Anne Gracie and The Summer Bride

Mary Jo here: 

Since Anne Gracie and I both have July releases, we decided to interview each SummerBrideMedother!  Anne talked to me about Once a Soldier last week, and now it's my turn to enthuse about Anne's The Summer Bride, the last of the Chance Sisters quartet.  I enjoyed reading it so much that I promptly reread the first three books in the series.  

The book has been well received,  Romantic Times says, "Gracie's Chance Sisters have captivated readers and stolen their hearts, perhaps none more than Daisy, whose fast-paced story will delight fans.  All the characters readers adore are part of the tale, and which the charming plot enchants, it's the characters who take center stage."  

Library Journal’s verdict was: “Passionate and sumptuously witty, this final book in Gracie’s sparkling quartet has the entire household rooting (and plotting) for Daisy and Flynn to get things right.”

MJP: Anne, the premise for The Chance Sisters is brilliant, and the first book, The Autumn Bride, was listed as one of the ten best romances of the year by Library Journal, as well as being a Romantic Times Top Pick.  Can you tell us about the premise?  And do you have any idea of where such a great idea came from?  (Probably not. <G>)

AG: Actually I do know where the inspiration for the first book came from — it was a dream I had, in which an old lady was lying in bed, ill and in a desperate state, and a young woman climbed in her window. I scribbled it down in my notebook, and it kept nagging me and throwing up questions — who was the old lady, why was the girl climbing in the window — for no honest reason, surely? And that’s how I knew it was the start of a story.

The basic premise is, four girls band together as “sisters of the heart” in order to Cover-autumn-bridesurvive. When they find Lady Beatrice ill, neglected and abused by her servants, they pretend to be her nieces, and the girls and the old lady form a kind of family.

MJP: The four couples have been very different, so their romance are all quite different.  But in The Summer Bride, Daisy and Flynn are the most unusual of all, particularly Daisy.  Will you tell us about her?

AG:  Daisy is the Cockney maidservant who risked her safety to help Jane and Damaris escape from the brothel where they were imprisoned. She started off in my mind as a minor character, but as soon as she hit the page, she sprang to life.  She’s gutsy and outspoken and has a dream. I loved her from the start, so I was determined to give Daisy her own story.

PinkDressCreamLaceOverlay&trainHere’s a small snippet of Daisy’s thoughts:

    Daisy had no illusions about herself. She was a little Cockney guttersnipe with a gimpy leg and a foul mouth—though she was working on the swearing, and her grammar. But she loved beautiful clothes and—praise be!— she was good at making them.
    She was going to be somebody, and she was going to do it all herself; Daisy Chance, Dressmaker to the Toffs, with a shop and a business all her own. That was her dream, and she was so hungry for it she could almost taste it.

MJP:  The hero, Flynn, is one gorgeous hunk of Irishman.  Tell me more!

Cover-winter-brideAG:  Again, he’s not a typical hero. And in the spirit of “show don’t tell” I’ll use another snippet from the book. Flynn aims to marry “the finest lady in London.’ Here he’s talking to Lady Beatrice, who’s cross with him for not taking her into his confidence:

    She eyed him narrowly. "Finding you've aimed rather too high, have you? I did warn you. A low-born, uneducated sea-captain, Irish—and Roman Catholic to boot!" She shook her head.
    "Lapsed, m'lady, and though all you say is true, I don't believe I'm aimin' too high," Flynn said mildly. He was comfortable in his own skin and knew his own worth. "I'm also rich—a self-made man with a fleet of ships and a tradin' empire that spreads from here to the four corners of the earth."
    Lady Beatrice sniffed. "Money acquired in trade."
    Flynn grinned, undeceived by her disparaging tone. "Aye, m'lady, lots of nasty vulgar money at me disposal which the poor lass who consents to become me wife will have to help me spend.  'Twill be a terrible burden for her, I'm thinkin'."
    Lady Beatrice's finely painted lips twitched. "Undoubtedly. Modesty is not one of your virtues, is it, Mr. Flynn."
    Flynn shrugged. He'd never seen the point of hiding his light under a bushel.

GreendressMJP: Though Daisy and Flynn are connected with members of the beau monde by bonds of friendship, they are both openly involved in commercial activities – in “trade!”  How does that tie into the larger society?  

AG: It’s actually one of the things Daisy and Flynn bond over. The upper classes tended to frown on “trade” – they liked money. of course, but it was vulgar to refer to it, and they tended to look down on shopkeepers. But Daisy and Flynn also argue about business—she’s stubborn and her background has made her wary of trusting others—especially men.

  GreendressGirl   “You’re looking exhausted,” Flynn said bluntly.
    “So what? Hard work never killed nobody. I’m startin’ a business, remember?”
    “I know, and that’s why I decided to come tonight, when nobody else was here to overhear what I have to say.”
    Daisy gave him a flinty look. “What’s it got to do with you?”
    “Nothing. But I know a lot more about how to run a business than you do, and I have to tell you, you’re goin’ about it the wrong way.”
    Daisy stiffened. She set down her teacup with a clatter. “Well, thanks very much, Mr. Flynn, and now you’ve told me, you can get back to your bloody ball.”
    “Settle down, firebrand, I mean no insult.”
    “No? You tell me I’m doin’ everything wrong—me, who’s workin’ my fingers to the bone every hour God sends, making beautiful clothes for Jane and the others—clothes that other ladies want to order—an’ you expect me not to be angry? Bloody oath, I’m angry! What the hell would you know about ladies’ clothin’ anyway?”

MJP: Thanks so much for sharing a little of the book, Anne.  Now I'm ready to Cover-spring-bridereread The Summer Bride!   Leave a comment or answer this question by midnight Thursday to get into the drawing for a copy of the book.

Anne's Question: Editors are always telling me that people only want to read about aristocratic heroines. Is that true for you?

MJP:  Thanks so much for the lovely interview, Anne.  We'll have to do this again if the book release schedule permits!

250 thoughts on “Anne Gracie and The Summer Bride”

  1. I think it’s more the dukes than the women’s titles that draw readers. They’re fine with the Cinderella story, so a low-class heroine doesn’t matter so much as long as she ends up a duchess.
    Meeting Daisy in the first book made a huge impression on me. I never actually realised she was going to be a heroine in the series, but I am so glad she is – I actually just went back and reread the beginning of the first book, just to re-meet her! I am also glad she ended up with a man who deserved her, and one who came from a similar background.
    I lived and worked in the Lincoln’s Inn area of London for years, with customers who had family title signet rings, and those weird black credit cards that meant they were rich enough to afford anything (with weird titles on them).
    And you know what? That’s why I like my historical romance heroes to be self-made men! Once you’ve experienced the upper-class British world, you understand why the Daisy-types would never fit into that snobbery…
    I now have three copies of The Summer Bride, and have read and loved it, so don’t include me in the giveaway. 🙂

    Reply
  2. I think it’s more the dukes than the women’s titles that draw readers. They’re fine with the Cinderella story, so a low-class heroine doesn’t matter so much as long as she ends up a duchess.
    Meeting Daisy in the first book made a huge impression on me. I never actually realised she was going to be a heroine in the series, but I am so glad she is – I actually just went back and reread the beginning of the first book, just to re-meet her! I am also glad she ended up with a man who deserved her, and one who came from a similar background.
    I lived and worked in the Lincoln’s Inn area of London for years, with customers who had family title signet rings, and those weird black credit cards that meant they were rich enough to afford anything (with weird titles on them).
    And you know what? That’s why I like my historical romance heroes to be self-made men! Once you’ve experienced the upper-class British world, you understand why the Daisy-types would never fit into that snobbery…
    I now have three copies of The Summer Bride, and have read and loved it, so don’t include me in the giveaway. 🙂

    Reply
  3. I think it’s more the dukes than the women’s titles that draw readers. They’re fine with the Cinderella story, so a low-class heroine doesn’t matter so much as long as she ends up a duchess.
    Meeting Daisy in the first book made a huge impression on me. I never actually realised she was going to be a heroine in the series, but I am so glad she is – I actually just went back and reread the beginning of the first book, just to re-meet her! I am also glad she ended up with a man who deserved her, and one who came from a similar background.
    I lived and worked in the Lincoln’s Inn area of London for years, with customers who had family title signet rings, and those weird black credit cards that meant they were rich enough to afford anything (with weird titles on them).
    And you know what? That’s why I like my historical romance heroes to be self-made men! Once you’ve experienced the upper-class British world, you understand why the Daisy-types would never fit into that snobbery…
    I now have three copies of The Summer Bride, and have read and loved it, so don’t include me in the giveaway. 🙂

    Reply
  4. I think it’s more the dukes than the women’s titles that draw readers. They’re fine with the Cinderella story, so a low-class heroine doesn’t matter so much as long as she ends up a duchess.
    Meeting Daisy in the first book made a huge impression on me. I never actually realised she was going to be a heroine in the series, but I am so glad she is – I actually just went back and reread the beginning of the first book, just to re-meet her! I am also glad she ended up with a man who deserved her, and one who came from a similar background.
    I lived and worked in the Lincoln’s Inn area of London for years, with customers who had family title signet rings, and those weird black credit cards that meant they were rich enough to afford anything (with weird titles on them).
    And you know what? That’s why I like my historical romance heroes to be self-made men! Once you’ve experienced the upper-class British world, you understand why the Daisy-types would never fit into that snobbery…
    I now have three copies of The Summer Bride, and have read and loved it, so don’t include me in the giveaway. 🙂

    Reply
  5. I think it’s more the dukes than the women’s titles that draw readers. They’re fine with the Cinderella story, so a low-class heroine doesn’t matter so much as long as she ends up a duchess.
    Meeting Daisy in the first book made a huge impression on me. I never actually realised she was going to be a heroine in the series, but I am so glad she is – I actually just went back and reread the beginning of the first book, just to re-meet her! I am also glad she ended up with a man who deserved her, and one who came from a similar background.
    I lived and worked in the Lincoln’s Inn area of London for years, with customers who had family title signet rings, and those weird black credit cards that meant they were rich enough to afford anything (with weird titles on them).
    And you know what? That’s why I like my historical romance heroes to be self-made men! Once you’ve experienced the upper-class British world, you understand why the Daisy-types would never fit into that snobbery…
    I now have three copies of The Summer Bride, and have read and loved it, so don’t include me in the giveaway. 🙂

    Reply
  6. I have some catching up to do with this series. I’ve read the first book, but I haven’t read the next two. But Daisy’s story sounds so interesting that I might just read her before I read the middle two.
    As to your question – I’m probably not in the majority, but I don’t mind when characters “step out of the box.” If you had nothing else to go by except all of the HR novels out there, you would think that half of the population were aristocrats and the other half were people who served them.
    The important thing to me is how well the story is told and well the characters are drawn. Putting a title on a dull character will not help a story or putting a plain “mister” won’t make an interesting character any less so.

