Anne Gracie and a Sparkling Spring Bride

Cat 243 Doverby Mary Jo

Due to stealth and cunning, I was able to acquire an early copy of Word Wench Anne Gracie's The Spring Bride, third in her Chance Sisters series.  I volunteered to interview her about the book, which gives me an opportunity to gush about it.  <G>

I love the Chance Sisters, and I'm not alone in that. The first book, The Spring Bride US versionAutumn Bride, made several "best of the year" lists including Library Journal and NPR, and was also a RITA finalist.  The Winter Bride received several starred reviews, an RT top pick, and was voted Favourite Historical by members of the Australian Romance readers Association. The Spring Bride received 4 1/2 stars from Romantic Times, and I think it may be the best Chance sister book yet.

MJP: Anne, could you tell us how the Chance Sisters came to be?   



AG: Firstly thanks for those very kind words, Mary Jo. As for how the Chance Sisters came to be — sometimes ideas for stories come to me just as I'm falling asleep or waking up — that semi-dream state is a fertile time for me. It's almost like a film is rolling in my head, and I get images and dialogue — quite vivid. 

So, in this semi-dream there was a young woman climbing through the window of an old mansion at night — I knew she was desperate and intending to steal something, and I knew she'd never done anything like this before. Inside the room she finds an aristocratic old lady, bedridden and in dire straits. So I wrote it all down in the notebook I keep by my bed, and it's pretty much word for word the scene in The Autumn Bride where Abby meets Lady Bea.

The rest came from brainstorming and nutting things out. <g>

 MJP:  The heroine of Spring Bride is Jane, the young biological sister of Abby, heroine of the first book.  Up to this point, she wasn't too developed, being mostly rather quiet and very beautiful, in the way that causes trouble.  Can you talk about how you developed her into such an interesting protagonist?

 AG: Yes, in the earlier books Jane was very much the baby sister. She had lived a fairly Aussie Coversheltered life — in an orphanage from the age of six to eighteen, and then was with her sisters, so she was both young and inexperienced. Really it was just a matter of digging around in her backstory — those early childhood memories of the time she and Abby were struggling to survive had had a huge influence on Jane's personality. She wants a home and children and she's determined to keep them safe —safer than she and Abby ever were — so she's ready to make a sensible convenient marriage. She's a very conventional good girl at the start. But she really develops during this story, and I think readers will be cheering for her by the end. (That's the Australian cover on the right.) 

 MJP:  The delightful hero, Zachary Black, hasn't appeared in the series before.  Please tell us about him!

AG: I'm glad you like him — I had fun with Zach! When I was planning the series, I had another hero in mind for Jane, but when I realized who she'd become, I knew that she needed a different hero — one who would challenge her and force her to grow. And Zach was just the ticket — a charming rogue who apparently has no home, no income, and is, to all intents and purposes completely and utterly impossible. And yet . . .

Zach left his home under a cloud when he was sixteen and he hasn't been back. He's been drifting around Europe, doing a bit of spying for the government during the war, and now has returned to England to find himself caught up in a legal tangle. Nothing much matters to Zach — he takes life lightly — but as the story progress, he realizes he can't keep drifting. Apart from anything , there's this girl . . .

Autumn BrideMJP:  There is also a dog…..

AG: Ah, yes. The dog brings these two unlikely people together. Jane was the girl, you may remember, who was responsible for bringing the cats to Lady Beatrice's house. In this story she rescues a dog from being kicked to pieces by a group of young thugs. And when the thugs turn on her, a certain tall, dark gypsy comes to her rescue.

MJP:  You're the one who taught me how effective an excerpt can be, so please give us one!

AG: This takes place immediately after the dog rescue. The gypsy (Zach) has routed the young thugs and Jane is investigating the state of the dog.

          Judging the moment right, she reached out to touch the dog.
          Again, the gypsy grabbed her, this time by the wrist.
          Jane jumped. The dog flinched and growled again.
          She froze a moment, staring down at the big hand holding her wrist so firmly. Warm, brown, masculine fingers wrapped around her bare skin. She would have imagined a gypsy's hands would feel rough but his didn't. She tried to remember how those hands had smashed into those young thugs. His grip was strong, but he wasn't hurting her.
          With dignity, she turned her head to glare at him. An unhand-me-sir sort of glare. A society-lady-to-gypsy sort of glare.
          It ought to have put him in his place.
          It didn't.
          Their gazes locked for an endless moment. Gray-green eyes bored unapologetically into hers, warm hard fingers gripped her firmly. The noise of the city, the dismal reek of the alleyway, even the dog faded again from her awareness. Such bright, hard, unsettling eyes. Soul-stealing eyes. She swallowed and fought to maintain her composure.

