinda asked: “are there any Australian-set historical romance novels you could recommend? I would love to read one. . .”
    That’s a tough question, RevMelinda. The trouble is, there’s very little romance published in Australia, and a lot of it is more the tragic sort than the happy ending kind I love. Like My Brilliant Career – you might know the movie and she should have taken Sam Neil, IMO. πŸ˜‰
    All I can think of at the moment is Sara Dane, by Catherine Gaskin, and that’s an old book and not by an Australian author. I would write them in a heartbeat, but neither my US or my previous UK editors are interested. I’ll give it some thought and get back to you with some names.

    Reply
  93. RevMelinda asked: “are there any Australian-set historical romance novels you could recommend? I would love to read one. . .”
    That’s a tough question, RevMelinda. The trouble is, there’s very little romance published in Australia, and a lot of it is more the tragic sort than the happy ending kind I love. Like My Brilliant Career – you might know the movie and she should have taken Sam Neil, IMO. πŸ˜‰
    All I can think of at the moment is Sara Dane, by Catherine Gaskin, and that’s an old book and not by an Australian author. I would write them in a heartbeat, but neither my US or my previous UK editors are interested. I’ll give it some thought and get back to you with some names.

    Reply
  94. RevMelinda asked: “are there any Australian-set historical romance novels you could recommend? I would love to read one. . .”
    That’s a tough question, RevMelinda. The trouble is, there’s very little romance published in Australia, and a lot of it is more the tragic sort than the happy ending kind I love. Like My Brilliant Career – you might know the movie and she should have taken Sam Neil, IMO. πŸ˜‰
    All I can think of at the moment is Sara Dane, by Catherine Gaskin, and that’s an old book and not by an Australian author. I would write them in a heartbeat, but neither my US or my previous UK editors are interested. I’ll give it some thought and get back to you with some names.

    Reply
  95. RevMelinda asked: “are there any Australian-set historical romance novels you could recommend? I would love to read one. . .”
    That’s a tough question, RevMelinda. The trouble is, there’s very little romance published in Australia, and a lot of it is more the tragic sort than the happy ending kind I love. Like My Brilliant Career – you might know the movie and she should have taken Sam Neil, IMO. πŸ˜‰
    All I can think of at the moment is Sara Dane, by Catherine Gaskin, and that’s an old book and not by an Australian author. I would write them in a heartbeat, but neither my US or my previous UK editors are interested. I’ll give it some thought and get back to you with some names.

    Reply
  96. Robin, I had such fun with that book. And this is why I can’t plan books. I’d planned for Gideon to be a dark and dangerous hero, and he arrived as a flippant devil-may-care type who utterly refused to brood.
    As for the rake joke, I’m a shocker for a good (appalling?) pun – a trait passed on to me by my dad.

    Reply
  97. Robin, I had such fun with that book. And this is why I can’t plan books. I’d planned for Gideon to be a dark and dangerous hero, and he arrived as a flippant devil-may-care type who utterly refused to brood.
    As for the rake joke, I’m a shocker for a good (appalling?) pun – a trait passed on to me by my dad.

    Reply
  98. Robin, I had such fun with that book. And this is why I can’t plan books. I’d planned for Gideon to be a dark and dangerous hero, and he arrived as a flippant devil-may-care type who utterly refused to brood.
    As for the rake joke, I’m a shocker for a good (appalling?) pun – a trait passed on to me by my dad.

    Reply
  99. Robin, I had such fun with that book. And this is why I can’t plan books. I’d planned for Gideon to be a dark and dangerous hero, and he arrived as a flippant devil-may-care type who utterly refused to brood.
    As for the rake joke, I’m a shocker for a good (appalling?) pun – a trait passed on to me by my dad.

    Reply
  100. Robin, I had such fun with that book. And this is why I can’t plan books. I’d planned for Gideon to be a dark and dangerous hero, and he arrived as a flippant devil-may-care type who utterly refused to brood.
    As for the rake joke, I’m a shocker for a good (appalling?) pun – a trait passed on to me by my dad.

    Reply
  101. Susan D/C – thank you. I am so delighted that so many people remember my early Harlequins. I’m so fond of those books.
    As for the Jason Issacs pic I used on my collage, he is a wonderful actor, but it’s not actually the physical features that matter so much as the mood/expression in the picture. The pics I used capture the strength and the underlying vulnerability of my hero, Gabe.

    Reply
  102. Susan D/C – thank you. I am so delighted that so many people remember my early Harlequins. I’m so fond of those books.
    As for the Jason Issacs pic I used on my collage, he is a wonderful actor, but it’s not actually the physical features that matter so much as the mood/expression in the picture. The pics I used capture the strength and the underlying vulnerability of my hero, Gabe.

    Reply
  103. Susan D/C – thank you. I am so delighted that so many people remember my early Harlequins. I’m so fond of those books.
    As for the Jason Issacs pic I used on my collage, he is a wonderful actor, but it’s not actually the physical features that matter so much as the mood/expression in the picture. The pics I used capture the strength and the underlying vulnerability of my hero, Gabe.

    Reply
  104. Susan D/C – thank you. I am so delighted that so many people remember my early Harlequins. I’m so fond of those books.
    As for the Jason Issacs pic I used on my collage, he is a wonderful actor, but it’s not actually the physical features that matter so much as the mood/expression in the picture. The pics I used capture the strength and the underlying vulnerability of my hero, Gabe.

    Reply
  105. Susan D/C – thank you. I am so delighted that so many people remember my early Harlequins. I’m so fond of those books.
    As for the Jason Issacs pic I used on my collage, he is a wonderful actor, but it’s not actually the physical features that matter so much as the mood/expression in the picture. The pics I used capture the strength and the underlying vulnerability of my hero, Gabe.

    Reply
  106. MJP here.
    Anne, I figure you’re staying up late to talk to us! Or you don’t sleep much.:) But thanks for interacting with us.
    I remember Gaskin’s SARA DANE. It’s a great story, and it might be available in a library or through ILL, though as you say, she’s not Australian.
    Anna Jacobs is English born but now lives in Western Australia. She writes mostly sagas, but upbeat ones, and I believe that several are set in Australia. (Though Northern England is more common.) She’s probably be hard to find in the U.S., but she’s publishing in the U. K.
    As to the rite of passage of Down Under girls doing the hitchhiker’s grand tour of the world–I always assumed that since Australia and New Zealand are so far away, that taking a year to see the world was a sensible way to expand horizons before becoming tided down with responsiblities. All of the young women I met doing this were terrific, too!
    Paula, thanks for the kind words about my books! I’m within a couple of days of finishing the WIP, and all good words are gratefully received. πŸ™‚
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  107. MJP here.
    Anne, I figure you’re staying up late to talk to us! Or you don’t sleep much.:) But thanks for interacting with us.
    I remember Gaskin’s SARA DANE. It’s a great story, and it might be available in a library or through ILL, though as you say, she’s not Australian.
    Anna Jacobs is English born but now lives in Western Australia. She writes mostly sagas, but upbeat ones, and I believe that several are set in Australia. (Though Northern England is more common.) She’s probably be hard to find in the U.S., but she’s publishing in the U. K.
    As to the rite of passage of Down Under girls doing the hitchhiker’s grand tour of the world–I always assumed that since Australia and New Zealand are so far away, that taking a year to see the world was a sensible way to expand horizons before becoming tided down with responsiblities. All of the young women I met doing this were terrific, too!
    Paula, thanks for the kind words about my books! I’m within a couple of days of finishing the WIP, and all good words are gratefully received. πŸ™‚
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  108. MJP here.
    Anne, I figure you’re staying up late to talk to us! Or you don’t sleep much.:) But thanks for interacting with us.
    I remember Gaskin’s SARA DANE. It’s a great story, and it might be available in a library or through ILL, though as you say, she’s not Australian.
    Anna Jacobs is English born but now lives in Western Australia. She writes mostly sagas, but upbeat ones, and I believe that several are set in Australia. (Though Northern England is more common.) She’s probably be hard to find in the U.S., but she’s publishing in the U. K.
    As to the rite of passage of Down Under girls doing the hitchhiker’s grand tour of the world–I always assumed that since Australia and New Zealand are so far away, that taking a year to see the world was a sensible way to expand horizons before becoming tided down with responsiblities. All of the young women I met doing this were terrific, too!
    Paula, thanks for the kind words about my books! I’m within a couple of days of finishing the WIP, and all good words are gratefully received. πŸ™‚
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  109. MJP here.
    Anne, I figure you’re staying up late to talk to us! Or you don’t sleep much.:) But thanks for interacting with us.
    I remember Gaskin’s SARA DANE. It’s a great story, and it might be available in a library or through ILL, though as you say, she’s not Australian.
    Anna Jacobs is English born but now lives in Western Australia. She writes mostly sagas, but upbeat ones, and I believe that several are set in Australia. (Though Northern England is more common.) She’s probably be hard to find in the U.S., but she’s publishing in the U. K.
    As to the rite of passage of Down Under girls doing the hitchhiker’s grand tour of the world–I always assumed that since Australia and New Zealand are so far away, that taking a year to see the world was a sensible way to expand horizons before becoming tided down with responsiblities. All of the young women I met doing this were terrific, too!
    Paula, thanks for the kind words about my books! I’m within a couple of days of finishing the WIP, and all good words are gratefully received. πŸ™‚
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  110. MJP here.
    Anne, I figure you’re staying up late to talk to us! Or you don’t sleep much.:) But thanks for interacting with us.
    I remember Gaskin’s SARA DANE. It’s a great story, and it might be available in a library or through ILL, though as you say, she’s not Australian.
    Anna Jacobs is English born but now lives in Western Australia. She writes mostly sagas, but upbeat ones, and I believe that several are set in Australia. (Though Northern England is more common.) She’s probably be hard to find in the U.S., but she’s publishing in the U. K.
    As to the rite of passage of Down Under girls doing the hitchhiker’s grand tour of the world–I always assumed that since Australia and New Zealand are so far away, that taking a year to see the world was a sensible way to expand horizons before becoming tided down with responsiblities. All of the young women I met doing this were terrific, too!
    Paula, thanks for the kind words about my books! I’m within a couple of days of finishing the WIP, and all good words are gratefully received. πŸ™‚
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  111. Thanks Louis. I hope you enjoy the new book.
    Karen, as I said, I think it’s a rite of passage for young people. Plus there’s something in the Australian/NZ psyche that makes us grow up looking outwards to the rest of the world. Maybe an itch for adventure and a curiosity about the rest of the world.
    Interestingly it’s also a really common phenomenon for retired and elderly people in Australia to travel around Australia, staying in camping grounds, and taking month or sometimes years to do it. There’s a wonderful documentary called Grey Nomads that shows it beautifully.