    Reply
  7. I have some catching up to do with this series. I’ve read the first book, but I haven’t read the next two. But Daisy’s story sounds so interesting that I might just read her before I read the middle two.
    As to your question – I’m probably not in the majority, but I don’t mind when characters “step out of the box.” If you had nothing else to go by except all of the HR novels out there, you would think that half of the population were aristocrats and the other half were people who served them.
    The important thing to me is how well the story is told and well the characters are drawn. Putting a title on a dull character will not help a story or putting a plain “mister” won’t make an interesting character any less so.

    Reply
  8. I have some catching up to do with this series. I’ve read the first book, but I haven’t read the next two. But Daisy’s story sounds so interesting that I might just read her before I read the middle two.
    As to your question – I’m probably not in the majority, but I don’t mind when characters “step out of the box.” If you had nothing else to go by except all of the HR novels out there, you would think that half of the population were aristocrats and the other half were people who served them.
    The important thing to me is how well the story is told and well the characters are drawn. Putting a title on a dull character will not help a story or putting a plain “mister” won’t make an interesting character any less so.

    Reply
  9. I have some catching up to do with this series. I’ve read the first book, but I haven’t read the next two. But Daisy’s story sounds so interesting that I might just read her before I read the middle two.
    As to your question – I’m probably not in the majority, but I don’t mind when characters “step out of the box.” If you had nothing else to go by except all of the HR novels out there, you would think that half of the population were aristocrats and the other half were people who served them.
    The important thing to me is how well the story is told and well the characters are drawn. Putting a title on a dull character will not help a story or putting a plain “mister” won’t make an interesting character any less so.

    Reply
  10. I have some catching up to do with this series. I’ve read the first book, but I haven’t read the next two. But Daisy’s story sounds so interesting that I might just read her before I read the middle two.
    As to your question – I’m probably not in the majority, but I don’t mind when characters “step out of the box.” If you had nothing else to go by except all of the HR novels out there, you would think that half of the population were aristocrats and the other half were people who served them.
    The important thing to me is how well the story is told and well the characters are drawn. Putting a title on a dull character will not help a story or putting a plain “mister” won’t make an interesting character any less so.

    Reply
  11. Personally, I love the commoner heroine–Demelza Carne and Eliza Doolittle are two of my favorites of the breed. And I think the commoner hero, when matched with a sheltered aristocratic heroine, has become increasingly popular. And aristocratic heroes appear never to have gone out of fashion. But I think having both halves of the couple be working class/non-aristocrats might be a hard sell for some readers and some publishers. Maybe because some perceived romantic fantasy element is missing.

    Reply
  12. Personally, I love the commoner heroine–Demelza Carne and Eliza Doolittle are two of my favorites of the breed. And I think the commoner hero, when matched with a sheltered aristocratic heroine, has become increasingly popular. And aristocratic heroes appear never to have gone out of fashion. But I think having both halves of the couple be working class/non-aristocrats might be a hard sell for some readers and some publishers. Maybe because some perceived romantic fantasy element is missing.

    Reply
  13. Personally, I love the commoner heroine–Demelza Carne and Eliza Doolittle are two of my favorites of the breed. And I think the commoner hero, when matched with a sheltered aristocratic heroine, has become increasingly popular. And aristocratic heroes appear never to have gone out of fashion. But I think having both halves of the couple be working class/non-aristocrats might be a hard sell for some readers and some publishers. Maybe because some perceived romantic fantasy element is missing.

    Reply
  14. Personally, I love the commoner heroine–Demelza Carne and Eliza Doolittle are two of my favorites of the breed. And I think the commoner hero, when matched with a sheltered aristocratic heroine, has become increasingly popular. And aristocratic heroes appear never to have gone out of fashion. But I think having both halves of the couple be working class/non-aristocrats might be a hard sell for some readers and some publishers. Maybe because some perceived romantic fantasy element is missing.

    Reply
  15. Personally, I love the commoner heroine–Demelza Carne and Eliza Doolittle are two of my favorites of the breed. And I think the commoner hero, when matched with a sheltered aristocratic heroine, has become increasingly popular. And aristocratic heroes appear never to have gone out of fashion. But I think having both halves of the couple be working class/non-aristocrats might be a hard sell for some readers and some publishers. Maybe because some perceived romantic fantasy element is missing.

    Reply
  16. Sonya, you’re right about the Cinderella factor–it is possibly THE principal romance trope.
    I’ve not dealt with toffs with black credit cards , but I’ve met some American trust fund babies, and the money sense of entitlement do not make for ideal protagonists. That’s why I generally torture my heroes–it improves their characters. *G*

    Reply
  17. Sonya, you’re right about the Cinderella factor–it is possibly THE principal romance trope.
    I’ve not dealt with toffs with black credit cards , but I’ve met some American trust fund babies, and the money sense of entitlement do not make for ideal protagonists. That’s why I generally torture my heroes–it improves their characters. *G*

    Reply
  18. Sonya, you’re right about the Cinderella factor–it is possibly THE principal romance trope.
    I’ve not dealt with toffs with black credit cards , but I’ve met some American trust fund babies, and the money sense of entitlement do not make for ideal protagonists. That’s why I generally torture my heroes–it improves their characters. *G*

    Reply
  19. Sonya, you’re right about the Cinderella factor–it is possibly THE principal romance trope.
    I’ve not dealt with toffs with black credit cards , but I’ve met some American trust fund babies, and the money sense of entitlement do not make for ideal protagonists. That’s why I generally torture my heroes–it improves their characters. *G*

    Reply
  20. Sonya, you’re right about the Cinderella factor–it is possibly THE principal romance trope.
    I’ve not dealt with toffs with black credit cards , but I’ve met some American trust fund babies, and the money sense of entitlement do not make for ideal protagonists. That’s why I generally torture my heroes–it improves their characters. *G*

    Reply
  21. Mary T, you’re right, it’s ultimately how well the characters work together to create a reliable and swoonworthy romance, and Anne Gracie does that superbly.
    Her books stand alone well, but I hope you don’t deny yourself the treat of going back and reading Damaris and Jane’s stories! They are all wonderful in different ways.

    Reply
  22. Mary T, you’re right, it’s ultimately how well the characters work together to create a reliable and swoonworthy romance, and Anne Gracie does that superbly.
    Her books stand alone well, but I hope you don’t deny yourself the treat of going back and reading Damaris and Jane’s stories! They are all wonderful in different ways.

    Reply
  23. Mary T, you’re right, it’s ultimately how well the characters work together to create a reliable and swoonworthy romance, and Anne Gracie does that superbly.
    Her books stand alone well, but I hope you don’t deny yourself the treat of going back and reading Damaris and Jane’s stories! They are all wonderful in different ways.

    Reply
  24. Mary T, you’re right, it’s ultimately how well the characters work together to create a reliable and swoonworthy romance, and Anne Gracie does that superbly.
    Her books stand alone well, but I hope you don’t deny yourself the treat of going back and reading Damaris and Jane’s stories! They are all wonderful in different ways.

    Reply
  25. Mary T, you’re right, it’s ultimately how well the characters work together to create a reliable and swoonworthy romance, and Anne Gracie does that superbly.
    Her books stand alone well, but I hope you don’t deny yourself the treat of going back and reading Damaris and Jane’s stories! They are all wonderful in different ways.

    Reply
  26. Pamela, I suspect you’re right on all points, though since the hero and heroine of The Summer Bride have been hanging out with toffs, Daisy and FLynn’s backgrounds don’t work against them here. There are historical romance authors who write of less aristocratic characters, but it does take away some of the over the top fantasy.

    Reply
  27. Pamela, I suspect you’re right on all points, though since the hero and heroine of The Summer Bride have been hanging out with toffs, Daisy and FLynn’s backgrounds don’t work against them here. There are historical romance authors who write of less aristocratic characters, but it does take away some of the over the top fantasy.

    Reply
  28. Pamela, I suspect you’re right on all points, though since the hero and heroine of The Summer Bride have been hanging out with toffs, Daisy and FLynn’s backgrounds don’t work against them here. There are historical romance authors who write of less aristocratic characters, but it does take away some of the over the top fantasy.

    Reply
  29. Pamela, I suspect you’re right on all points, though since the hero and heroine of The Summer Bride have been hanging out with toffs, Daisy and FLynn’s backgrounds don’t work against them here. There are historical romance authors who write of less aristocratic characters, but it does take away some of the over the top fantasy.

    Reply
  30. Pamela, I suspect you’re right on all points, though since the hero and heroine of The Summer Bride have been hanging out with toffs, Daisy and FLynn’s backgrounds don’t work against them here. There are historical romance authors who write of less aristocratic characters, but it does take away some of the over the top fantasy.

    Reply
  31. In the right hands, non-aristocratic H and h can be more interesting and appealing – easier for the reader to identify with them. Carla Kelly, for example, has written some really interesting romances (though I must admit my favorite, Mrs Drew Plays Her Hand, does have an aristocratic H, but he’s very down-to-earth) Ever since The Autumn Bride, I’ve been looking forward to Daisy’s story.

    Reply
  32. In the right hands, non-aristocratic H and h can be more interesting and appealing – easier for the reader to identify with them. Carla Kelly, for example, has written some really interesting romances (though I must admit my favorite, Mrs Drew Plays Her Hand, does have an aristocratic H, but he’s very down-to-earth) Ever since The Autumn Bride, I’ve been looking forward to Daisy’s story.