*There are more snippets on my website and blog. On my website you'll see the "enter the hero" moment, and see just what a rogue Zachary Black is.

MJP: The Spring Bride is wonderfully romantic and full of surprises and great secondary characters.  So now of course I want to know about the next book, The Summer Bride!  And is it my imagination, or might there be another couple of characters in the background who might move to center stage in the future?

AG: The Summer Bride is, of course, Daisy's story. I love Daisy. She's gutsy and earthy and vulnerable and she has a passion for creating beautiful clothes.  I'm having fun with her story as well.

            As for these background characters you mention, I'm not sure who you mean. I always battle with characters who spring to life and want stories of their own.  <g>

MJP:  You're just born to conjure heroes, Anne!  Thanks so much for telling us about The Spring Bride.  (I totally love the cover, by the way, and the Australian one is also lovely.)  

  Spring Bride US versionAG: Thanks for interviewing me, Mary Jo,  and for giving me such lovely feedback about the book. As for the cover, I've been lucky there, I think.

 MJP: Anne will give away one copy of the book to someone who leaves a comment or a response by midnight Tuesday to this question:

Do you like or dislike animals in stories? Do you have a favorite?

 

315 thoughts on “Anne Gracie and a Sparkling Spring Bride”

  1. I do enjoy animals in stories, I think they often add a nice element to a story and bring out a different part of a character. For instance lots of the Regencies feature bits about how well the hero or heroine treats their horses. The book that comes to mind is Patricia’s _The Devilish Montague_, with the parrots and other birds that Jocelyn gathers for her brother.
    In modern romances, Susan Mallery has several books where she included real-life pets- readers bid on the chance to have their pet in a story and the proceeds went to a local animal shelter. That led to some adorable pets, like a cute little Pomeranian in one of her books.

    Reply
  2. I do enjoy animals in stories, I think they often add a nice element to a story and bring out a different part of a character. For instance lots of the Regencies feature bits about how well the hero or heroine treats their horses. The book that comes to mind is Patricia’s _The Devilish Montague_, with the parrots and other birds that Jocelyn gathers for her brother.
    In modern romances, Susan Mallery has several books where she included real-life pets- readers bid on the chance to have their pet in a story and the proceeds went to a local animal shelter. That led to some adorable pets, like a cute little Pomeranian in one of her books.

    Reply
  3. I do enjoy animals in stories, I think they often add a nice element to a story and bring out a different part of a character. For instance lots of the Regencies feature bits about how well the hero or heroine treats their horses. The book that comes to mind is Patricia’s _The Devilish Montague_, with the parrots and other birds that Jocelyn gathers for her brother.
    In modern romances, Susan Mallery has several books where she included real-life pets- readers bid on the chance to have their pet in a story and the proceeds went to a local animal shelter. That led to some adorable pets, like a cute little Pomeranian in one of her books.

    Reply
  4. I do enjoy animals in stories, I think they often add a nice element to a story and bring out a different part of a character. For instance lots of the Regencies feature bits about how well the hero or heroine treats their horses. The book that comes to mind is Patricia’s _The Devilish Montague_, with the parrots and other birds that Jocelyn gathers for her brother.
    In modern romances, Susan Mallery has several books where she included real-life pets- readers bid on the chance to have their pet in a story and the proceeds went to a local animal shelter. That led to some adorable pets, like a cute little Pomeranian in one of her books.

    Reply
  5. I do enjoy animals in stories, I think they often add a nice element to a story and bring out a different part of a character. For instance lots of the Regencies feature bits about how well the hero or heroine treats their horses. The book that comes to mind is Patricia’s _The Devilish Montague_, with the parrots and other birds that Jocelyn gathers for her brother.
    In modern romances, Susan Mallery has several books where she included real-life pets- readers bid on the chance to have their pet in a story and the proceeds went to a local animal shelter. That led to some adorable pets, like a cute little Pomeranian in one of her books.