    Reply
  112. Thanks Louis. I hope you enjoy the new book.
    Karen, as I said, I think it’s a rite of passage for young people. Plus there’s something in the Australian/NZ psyche that makes us grow up looking outwards to the rest of the world. Maybe an itch for adventure and a curiosity about the rest of the world.
    Interestingly it’s also a really common phenomenon for retired and elderly people in Australia to travel around Australia, staying in camping grounds, and taking month or sometimes years to do it. There’s a wonderful documentary called Grey Nomads that shows it beautifully.

    Reply
  113. Thanks Louis. I hope you enjoy the new book.
    Karen, as I said, I think it’s a rite of passage for young people. Plus there’s something in the Australian/NZ psyche that makes us grow up looking outwards to the rest of the world. Maybe an itch for adventure and a curiosity about the rest of the world.
    Interestingly it’s also a really common phenomenon for retired and elderly people in Australia to travel around Australia, staying in camping grounds, and taking month or sometimes years to do it. There’s a wonderful documentary called Grey Nomads that shows it beautifully.

    Reply
  114. Thanks Louis. I hope you enjoy the new book.
    Karen, as I said, I think it’s a rite of passage for young people. Plus there’s something in the Australian/NZ psyche that makes us grow up looking outwards to the rest of the world. Maybe an itch for adventure and a curiosity about the rest of the world.
    Interestingly it’s also a really common phenomenon for retired and elderly people in Australia to travel around Australia, staying in camping grounds, and taking month or sometimes years to do it. There’s a wonderful documentary called Grey Nomads that shows it beautifully.

    Reply
  115. Thanks Louis. I hope you enjoy the new book.
    Karen, as I said, I think it’s a rite of passage for young people. Plus there’s something in the Australian/NZ psyche that makes us grow up looking outwards to the rest of the world. Maybe an itch for adventure and a curiosity about the rest of the world.
    Interestingly it’s also a really common phenomenon for retired and elderly people in Australia to travel around Australia, staying in camping grounds, and taking month or sometimes years to do it. There’s a wonderful documentary called Grey Nomads that shows it beautifully.

    Reply
  116. Patricia, thank you for having me. It was such a thrill when Mary Jo invited me. Word Wenches is my regular morning coffee blog read, (it used to be my every day one until you decided to look after your own sanity instead of our addiction LOL) so I feel as though I know some of you already. And then there are those of you whose books fill my shelves and my to-be-read pile… And I did burn the midnight oil for the first comments , but it was no hardship – I’m doing edits. And now it’s crack of dawn… well 7.30am.
    Thanks Joye. I hope you enjoy the new one.

    Reply
  117. Patricia, thank you for having me. It was such a thrill when Mary Jo invited me. Word Wenches is my regular morning coffee blog read, (it used to be my every day one until you decided to look after your own sanity instead of our addiction LOL) so I feel as though I know some of you already. And then there are those of you whose books fill my shelves and my to-be-read pile… And I did burn the midnight oil for the first comments , but it was no hardship – I’m doing edits. And now it’s crack of dawn… well 7.30am.
    Thanks Joye. I hope you enjoy the new one.

    Reply
  118. Patricia, thank you for having me. It was such a thrill when Mary Jo invited me. Word Wenches is my regular morning coffee blog read, (it used to be my every day one until you decided to look after your own sanity instead of our addiction LOL) so I feel as though I know some of you already. And then there are those of you whose books fill my shelves and my to-be-read pile… And I did burn the midnight oil for the first comments , but it was no hardship – I’m doing edits. And now it’s crack of dawn… well 7.30am.
    Thanks Joye. I hope you enjoy the new one.

    Reply
  119. Patricia, thank you for having me. It was such a thrill when Mary Jo invited me. Word Wenches is my regular morning coffee blog read, (it used to be my every day one until you decided to look after your own sanity instead of our addiction LOL) so I feel as though I know some of you already. And then there are those of you whose books fill my shelves and my to-be-read pile… And I did burn the midnight oil for the first comments , but it was no hardship – I’m doing edits. And now it’s crack of dawn… well 7.30am.
    Thanks Joye. I hope you enjoy the new one.

    Reply
  120. Patricia, thank you for having me. It was such a thrill when Mary Jo invited me. Word Wenches is my regular morning coffee blog read, (it used to be my every day one until you decided to look after your own sanity instead of our addiction LOL) so I feel as though I know some of you already. And then there are those of you whose books fill my shelves and my to-be-read pile… And I did burn the midnight oil for the first comments , but it was no hardship – I’m doing edits. And now it’s crack of dawn… well 7.30am.
    Thanks Joye. I hope you enjoy the new one.

    Reply
  121. Piper I just realized I forgot to answer your question about Gabe’s brothers. Again, this is the difficulty I face when ‘m forced to plan ahead (and publishers love to plan ahead — I’m sure for frivolous reasons )
    For me, my characters only come to life when they hit the page walking and talking, and often they do things I didn’t plan. I didn’t intend to include any brothers apart from Harry, but a government connection was needed and Nash walked in to a scene and hung about delicately hinting that he was a hero in the making. Now his older brother Marcus is doing the same in Harry’s book. But I have no idea if I’m going to be able to write their stories — that’s up to the publisher.

    Reply
  122. Piper I just realized I forgot to answer your question about Gabe’s brothers. Again, this is the difficulty I face when ‘m forced to plan ahead (and publishers love to plan ahead — I’m sure for frivolous reasons )
    For me, my characters only come to life when they hit the page walking and talking, and often they do things I didn’t plan. I didn’t intend to include any brothers apart from Harry, but a government connection was needed and Nash walked in to a scene and hung about delicately hinting that he was a hero in the making. Now his older brother Marcus is doing the same in Harry’s book. But I have no idea if I’m going to be able to write their stories — that’s up to the publisher.

    Reply
  123. Piper I just realized I forgot to answer your question about Gabe’s brothers. Again, this is the difficulty I face when ‘m forced to plan ahead (and publishers love to plan ahead — I’m sure for frivolous reasons )
    For me, my characters only come to life when they hit the page walking and talking, and often they do things I didn’t plan. I didn’t intend to include any brothers apart from Harry, but a government connection was needed and Nash walked in to a scene and hung about delicately hinting that he was a hero in the making. Now his older brother Marcus is doing the same in Harry’s book. But I have no idea if I’m going to be able to write their stories — that’s up to the publisher.

    Reply
  124. Piper I just realized I forgot to answer your question about Gabe’s brothers. Again, this is the difficulty I face when ‘m forced to plan ahead (and publishers love to plan ahead — I’m sure for frivolous reasons )
    For me, my characters only come to life when they hit the page walking and talking, and often they do things I didn’t plan. I didn’t intend to include any brothers apart from Harry, but a government connection was needed and Nash walked in to a scene and hung about delicately hinting that he was a hero in the making. Now his older brother Marcus is doing the same in Harry’s book. But I have no idea if I’m going to be able to write their stories — that’s up to the publisher.

    Reply
  125. Piper I just realized I forgot to answer your question about Gabe’s brothers. Again, this is the difficulty I face when ‘m forced to plan ahead (and publishers love to plan ahead — I’m sure for frivolous reasons )
    For me, my characters only come to life when they hit the page walking and talking, and often they do things I didn’t plan. I didn’t intend to include any brothers apart from Harry, but a government connection was needed and Nash walked in to a scene and hung about delicately hinting that he was a hero in the making. Now his older brother Marcus is doing the same in Harry’s book. But I have no idea if I’m going to be able to write their stories — that’s up to the publisher.