    Reply
  33. In the right hands, non-aristocratic H and h can be more interesting and appealing – easier for the reader to identify with them. Carla Kelly, for example, has written some really interesting romances (though I must admit my favorite, Mrs Drew Plays Her Hand, does have an aristocratic H, but he’s very down-to-earth) Ever since The Autumn Bride, I’ve been looking forward to Daisy’s story.

    Reply
  34. In the right hands, non-aristocratic H and h can be more interesting and appealing – easier for the reader to identify with them. Carla Kelly, for example, has written some really interesting romances (though I must admit my favorite, Mrs Drew Plays Her Hand, does have an aristocratic H, but he’s very down-to-earth) Ever since The Autumn Bride, I’ve been looking forward to Daisy’s story.

    Reply
  35. In the right hands, non-aristocratic H and h can be more interesting and appealing – easier for the reader to identify with them. Carla Kelly, for example, has written some really interesting romances (though I must admit my favorite, Mrs Drew Plays Her Hand, does have an aristocratic H, but he’s very down-to-earth) Ever since The Autumn Bride, I’ve been looking forward to Daisy’s story.

    Reply
  36. I am so very very tired of Dukes! It is a treat to find a book about ordinary non-aristocratic folk. However, I don’t mind rich!

    Reply
  37. I am so very very tired of Dukes! It is a treat to find a book about ordinary non-aristocratic folk. However, I don’t mind rich!

    Reply
  38. I am so very very tired of Dukes! It is a treat to find a book about ordinary non-aristocratic folk. However, I don’t mind rich!

    Reply
  39. I am so very very tired of Dukes! It is a treat to find a book about ordinary non-aristocratic folk. However, I don’t mind rich!

    Reply
  40. I am so very very tired of Dukes! It is a treat to find a book about ordinary non-aristocratic folk. However, I don’t mind rich!

    Reply
  41. I don’t read much romance any more, precisely because I’m tired of all the aristocrats and billionaires. Of course there are some authors whose work I’ll read regardless, because they make even aristocrats and billionaires – in short supply in my own life – into believable characters I want to know better.
    The Word Wenches are definitely among those authors, and I’ll read anything they write, but I’ve loved this series and I’m so glad Daisy finally gets her HEA! Thanks for the heads-up on The Summer Bride; I didn’t realize it was out.

    Reply
  42. I don’t read much romance any more, precisely because I’m tired of all the aristocrats and billionaires. Of course there are some authors whose work I’ll read regardless, because they make even aristocrats and billionaires – in short supply in my own life – into believable characters I want to know better.
    The Word Wenches are definitely among those authors, and I’ll read anything they write, but I’ve loved this series and I’m so glad Daisy finally gets her HEA! Thanks for the heads-up on The Summer Bride; I didn’t realize it was out.

    Reply
  43. I don’t read much romance any more, precisely because I’m tired of all the aristocrats and billionaires. Of course there are some authors whose work I’ll read regardless, because they make even aristocrats and billionaires – in short supply in my own life – into believable characters I want to know better.
    The Word Wenches are definitely among those authors, and I’ll read anything they write, but I’ve loved this series and I’m so glad Daisy finally gets her HEA! Thanks for the heads-up on The Summer Bride; I didn’t realize it was out.

    Reply
  44. I don’t read much romance any more, precisely because I’m tired of all the aristocrats and billionaires. Of course there are some authors whose work I’ll read regardless, because they make even aristocrats and billionaires – in short supply in my own life – into believable characters I want to know better.
    The Word Wenches are definitely among those authors, and I’ll read anything they write, but I’ve loved this series and I’m so glad Daisy finally gets her HEA! Thanks for the heads-up on The Summer Bride; I didn’t realize it was out.

    Reply
  45. I don’t read much romance any more, precisely because I’m tired of all the aristocrats and billionaires. Of course there are some authors whose work I’ll read regardless, because they make even aristocrats and billionaires – in short supply in my own life – into believable characters I want to know better.
    The Word Wenches are definitely among those authors, and I’ll read anything they write, but I’ve loved this series and I’m so glad Daisy finally gets her HEA! Thanks for the heads-up on The Summer Bride; I didn’t realize it was out.

    Reply
  46. LynneW–
    THE SUMMER BRIDE was just released yesterday, so fresh off the presses! And a delightful summer read for those of us in the northern hemisphere. A delightful winter read for those more southerly. *G*

    Reply
  47. LynneW–
    THE SUMMER BRIDE was just released yesterday, so fresh off the presses! And a delightful summer read for those of us in the northern hemisphere. A delightful winter read for those more southerly. *G*

    Reply
  48. LynneW–
    THE SUMMER BRIDE was just released yesterday, so fresh off the presses! And a delightful summer read for those of us in the northern hemisphere. A delightful winter read for those more southerly. *G*

    Reply
  49. LynneW–
    THE SUMMER BRIDE was just released yesterday, so fresh off the presses! And a delightful summer read for those of us in the northern hemisphere. A delightful winter read for those more southerly. *G*

    Reply
  50. LynneW–
    THE SUMMER BRIDE was just released yesterday, so fresh off the presses! And a delightful summer read for those of us in the northern hemisphere. A delightful winter read for those more southerly. *G*

    Reply
  51. This sounds like a wonderful story! I like stories where the lower orders are the main characters. It’s like a breath of fresh air after reading about the ‘high born toffs’! Seriously though I read a wide variety of stuff and I am looking forward to this one.

    Reply
  52. This sounds like a wonderful story! I like stories where the lower orders are the main characters. It’s like a breath of fresh air after reading about the ‘high born toffs’! Seriously though I read a wide variety of stuff and I am looking forward to this one.

    Reply
  53. This sounds like a wonderful story! I like stories where the lower orders are the main characters. It’s like a breath of fresh air after reading about the ‘high born toffs’! Seriously though I read a wide variety of stuff and I am looking forward to this one.

    Reply
  54. This sounds like a wonderful story! I like stories where the lower orders are the main characters. It’s like a breath of fresh air after reading about the ‘high born toffs’! Seriously though I read a wide variety of stuff and I am looking forward to this one.

    Reply
  55. This sounds like a wonderful story! I like stories where the lower orders are the main characters. It’s like a breath of fresh air after reading about the ‘high born toffs’! Seriously though I read a wide variety of stuff and I am looking forward to this one.

    Reply
  56. Too many Dukes and Earls….They have become like too many sweets giving me a sour stomach – giggle.
    Grace Burrowes does have Dukes and Earls but she also has lots of 2nd, 3rd, 4th sons and daughters involved with regular people.
    I think Daisy and Flynn happened and sold because readers are so invested with Daisy and her story that it wouldn’t matter who she became involved with. But I do think having her end up with Flynn was brilliant.
    Tortured, down to earth, humbled men make much better hero’s than those who haven’t encountered any difficulties.
    I’m always interested in H/h that are plain local gentry as well.

    Reply
  57. Too many Dukes and Earls….They have become like too many sweets giving me a sour stomach – giggle.
    Grace Burrowes does have Dukes and Earls but she also has lots of 2nd, 3rd, 4th sons and daughters involved with regular people.
    I think Daisy and Flynn happened and sold because readers are so invested with Daisy and her story that it wouldn’t matter who she became involved with. But I do think having her end up with Flynn was brilliant.
    Tortured, down to earth, humbled men make much better hero’s than those who haven’t encountered any difficulties.
    I’m always interested in H/h that are plain local gentry as well.

    Reply
  58. Too many Dukes and Earls….They have become like too many sweets giving me a sour stomach – giggle.
    Grace Burrowes does have Dukes and Earls but she also has lots of 2nd, 3rd, 4th sons and daughters involved with regular people.
    I think Daisy and Flynn happened and sold because readers are so invested with Daisy and her story that it wouldn’t matter who she became involved with. But I do think having her end up with Flynn was brilliant.
    Tortured, down to earth, humbled men make much better hero’s than those who haven’t encountered any difficulties.
    I’m always interested in H/h that are plain local gentry as well.

    Reply
  59. Too many Dukes and Earls….They have become like too many sweets giving me a sour stomach – giggle.
    Grace Burrowes does have Dukes and Earls but she also has lots of 2nd, 3rd, 4th sons and daughters involved with regular people.
    I think Daisy and Flynn happened and sold because readers are so invested with Daisy and her story that it wouldn’t matter who she became involved with. But I do think having her end up with Flynn was brilliant.
    Tortured, down to earth, humbled men make much better hero’s than those who haven’t encountered any difficulties.
    I’m always interested in H/h that are plain local gentry as well.

    Reply
  60. Too many Dukes and Earls….They have become like too many sweets giving me a sour stomach – giggle.
    Grace Burrowes does have Dukes and Earls but she also has lots of 2nd, 3rd, 4th sons and daughters involved with regular people.
    I think Daisy and Flynn happened and sold because readers are so invested with Daisy and her story that it wouldn’t matter who she became involved with. But I do think having her end up with Flynn was brilliant.
    Tortured, down to earth, humbled men make much better hero’s than those who haven’t encountered any difficulties.
    I’m always interested in H/h that are plain local gentry as well.

    Reply
  61. I don’t need to have the hero be a billionaire or a Duke– and think the plethora of them makes romance books look silly. However, I usually prefer heroes of the upper classes who are comfortably established or has something to offer an heiress. I don’t want to read about the travails of workers– or a social science book on the hardship of the poor. I can read non fiction for that. I haven’t read any of Gracie’s books in this series. I have read Carla Kelly and like hers even though she mangles some of the rules, laws, and titles. I mostly don’t read about lower class heroes and heroines because I don’t like reading other than standard English. The heroes and heroines don’t have to be titled but a good heroine deserves the best and if that is a man with a title– so be it.

    Reply
  62. I don’t need to have the hero be a billionaire or a Duke– and think the plethora of them makes romance books look silly. However, I usually prefer heroes of the upper classes who are comfortably established or has something to offer an heiress. I don’t want to read about the travails of workers– or a social science book on the hardship of the poor. I can read non fiction for that. I haven’t read any of Gracie’s books in this series. I have read Carla Kelly and like hers even though she mangles some of the rules, laws, and titles. I mostly don’t read about lower class heroes and heroines because I don’t like reading other than standard English. The heroes and heroines don’t have to be titled but a good heroine deserves the best and if that is a man with a title– so be it.