    Reply
  6. I did like the kitties in The Spring Bride, especially when Max nipped Max 🙂 I have a favourite dog, a staffordshire bull terrier, in a true story called Jock of the Bushveld by Percy Fitzpatrick. I can also never forget Bodger and Tao and Lauth from The Incredible Journey by Sheila Burnford. And do spiders count? I’m thinking about Charlotte. It’s a serious achievement to make me empathise with a spider!
    PS: Anne, that extract is such a TEASE. Thank goodness I have pre-ordered the ebook. Otherwise I would be having a sleepless night. Well, I might be having that anyway…

    Reply
  7. I did like the kitties in The Spring Bride, especially when Max nipped Max 🙂 I have a favourite dog, a staffordshire bull terrier, in a true story called Jock of the Bushveld by Percy Fitzpatrick. I can also never forget Bodger and Tao and Lauth from The Incredible Journey by Sheila Burnford. And do spiders count? I’m thinking about Charlotte. It’s a serious achievement to make me empathise with a spider!
    PS: Anne, that extract is such a TEASE. Thank goodness I have pre-ordered the ebook. Otherwise I would be having a sleepless night. Well, I might be having that anyway…

    Reply
  8. I did like the kitties in The Spring Bride, especially when Max nipped Max 🙂 I have a favourite dog, a staffordshire bull terrier, in a true story called Jock of the Bushveld by Percy Fitzpatrick. I can also never forget Bodger and Tao and Lauth from The Incredible Journey by Sheila Burnford. And do spiders count? I’m thinking about Charlotte. It’s a serious achievement to make me empathise with a spider!
    PS: Anne, that extract is such a TEASE. Thank goodness I have pre-ordered the ebook. Otherwise I would be having a sleepless night. Well, I might be having that anyway…

    Reply
  9. I did like the kitties in The Spring Bride, especially when Max nipped Max 🙂 I have a favourite dog, a staffordshire bull terrier, in a true story called Jock of the Bushveld by Percy Fitzpatrick. I can also never forget Bodger and Tao and Lauth from The Incredible Journey by Sheila Burnford. And do spiders count? I’m thinking about Charlotte. It’s a serious achievement to make me empathise with a spider!
    PS: Anne, that extract is such a TEASE. Thank goodness I have pre-ordered the ebook. Otherwise I would be having a sleepless night. Well, I might be having that anyway…

    Reply
  10. I did like the kitties in The Spring Bride, especially when Max nipped Max 🙂 I have a favourite dog, a staffordshire bull terrier, in a true story called Jock of the Bushveld by Percy Fitzpatrick. I can also never forget Bodger and Tao and Lauth from The Incredible Journey by Sheila Burnford. And do spiders count? I’m thinking about Charlotte. It’s a serious achievement to make me empathise with a spider!
    PS: Anne, that extract is such a TEASE. Thank goodness I have pre-ordered the ebook. Otherwise I would be having a sleepless night. Well, I might be having that anyway…

    Reply
  11. Animals, as pets, or as in this case, rescued,……as long as they make the story. Become part of the story, they are worthy and should be in.

    Reply
  12. Animals, as pets, or as in this case, rescued,……as long as they make the story. Become part of the story, they are worthy and should be in.

    Reply
  13. Animals, as pets, or as in this case, rescued,……as long as they make the story. Become part of the story, they are worthy and should be in.

    Reply
  14. Animals, as pets, or as in this case, rescued,……as long as they make the story. Become part of the story, they are worthy and should be in.

    Reply
  15. Animals, as pets, or as in this case, rescued,……as long as they make the story. Become part of the story, they are worthy and should be in.

    Reply
  16. I love when animals are part of the story. They can add fun to the story line by being naughty. But I can’t say if I have one that is a favorite.

    Reply
  17. I love when animals are part of the story. They can add fun to the story line by being naughty. But I can’t say if I have one that is a favorite.

    Reply
  18. I love when animals are part of the story. They can add fun to the story line by being naughty. But I can’t say if I have one that is a favorite.

    Reply
  19. I love when animals are part of the story. They can add fun to the story line by being naughty. But I can’t say if I have one that is a favorite.

    Reply
  20. I love when animals are part of the story. They can add fun to the story line by being naughty. But I can’t say if I have one that is a favorite.