    Reply
  126. Anne I LOVED the Stolen Princess, Callie adn Gabe were so different, funny, witty, I though it was the best book I’ve read in monthes, It was a thoughtful well rounded book… I really enjoyed Callie she was just a treat for a heroine… I think writers sometimes overlook the heroine , and they mostly end up unlikable and whiny, but Callie was AWESOME… the rough riders Are looking GOOD!!!! the brotherly relationship was interesting I hope we will see more of them becoming more close.. that would be good a story.. Thanks for a great read… Tal

    Reply
  127. Anne I LOVED the Stolen Princess, Callie adn Gabe were so different, funny, witty, I though it was the best book I’ve read in monthes, It was a thoughtful well rounded book… I really enjoyed Callie she was just a treat for a heroine… I think writers sometimes overlook the heroine , and they mostly end up unlikable and whiny, but Callie was AWESOME… the rough riders Are looking GOOD!!!! the brotherly relationship was interesting I hope we will see more of them becoming more close.. that would be good a story.. Thanks for a great read… Tal

    Reply
  128. Anne I LOVED the Stolen Princess, Callie adn Gabe were so different, funny, witty, I though it was the best book I’ve read in monthes, It was a thoughtful well rounded book… I really enjoyed Callie she was just a treat for a heroine… I think writers sometimes overlook the heroine , and they mostly end up unlikable and whiny, but Callie was AWESOME… the rough riders Are looking GOOD!!!! the brotherly relationship was interesting I hope we will see more of them becoming more close.. that would be good a story.. Thanks for a great read… Tal

    Reply
  129. Anne I LOVED the Stolen Princess, Callie adn Gabe were so different, funny, witty, I though it was the best book I’ve read in monthes, It was a thoughtful well rounded book… I really enjoyed Callie she was just a treat for a heroine… I think writers sometimes overlook the heroine , and they mostly end up unlikable and whiny, but Callie was AWESOME… the rough riders Are looking GOOD!!!! the brotherly relationship was interesting I hope we will see more of them becoming more close.. that would be good a story.. Thanks for a great read… Tal

    Reply
  130. Anne I LOVED the Stolen Princess, Callie adn Gabe were so different, funny, witty, I though it was the best book I’ve read in monthes, It was a thoughtful well rounded book… I really enjoyed Callie she was just a treat for a heroine… I think writers sometimes overlook the heroine , and they mostly end up unlikable and whiny, but Callie was AWESOME… the rough riders Are looking GOOD!!!! the brotherly relationship was interesting I hope we will see more of them becoming more close.. that would be good a story.. Thanks for a great read… Tal

    Reply
  131. Anne, I’m a reader-to-be (hey,I didn’t even discover romantic fiction until a couple of years ago and I’ve got LOTSA catching up to do!) but I’m all excited about the idea of collaging a story. Does every book get its own collage? I’ve done it for my business, but hadn’t thought to do it for my stories. And I’m always looking for sources of legitimate procrastination (especially those that involve making rather than cleaning messes). Thanks for the creativity boost!

    Reply
  132. Anne, I’m a reader-to-be (hey,I didn’t even discover romantic fiction until a couple of years ago and I’ve got LOTSA catching up to do!) but I’m all excited about the idea of collaging a story. Does every book get its own collage? I’ve done it for my business, but hadn’t thought to do it for my stories. And I’m always looking for sources of legitimate procrastination (especially those that involve making rather than cleaning messes). Thanks for the creativity boost!

    Reply
  133. Anne, I’m a reader-to-be (hey,I didn’t even discover romantic fiction until a couple of years ago and I’ve got LOTSA catching up to do!) but I’m all excited about the idea of collaging a story. Does every book get its own collage? I’ve done it for my business, but hadn’t thought to do it for my stories. And I’m always looking for sources of legitimate procrastination (especially those that involve making rather than cleaning messes). Thanks for the creativity boost!

    Reply
  134. Anne, I’m a reader-to-be (hey,I didn’t even discover romantic fiction until a couple of years ago and I’ve got LOTSA catching up to do!) but I’m all excited about the idea of collaging a story. Does every book get its own collage? I’ve done it for my business, but hadn’t thought to do it for my stories. And I’m always looking for sources of legitimate procrastination (especially those that involve making rather than cleaning messes). Thanks for the creativity boost!

    Reply
  135. Anne, I’m a reader-to-be (hey,I didn’t even discover romantic fiction until a couple of years ago and I’ve got LOTSA catching up to do!) but I’m all excited about the idea of collaging a story. Does every book get its own collage? I’ve done it for my business, but hadn’t thought to do it for my stories. And I’m always looking for sources of legitimate procrastination (especially those that involve making rather than cleaning messes). Thanks for the creativity boost!

    Reply
  136. Elaine, the cat drawing is by Moira, a talented longtime friend of mine who I’ve worked with in high schools and in the commuunity adult literacy sector – an she and her husband were also in the band that owns the microphpone on my website front page. She has a knack with her cartoons – they always make me smile.

    Reply
  137. Elaine, the cat drawing is by Moira, a talented longtime friend of mine who I’ve worked with in high schools and in the commuunity adult literacy sector – an she and her husband were also in the band that owns the microphpone on my website front page. She has a knack with her cartoons – they always make me smile.

    Reply
  138. Elaine, the cat drawing is by Moira, a talented longtime friend of mine who I’ve worked with in high schools and in the commuunity adult literacy sector – an she and her husband were also in the band that owns the microphpone on my website front page. She has a knack with her cartoons – they always make me smile.

    Reply
  139. Elaine, the cat drawing is by Moira, a talented longtime friend of mine who I’ve worked with in high schools and in the commuunity adult literacy sector – an she and her husband were also in the band that owns the microphpone on my website front page. She has a knack with her cartoons – they always make me smile.

    Reply
  140. Elaine, the cat drawing is by Moira, a talented longtime friend of mine who I’ve worked with in high schools and in the commuunity adult literacy sector – an she and her husband were also in the band that owns the microphpone on my website front page. She has a knack with her cartoons – they always make me smile.

    Reply
  141. Tal, I’m so pleased you liked Callie and Gabe. Comments like yours keep writers writing.
    Keri I only came to story collage in the last few years, so The Perfect Kiss was the first one I did.
    http://www.annegracie.com/kisscollbig.jpg
    My friend Barbara Hannay (who writers lovely contemporary Australian romance for Harlequin Romance) first got me interested, and then I read Jenny Crusie writing about them, and Susan Wiggs and Barbara Samuel — all wonderful writers, so I thought I’d try. And I’m hooked. I’ve already started the collage for the next book.

    Reply
  142. Tal, I’m so pleased you liked Callie and Gabe. Comments like yours keep writers writing.
    Keri I only came to story collage in the last few years, so The Perfect Kiss was the first one I did.
    http://www.annegracie.com/kisscollbig.jpg
    My friend Barbara Hannay (who writers lovely contemporary Australian romance for Harlequin Romance) first got me interested, and then I read Jenny Crusie writing about them, and Susan Wiggs and Barbara Samuel — all wonderful writers, so I thought I’d try. And I’m hooked. I’ve already started the collage for the next book.

    Reply
  143. Tal, I’m so pleased you liked Callie and Gabe. Comments like yours keep writers writing.
    Keri I only came to story collage in the last few years, so The Perfect Kiss was the first one I did.
    http://www.annegracie.com/kisscollbig.jpg
    My friend Barbara Hannay (who writers lovely contemporary Australian romance for Harlequin Romance) first got me interested, and then I read Jenny Crusie writing about them, and Susan Wiggs and Barbara Samuel — all wonderful writers, so I thought I’d try. And I’m hooked. I’ve already started the collage for the next book.

    Reply
  144. Tal, I’m so pleased you liked Callie and Gabe. Comments like yours keep writers writing.
    Keri I only came to story collage in the last few years, so The Perfect Kiss was the first one I did.
    http://www.annegracie.com/kisscollbig.jpg
    My friend Barbara Hannay (who writers lovely contemporary Australian romance for Harlequin Romance) first got me interested, and then I read Jenny Crusie writing about them, and Susan Wiggs and Barbara Samuel — all wonderful writers, so I thought I’d try. And I’m hooked. I’ve already started the collage for the next book.

    Reply
  145. Tal, I’m so pleased you liked Callie and Gabe. Comments like yours keep writers writing.
    Keri I only came to story collage in the last few years, so The Perfect Kiss was the first one I did.
    http://www.annegracie.com/kisscollbig.jpg
    My friend Barbara Hannay (who writers lovely contemporary Australian romance for Harlequin Romance) first got me interested, and then I read Jenny Crusie writing about them, and Susan Wiggs and Barbara Samuel — all wonderful writers, so I thought I’d try. And I’m hooked. I’ve already started the collage for the next book.