    Reply
  63. I don’t need to have the hero be a billionaire or a Duke– and think the plethora of them makes romance books look silly. However, I usually prefer heroes of the upper classes who are comfortably established or has something to offer an heiress. I don’t want to read about the travails of workers– or a social science book on the hardship of the poor. I can read non fiction for that. I haven’t read any of Gracie’s books in this series. I have read Carla Kelly and like hers even though she mangles some of the rules, laws, and titles. I mostly don’t read about lower class heroes and heroines because I don’t like reading other than standard English. The heroes and heroines don’t have to be titled but a good heroine deserves the best and if that is a man with a title– so be it.

    Reply
  64. I don’t need to have the hero be a billionaire or a Duke– and think the plethora of them makes romance books look silly. However, I usually prefer heroes of the upper classes who are comfortably established or has something to offer an heiress. I don’t want to read about the travails of workers– or a social science book on the hardship of the poor. I can read non fiction for that. I haven’t read any of Gracie’s books in this series. I have read Carla Kelly and like hers even though she mangles some of the rules, laws, and titles. I mostly don’t read about lower class heroes and heroines because I don’t like reading other than standard English. The heroes and heroines don’t have to be titled but a good heroine deserves the best and if that is a man with a title– so be it.

    Reply
  65. I don’t need to have the hero be a billionaire or a Duke– and think the plethora of them makes romance books look silly. However, I usually prefer heroes of the upper classes who are comfortably established or has something to offer an heiress. I don’t want to read about the travails of workers– or a social science book on the hardship of the poor. I can read non fiction for that. I haven’t read any of Gracie’s books in this series. I have read Carla Kelly and like hers even though she mangles some of the rules, laws, and titles. I mostly don’t read about lower class heroes and heroines because I don’t like reading other than standard English. The heroes and heroines don’t have to be titled but a good heroine deserves the best and if that is a man with a title– so be it.

    Reply
  66. I’ve read romances with heroines of all backgrounds – nobility or common. Duchesses, countesses, bluestockings, wallflowers, governesses, working classes – I’ve read and enjoyed them all. The titles of the characters involved doesn’t matter, unless it affects the story (and it often does, especially with historical romance). If the characters are interesting and the story keeps me reading, then the story could be about a milkmaid running away with a stable boy for all I care.

    Reply
  67. I’ve read romances with heroines of all backgrounds – nobility or common. Duchesses, countesses, bluestockings, wallflowers, governesses, working classes – I’ve read and enjoyed them all. The titles of the characters involved doesn’t matter, unless it affects the story (and it often does, especially with historical romance). If the characters are interesting and the story keeps me reading, then the story could be about a milkmaid running away with a stable boy for all I care.

    Reply
  68. I’ve read romances with heroines of all backgrounds – nobility or common. Duchesses, countesses, bluestockings, wallflowers, governesses, working classes – I’ve read and enjoyed them all. The titles of the characters involved doesn’t matter, unless it affects the story (and it often does, especially with historical romance). If the characters are interesting and the story keeps me reading, then the story could be about a milkmaid running away with a stable boy for all I care.

    Reply
  69. I’ve read romances with heroines of all backgrounds – nobility or common. Duchesses, countesses, bluestockings, wallflowers, governesses, working classes – I’ve read and enjoyed them all. The titles of the characters involved doesn’t matter, unless it affects the story (and it often does, especially with historical romance). If the characters are interesting and the story keeps me reading, then the story could be about a milkmaid running away with a stable boy for all I care.

    Reply
  70. I’ve read romances with heroines of all backgrounds – nobility or common. Duchesses, countesses, bluestockings, wallflowers, governesses, working classes – I’ve read and enjoyed them all. The titles of the characters involved doesn’t matter, unless it affects the story (and it often does, especially with historical romance). If the characters are interesting and the story keeps me reading, then the story could be about a milkmaid running away with a stable boy for all I care.

    Reply
  71. Three copies, Sonya? LOL. As for Daisy, she wasn’t originally intended to be a heroine — just a walk-on, walk-off maidservant. But I fell for her, and I have to say, so did readers. If this series had been contracted as a trilogy, I think it would have become a quartet, just from reader pressure. 🙂

    Reply
  72. Three copies, Sonya? LOL. As for Daisy, she wasn’t originally intended to be a heroine — just a walk-on, walk-off maidservant. But I fell for her, and I have to say, so did readers. If this series had been contracted as a trilogy, I think it would have become a quartet, just from reader pressure. 🙂

    Reply
  73. Three copies, Sonya? LOL. As for Daisy, she wasn’t originally intended to be a heroine — just a walk-on, walk-off maidservant. But I fell for her, and I have to say, so did readers. If this series had been contracted as a trilogy, I think it would have become a quartet, just from reader pressure. 🙂

    Reply
  74. Three copies, Sonya? LOL. As for Daisy, she wasn’t originally intended to be a heroine — just a walk-on, walk-off maidservant. But I fell for her, and I have to say, so did readers. If this series had been contracted as a trilogy, I think it would have become a quartet, just from reader pressure. 🙂

    Reply
  75. Three copies, Sonya? LOL. As for Daisy, she wasn’t originally intended to be a heroine — just a walk-on, walk-off maidservant. But I fell for her, and I have to say, so did readers. If this series had been contracted as a trilogy, I think it would have become a quartet, just from reader pressure. 🙂

    Reply
  76. Mary, I’ve tried to make all my books stand alone, but there are inevitable continuities that probably make them better read in order.
    That’s so true about half the fictional regency world being aristocrats and the other half servants.

    Reply
  77. Mary, I’ve tried to make all my books stand alone, but there are inevitable continuities that probably make them better read in order.
    That’s so true about half the fictional regency world being aristocrats and the other half servants.

    Reply
  78. Mary, I’ve tried to make all my books stand alone, but there are inevitable continuities that probably make them better read in order.
    That’s so true about half the fictional regency world being aristocrats and the other half servants.

    Reply
  79. Mary, I’ve tried to make all my books stand alone, but there are inevitable continuities that probably make them better read in order.
    That’s so true about half the fictional regency world being aristocrats and the other half servants.

    Reply
  80. Mary, I’ve tried to make all my books stand alone, but there are inevitable continuities that probably make them better read in order.
    That’s so true about half the fictional regency world being aristocrats and the other half servants.

    Reply
  81. Pamela, I think you;’re right about the romantic fantasy being reduced if they’re both working class. A friend of mine, who’s not a romance reader and has only read my romances, once complained that all of my heroines ended up rich and with a lord or someone very rich. Why can’t they be happy with an ordinary working man? And I tried to explain that part of the romantic the fantasy was for no more troubles of the poverty and hard work style. And that of course a couple could be poor but happy, but isn’t rich and happy better? Or at least more fun?

    Reply
  82. Pamela, I think you;’re right about the romantic fantasy being reduced if they’re both working class. A friend of mine, who’s not a romance reader and has only read my romances, once complained that all of my heroines ended up rich and with a lord or someone very rich. Why can’t they be happy with an ordinary working man? And I tried to explain that part of the romantic the fantasy was for no more troubles of the poverty and hard work style. And that of course a couple could be poor but happy, but isn’t rich and happy better? Or at least more fun?

    Reply
  83. Pamela, I think you;’re right about the romantic fantasy being reduced if they’re both working class. A friend of mine, who’s not a romance reader and has only read my romances, once complained that all of my heroines ended up rich and with a lord or someone very rich. Why can’t they be happy with an ordinary working man? And I tried to explain that part of the romantic the fantasy was for no more troubles of the poverty and hard work style. And that of course a couple could be poor but happy, but isn’t rich and happy better? Or at least more fun?

    Reply
  84. Pamela, I think you;’re right about the romantic fantasy being reduced if they’re both working class. A friend of mine, who’s not a romance reader and has only read my romances, once complained that all of my heroines ended up rich and with a lord or someone very rich. Why can’t they be happy with an ordinary working man? And I tried to explain that part of the romantic the fantasy was for no more troubles of the poverty and hard work style. And that of course a couple could be poor but happy, but isn’t rich and happy better? Or at least more fun?

    Reply
  85. Pamela, I think you;’re right about the romantic fantasy being reduced if they’re both working class. A friend of mine, who’s not a romance reader and has only read my romances, once complained that all of my heroines ended up rich and with a lord or someone very rich. Why can’t they be happy with an ordinary working man? And I tried to explain that part of the romantic the fantasy was for no more troubles of the poverty and hard work style. And that of course a couple could be poor but happy, but isn’t rich and happy better? Or at least more fun?

    Reply
  86. Thanks Miriam, yes I also thought of carla Kelly, who does non-aristo’s very well indeed. Also Sherry Thomas has done one or two, also Courtney Milan.
    I hope you enjoy Daisy’s story.

    Reply
  87. Thanks Miriam, yes I also thought of carla Kelly, who does non-aristo’s very well indeed. Also Sherry Thomas has done one or two, also Courtney Milan.
    I hope you enjoy Daisy’s story.

    Reply
  88. Thanks Miriam, yes I also thought of carla Kelly, who does non-aristo’s very well indeed. Also Sherry Thomas has done one or two, also Courtney Milan.
    I hope you enjoy Daisy’s story.

    Reply
  89. Thanks Miriam, yes I also thought of carla Kelly, who does non-aristo’s very well indeed. Also Sherry Thomas has done one or two, also Courtney Milan.
    I hope you enjoy Daisy’s story.

    Reply
  90. Thanks Miriam, yes I also thought of carla Kelly, who does non-aristo’s very well indeed. Also Sherry Thomas has done one or two, also Courtney Milan.
    I hope you enjoy Daisy’s story.