    Reply
  21. I like the way that humans bond with animals, especially horses and dogs. Some great Westerns by Catherine Anderson and Elizabeth Lowell come to mind but I think my favourite is ‘The Horse Dancer’ by Jojo Moyes …. When a fourteen year old’s world falls apart her horse is the only thing that keeps her going.
    I loved the excerpt … I think I’m going to have to explore further. I don’t like the way that the covers (except the Aussie version) decapitate the heroine though. Fortunately I buy e-books or audios where it doesn’t matter!
    I wondered what the expanse of mauve plants in the Aussie cover could be. For some reason they remind me of the wonderful oceans of blue bells visible in English landscapes at this time of year!
    Loved the interview. 🙂

    Reply
  22. I like the way that humans bond with animals, especially horses and dogs. Some great Westerns by Catherine Anderson and Elizabeth Lowell come to mind but I think my favourite is ‘The Horse Dancer’ by Jojo Moyes …. When a fourteen year old’s world falls apart her horse is the only thing that keeps her going.
    I loved the excerpt … I think I’m going to have to explore further. I don’t like the way that the covers (except the Aussie version) decapitate the heroine though. Fortunately I buy e-books or audios where it doesn’t matter!
    I wondered what the expanse of mauve plants in the Aussie cover could be. For some reason they remind me of the wonderful oceans of blue bells visible in English landscapes at this time of year!
    Loved the interview. 🙂

    Reply
  23. I like the way that humans bond with animals, especially horses and dogs. Some great Westerns by Catherine Anderson and Elizabeth Lowell come to mind but I think my favourite is ‘The Horse Dancer’ by Jojo Moyes …. When a fourteen year old’s world falls apart her horse is the only thing that keeps her going.
    I loved the excerpt … I think I’m going to have to explore further. I don’t like the way that the covers (except the Aussie version) decapitate the heroine though. Fortunately I buy e-books or audios where it doesn’t matter!
    I wondered what the expanse of mauve plants in the Aussie cover could be. For some reason they remind me of the wonderful oceans of blue bells visible in English landscapes at this time of year!
    Loved the interview. 🙂

    Reply
  24. I like the way that humans bond with animals, especially horses and dogs. Some great Westerns by Catherine Anderson and Elizabeth Lowell come to mind but I think my favourite is ‘The Horse Dancer’ by Jojo Moyes …. When a fourteen year old’s world falls apart her horse is the only thing that keeps her going.
    I loved the excerpt … I think I’m going to have to explore further. I don’t like the way that the covers (except the Aussie version) decapitate the heroine though. Fortunately I buy e-books or audios where it doesn’t matter!
    I wondered what the expanse of mauve plants in the Aussie cover could be. For some reason they remind me of the wonderful oceans of blue bells visible in English landscapes at this time of year!
    Loved the interview. 🙂

    Reply
  25. I like the way that humans bond with animals, especially horses and dogs. Some great Westerns by Catherine Anderson and Elizabeth Lowell come to mind but I think my favourite is ‘The Horse Dancer’ by Jojo Moyes …. When a fourteen year old’s world falls apart her horse is the only thing that keeps her going.
    I loved the excerpt … I think I’m going to have to explore further. I don’t like the way that the covers (except the Aussie version) decapitate the heroine though. Fortunately I buy e-books or audios where it doesn’t matter!
    I wondered what the expanse of mauve plants in the Aussie cover could be. For some reason they remind me of the wonderful oceans of blue bells visible in English landscapes at this time of year!
    Loved the interview. 🙂

    Reply
  26. I know I don’t even have The Spring Bride in my hands yet (pre-ordered it, though), but I’m so happy to know that I can look forward to The Summer Bride!

    Reply
  27. I know I don’t even have The Spring Bride in my hands yet (pre-ordered it, though), but I’m so happy to know that I can look forward to The Summer Bride!

    Reply
  28. I know I don’t even have The Spring Bride in my hands yet (pre-ordered it, though), but I’m so happy to know that I can look forward to The Summer Bride!

    Reply
  29. I know I don’t even have The Spring Bride in my hands yet (pre-ordered it, though), but I’m so happy to know that I can look forward to The Summer Bride!

    Reply
  30. I know I don’t even have The Spring Bride in my hands yet (pre-ordered it, though), but I’m so happy to know that I can look forward to The Summer Bride!