    Reply
  146. RevMelinda, I have some titles of Australian Historical Romance for you, provided by my friend Bronwyn Jameson (fab Desire author). Bron said:
    Candice Proctor, Anne? Need to go check my keeper cupboard for the titles but from memory she did 3 all set around the time of white settlement. 2 featured our convict history. And they’re definitely historical romance. I loved them because (a) I’m a fan of her writing anyway, but (b) because of the setting.
    Okay, here they are:
    Night In Eden (NSW)
    September Moon (Sth Australia)
    Whispers of Heaven (Tasmania)

    Reply
  147. RevMelinda, I have some titles of Australian Historical Romance for you, provided by my friend Bronwyn Jameson (fab Desire author). Bron said:
    Candice Proctor, Anne? Need to go check my keeper cupboard for the titles but from memory she did 3 all set around the time of white settlement. 2 featured our convict history. And they’re definitely historical romance. I loved them because (a) I’m a fan of her writing anyway, but (b) because of the setting.
    Okay, here they are:
    Night In Eden (NSW)
    September Moon (Sth Australia)
    Whispers of Heaven (Tasmania)

    Reply
  148. RevMelinda, I have some titles of Australian Historical Romance for you, provided by my friend Bronwyn Jameson (fab Desire author). Bron said:
    Candice Proctor, Anne? Need to go check my keeper cupboard for the titles but from memory she did 3 all set around the time of white settlement. 2 featured our convict history. And they’re definitely historical romance. I loved them because (a) I’m a fan of her writing anyway, but (b) because of the setting.
    Okay, here they are:
    Night In Eden (NSW)
    September Moon (Sth Australia)
    Whispers of Heaven (Tasmania)

    Reply
  149. RevMelinda, I have some titles of Australian Historical Romance for you, provided by my friend Bronwyn Jameson (fab Desire author). Bron said:
    Candice Proctor, Anne? Need to go check my keeper cupboard for the titles but from memory she did 3 all set around the time of white settlement. 2 featured our convict history. And they’re definitely historical romance. I loved them because (a) I’m a fan of her writing anyway, but (b) because of the setting.
    Okay, here they are:
    Night In Eden (NSW)
    September Moon (Sth Australia)
    Whispers of Heaven (Tasmania)

    Reply
  150. RevMelinda, I have some titles of Australian Historical Romance for you, provided by my friend Bronwyn Jameson (fab Desire author). Bron said:
    Candice Proctor, Anne? Need to go check my keeper cupboard for the titles but from memory she did 3 all set around the time of white settlement. 2 featured our convict history. And they’re definitely historical romance. I loved them because (a) I’m a fan of her writing anyway, but (b) because of the setting.
    Okay, here they are:
    Night In Eden (NSW)
    September Moon (Sth Australia)
    Whispers of Heaven (Tasmania)

    Reply
  151. Anne, I’m so glad to hear Tibby and Ethan get their happy ending. I loved their characters in The Stolen Princess, just as I loved the whole book – thanks for a terrific read.
    I didn’t know you wrote books designed for adult learner readers. How terrific. I can just imagine your classes lapping them up.
    Annie

    Reply
  152. Anne, I’m so glad to hear Tibby and Ethan get their happy ending. I loved their characters in The Stolen Princess, just as I loved the whole book – thanks for a terrific read.
    I didn’t know you wrote books designed for adult learner readers. How terrific. I can just imagine your classes lapping them up.
    Annie

    Reply
  153. Anne, I’m so glad to hear Tibby and Ethan get their happy ending. I loved their characters in The Stolen Princess, just as I loved the whole book – thanks for a terrific read.
    I didn’t know you wrote books designed for adult learner readers. How terrific. I can just imagine your classes lapping them up.
    Annie

    Reply
  154. Anne, I’m so glad to hear Tibby and Ethan get their happy ending. I loved their characters in The Stolen Princess, just as I loved the whole book – thanks for a terrific read.
    I didn’t know you wrote books designed for adult learner readers. How terrific. I can just imagine your classes lapping them up.
    Annie

    Reply
  155. Anne, I’m so glad to hear Tibby and Ethan get their happy ending. I loved their characters in The Stolen Princess, just as I loved the whole book – thanks for a terrific read.
    I didn’t know you wrote books designed for adult learner readers. How terrific. I can just imagine your classes lapping them up.
    Annie

    Reply
  156. I tried to post this last night, but alas, the website didn’t like my email address, so I gave up. Hi Anne, lovely to see you over here, and I absolutely loved The Stolen Princess, excellent work! I’m sill upset with Kate and Elle that they managed (inadvertantly) to arrange for you to attend the _only_ Brraddicts meeting of the year that I couldn’t possibly make because of family commitments! However, Elle lent me TSP, so I’m thinking about forgiving. πŸ™‚ Hopefully you’ll be able to visit us again next time you are in Brisbane. Fantastic to hear about the work you are doing with adult literacy also. I have had the opportunity to be involved with Youngcare, and their next facility will likely be for those with brain injuries – who are having to re-learn everything, so I’m sure works like yours will be invaluable in that process.

    Reply
  157. I tried to post this last night, but alas, the website didn’t like my email address, so I gave up. Hi Anne, lovely to see you over here, and I absolutely loved The Stolen Princess, excellent work! I’m sill upset with Kate and Elle that they managed (inadvertantly) to arrange for you to attend the _only_ Brraddicts meeting of the year that I couldn’t possibly make because of family commitments! However, Elle lent me TSP, so I’m thinking about forgiving. πŸ™‚ Hopefully you’ll be able to visit us again next time you are in Brisbane. Fantastic to hear about the work you are doing with adult literacy also. I have had the opportunity to be involved with Youngcare, and their next facility will likely be for those with brain injuries – who are having to re-learn everything, so I’m sure works like yours will be invaluable in that process.

    Reply
  158. I tried to post this last night, but alas, the website didn’t like my email address, so I gave up. Hi Anne, lovely to see you over here, and I absolutely loved The Stolen Princess, excellent work! I’m sill upset with Kate and Elle that they managed (inadvertantly) to arrange for you to attend the _only_ Brraddicts meeting of the year that I couldn’t possibly make because of family commitments! However, Elle lent me TSP, so I’m thinking about forgiving. πŸ™‚ Hopefully you’ll be able to visit us again next time you are in Brisbane. Fantastic to hear about the work you are doing with adult literacy also. I have had the opportunity to be involved with Youngcare, and their next facility will likely be for those with brain injuries – who are having to re-learn everything, so I’m sure works like yours will be invaluable in that process.

    Reply
  159. I tried to post this last night, but alas, the website didn’t like my email address, so I gave up. Hi Anne, lovely to see you over here, and I absolutely loved The Stolen Princess, excellent work! I’m sill upset with Kate and Elle that they managed (inadvertantly) to arrange for you to attend the _only_ Brraddicts meeting of the year that I couldn’t possibly make because of family commitments! However, Elle lent me TSP, so I’m thinking about forgiving. πŸ™‚ Hopefully you’ll be able to visit us again next time you are in Brisbane. Fantastic to hear about the work you are doing with adult literacy also. I have had the opportunity to be involved with Youngcare, and their next facility will likely be for those with brain injuries – who are having to re-learn everything, so I’m sure works like yours will be invaluable in that process.

    Reply
  160. I tried to post this last night, but alas, the website didn’t like my email address, so I gave up. Hi Anne, lovely to see you over here, and I absolutely loved The Stolen Princess, excellent work! I’m sill upset with Kate and Elle that they managed (inadvertantly) to arrange for you to attend the _only_ Brraddicts meeting of the year that I couldn’t possibly make because of family commitments! However, Elle lent me TSP, so I’m thinking about forgiving. πŸ™‚ Hopefully you’ll be able to visit us again next time you are in Brisbane. Fantastic to hear about the work you are doing with adult literacy also. I have had the opportunity to be involved with Youngcare, and their next facility will likely be for those with brain injuries – who are having to re-learn everything, so I’m sure works like yours will be invaluable in that process.

    Reply
  161. Anne,
    What a wonderful, wonderful post! I enjoyed it so much. As a librarian, I am totally on board with you about adult literacy. (And I will see about ordering your beginner books for my library – how’s that for networking? *g*)
    Also as a librarian, I’m sitting here grinning from ear to ear after reading the Eva Ibbotson story. I just adored it!
    As a reader, well, there’s nothing left to say about your marvellous books. heh heh And as a fellow Aussie, I say – On ya, mate!

    Reply
  162. Anne,
    What a wonderful, wonderful post! I enjoyed it so much. As a librarian, I am totally on board with you about adult literacy. (And I will see about ordering your beginner books for my library – how’s that for networking? *g*)
    Also as a librarian, I’m sitting here grinning from ear to ear after reading the Eva Ibbotson story. I just adored it!
    As a reader, well, there’s nothing left to say about your marvellous books. heh heh And as a fellow Aussie, I say – On ya, mate!

    Reply
  163. Anne,
    What a wonderful, wonderful post! I enjoyed it so much. As a librarian, I am totally on board with you about adult literacy. (And I will see about ordering your beginner books for my library – how’s that for networking? *g*)
    Also as a librarian, I’m sitting here grinning from ear to ear after reading the Eva Ibbotson story. I just adored it!
    As a reader, well, there’s nothing left to say about your marvellous books. heh heh And as a fellow Aussie, I say – On ya, mate!

    Reply
  164. Anne,
    What a wonderful, wonderful post! I enjoyed it so much. As a librarian, I am totally on board with you about adult literacy. (And I will see about ordering your beginner books for my library – how’s that for networking? *g*)
    Also as a librarian, I’m sitting here grinning from ear to ear after reading the Eva Ibbotson story. I just adored it!
    As a reader, well, there’s nothing left to say about your marvellous books. heh heh And as a fellow Aussie, I say – On ya, mate!