    Reply
  91. I tend to agree with you — rich is good, and not all aristocrats have to have titles — Georgette Heyer’s ARABELLA springs to mind, with the gorgeous hero Mr Beaumaris.
    I’ve only had one duke in my books, and he was the secondary romance in The Perfect Rake. But I’m thinking I might just make one of the heroes in the new series a duke. We’ll see.

    Reply
  92. I tend to agree with you — rich is good, and not all aristocrats have to have titles — Georgette Heyer’s ARABELLA springs to mind, with the gorgeous hero Mr Beaumaris.
    I’ve only had one duke in my books, and he was the secondary romance in The Perfect Rake. But I’m thinking I might just make one of the heroes in the new series a duke. We’ll see.

    Reply
  93. I tend to agree with you — rich is good, and not all aristocrats have to have titles — Georgette Heyer’s ARABELLA springs to mind, with the gorgeous hero Mr Beaumaris.
    I’ve only had one duke in my books, and he was the secondary romance in The Perfect Rake. But I’m thinking I might just make one of the heroes in the new series a duke. We’ll see.

    Reply
  94. I tend to agree with you — rich is good, and not all aristocrats have to have titles — Georgette Heyer’s ARABELLA springs to mind, with the gorgeous hero Mr Beaumaris.
    I’ve only had one duke in my books, and he was the secondary romance in The Perfect Rake. But I’m thinking I might just make one of the heroes in the new series a duke. We’ll see.

    Reply
  95. I tend to agree with you — rich is good, and not all aristocrats have to have titles — Georgette Heyer’s ARABELLA springs to mind, with the gorgeous hero Mr Beaumaris.
    I’ve only had one duke in my books, and he was the secondary romance in The Perfect Rake. But I’m thinking I might just make one of the heroes in the new series a duke. We’ll see.

    Reply
  96. Thanks, Lynn — I’m so glad you’ve enjoyed the other books in the series. I do try to get word out about new releases, but the best way to keep up is to sign up for my newsletter. It’s at the bottom of my website home page, or on my facebook author page.
    I don’t send out many newsletters, so you won’t get bombarded.

    Reply
  97. Thanks, Lynn — I’m so glad you’ve enjoyed the other books in the series. I do try to get word out about new releases, but the best way to keep up is to sign up for my newsletter. It’s at the bottom of my website home page, or on my facebook author page.
    I don’t send out many newsletters, so you won’t get bombarded.

    Reply
  98. Thanks, Lynn — I’m so glad you’ve enjoyed the other books in the series. I do try to get word out about new releases, but the best way to keep up is to sign up for my newsletter. It’s at the bottom of my website home page, or on my facebook author page.
    I don’t send out many newsletters, so you won’t get bombarded.

    Reply
  99. Thanks, Lynn — I’m so glad you’ve enjoyed the other books in the series. I do try to get word out about new releases, but the best way to keep up is to sign up for my newsletter. It’s at the bottom of my website home page, or on my facebook author page.
    I don’t send out many newsletters, so you won’t get bombarded.

    Reply
  100. Thanks, Lynn — I’m so glad you’ve enjoyed the other books in the series. I do try to get word out about new releases, but the best way to keep up is to sign up for my newsletter. It’s at the bottom of my website home page, or on my facebook author page.
    I don’t send out many newsletters, so you won’t get bombarded.

    Reply
  101. Teresa, I had such fun with Daisy and Flynn. Their language is quite down-to-earth and I didn’t try to find politer ways of speaking for them. And though I know a lot of readers wanted Daisy to have the complete Eliza Dolittle style makeover and become the perfect lady, I felt it didn’t go with her stubbon determination to be herself—and a success, regardless. Daisy acting like the perfect society lady would take away the grit and the glory that was down-to-earth Daisy.

    Reply
  102. Teresa, I had such fun with Daisy and Flynn. Their language is quite down-to-earth and I didn’t try to find politer ways of speaking for them. And though I know a lot of readers wanted Daisy to have the complete Eliza Dolittle style makeover and become the perfect lady, I felt it didn’t go with her stubbon determination to be herself—and a success, regardless. Daisy acting like the perfect society lady would take away the grit and the glory that was down-to-earth Daisy.

    Reply
  103. Teresa, I had such fun with Daisy and Flynn. Their language is quite down-to-earth and I didn’t try to find politer ways of speaking for them. And though I know a lot of readers wanted Daisy to have the complete Eliza Dolittle style makeover and become the perfect lady, I felt it didn’t go with her stubbon determination to be herself—and a success, regardless. Daisy acting like the perfect society lady would take away the grit and the glory that was down-to-earth Daisy.

    Reply
  104. Teresa, I had such fun with Daisy and Flynn. Their language is quite down-to-earth and I didn’t try to find politer ways of speaking for them. And though I know a lot of readers wanted Daisy to have the complete Eliza Dolittle style makeover and become the perfect lady, I felt it didn’t go with her stubbon determination to be herself—and a success, regardless. Daisy acting like the perfect society lady would take away the grit and the glory that was down-to-earth Daisy.

    Reply
  105. Teresa, I had such fun with Daisy and Flynn. Their language is quite down-to-earth and I didn’t try to find politer ways of speaking for them. And though I know a lot of readers wanted Daisy to have the complete Eliza Dolittle style makeover and become the perfect lady, I felt it didn’t go with her stubbon determination to be herself—and a success, regardless. Daisy acting like the perfect society lady would take away the grit and the glory that was down-to-earth Daisy.

    Reply
  106. Thanks, Vicki — I really enjoyed seeing Flynn wrestle with his intentions, too, and realize who the finest lady in London really was, for him.
    I also enjoy a really tortured hero — Mary Jo has some fabulous ones.

    Reply
  107. Thanks, Vicki — I really enjoyed seeing Flynn wrestle with his intentions, too, and realize who the finest lady in London really was, for him.
    I also enjoy a really tortured hero — Mary Jo has some fabulous ones.

    Reply
  108. Thanks, Vicki — I really enjoyed seeing Flynn wrestle with his intentions, too, and realize who the finest lady in London really was, for him.
    I also enjoy a really tortured hero — Mary Jo has some fabulous ones.

    Reply
  109. Thanks, Vicki — I really enjoyed seeing Flynn wrestle with his intentions, too, and realize who the finest lady in London really was, for him.
    I also enjoy a really tortured hero — Mary Jo has some fabulous ones.

    Reply
  110. Thanks, Vicki — I really enjoyed seeing Flynn wrestle with his intentions, too, and realize who the finest lady in London really was, for him.
    I also enjoy a really tortured hero — Mary Jo has some fabulous ones.

    Reply
  111. Thanks, Nancy. Yes I think the travails of workers can be a bit grim — but now I’m thinking of a couple of books of that style that I love — HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY, which is heartbreaking in parts but also wonderful, and PRECIOUS BANE, which we talked about in a WWR post a few months back, where the heroine works like a dog for her stingy brother and the hero is a weaver. But neither of those are classic romances.

    Reply
  112. Thanks, Nancy. Yes I think the travails of workers can be a bit grim — but now I’m thinking of a couple of books of that style that I love — HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY, which is heartbreaking in parts but also wonderful, and PRECIOUS BANE, which we talked about in a WWR post a few months back, where the heroine works like a dog for her stingy brother and the hero is a weaver. But neither of those are classic romances.

    Reply
  113. Thanks, Nancy. Yes I think the travails of workers can be a bit grim — but now I’m thinking of a couple of books of that style that I love — HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY, which is heartbreaking in parts but also wonderful, and PRECIOUS BANE, which we talked about in a WWR post a few months back, where the heroine works like a dog for her stingy brother and the hero is a weaver. But neither of those are classic romances.

    Reply
  114. Thanks, Nancy. Yes I think the travails of workers can be a bit grim — but now I’m thinking of a couple of books of that style that I love — HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY, which is heartbreaking in parts but also wonderful, and PRECIOUS BANE, which we talked about in a WWR post a few months back, where the heroine works like a dog for her stingy brother and the hero is a weaver. But neither of those are classic romances.

    Reply
  115. Thanks, Nancy. Yes I think the travails of workers can be a bit grim — but now I’m thinking of a couple of books of that style that I love — HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY, which is heartbreaking in parts but also wonderful, and PRECIOUS BANE, which we talked about in a WWR post a few months back, where the heroine works like a dog for her stingy brother and the hero is a weaver. But neither of those are classic romances.

    Reply
  116. Thanks, Chrissy. I think if the milkmaid ran off with the stableboy, they’d have to go to America or Canada or Australia or NZ or somewhere and then make it rich. Otherwise their happy ending would be haunted (in my mind at least) but future grinding hard work and financial difficulties and all the trouble of poverty. But I do love a good rags to riches story.

    Reply
  117. Thanks, Chrissy. I think if the milkmaid ran off with the stableboy, they’d have to go to America or Canada or Australia or NZ or somewhere and then make it rich. Otherwise their happy ending would be haunted (in my mind at least) but future grinding hard work and financial difficulties and all the trouble of poverty. But I do love a good rags to riches story.

    Reply
  118. Thanks, Chrissy. I think if the milkmaid ran off with the stableboy, they’d have to go to America or Canada or Australia or NZ or somewhere and then make it rich. Otherwise their happy ending would be haunted (in my mind at least) but future grinding hard work and financial difficulties and all the trouble of poverty. But I do love a good rags to riches story.

    Reply
  119. Thanks, Chrissy. I think if the milkmaid ran off with the stableboy, they’d have to go to America or Canada or Australia or NZ or somewhere and then make it rich. Otherwise their happy ending would be haunted (in my mind at least) but future grinding hard work and financial difficulties and all the trouble of poverty. But I do love a good rags to riches story.

    Reply
  120. Thanks, Chrissy. I think if the milkmaid ran off with the stableboy, they’d have to go to America or Canada or Australia or NZ or somewhere and then make it rich. Otherwise their happy ending would be haunted (in my mind at least) but future grinding hard work and financial difficulties and all the trouble of poverty. But I do love a good rags to riches story.