    Reply
  31. I like animals in stories as long as they don’t detract from the story. That said, I’m working on a “character” with wings in my next story. So looking forward to reading The Spring Bride. Since I’m trapped in the writing/editing cave, I’m sending my daughter to buy the book for me on Thursday! Best of luck with this story, Anne!

    Reply
  32. I like animals in stories as long as they don’t detract from the story. That said, I’m working on a “character” with wings in my next story. So looking forward to reading The Spring Bride. Since I’m trapped in the writing/editing cave, I’m sending my daughter to buy the book for me on Thursday! Best of luck with this story, Anne!

    Reply
  33. I like animals in stories as long as they don’t detract from the story. That said, I’m working on a “character” with wings in my next story. So looking forward to reading The Spring Bride. Since I’m trapped in the writing/editing cave, I’m sending my daughter to buy the book for me on Thursday! Best of luck with this story, Anne!

    Reply
  34. I like animals in stories as long as they don’t detract from the story. That said, I’m working on a “character” with wings in my next story. So looking forward to reading The Spring Bride. Since I’m trapped in the writing/editing cave, I’m sending my daughter to buy the book for me on Thursday! Best of luck with this story, Anne!

    Reply
  35. I like animals in stories as long as they don’t detract from the story. That said, I’m working on a “character” with wings in my next story. So looking forward to reading The Spring Bride. Since I’m trapped in the writing/editing cave, I’m sending my daughter to buy the book for me on Thursday! Best of luck with this story, Anne!

    Reply
  36. I enjoy reading about animals, esp in books and reading one of the comments above made me recall that the most effective uses of a pet parrot that I read recently was in Stella Riley’s A Parfit Knight (also love the title’s Chaucer reference). The brother of the heroine and the hero can’t fight over her as this would damage the lady’s reputation so they fight over the fact that the hero has taught the parrot to spit seeds! It’s a great book set in the 1700s.
    As for most unusual animals in a regency, that has to be the Penguins used by Mary Jo Putney in Thunder and Roses.

    Reply
  37. I enjoy reading about animals, esp in books and reading one of the comments above made me recall that the most effective uses of a pet parrot that I read recently was in Stella Riley’s A Parfit Knight (also love the title’s Chaucer reference). The brother of the heroine and the hero can’t fight over her as this would damage the lady’s reputation so they fight over the fact that the hero has taught the parrot to spit seeds! It’s a great book set in the 1700s.
    As for most unusual animals in a regency, that has to be the Penguins used by Mary Jo Putney in Thunder and Roses.

    Reply
  38. I enjoy reading about animals, esp in books and reading one of the comments above made me recall that the most effective uses of a pet parrot that I read recently was in Stella Riley’s A Parfit Knight (also love the title’s Chaucer reference). The brother of the heroine and the hero can’t fight over her as this would damage the lady’s reputation so they fight over the fact that the hero has taught the parrot to spit seeds! It’s a great book set in the 1700s.
    As for most unusual animals in a regency, that has to be the Penguins used by Mary Jo Putney in Thunder and Roses.

    Reply
  39. I enjoy reading about animals, esp in books and reading one of the comments above made me recall that the most effective uses of a pet parrot that I read recently was in Stella Riley’s A Parfit Knight (also love the title’s Chaucer reference). The brother of the heroine and the hero can’t fight over her as this would damage the lady’s reputation so they fight over the fact that the hero has taught the parrot to spit seeds! It’s a great book set in the 1700s.
    As for most unusual animals in a regency, that has to be the Penguins used by Mary Jo Putney in Thunder and Roses.

    Reply
  40. I enjoy reading about animals, esp in books and reading one of the comments above made me recall that the most effective uses of a pet parrot that I read recently was in Stella Riley’s A Parfit Knight (also love the title’s Chaucer reference). The brother of the heroine and the hero can’t fight over her as this would damage the lady’s reputation so they fight over the fact that the hero has taught the parrot to spit seeds! It’s a great book set in the 1700s.
    As for most unusual animals in a regency, that has to be the Penguins used by Mary Jo Putney in Thunder and Roses.

    Reply
  41. The penguins!!!!!!!!!!! I could’t resist. I even hauled the Mayhem Consultant off to the Baltimore Zoo so we could see the temperate zone black footed penguins from an island off South Africa, the only kind that would do for Wales. (I think that’s what they were–it’s been a while and I’m too lazy to double check. *G*) I will add that the zoo penguins have a REALLY cushy arrangement here, with their own lake, island, and privacy shelters.