    Reply
  165. Anne,
    What a wonderful, wonderful post! I enjoyed it so much. As a librarian, I am totally on board with you about adult literacy. (And I will see about ordering your beginner books for my library – how’s that for networking? *g*)
    Also as a librarian, I’m sitting here grinning from ear to ear after reading the Eva Ibbotson story. I just adored it!
    As a reader, well, there’s nothing left to say about your marvellous books. heh heh And as a fellow Aussie, I say – On ya, mate!

    Reply
  166. Thanks Annie, Debbie and Denise,
    Thanks, Annie. I couldn’t not give Tibby and Ethan a happy ending — I love them as characters.
    Debbie, if I can visit Braddicts (for the uninitiated, Brisbane Romance Reading Addicts — a fantastic reading group) again on another visit north I will. I got some lovely reading recommendations and it was a fun night.
    Denise, great networking, library gal! And yes, that Eva Ibbotson story is gorrrgeous, isn’t it? I love her books — her romances for adults are wonderful. And they’ve reissued some – the Morning Gift and A Countess Below Stairs has been retitled. Highly, highly recommended.

    Reply
  167. Thanks Annie, Debbie and Denise,
    Thanks, Annie. I couldn’t not give Tibby and Ethan a happy ending — I love them as characters.
    Debbie, if I can visit Braddicts (for the uninitiated, Brisbane Romance Reading Addicts — a fantastic reading group) again on another visit north I will. I got some lovely reading recommendations and it was a fun night.
    Denise, great networking, library gal! And yes, that Eva Ibbotson story is gorrrgeous, isn’t it? I love her books — her romances for adults are wonderful. And they’ve reissued some – the Morning Gift and A Countess Below Stairs has been retitled. Highly, highly recommended.

    Reply
  168. Thanks Annie, Debbie and Denise,
    Thanks, Annie. I couldn’t not give Tibby and Ethan a happy ending — I love them as characters.
    Debbie, if I can visit Braddicts (for the uninitiated, Brisbane Romance Reading Addicts — a fantastic reading group) again on another visit north I will. I got some lovely reading recommendations and it was a fun night.
    Denise, great networking, library gal! And yes, that Eva Ibbotson story is gorrrgeous, isn’t it? I love her books — her romances for adults are wonderful. And they’ve reissued some – the Morning Gift and A Countess Below Stairs has been retitled. Highly, highly recommended.

    Reply
  169. Thanks Annie, Debbie and Denise,
    Thanks, Annie. I couldn’t not give Tibby and Ethan a happy ending — I love them as characters.
    Debbie, if I can visit Braddicts (for the uninitiated, Brisbane Romance Reading Addicts — a fantastic reading group) again on another visit north I will. I got some lovely reading recommendations and it was a fun night.
    Denise, great networking, library gal! And yes, that Eva Ibbotson story is gorrrgeous, isn’t it? I love her books — her romances for adults are wonderful. And they’ve reissued some – the Morning Gift and A Countess Below Stairs has been retitled. Highly, highly recommended.

    Reply
  170. Thanks Annie, Debbie and Denise,
    Thanks, Annie. I couldn’t not give Tibby and Ethan a happy ending — I love them as characters.
    Debbie, if I can visit Braddicts (for the uninitiated, Brisbane Romance Reading Addicts — a fantastic reading group) again on another visit north I will. I got some lovely reading recommendations and it was a fun night.
    Denise, great networking, library gal! And yes, that Eva Ibbotson story is gorrrgeous, isn’t it? I love her books — her romances for adults are wonderful. And they’ve reissued some – the Morning Gift and A Countess Below Stairs has been retitled. Highly, highly recommended.

    Reply
  171. From MJP:
    Dittoing the praise for Eva Ibbotson! She’s a MARVELOUS writer–warm, witty, and profoundly romantic.
    I also love that library piece she wrote. Several times when I’ve spoken at a library, I’ve ended by reading that story, and people just SWOON! It’s great that some of her books are being reissued again.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  172. From MJP:
    Dittoing the praise for Eva Ibbotson! She’s a MARVELOUS writer–warm, witty, and profoundly romantic.
    I also love that library piece she wrote. Several times when I’ve spoken at a library, I’ve ended by reading that story, and people just SWOON! It’s great that some of her books are being reissued again.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  173. From MJP:
    Dittoing the praise for Eva Ibbotson! She’s a MARVELOUS writer–warm, witty, and profoundly romantic.
    I also love that library piece she wrote. Several times when I’ve spoken at a library, I’ve ended by reading that story, and people just SWOON! It’s great that some of her books are being reissued again.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  174. From MJP:
    Dittoing the praise for Eva Ibbotson! She’s a MARVELOUS writer–warm, witty, and profoundly romantic.
    I also love that library piece she wrote. Several times when I’ve spoken at a library, I’ve ended by reading that story, and people just SWOON! It’s great that some of her books are being reissued again.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  175. From MJP:
    Dittoing the praise for Eva Ibbotson! She’s a MARVELOUS writer–warm, witty, and profoundly romantic.
    I also love that library piece she wrote. Several times when I’ve spoken at a library, I’ve ended by reading that story, and people just SWOON! It’s great that some of her books are being reissued again.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  176. Mary Jo, what a coincidence, I’m doing a library talk in a couple of hours, and after I’d posted the link I thought to myself, “I might read this to the audience today” and I printed it off.
    The question is, can I read it without choking up?

    Reply
  177. Mary Jo, what a coincidence, I’m doing a library talk in a couple of hours, and after I’d posted the link I thought to myself, “I might read this to the audience today” and I printed it off.
    The question is, can I read it without choking up?

    Reply
  178. Mary Jo, what a coincidence, I’m doing a library talk in a couple of hours, and after I’d posted the link I thought to myself, “I might read this to the audience today” and I printed it off.
    The question is, can I read it without choking up?

    Reply
  179. Mary Jo, what a coincidence, I’m doing a library talk in a couple of hours, and after I’d posted the link I thought to myself, “I might read this to the audience today” and I printed it off.
    The question is, can I read it without choking up?

    Reply
  180. Mary Jo, what a coincidence, I’m doing a library talk in a couple of hours, and after I’d posted the link I thought to myself, “I might read this to the audience today” and I printed it off.
    The question is, can I read it without choking up?

    Reply
  181. Anne, I really enjoyed The Stolen Princess, and I’m looking forward to the rest of the Devil Riders’ stories. I don’t know how Eva Ibbotson got into this discussion, but I really loved A Countess Below Stairs — what a great mvoie the Brits could make out of that book πŸ™‚ It gives me hope when a great out of print author gets back into print.

    Reply
  182. Anne, I really enjoyed The Stolen Princess, and I’m looking forward to the rest of the Devil Riders’ stories. I don’t know how Eva Ibbotson got into this discussion, but I really loved A Countess Below Stairs — what a great mvoie the Brits could make out of that book πŸ™‚ It gives me hope when a great out of print author gets back into print.

    Reply
  183. Anne, I really enjoyed The Stolen Princess, and I’m looking forward to the rest of the Devil Riders’ stories. I don’t know how Eva Ibbotson got into this discussion, but I really loved A Countess Below Stairs — what a great mvoie the Brits could make out of that book πŸ™‚ It gives me hope when a great out of print author gets back into print.

    Reply
  184. Anne, I really enjoyed The Stolen Princess, and I’m looking forward to the rest of the Devil Riders’ stories. I don’t know how Eva Ibbotson got into this discussion, but I really loved A Countess Below Stairs — what a great mvoie the Brits could make out of that book πŸ™‚ It gives me hope when a great out of print author gets back into print.

    Reply
  185. Anne, I really enjoyed The Stolen Princess, and I’m looking forward to the rest of the Devil Riders’ stories. I don’t know how Eva Ibbotson got into this discussion, but I really loved A Countess Below Stairs — what a great mvoie the Brits could make out of that book πŸ™‚ It gives me hope when a great out of print author gets back into print.

    Reply
  186. Anne, I am so looking forward to the new book!
    I was interested to know why your fictional cat is called “Mizuri”? In swahili, mizuri, means thank you.
    I believe every family has its own language and although a long time (and proud) Aussie, I am actually 3rd generation born Kenyan (or at least Colonial Kenyan – born pre-independence). As a consequence my family have always used a sort of “swanglish”, with our normal conversation liberally laced with swahili words. Throw in some behasa from our time in south east asia and we have a family language that has continued down the generations (even my husband speaks it!).
    My grown sons were horrified to discover only recently that words they used naturally in every day speech with their friends were in fact swahili words (such as mizuri, maradadi, kali) and thus completely incomprehensible to any outsider.
    No wonder they got some strange looks.