    Reply
  121. Well, Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. D’Arcy didn’t have titles, neither did Jane Eyre and Mr. Rochester. It didn’t seem to hurt their love stories any (although they were at least gentry or higher). I look forward to Daisy’s story because it will be a refreshing change of pace. Some of my favourite storybook lovebirds are from the more common social classes, the two pairs above, but I’d add Anne Shirley and Gilbert Blythe (every Canadian girl’s first crush) to the list. It’s interesting that the rise of the titled hero came about right around the time that real life titled heroes were losing their power. Yes the titled class still exists but they are no longer the rule makers of our societies, nor, apart from the royal family, do they automatically earn our respect by virtue of their birth. Maybe it’s a strange form of misplaced nostalgia for a distant past that, really, never existed. After all, there were far more Daisy’s than Jane’s!

    Reply
  122. Well, Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. D’Arcy didn’t have titles, neither did Jane Eyre and Mr. Rochester. It didn’t seem to hurt their love stories any (although they were at least gentry or higher). I look forward to Daisy’s story because it will be a refreshing change of pace. Some of my favourite storybook lovebirds are from the more common social classes, the two pairs above, but I’d add Anne Shirley and Gilbert Blythe (every Canadian girl’s first crush) to the list. It’s interesting that the rise of the titled hero came about right around the time that real life titled heroes were losing their power. Yes the titled class still exists but they are no longer the rule makers of our societies, nor, apart from the royal family, do they automatically earn our respect by virtue of their birth. Maybe it’s a strange form of misplaced nostalgia for a distant past that, really, never existed. After all, there were far more Daisy’s than Jane’s!

    Reply
  123. Well, Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. D’Arcy didn’t have titles, neither did Jane Eyre and Mr. Rochester. It didn’t seem to hurt their love stories any (although they were at least gentry or higher). I look forward to Daisy’s story because it will be a refreshing change of pace. Some of my favourite storybook lovebirds are from the more common social classes, the two pairs above, but I’d add Anne Shirley and Gilbert Blythe (every Canadian girl’s first crush) to the list. It’s interesting that the rise of the titled hero came about right around the time that real life titled heroes were losing their power. Yes the titled class still exists but they are no longer the rule makers of our societies, nor, apart from the royal family, do they automatically earn our respect by virtue of their birth. Maybe it’s a strange form of misplaced nostalgia for a distant past that, really, never existed. After all, there were far more Daisy’s than Jane’s!

    Reply
  124. Well, Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. D’Arcy didn’t have titles, neither did Jane Eyre and Mr. Rochester. It didn’t seem to hurt their love stories any (although they were at least gentry or higher). I look forward to Daisy’s story because it will be a refreshing change of pace. Some of my favourite storybook lovebirds are from the more common social classes, the two pairs above, but I’d add Anne Shirley and Gilbert Blythe (every Canadian girl’s first crush) to the list. It’s interesting that the rise of the titled hero came about right around the time that real life titled heroes were losing their power. Yes the titled class still exists but they are no longer the rule makers of our societies, nor, apart from the royal family, do they automatically earn our respect by virtue of their birth. Maybe it’s a strange form of misplaced nostalgia for a distant past that, really, never existed. After all, there were far more Daisy’s than Jane’s!

    Reply
  125. Well, Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. D’Arcy didn’t have titles, neither did Jane Eyre and Mr. Rochester. It didn’t seem to hurt their love stories any (although they were at least gentry or higher). I look forward to Daisy’s story because it will be a refreshing change of pace. Some of my favourite storybook lovebirds are from the more common social classes, the two pairs above, but I’d add Anne Shirley and Gilbert Blythe (every Canadian girl’s first crush) to the list. It’s interesting that the rise of the titled hero came about right around the time that real life titled heroes were losing their power. Yes the titled class still exists but they are no longer the rule makers of our societies, nor, apart from the royal family, do they automatically earn our respect by virtue of their birth. Maybe it’s a strange form of misplaced nostalgia for a distant past that, really, never existed. After all, there were far more Daisy’s than Jane’s!

    Reply
  126. There were indeed, Jana. But sometimes it’s the rarer bird that people look to for glamor and escapism. I adored Anne Shirley and Gilbert Blythe, too. And one of my all-time favorite lines from a book is (and this is off the top of my head so it’s probably a misquote: “But I don’t have any black dresses.” 🙂 Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  127. There were indeed, Jana. But sometimes it’s the rarer bird that people look to for glamor and escapism. I adored Anne Shirley and Gilbert Blythe, too. And one of my all-time favorite lines from a book is (and this is off the top of my head so it’s probably a misquote: “But I don’t have any black dresses.” 🙂 Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  128. There were indeed, Jana. But sometimes it’s the rarer bird that people look to for glamor and escapism. I adored Anne Shirley and Gilbert Blythe, too. And one of my all-time favorite lines from a book is (and this is off the top of my head so it’s probably a misquote: “But I don’t have any black dresses.” 🙂 Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  129. There were indeed, Jana. But sometimes it’s the rarer bird that people look to for glamor and escapism. I adored Anne Shirley and Gilbert Blythe, too. And one of my all-time favorite lines from a book is (and this is off the top of my head so it’s probably a misquote: “But I don’t have any black dresses.” 🙂 Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  130. There were indeed, Jana. But sometimes it’s the rarer bird that people look to for glamor and escapism. I adored Anne Shirley and Gilbert Blythe, too. And one of my all-time favorite lines from a book is (and this is off the top of my head so it’s probably a misquote: “But I don’t have any black dresses.” 🙂 Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  131. Not true of me. What I want to read about are intelligent, sensible, compassionate, competent, clever, educated or well read heroines who have a sense of ethics and a moral compass — or have those qualities by the end of the story. What they look like or which class they come from is not in itself important to me one way or the other.
    My copy of The Spring Bride was hurled against my mat early this afternoon and I’m looking forward to settling in for a good read 🙂

    Reply
  132. Not true of me. What I want to read about are intelligent, sensible, compassionate, competent, clever, educated or well read heroines who have a sense of ethics and a moral compass — or have those qualities by the end of the story. What they look like or which class they come from is not in itself important to me one way or the other.
    My copy of The Spring Bride was hurled against my mat early this afternoon and I’m looking forward to settling in for a good read 🙂

    Reply
  133. Not true of me. What I want to read about are intelligent, sensible, compassionate, competent, clever, educated or well read heroines who have a sense of ethics and a moral compass — or have those qualities by the end of the story. What they look like or which class they come from is not in itself important to me one way or the other.
    My copy of The Spring Bride was hurled against my mat early this afternoon and I’m looking forward to settling in for a good read 🙂

    Reply
  134. Not true of me. What I want to read about are intelligent, sensible, compassionate, competent, clever, educated or well read heroines who have a sense of ethics and a moral compass — or have those qualities by the end of the story. What they look like or which class they come from is not in itself important to me one way or the other.
    My copy of The Spring Bride was hurled against my mat early this afternoon and I’m looking forward to settling in for a good read 🙂

    Reply
  135. Not true of me. What I want to read about are intelligent, sensible, compassionate, competent, clever, educated or well read heroines who have a sense of ethics and a moral compass — or have those qualities by the end of the story. What they look like or which class they come from is not in itself important to me one way or the other.
    My copy of The Spring Bride was hurled against my mat early this afternoon and I’m looking forward to settling in for a good read 🙂

    Reply
  136. I’ve been looking forward to this book particularly because Daisy is who she is and remains true to herself and her dreams! She is comfortable within her own skin and needs a hero who loves her and appreciates the unique qualities that make her Daisy. I can’t wait to read this story about a heroine who is a real lady by my definition – she’s loving and loyal to her friends without any hidden agenda to become a stereotypical titled lady!

    Reply
  137. I’ve been looking forward to this book particularly because Daisy is who she is and remains true to herself and her dreams! She is comfortable within her own skin and needs a hero who loves her and appreciates the unique qualities that make her Daisy. I can’t wait to read this story about a heroine who is a real lady by my definition – she’s loving and loyal to her friends without any hidden agenda to become a stereotypical titled lady!

    Reply
  138. I’ve been looking forward to this book particularly because Daisy is who she is and remains true to herself and her dreams! She is comfortable within her own skin and needs a hero who loves her and appreciates the unique qualities that make her Daisy. I can’t wait to read this story about a heroine who is a real lady by my definition – she’s loving and loyal to her friends without any hidden agenda to become a stereotypical titled lady!

    Reply
  139. I’ve been looking forward to this book particularly because Daisy is who she is and remains true to herself and her dreams! She is comfortable within her own skin and needs a hero who loves her and appreciates the unique qualities that make her Daisy. I can’t wait to read this story about a heroine who is a real lady by my definition – she’s loving and loyal to her friends without any hidden agenda to become a stereotypical titled lady!

    Reply
  140. I’ve been looking forward to this book particularly because Daisy is who she is and remains true to herself and her dreams! She is comfortable within her own skin and needs a hero who loves her and appreciates the unique qualities that make her Daisy. I can’t wait to read this story about a heroine who is a real lady by my definition – she’s loving and loyal to her friends without any hidden agenda to become a stereotypical titled lady!

    Reply
  141. Thanks, Janice — yes I feel that strength of character is the most important quality. And I do like the way you say “or have those qualities by the end of the story.” I think it’s important for the main characters in a book to learn and grow and change, to some extent.

    Reply
  142. Thanks, Janice — yes I feel that strength of character is the most important quality. And I do like the way you say “or have those qualities by the end of the story.” I think it’s important for the main characters in a book to learn and grow and change, to some extent.

    Reply
  143. Thanks, Janice — yes I feel that strength of character is the most important quality. And I do like the way you say “or have those qualities by the end of the story.” I think it’s important for the main characters in a book to learn and grow and change, to some extent.

    Reply
  144. Thanks, Janice — yes I feel that strength of character is the most important quality. And I do like the way you say “or have those qualities by the end of the story.” I think it’s important for the main characters in a book to learn and grow and change, to some extent.

    Reply
  145. Thanks, Janice — yes I feel that strength of character is the most important quality. And I do like the way you say “or have those qualities by the end of the story.” I think it’s important for the main characters in a book to learn and grow and change, to some extent.

    Reply
  146. Thanks, Karelene — yes, I wanted Daisy to still be herself, and not some pretend lady. She did have some learning and growing to do, but her essential “Daisyness” stays strong and true.