    Reply
  42. The penguins!!!!!!!!!!! I could’t resist. I even hauled the Mayhem Consultant off to the Baltimore Zoo so we could see the temperate zone black footed penguins from an island off South Africa, the only kind that would do for Wales. (I think that’s what they were–it’s been a while and I’m too lazy to double check. *G*) I will add that the zoo penguins have a REALLY cushy arrangement here, with their own lake, island, and privacy shelters.

    Reply
  43. The penguins!!!!!!!!!!! I could’t resist. I even hauled the Mayhem Consultant off to the Baltimore Zoo so we could see the temperate zone black footed penguins from an island off South Africa, the only kind that would do for Wales. (I think that’s what they were–it’s been a while and I’m too lazy to double check. *G*) I will add that the zoo penguins have a REALLY cushy arrangement here, with their own lake, island, and privacy shelters.

    Reply
  44. The penguins!!!!!!!!!!! I could’t resist. I even hauled the Mayhem Consultant off to the Baltimore Zoo so we could see the temperate zone black footed penguins from an island off South Africa, the only kind that would do for Wales. (I think that’s what they were–it’s been a while and I’m too lazy to double check. *G*) I will add that the zoo penguins have a REALLY cushy arrangement here, with their own lake, island, and privacy shelters.

    Reply
  45. The penguins!!!!!!!!!!! I could’t resist. I even hauled the Mayhem Consultant off to the Baltimore Zoo so we could see the temperate zone black footed penguins from an island off South Africa, the only kind that would do for Wales. (I think that’s what they were–it’s been a while and I’m too lazy to double check. *G*) I will add that the zoo penguins have a REALLY cushy arrangement here, with their own lake, island, and privacy shelters.

    Reply
  46. Writing in pets so that they become a part of the story isn’t always easy, but Montague was a perfect foil for my talkative parrots! Glad you enjoyed them.
    And yes, Susan Mallery’s pets serve a very worthy service!

    Reply
  47. Writing in pets so that they become a part of the story isn’t always easy, but Montague was a perfect foil for my talkative parrots! Glad you enjoyed them.
    And yes, Susan Mallery’s pets serve a very worthy service!

    Reply
  48. Writing in pets so that they become a part of the story isn’t always easy, but Montague was a perfect foil for my talkative parrots! Glad you enjoyed them.
    And yes, Susan Mallery’s pets serve a very worthy service!

    Reply
  49. Writing in pets so that they become a part of the story isn’t always easy, but Montague was a perfect foil for my talkative parrots! Glad you enjoyed them.
    And yes, Susan Mallery’s pets serve a very worthy service!

    Reply
  50. Writing in pets so that they become a part of the story isn’t always easy, but Montague was a perfect foil for my talkative parrots! Glad you enjoyed them.
    And yes, Susan Mallery’s pets serve a very worthy service!

    Reply
  51. I adore animals – especially dogs – in stories. I even love it when horses make life easier for someone as I have read before. Having them in stories make stories special. We still miss Smokey T. Dawg after six years without him. He missed living 18 years by three months. He was the perfect dog for us. Went everywhere with us. Kept us laughing for most of those years – though we cried a lot the last two years for the loss of the fiesty, little black, part doxy part chihuahua – as we watched age finally defeat him. What a joy he was and his memories still are. We have Cody and BooBelle now and love them dearly, but Smokey was our heart and will always remain so.

    Reply
  52. I adore animals – especially dogs – in stories. I even love it when horses make life easier for someone as I have read before. Having them in stories make stories special. We still miss Smokey T. Dawg after six years without him. He missed living 18 years by three months. He was the perfect dog for us. Went everywhere with us. Kept us laughing for most of those years – though we cried a lot the last two years for the loss of the fiesty, little black, part doxy part chihuahua – as we watched age finally defeat him. What a joy he was and his memories still are. We have Cody and BooBelle now and love them dearly, but Smokey was our heart and will always remain so.