    Reply
  187. Anne, I am so looking forward to the new book!
    I was interested to know why your fictional cat is called “Mizuri”? In swahili, mizuri, means thank you.
    I believe every family has its own language and although a long time (and proud) Aussie, I am actually 3rd generation born Kenyan (or at least Colonial Kenyan – born pre-independence). As a consequence my family have always used a sort of “swanglish”, with our normal conversation liberally laced with swahili words. Throw in some behasa from our time in south east asia and we have a family language that has continued down the generations (even my husband speaks it!).
    My grown sons were horrified to discover only recently that words they used naturally in every day speech with their friends were in fact swahili words (such as mizuri, maradadi, kali) and thus completely incomprehensible to any outsider.
    No wonder they got some strange looks.

    Reply
  188. Anne, I am so looking forward to the new book!
    I was interested to know why your fictional cat is called “Mizuri”? In swahili, mizuri, means thank you.
    I believe every family has its own language and although a long time (and proud) Aussie, I am actually 3rd generation born Kenyan (or at least Colonial Kenyan – born pre-independence). As a consequence my family have always used a sort of “swanglish”, with our normal conversation liberally laced with swahili words. Throw in some behasa from our time in south east asia and we have a family language that has continued down the generations (even my husband speaks it!).
    My grown sons were horrified to discover only recently that words they used naturally in every day speech with their friends were in fact swahili words (such as mizuri, maradadi, kali) and thus completely incomprehensible to any outsider.
    No wonder they got some strange looks.

    Reply
  189. Anne, I am so looking forward to the new book!
    I was interested to know why your fictional cat is called “Mizuri”? In swahili, mizuri, means thank you.
    I believe every family has its own language and although a long time (and proud) Aussie, I am actually 3rd generation born Kenyan (or at least Colonial Kenyan – born pre-independence). As a consequence my family have always used a sort of “swanglish”, with our normal conversation liberally laced with swahili words. Throw in some behasa from our time in south east asia and we have a family language that has continued down the generations (even my husband speaks it!).
    My grown sons were horrified to discover only recently that words they used naturally in every day speech with their friends were in fact swahili words (such as mizuri, maradadi, kali) and thus completely incomprehensible to any outsider.
    No wonder they got some strange looks.

    Reply
  190. Anne, I am so looking forward to the new book!
    I was interested to know why your fictional cat is called “Mizuri”? In swahili, mizuri, means thank you.
    I believe every family has its own language and although a long time (and proud) Aussie, I am actually 3rd generation born Kenyan (or at least Colonial Kenyan – born pre-independence). As a consequence my family have always used a sort of “swanglish”, with our normal conversation liberally laced with swahili words. Throw in some behasa from our time in south east asia and we have a family language that has continued down the generations (even my husband speaks it!).
    My grown sons were horrified to discover only recently that words they used naturally in every day speech with their friends were in fact swahili words (such as mizuri, maradadi, kali) and thus completely incomprehensible to any outsider.
    No wonder they got some strange looks.

    Reply
  191. RevMelinda, I’ve ordered a couple of Candice’s books as well. .
    Candice is an American who used to live in South Australia. She returned to the US around the time I joined RWAustralia so I never got to meet her, but she left a lot of friends–and fans– behind.
    Presents writer Trish Morey wrote to me with this:
    “And Beyond Sunrise, while set in South Pacific rather than Oz, features a gorgeous Aussie hero, Jack Ryder, who takes on the the buttoned up India McKnight, spinster, Scotswoman and travel writer of some reknown… And now I’ve got it out the bookshelf, I”m gonna have to read it again…”
    And BTW, If you don’t like convict stories, the one set in South Australia won’t be about convicts. South Australia and Victoria were free settlements and never had convicts.

    Reply
  192. RevMelinda, I’ve ordered a couple of Candice’s books as well. .
    Candice is an American who used to live in South Australia. She returned to the US around the time I joined RWAustralia so I never got to meet her, but she left a lot of friends–and fans– behind.
    Presents writer Trish Morey wrote to me with this:
    “And Beyond Sunrise, while set in South Pacific rather than Oz, features a gorgeous Aussie hero, Jack Ryder, who takes on the the buttoned up India McKnight, spinster, Scotswoman and travel writer of some reknown… And now I’ve got it out the bookshelf, I”m gonna have to read it again…”
    And BTW, If you don’t like convict stories, the one set in South Australia won’t be about convicts. South Australia and Victoria were free settlements and never had convicts.

    Reply
  193. RevMelinda, I’ve ordered a couple of Candice’s books as well. .
    Candice is an American who used to live in South Australia. She returned to the US around the time I joined RWAustralia so I never got to meet her, but she left a lot of friends–and fans– behind.
    Presents writer Trish Morey wrote to me with this:
    “And Beyond Sunrise, while set in South Pacific rather than Oz, features a gorgeous Aussie hero, Jack Ryder, who takes on the the buttoned up India McKnight, spinster, Scotswoman and travel writer of some reknown… And now I’ve got it out the bookshelf, I”m gonna have to read it again…”
    And BTW, If you don’t like convict stories, the one set in South Australia won’t be about convicts. South Australia and Victoria were free settlements and never had convicts.

    Reply
  194. RevMelinda, I’ve ordered a couple of Candice’s books as well. .
    Candice is an American who used to live in South Australia. She returned to the US around the time I joined RWAustralia so I never got to meet her, but she left a lot of friends–and fans– behind.
    Presents writer Trish Morey wrote to me with this:
    “And Beyond Sunrise, while set in South Pacific rather than Oz, features a gorgeous Aussie hero, Jack Ryder, who takes on the the buttoned up India McKnight, spinster, Scotswoman and travel writer of some reknown… And now I’ve got it out the bookshelf, I”m gonna have to read it again…”
    And BTW, If you don’t like convict stories, the one set in South Australia won’t be about convicts. South Australia and Victoria were free settlements and never had convicts.

    Reply
  195. RevMelinda, I’ve ordered a couple of Candice’s books as well. .
    Candice is an American who used to live in South Australia. She returned to the US around the time I joined RWAustralia so I never got to meet her, but she left a lot of friends–and fans– behind.
    Presents writer Trish Morey wrote to me with this:
    “And Beyond Sunrise, while set in South Pacific rather than Oz, features a gorgeous Aussie hero, Jack Ryder, who takes on the the buttoned up India McKnight, spinster, Scotswoman and travel writer of some reknown… And now I’ve got it out the bookshelf, I”m gonna have to read it again…”
    And BTW, If you don’t like convict stories, the one set in South Australia won’t be about convicts. South Australia and Victoria were free settlements and never had convicts.

    Reply
  196. Janice, I’m so glad you enjoyed the Princess.
    I tell people about Eva Ibbotson’s books whenever I can. I think they’re wonderful and shouldn’t have ever gone out of print. I bought mine second hand at exorbitant prices over the internet and am so delighted that some are back in print so I can buy copies for my friends.

    Reply
  197. Janice, I’m so glad you enjoyed the Princess.
    I tell people about Eva Ibbotson’s books whenever I can. I think they’re wonderful and shouldn’t have ever gone out of print. I bought mine second hand at exorbitant prices over the internet and am so delighted that some are back in print so I can buy copies for my friends.

    Reply
  198. Janice, I’m so glad you enjoyed the Princess.
    I tell people about Eva Ibbotson’s books whenever I can. I think they’re wonderful and shouldn’t have ever gone out of print. I bought mine second hand at exorbitant prices over the internet and am so delighted that some are back in print so I can buy copies for my friends.

    Reply
  199. Janice, I’m so glad you enjoyed the Princess.
    I tell people about Eva Ibbotson’s books whenever I can. I think they’re wonderful and shouldn’t have ever gone out of print. I bought mine second hand at exorbitant prices over the internet and am so delighted that some are back in print so I can buy copies for my friends.

    Reply
  200. Janice, I’m so glad you enjoyed the Princess.
    I tell people about Eva Ibbotson’s books whenever I can. I think they’re wonderful and shouldn’t have ever gone out of print. I bought mine second hand at exorbitant prices over the internet and am so delighted that some are back in print so I can buy copies for my friends.

    Reply
  201. Alison, fascinating story about Kenya and the way people pick up language. And families who have their own special words.
    I’m pretty sure my “Mizuri the Cat” was named after the baby gorilla who was born in Melbourne zoo. The real Mizuri the cat belonged to Joyce, a Lebanese lady in my class (and a fabulous cook.) I originally wrote the story for her. It’s a sad story, the only sad one in the collection. But it gets people talking about their beloved pets…

    Reply
  202. Alison, fascinating story about Kenya and the way people pick up language. And families who have their own special words.
    I’m pretty sure my “Mizuri the Cat” was named after the baby gorilla who was born in Melbourne zoo. The real Mizuri the cat belonged to Joyce, a Lebanese lady in my class (and a fabulous cook.) I originally wrote the story for her. It’s a sad story, the only sad one in the collection. But it gets people talking about their beloved pets…

    Reply
  203. Alison, fascinating story about Kenya and the way people pick up language. And families who have their own special words.
    I’m pretty sure my “Mizuri the Cat” was named after the baby gorilla who was born in Melbourne zoo. The real Mizuri the cat belonged to Joyce, a Lebanese lady in my class (and a fabulous cook.) I originally wrote the story for her. It’s a sad story, the only sad one in the collection. But it gets people talking about their beloved pets…