    Reply
  147. Thanks, Karelene — yes, I wanted Daisy to still be herself, and not some pretend lady. She did have some learning and growing to do, but her essential “Daisyness” stays strong and true.

    Reply
  148. Thanks, Karelene — yes, I wanted Daisy to still be herself, and not some pretend lady. She did have some learning and growing to do, but her essential “Daisyness” stays strong and true.

    Reply
  149. Thanks, Karelene — yes, I wanted Daisy to still be herself, and not some pretend lady. She did have some learning and growing to do, but her essential “Daisyness” stays strong and true.

    Reply
  150. Thanks, Karelene — yes, I wanted Daisy to still be herself, and not some pretend lady. She did have some learning and growing to do, but her essential “Daisyness” stays strong and true.

    Reply
  151. I have loved all of these plucky young women, and I am so glad Daisy’s story is now out. I enjoy reading about the wealthy, entitled classes, but I also love every good love story, regardless of the characters’ circumstances. I think part of the appeal of the whole duke thing is the unfortunate truth that many conflicts between couples arise over money – or the scarcity thereof! I’ve been happily married for 30 years, but the worst disagreements my husband and I have ever had all arose over how to allocate too scarce resources. Had we a duke’s resources, those disputes would presumably disappear! Then there’s the whole wonderful fantasy of actually having a staff to help out . . . we DO read to escape reality just a bit, don’t we?! Then again, Daisy has talents with a needle that I’d never have in a million years – yet another fantasy! Can’t wait to read her HEA.

    Reply
  152. I have loved all of these plucky young women, and I am so glad Daisy’s story is now out. I enjoy reading about the wealthy, entitled classes, but I also love every good love story, regardless of the characters’ circumstances. I think part of the appeal of the whole duke thing is the unfortunate truth that many conflicts between couples arise over money – or the scarcity thereof! I’ve been happily married for 30 years, but the worst disagreements my husband and I have ever had all arose over how to allocate too scarce resources. Had we a duke’s resources, those disputes would presumably disappear! Then there’s the whole wonderful fantasy of actually having a staff to help out . . . we DO read to escape reality just a bit, don’t we?! Then again, Daisy has talents with a needle that I’d never have in a million years – yet another fantasy! Can’t wait to read her HEA.

    Reply
  153. I have loved all of these plucky young women, and I am so glad Daisy’s story is now out. I enjoy reading about the wealthy, entitled classes, but I also love every good love story, regardless of the characters’ circumstances. I think part of the appeal of the whole duke thing is the unfortunate truth that many conflicts between couples arise over money – or the scarcity thereof! I’ve been happily married for 30 years, but the worst disagreements my husband and I have ever had all arose over how to allocate too scarce resources. Had we a duke’s resources, those disputes would presumably disappear! Then there’s the whole wonderful fantasy of actually having a staff to help out . . . we DO read to escape reality just a bit, don’t we?! Then again, Daisy has talents with a needle that I’d never have in a million years – yet another fantasy! Can’t wait to read her HEA.

    Reply
  154. I have loved all of these plucky young women, and I am so glad Daisy’s story is now out. I enjoy reading about the wealthy, entitled classes, but I also love every good love story, regardless of the characters’ circumstances. I think part of the appeal of the whole duke thing is the unfortunate truth that many conflicts between couples arise over money – or the scarcity thereof! I’ve been happily married for 30 years, but the worst disagreements my husband and I have ever had all arose over how to allocate too scarce resources. Had we a duke’s resources, those disputes would presumably disappear! Then there’s the whole wonderful fantasy of actually having a staff to help out . . . we DO read to escape reality just a bit, don’t we?! Then again, Daisy has talents with a needle that I’d never have in a million years – yet another fantasy! Can’t wait to read her HEA.

    Reply
  155. I have loved all of these plucky young women, and I am so glad Daisy’s story is now out. I enjoy reading about the wealthy, entitled classes, but I also love every good love story, regardless of the characters’ circumstances. I think part of the appeal of the whole duke thing is the unfortunate truth that many conflicts between couples arise over money – or the scarcity thereof! I’ve been happily married for 30 years, but the worst disagreements my husband and I have ever had all arose over how to allocate too scarce resources. Had we a duke’s resources, those disputes would presumably disappear! Then there’s the whole wonderful fantasy of actually having a staff to help out . . . we DO read to escape reality just a bit, don’t we?! Then again, Daisy has talents with a needle that I’d never have in a million years – yet another fantasy! Can’t wait to read her HEA.

    Reply
  156. Thanks, Margaret — I think the money worry thing is hugely important, and one of the reasons I don’t write working class couples, because especially knowing what history would be bringing them, I know they’d be facing terribly hard times. As for having a staff to help out —I occasionally indulge in that fantasy of having people to do all the things that need doing. Though I don’t think I’d feel too comfortable with servants. I don’t like being waited on hand and foot. I think I’d prefer elves who do all the housework etc while I sleep. 🙂

    Reply
  157. Thanks, Margaret — I think the money worry thing is hugely important, and one of the reasons I don’t write working class couples, because especially knowing what history would be bringing them, I know they’d be facing terribly hard times. As for having a staff to help out —I occasionally indulge in that fantasy of having people to do all the things that need doing. Though I don’t think I’d feel too comfortable with servants. I don’t like being waited on hand and foot. I think I’d prefer elves who do all the housework etc while I sleep. 🙂

    Reply
  158. Thanks, Margaret — I think the money worry thing is hugely important, and one of the reasons I don’t write working class couples, because especially knowing what history would be bringing them, I know they’d be facing terribly hard times. As for having a staff to help out —I occasionally indulge in that fantasy of having people to do all the things that need doing. Though I don’t think I’d feel too comfortable with servants. I don’t like being waited on hand and foot. I think I’d prefer elves who do all the housework etc while I sleep. 🙂

    Reply
  159. Thanks, Margaret — I think the money worry thing is hugely important, and one of the reasons I don’t write working class couples, because especially knowing what history would be bringing them, I know they’d be facing terribly hard times. As for having a staff to help out —I occasionally indulge in that fantasy of having people to do all the things that need doing. Though I don’t think I’d feel too comfortable with servants. I don’t like being waited on hand and foot. I think I’d prefer elves who do all the housework etc while I sleep. 🙂

    Reply
  160. Thanks, Margaret — I think the money worry thing is hugely important, and one of the reasons I don’t write working class couples, because especially knowing what history would be bringing them, I know they’d be facing terribly hard times. As for having a staff to help out —I occasionally indulge in that fantasy of having people to do all the things that need doing. Though I don’t think I’d feel too comfortable with servants. I don’t like being waited on hand and foot. I think I’d prefer elves who do all the housework etc while I sleep. 🙂

    Reply
  161. Hi Anne,
    I haven’t read this series yet, but I would love to read them after the snippets you’ve posted here.
    To answer your question: no, I don’t only want to read about aristocratic heroines. On the contrary! I love a gutsy heroine who speaks her mind and isn’t afraid to stand up to the constraints of society.

    Reply
  162. Hi Anne,
    I haven’t read this series yet, but I would love to read them after the snippets you’ve posted here.
    To answer your question: no, I don’t only want to read about aristocratic heroines. On the contrary! I love a gutsy heroine who speaks her mind and isn’t afraid to stand up to the constraints of society.

    Reply
  163. Hi Anne,
    I haven’t read this series yet, but I would love to read them after the snippets you’ve posted here.
    To answer your question: no, I don’t only want to read about aristocratic heroines. On the contrary! I love a gutsy heroine who speaks her mind and isn’t afraid to stand up to the constraints of society.

    Reply
  164. Hi Anne,
    I haven’t read this series yet, but I would love to read them after the snippets you’ve posted here.
    To answer your question: no, I don’t only want to read about aristocratic heroines. On the contrary! I love a gutsy heroine who speaks her mind and isn’t afraid to stand up to the constraints of society.

    Reply
  165. Hi Anne,
    I haven’t read this series yet, but I would love to read them after the snippets you’ve posted here.
    To answer your question: no, I don’t only want to read about aristocratic heroines. On the contrary! I love a gutsy heroine who speaks her mind and isn’t afraid to stand up to the constraints of society.

    Reply
  166. I loved the interview. Thank you, ladies.
    I look forward to reading this book….I have loved all the other three.
    I don’t think having a character or characters with a title is always important. I think being interesting is important. I have loved some books which were stories of people not of the ton. I like the idea of people who have ideas and are willing to follow through to make those ideas into reality. I like the idea of women who do things. They do not have to be titled.
    All this does not mean that I am not going to love a good Earl and Lady Somebody story. But, if the story is well done, with characters who I would like to know and has humor I will like the story.

    Reply
  167. I loved the interview. Thank you, ladies.
    I look forward to reading this book….I have loved all the other three.
    I don’t think having a character or characters with a title is always important. I think being interesting is important. I have loved some books which were stories of people not of the ton. I like the idea of people who have ideas and are willing to follow through to make those ideas into reality. I like the idea of women who do things. They do not have to be titled.
    All this does not mean that I am not going to love a good Earl and Lady Somebody story. But, if the story is well done, with characters who I would like to know and has humor I will like the story.

    Reply
  168. I loved the interview. Thank you, ladies.
    I look forward to reading this book….I have loved all the other three.
    I don’t think having a character or characters with a title is always important. I think being interesting is important. I have loved some books which were stories of people not of the ton. I like the idea of people who have ideas and are willing to follow through to make those ideas into reality. I like the idea of women who do things. They do not have to be titled.
    All this does not mean that I am not going to love a good Earl and Lady Somebody story. But, if the story is well done, with characters who I would like to know and has humor I will like the story.

    Reply
  169. I loved the interview. Thank you, ladies.
    I look forward to reading this book….I have loved all the other three.
    I don’t think having a character or characters with a title is always important. I think being interesting is important. I have loved some books which were stories of people not of the ton. I like the idea of people who have ideas and are willing to follow through to make those ideas into reality. I like the idea of women who do things. They do not have to be titled.
    All this does not mean that I am not going to love a good Earl and Lady Somebody story. But, if the story is well done, with characters who I would like to know and has humor I will like the story.