    Reply
  53. I adore animals – especially dogs – in stories. I even love it when horses make life easier for someone as I have read before. Having them in stories make stories special. We still miss Smokey T. Dawg after six years without him. He missed living 18 years by three months. He was the perfect dog for us. Went everywhere with us. Kept us laughing for most of those years – though we cried a lot the last two years for the loss of the fiesty, little black, part doxy part chihuahua – as we watched age finally defeat him. What a joy he was and his memories still are. We have Cody and BooBelle now and love them dearly, but Smokey was our heart and will always remain so.

    Reply
  54. I adore animals – especially dogs – in stories. I even love it when horses make life easier for someone as I have read before. Having them in stories make stories special. We still miss Smokey T. Dawg after six years without him. He missed living 18 years by three months. He was the perfect dog for us. Went everywhere with us. Kept us laughing for most of those years – though we cried a lot the last two years for the loss of the fiesty, little black, part doxy part chihuahua – as we watched age finally defeat him. What a joy he was and his memories still are. We have Cody and BooBelle now and love them dearly, but Smokey was our heart and will always remain so.

    Reply
  55. I adore animals – especially dogs – in stories. I even love it when horses make life easier for someone as I have read before. Having them in stories make stories special. We still miss Smokey T. Dawg after six years without him. He missed living 18 years by three months. He was the perfect dog for us. Went everywhere with us. Kept us laughing for most of those years – though we cried a lot the last two years for the loss of the fiesty, little black, part doxy part chihuahua – as we watched age finally defeat him. What a joy he was and his memories still are. We have Cody and BooBelle now and love them dearly, but Smokey was our heart and will always remain so.

    Reply
  56. I often enjoy animals in stories, if they are written well and serve a purpose in the plot (like any secondary character).
    I recently finished reading Anne Stuart’s classic “The Demon Count” in which a 20-pound cat plays a heroic role. Patrick is currently my favorite animal in a romance novel I’ve read.

    Reply
  57. I often enjoy animals in stories, if they are written well and serve a purpose in the plot (like any secondary character).
    I recently finished reading Anne Stuart’s classic “The Demon Count” in which a 20-pound cat plays a heroic role. Patrick is currently my favorite animal in a romance novel I’ve read.

    Reply
  58. I often enjoy animals in stories, if they are written well and serve a purpose in the plot (like any secondary character).
    I recently finished reading Anne Stuart’s classic “The Demon Count” in which a 20-pound cat plays a heroic role. Patrick is currently my favorite animal in a romance novel I’ve read.

    Reply
  59. I often enjoy animals in stories, if they are written well and serve a purpose in the plot (like any secondary character).
    I recently finished reading Anne Stuart’s classic “The Demon Count” in which a 20-pound cat plays a heroic role. Patrick is currently my favorite animal in a romance novel I’ve read.

    Reply
  60. I often enjoy animals in stories, if they are written well and serve a purpose in the plot (like any secondary character).
    I recently finished reading Anne Stuart’s classic “The Demon Count” in which a 20-pound cat plays a heroic role. Patrick is currently my favorite animal in a romance novel I’ve read.

    Reply
  61. Two animals that come to mind from various books are Luff the dog in Frederica by Georgette Heyer and Annabelle the cat who was in two of Mary Jo’s books. Rogue and the Runaway and I’m not remembering the name of the book the cat first appeared in. I can remember all kinds of details about that book (Maggie & Rafe) but not the title.
    Animals show more about a character – good and bad. Luff and Annabelle were important in the way they helped move the story along. They wouldn’t have been as interesting if they didn’t have a “character” themselves or if they were just there in the story.
    I love the dust bunnies in Jayne Castle’s Harmony series. And it has been fun watching the development of pets in Robin D. Owen’s Celta series. And who can forget the fire lizards in Anne McCaffrey’s Pern series… Hmm, interesting that all of three of those authors write books that would be considered futuristic, fantasy, paranormal….

    Reply
  62. Two animals that come to mind from various books are Luff the dog in Frederica by Georgette Heyer and Annabelle the cat who was in two of Mary Jo’s books. Rogue and the Runaway and I’m not remembering the name of the book the cat first appeared in. I can remember all kinds of details about that book (Maggie & Rafe) but not the title.
    Animals show more about a character – good and bad. Luff and Annabelle were important in the way they helped move the story along. They wouldn’t have been as interesting if they didn’t have a “character” themselves or if they were just there in the story.
    I love the dust bunnies in Jayne Castle’s Harmony series. And it has been fun watching the development of pets in Robin D. Owen’s Celta series. And who can forget the fire lizards in Anne McCaffrey’s Pern series… Hmm, interesting that all of three of those authors write books that would be considered futuristic, fantasy, paranormal….