    Reply
  204. Alison, fascinating story about Kenya and the way people pick up language. And families who have their own special words.
    I’m pretty sure my “Mizuri the Cat” was named after the baby gorilla who was born in Melbourne zoo. The real Mizuri the cat belonged to Joyce, a Lebanese lady in my class (and a fabulous cook.) I originally wrote the story for her. It’s a sad story, the only sad one in the collection. But it gets people talking about their beloved pets…

    Reply
  205. Alison, fascinating story about Kenya and the way people pick up language. And families who have their own special words.
    I’m pretty sure my “Mizuri the Cat” was named after the baby gorilla who was born in Melbourne zoo. The real Mizuri the cat belonged to Joyce, a Lebanese lady in my class (and a fabulous cook.) I originally wrote the story for her. It’s a sad story, the only sad one in the collection. But it gets people talking about their beloved pets…

    Reply
  206. Hi Anne,
    I’m a collage person, too. I love making them. In fact, I have two tacked to the wall on either side of my desk for my current ms. πŸ™‚
    I really enjoyed learning about you and your writing. Thanks for sharing! Oh, and best of luck with The Stolen Princess!
    Carol

    Reply
  207. Hi Anne,
    I’m a collage person, too. I love making them. In fact, I have two tacked to the wall on either side of my desk for my current ms. πŸ™‚
    I really enjoyed learning about you and your writing. Thanks for sharing! Oh, and best of luck with The Stolen Princess!
    Carol

    Reply
  208. Hi Anne,
    I’m a collage person, too. I love making them. In fact, I have two tacked to the wall on either side of my desk for my current ms. πŸ™‚
    I really enjoyed learning about you and your writing. Thanks for sharing! Oh, and best of luck with The Stolen Princess!
    Carol

    Reply
  209. Hi Anne,
    I’m a collage person, too. I love making them. In fact, I have two tacked to the wall on either side of my desk for my current ms. πŸ™‚
    I really enjoyed learning about you and your writing. Thanks for sharing! Oh, and best of luck with The Stolen Princess!
    Carol

    Reply
  210. Hi Anne,
    I’m a collage person, too. I love making them. In fact, I have two tacked to the wall on either side of my desk for my current ms. πŸ™‚
    I really enjoyed learning about you and your writing. Thanks for sharing! Oh, and best of luck with The Stolen Princess!
    Carol

    Reply
  211. the part i enjoyed the most about the adult beginner literacy books – how inspiring! i’m going to go see if i can find them in my library (i live in canada)

    Reply
  212. the part i enjoyed the most about the adult beginner literacy books – how inspiring! i’m going to go see if i can find them in my library (i live in canada)

    Reply
  213. the part i enjoyed the most about the adult beginner literacy books – how inspiring! i’m going to go see if i can find them in my library (i live in canada)

    Reply
  214. the part i enjoyed the most about the adult beginner literacy books – how inspiring! i’m going to go see if i can find them in my library (i live in canada)

    Reply
  215. the part i enjoyed the most about the adult beginner literacy books – how inspiring! i’m going to go see if i can find them in my library (i live in canada)

    Reply
  216. Anne, stopping by here late on Friday night to see your interview. How wonderful! As you know from your time with the Romance Banditas that you’re an auto-buy for me. I remain in awe of your talent and of your generosity toward beginner writers. And before I say good night here, I’m going to put in another bid for a trip to SF this July.

    Reply
  217. Anne, stopping by here late on Friday night to see your interview. How wonderful! As you know from your time with the Romance Banditas that you’re an auto-buy for me. I remain in awe of your talent and of your generosity toward beginner writers. And before I say good night here, I’m going to put in another bid for a trip to SF this July.

    Reply
  218. Anne, stopping by here late on Friday night to see your interview. How wonderful! As you know from your time with the Romance Banditas that you’re an auto-buy for me. I remain in awe of your talent and of your generosity toward beginner writers. And before I say good night here, I’m going to put in another bid for a trip to SF this July.

    Reply
  219. Anne, stopping by here late on Friday night to see your interview. How wonderful! As you know from your time with the Romance Banditas that you’re an auto-buy for me. I remain in awe of your talent and of your generosity toward beginner writers. And before I say good night here, I’m going to put in another bid for a trip to SF this July.

    Reply
  220. Anne, stopping by here late on Friday night to see your interview. How wonderful! As you know from your time with the Romance Banditas that you’re an auto-buy for me. I remain in awe of your talent and of your generosity toward beginner writers. And before I say good night here, I’m going to put in another bid for a trip to SF this July.

    Reply
  221. Carol, love the idea of you being surrounded by your collages — that’s reeeally plunging yourself into your story.
    Maya, they’re very simple stories — I think it’s Moira’s cartoons that make all the difference.
    Keira, lovely to see you here, and thank you for your very kind comments. I’d love to go to SFO, but I’m going to NY in March and the UK after that, and really I do need to leave some time to write books, so unless something spectacular changes, I doubt I’ll be there. πŸ™
    Serena, hi to you, too – folks Serena is a wonderful aussie supporter of romance and romance writers from my home town. A true heroine!
    And by the way, I did read that Eva Ibbotson story in my library talk and I did choke up, twice… But they all loved the story.

    Reply
  222. Carol, love the idea of you being surrounded by your collages — that’s reeeally plunging yourself into your story.
    Maya, they’re very simple stories — I think it’s Moira’s cartoons that make all the difference.
    Keira, lovely to see you here, and thank you for your very kind comments. I’d love to go to SFO, but I’m going to NY in March and the UK after that, and really I do need to leave some time to write books, so unless something spectacular changes, I doubt I’ll be there. πŸ™
    Serena, hi to you, too – folks Serena is a wonderful aussie supporter of romance and romance writers from my home town. A true heroine!
    And by the way, I did read that Eva Ibbotson story in my library talk and I did choke up, twice… But they all loved the story.

    Reply
  223. Carol, love the idea of you being surrounded by your collages — that’s reeeally plunging yourself into your story.
    Maya, they’re very simple stories — I think it’s Moira’s cartoons that make all the difference.
    Keira, lovely to see you here, and thank you for your very kind comments. I’d love to go to SFO, but I’m going to NY in March and the UK after that, and really I do need to leave some time to write books, so unless something spectacular changes, I doubt I’ll be there. πŸ™
    Serena, hi to you, too – folks Serena is a wonderful aussie supporter of romance and romance writers from my home town. A true heroine!
    And by the way, I did read that Eva Ibbotson story in my library talk and I did choke up, twice… But they all loved the story.

    Reply
  224. Carol, love the idea of you being surrounded by your collages — that’s reeeally plunging yourself into your story.
    Maya, they’re very simple stories — I think it’s Moira’s cartoons that make all the difference.
    Keira, lovely to see you here, and thank you for your very kind comments. I’d love to go to SFO, but I’m going to NY in March and the UK after that, and really I do need to leave some time to write books, so unless something spectacular changes, I doubt I’ll be there. πŸ™
    Serena, hi to you, too – folks Serena is a wonderful aussie supporter of romance and romance writers from my home town. A true heroine!
    And by the way, I did read that Eva Ibbotson story in my library talk and I did choke up, twice… But they all loved the story.

    Reply
  225. Carol, love the idea of you being surrounded by your collages — that’s reeeally plunging yourself into your story.
    Maya, they’re very simple stories — I think it’s Moira’s cartoons that make all the difference.
    Keira, lovely to see you here, and thank you for your very kind comments. I’d love to go to SFO, but I’m going to NY in March and the UK after that, and really I do need to leave some time to write books, so unless something spectacular changes, I doubt I’ll be there. πŸ™
    Serena, hi to you, too – folks Serena is a wonderful aussie supporter of romance and romance writers from my home town. A true heroine!
    And by the way, I did read that Eva Ibbotson story in my library talk and I did choke up, twice… But they all loved the story.

    Reply
  226. Hello Anne —
    Welcome to Word Wenches and thank you for all the recommended reads — yours especailly.
    Kudos to you on your work w/adult literacy education. There is no greater joy, IMHO, than opening someone’s eyes to the world of reading.

    Reply
  227. Hello Anne —
    Welcome to Word Wenches and thank you for all the recommended reads — yours especailly.
    Kudos to you on your work w/adult literacy education. There is no greater joy, IMHO, than opening someone’s eyes to the world of reading.

    Reply
  228. Hello Anne —
    Welcome to Word Wenches and thank you for all the recommended reads — yours especailly.
    Kudos to you on your work w/adult literacy education. There is no greater joy, IMHO, than opening someone’s eyes to the world of reading.

    Reply
  229. Hello Anne —
    Welcome to Word Wenches and thank you for all the recommended reads — yours especailly.
    Kudos to you on your work w/adult literacy education. There is no greater joy, IMHO, than opening someone’s eyes to the world of reading.

    Reply
  230. Hello Anne —
    Welcome to Word Wenches and thank you for all the recommended reads — yours especailly.
    Kudos to you on your work w/adult literacy education. There is no greater joy, IMHO, than opening someone’s eyes to the world of reading.

    Reply
  231. Thanks NinaP — I was saying to Mary Jo, I feel like a real fan grrrl here, getting comments from wenches and their regulars.
    Thanks Teresa. And Kimmy, I’m ashamed to say I spent Valentine’s day working unromantically on my revisions. In fact it would have slipped passed almost unnoticed except for a lovely delivery of chocolates from the Harlequin Mills and Boon Sydney office — did I say that Mills and Boon were wonderful to me? They still are.