    Reply
  170. I loved the interview. Thank you, ladies.
    I look forward to reading this book….I have loved all the other three.
    I don’t think having a character or characters with a title is always important. I think being interesting is important. I have loved some books which were stories of people not of the ton. I like the idea of people who have ideas and are willing to follow through to make those ideas into reality. I like the idea of women who do things. They do not have to be titled.
    All this does not mean that I am not going to love a good Earl and Lady Somebody story. But, if the story is well done, with characters who I would like to know and has humor I will like the story.

    Reply
  171. Thanks Annette — “I think being interesting is important.” — yes, I absolutely agree. And this is spot on, too — “if the story is well done, with characters who I would like to know and has humor I will like the story.”
    Thanks for dropping by the Word Wenches

    Reply
  172. Thanks Annette — “I think being interesting is important.” — yes, I absolutely agree. And this is spot on, too — “if the story is well done, with characters who I would like to know and has humor I will like the story.”
    Thanks for dropping by the Word Wenches

    Reply
  173. Thanks Annette — “I think being interesting is important.” — yes, I absolutely agree. And this is spot on, too — “if the story is well done, with characters who I would like to know and has humor I will like the story.”
    Thanks for dropping by the Word Wenches

    Reply
  174. Thanks Annette — “I think being interesting is important.” — yes, I absolutely agree. And this is spot on, too — “if the story is well done, with characters who I would like to know and has humor I will like the story.”
    Thanks for dropping by the Word Wenches

    Reply
  175. Thanks Annette — “I think being interesting is important.” — yes, I absolutely agree. And this is spot on, too — “if the story is well done, with characters who I would like to know and has humor I will like the story.”
    Thanks for dropping by the Word Wenches

    Reply
  176. I’m more interested in intelligence and integrity than beauty, wealth or aristocracy. I also require reasonable historical accuracy, which is why I like the work of the Word Wenches

    Reply
  177. I’m more interested in intelligence and integrity than beauty, wealth or aristocracy. I also require reasonable historical accuracy, which is why I like the work of the Word Wenches

    Reply
  178. I’m more interested in intelligence and integrity than beauty, wealth or aristocracy. I also require reasonable historical accuracy, which is why I like the work of the Word Wenches

    Reply
  179. I’m more interested in intelligence and integrity than beauty, wealth or aristocracy. I also require reasonable historical accuracy, which is why I like the work of the Word Wenches

    Reply
  180. I’m more interested in intelligence and integrity than beauty, wealth or aristocracy. I also require reasonable historical accuracy, which is why I like the work of the Word Wenches

    Reply
  181. Thanks Anne — intelligence and integrity is crucial isn’t it? As is “being interesting” as mentioned above. And thank you for your compliment to all the wenches— yes, we do like to get things as historically reasonable as possible.

    Reply
  182. Thanks Anne — intelligence and integrity is crucial isn’t it? As is “being interesting” as mentioned above. And thank you for your compliment to all the wenches— yes, we do like to get things as historically reasonable as possible.

    Reply
  183. Thanks Anne — intelligence and integrity is crucial isn’t it? As is “being interesting” as mentioned above. And thank you for your compliment to all the wenches— yes, we do like to get things as historically reasonable as possible.

    Reply
  184. Thanks Anne — intelligence and integrity is crucial isn’t it? As is “being interesting” as mentioned above. And thank you for your compliment to all the wenches— yes, we do like to get things as historically reasonable as possible.

    Reply
  185. Thanks Anne — intelligence and integrity is crucial isn’t it? As is “being interesting” as mentioned above. And thank you for your compliment to all the wenches— yes, we do like to get things as historically reasonable as possible.

    Reply
  186. Thanks for the interview and for the snippet from The Summer Bride. As for your question: I’m happy to read about heroes and heroines from all classes so long as the book is well written.

    Reply
  187. Thanks for the interview and for the snippet from The Summer Bride. As for your question: I’m happy to read about heroes and heroines from all classes so long as the book is well written.

    Reply
  188. Thanks for the interview and for the snippet from The Summer Bride. As for your question: I’m happy to read about heroes and heroines from all classes so long as the book is well written.

    Reply
  189. Thanks for the interview and for the snippet from The Summer Bride. As for your question: I’m happy to read about heroes and heroines from all classes so long as the book is well written.

    Reply
  190. Thanks for the interview and for the snippet from The Summer Bride. As for your question: I’m happy to read about heroes and heroines from all classes so long as the book is well written.

    Reply
  191. Okay, I finished The Summer Bride this afternoon. Too hot to do anything but read 🙂
    I have a question. Pg 205, the woman who wound up in the brothel because her husband took everything and scarpered, and the magistrate told her sorry, nothing can be done. Was her story ever a book? It’s triggering something but I don’t know what. I’d read that book. I love problem stories, and that woman has a real problem.

    Reply
  192. Okay, I finished The Summer Bride this afternoon. Too hot to do anything but read 🙂
    I have a question. Pg 205, the woman who wound up in the brothel because her husband took everything and scarpered, and the magistrate told her sorry, nothing can be done. Was her story ever a book? It’s triggering something but I don’t know what. I’d read that book. I love problem stories, and that woman has a real problem.

    Reply
  193. Okay, I finished The Summer Bride this afternoon. Too hot to do anything but read 🙂
    I have a question. Pg 205, the woman who wound up in the brothel because her husband took everything and scarpered, and the magistrate told her sorry, nothing can be done. Was her story ever a book? It’s triggering something but I don’t know what. I’d read that book. I love problem stories, and that woman has a real problem.

    Reply
  194. Okay, I finished The Summer Bride this afternoon. Too hot to do anything but read 🙂
    I have a question. Pg 205, the woman who wound up in the brothel because her husband took everything and scarpered, and the magistrate told her sorry, nothing can be done. Was her story ever a book? It’s triggering something but I don’t know what. I’d read that book. I love problem stories, and that woman has a real problem.

    Reply
  195. Okay, I finished The Summer Bride this afternoon. Too hot to do anything but read 🙂
    I have a question. Pg 205, the woman who wound up in the brothel because her husband took everything and scarpered, and the magistrate told her sorry, nothing can be done. Was her story ever a book? It’s triggering something but I don’t know what. I’d read that book. I love problem stories, and that woman has a real problem.

    Reply
  196. Hi Janice, no I haven’t written that story. You’re right though — it would be an interesting one to explore. If I ever do, I’ll let you know.
    But if it’s triggering something, you might be thinking of Mary Balogh, who’s done a few books about women who were forced to turn to prostitution. The Secret Pearl and A Precious Jewel are two that spring to mind.

    Reply
  197. Hi Janice, no I haven’t written that story. You’re right though — it would be an interesting one to explore. If I ever do, I’ll let you know.
    But if it’s triggering something, you might be thinking of Mary Balogh, who’s done a few books about women who were forced to turn to prostitution. The Secret Pearl and A Precious Jewel are two that spring to mind.

    Reply
  198. Hi Janice, no I haven’t written that story. You’re right though — it would be an interesting one to explore. If I ever do, I’ll let you know.
    But if it’s triggering something, you might be thinking of Mary Balogh, who’s done a few books about women who were forced to turn to prostitution. The Secret Pearl and A Precious Jewel are two that spring to mind.

    Reply
  199. Hi Janice, no I haven’t written that story. You’re right though — it would be an interesting one to explore. If I ever do, I’ll let you know.
    But if it’s triggering something, you might be thinking of Mary Balogh, who’s done a few books about women who were forced to turn to prostitution. The Secret Pearl and A Precious Jewel are two that spring to mind.

    Reply
  200. Hi Janice, no I haven’t written that story. You’re right though — it would be an interesting one to explore. If I ever do, I’ll let you know.
    But if it’s triggering something, you might be thinking of Mary Balogh, who’s done a few books about women who were forced to turn to prostitution. The Secret Pearl and A Precious Jewel are two that spring to mind.

    Reply
  201. thanks, Anne. No, it’s not Balogh; I know the books you mention. It’ll come to me. If it exists.
    It is funny, isn’t it, how a minor bit can stick in your mind and become one of those 2 a. m. wide awake puzzles 🙂
    I don’t think I mentioned it — I enjoyed the book very much.

    Reply
  202. thanks, Anne. No, it’s not Balogh; I know the books you mention. It’ll come to me. If it exists.
    It is funny, isn’t it, how a minor bit can stick in your mind and become one of those 2 a. m. wide awake puzzles 🙂
    I don’t think I mentioned it — I enjoyed the book very much.

    Reply
  203. thanks, Anne. No, it’s not Balogh; I know the books you mention. It’ll come to me. If it exists.
    It is funny, isn’t it, how a minor bit can stick in your mind and become one of those 2 a. m. wide awake puzzles 🙂
    I don’t think I mentioned it — I enjoyed the book very much.

    Reply
  204. thanks, Anne. No, it’s not Balogh; I know the books you mention. It’ll come to me. If it exists.
    It is funny, isn’t it, how a minor bit can stick in your mind and become one of those 2 a. m. wide awake puzzles 🙂
    I don’t think I mentioned it — I enjoyed the book very much.

    Reply
  205. thanks, Anne. No, it’s not Balogh; I know the books you mention. It’ll come to me. If it exists.
    It is funny, isn’t it, how a minor bit can stick in your mind and become one of those 2 a. m. wide awake puzzles 🙂
    I don’t think I mentioned it — I enjoyed the book very much.

    Reply
  206. I do like fallen heroes-they are so much more interesting! And, I am tired of these upperclass heroines-they are all so one dimensional!

    Reply
  207. I do like fallen heroes-they are so much more interesting! And, I am tired of these upperclass heroines-they are all so one dimensional!

    Reply
  208. I do like fallen heroes-they are so much more interesting! And, I am tired of these upperclass heroines-they are all so one dimensional!

    Reply
  209. I do like fallen heroes-they are so much more interesting! And, I am tired of these upperclass heroines-they are all so one dimensional!

    Reply
  210. I do like fallen heroes-they are so much more interesting! And, I am tired of these upperclass heroines-they are all so one dimensional!

    Reply

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