    Reply
  232. Thanks NinaP — I was saying to Mary Jo, I feel like a real fan grrrl here, getting comments from wenches and their regulars.
    Thanks Teresa. And Kimmy, I’m ashamed to say I spent Valentine’s day working unromantically on my revisions. In fact it would have slipped passed almost unnoticed except for a lovely delivery of chocolates from the Harlequin Mills and Boon Sydney office — did I say that Mills and Boon were wonderful to me? They still are.

    Reply
  233. Thanks NinaP — I was saying to Mary Jo, I feel like a real fan grrrl here, getting comments from wenches and their regulars.
    Thanks Teresa. And Kimmy, I’m ashamed to say I spent Valentine’s day working unromantically on my revisions. In fact it would have slipped passed almost unnoticed except for a lovely delivery of chocolates from the Harlequin Mills and Boon Sydney office — did I say that Mills and Boon were wonderful to me? They still are.

    Reply
  234. Thanks NinaP — I was saying to Mary Jo, I feel like a real fan grrrl here, getting comments from wenches and their regulars.
    Thanks Teresa. And Kimmy, I’m ashamed to say I spent Valentine’s day working unromantically on my revisions. In fact it would have slipped passed almost unnoticed except for a lovely delivery of chocolates from the Harlequin Mills and Boon Sydney office — did I say that Mills and Boon were wonderful to me? They still are.

    Reply
  235. Thanks NinaP — I was saying to Mary Jo, I feel like a real fan grrrl here, getting comments from wenches and their regulars.
    Thanks Teresa. And Kimmy, I’m ashamed to say I spent Valentine’s day working unromantically on my revisions. In fact it would have slipped passed almost unnoticed except for a lovely delivery of chocolates from the Harlequin Mills and Boon Sydney office — did I say that Mills and Boon were wonderful to me? They still are.

    Reply
  236. Big waves to you, Ms. Gracie!! I discovered this post woefully late, but just thought I’d say hello and that I love your work and I can’t wait to read The Stolen Princess. It will be my reward when I finish my copy edits. From the excerpt on your website, your new hero sounds a little like Gideon from The Perfect Rake, whom I adored. Love that wonderful banter, you do it so well.
    Cheers,
    Christine

    Reply
  237. Big waves to you, Ms. Gracie!! I discovered this post woefully late, but just thought I’d say hello and that I love your work and I can’t wait to read The Stolen Princess. It will be my reward when I finish my copy edits. From the excerpt on your website, your new hero sounds a little like Gideon from The Perfect Rake, whom I adored. Love that wonderful banter, you do it so well.
    Cheers,
    Christine

    Reply
  238. Big waves to you, Ms. Gracie!! I discovered this post woefully late, but just thought I’d say hello and that I love your work and I can’t wait to read The Stolen Princess. It will be my reward when I finish my copy edits. From the excerpt on your website, your new hero sounds a little like Gideon from The Perfect Rake, whom I adored. Love that wonderful banter, you do it so well.
    Cheers,
    Christine

    Reply
  239. Big waves to you, Ms. Gracie!! I discovered this post woefully late, but just thought I’d say hello and that I love your work and I can’t wait to read The Stolen Princess. It will be my reward when I finish my copy edits. From the excerpt on your website, your new hero sounds a little like Gideon from The Perfect Rake, whom I adored. Love that wonderful banter, you do it so well.
    Cheers,
    Christine

    Reply
  240. Big waves to you, Ms. Gracie!! I discovered this post woefully late, but just thought I’d say hello and that I love your work and I can’t wait to read The Stolen Princess. It will be my reward when I finish my copy edits. From the excerpt on your website, your new hero sounds a little like Gideon from The Perfect Rake, whom I adored. Love that wonderful banter, you do it so well.
    Cheers,
    Christine

    Reply
  241. Woefully late? Oh My! I can’t believe I didn’t see this sooner!
    Anne, adored Stolen Princess though I think Gideon and Prudence will alway be my favorites of yours.
    I loved this interview! You didn’t mention to me your literacy advocacy. Through my girls’ years in grade school I worked with children in their classes as a ‘reading parent’ and would go in a few days a week to help children who needed extra reading skills. I ended up having several parents join in who had never been good readers as well and LOVED it!!
    Thanks for a great interview! Looking forward to the next book.
    Oh, and just a side note, I waited two years on a list at my local used bookstore before Gallant Waif came in but I was determined to own it, as well as your other OOP titles. You’re just so good!
    πŸ™‚

    Reply
  242. Woefully late? Oh My! I can’t believe I didn’t see this sooner!
    Anne, adored Stolen Princess though I think Gideon and Prudence will alway be my favorites of yours.
    I loved this interview! You didn’t mention to me your literacy advocacy. Through my girls’ years in grade school I worked with children in their classes as a ‘reading parent’ and would go in a few days a week to help children who needed extra reading skills. I ended up having several parents join in who had never been good readers as well and LOVED it!!
    Thanks for a great interview! Looking forward to the next book.
    Oh, and just a side note, I waited two years on a list at my local used bookstore before Gallant Waif came in but I was determined to own it, as well as your other OOP titles. You’re just so good!
    πŸ™‚

    Reply
  243. Woefully late? Oh My! I can’t believe I didn’t see this sooner!
    Anne, adored Stolen Princess though I think Gideon and Prudence will alway be my favorites of yours.
    I loved this interview! You didn’t mention to me your literacy advocacy. Through my girls’ years in grade school I worked with children in their classes as a ‘reading parent’ and would go in a few days a week to help children who needed extra reading skills. I ended up having several parents join in who had never been good readers as well and LOVED it!!
    Thanks for a great interview! Looking forward to the next book.
    Oh, and just a side note, I waited two years on a list at my local used bookstore before Gallant Waif came in but I was determined to own it, as well as your other OOP titles. You’re just so good!
    πŸ™‚

    Reply
  244. Woefully late? Oh My! I can’t believe I didn’t see this sooner!
    Anne, adored Stolen Princess though I think Gideon and Prudence will alway be my favorites of yours.
    I loved this interview! You didn’t mention to me your literacy advocacy. Through my girls’ years in grade school I worked with children in their classes as a ‘reading parent’ and would go in a few days a week to help children who needed extra reading skills. I ended up having several parents join in who had never been good readers as well and LOVED it!!
    Thanks for a great interview! Looking forward to the next book.
    Oh, and just a side note, I waited two years on a list at my local used bookstore before Gallant Waif came in but I was determined to own it, as well as your other OOP titles. You’re just so good!
    πŸ™‚

    Reply
  245. Woefully late? Oh My! I can’t believe I didn’t see this sooner!
    Anne, adored Stolen Princess though I think Gideon and Prudence will alway be my favorites of yours.
    I loved this interview! You didn’t mention to me your literacy advocacy. Through my girls’ years in grade school I worked with children in their classes as a ‘reading parent’ and would go in a few days a week to help children who needed extra reading skills. I ended up having several parents join in who had never been good readers as well and LOVED it!!
    Thanks for a great interview! Looking forward to the next book.
    Oh, and just a side note, I waited two years on a list at my local used bookstore before Gallant Waif came in but I was determined to own it, as well as your other OOP titles. You’re just so good!
    πŸ™‚

    Reply
  246. I LOVE READING PLAYS ESPECIALLY INTERESTING ONES.I WILL ALSO LIKE TO BE GIVEN A CLUE ON HOW TO COMPOSE A NOVEL.I SHALL BE GLAD IF THE SITE KEEP SENDING ME INTERESTING NAME OF PLAYS THROUGH MY EMAIL.THANKS

    Reply
  247. I LOVE READING PLAYS ESPECIALLY INTERESTING ONES.I WILL ALSO LIKE TO BE GIVEN A CLUE ON HOW TO COMPOSE A NOVEL.I SHALL BE GLAD IF THE SITE KEEP SENDING ME INTERESTING NAME OF PLAYS THROUGH MY EMAIL.THANKS

    Reply
  248. I LOVE READING PLAYS ESPECIALLY INTERESTING ONES.I WILL ALSO LIKE TO BE GIVEN A CLUE ON HOW TO COMPOSE A NOVEL.I SHALL BE GLAD IF THE SITE KEEP SENDING ME INTERESTING NAME OF PLAYS THROUGH MY EMAIL.THANKS

    Reply
  249. I LOVE READING PLAYS ESPECIALLY INTERESTING ONES.I WILL ALSO LIKE TO BE GIVEN A CLUE ON HOW TO COMPOSE A NOVEL.I SHALL BE GLAD IF THE SITE KEEP SENDING ME INTERESTING NAME OF PLAYS THROUGH MY EMAIL.THANKS

    Reply
  250. I LOVE READING PLAYS ESPECIALLY INTERESTING ONES.I WILL ALSO LIKE TO BE GIVEN A CLUE ON HOW TO COMPOSE A NOVEL.I SHALL BE GLAD IF THE SITE KEEP SENDING ME INTERESTING NAME OF PLAYS THROUGH MY EMAIL.THANKS

    Reply

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