    Reply
  63. Two animals that come to mind from various books are Luff the dog in Frederica by Georgette Heyer and Annabelle the cat who was in two of Mary Jo’s books. Rogue and the Runaway and I’m not remembering the name of the book the cat first appeared in. I can remember all kinds of details about that book (Maggie & Rafe) but not the title.
    Animals show more about a character – good and bad. Luff and Annabelle were important in the way they helped move the story along. They wouldn’t have been as interesting if they didn’t have a “character” themselves or if they were just there in the story.
    I love the dust bunnies in Jayne Castle’s Harmony series. And it has been fun watching the development of pets in Robin D. Owen’s Celta series. And who can forget the fire lizards in Anne McCaffrey’s Pern series… Hmm, interesting that all of three of those authors write books that would be considered futuristic, fantasy, paranormal….

    Reply
  64. Two animals that come to mind from various books are Luff the dog in Frederica by Georgette Heyer and Annabelle the cat who was in two of Mary Jo’s books. Rogue and the Runaway and I’m not remembering the name of the book the cat first appeared in. I can remember all kinds of details about that book (Maggie & Rafe) but not the title.
    Animals show more about a character – good and bad. Luff and Annabelle were important in the way they helped move the story along. They wouldn’t have been as interesting if they didn’t have a “character” themselves or if they were just there in the story.
    I love the dust bunnies in Jayne Castle’s Harmony series. And it has been fun watching the development of pets in Robin D. Owen’s Celta series. And who can forget the fire lizards in Anne McCaffrey’s Pern series… Hmm, interesting that all of three of those authors write books that would be considered futuristic, fantasy, paranormal….

    Reply
  65. Two animals that come to mind from various books are Luff the dog in Frederica by Georgette Heyer and Annabelle the cat who was in two of Mary Jo’s books. Rogue and the Runaway and I’m not remembering the name of the book the cat first appeared in. I can remember all kinds of details about that book (Maggie & Rafe) but not the title.
    Animals show more about a character – good and bad. Luff and Annabelle were important in the way they helped move the story along. They wouldn’t have been as interesting if they didn’t have a “character” themselves or if they were just there in the story.
    I love the dust bunnies in Jayne Castle’s Harmony series. And it has been fun watching the development of pets in Robin D. Owen’s Celta series. And who can forget the fire lizards in Anne McCaffrey’s Pern series… Hmm, interesting that all of three of those authors write books that would be considered futuristic, fantasy, paranormal….

    Reply
  66. I’m not a huge fan of animals in stories, unless they are truly a character in it. Like Joey who was the “War Horse” made famous in the Speiberg movie a couple years ago, or Caine from James Rollins’ The Kill Switch who is a “retired” military trained dog.

    Reply
  67. I’m not a huge fan of animals in stories, unless they are truly a character in it. Like Joey who was the “War Horse” made famous in the Speiberg movie a couple years ago, or Caine from James Rollins’ The Kill Switch who is a “retired” military trained dog.

    Reply
  68. I’m not a huge fan of animals in stories, unless they are truly a character in it. Like Joey who was the “War Horse” made famous in the Speiberg movie a couple years ago, or Caine from James Rollins’ The Kill Switch who is a “retired” military trained dog.

    Reply
  69. I’m not a huge fan of animals in stories, unless they are truly a character in it. Like Joey who was the “War Horse” made famous in the Speiberg movie a couple years ago, or Caine from James Rollins’ The Kill Switch who is a “retired” military trained dog.

    Reply
  70. I’m not a huge fan of animals in stories, unless they are truly a character in it. Like Joey who was the “War Horse” made famous in the Speiberg movie a couple years ago, or Caine from James Rollins’ The Kill Switch who is a “retired” military trained dog.

    Reply
  71. I love animals in stories. They show a side of characters that we might not see otherwise. Thanks for these books. I’ve got The Spring Bride on hold at the library. Can’t wait to get it. Of course, winning a copy would be even better.

    Reply
  72. I love animals in stories. They show a side of characters that we might not see otherwise. Thanks for these books. I’ve got The Spring Bride on hold at the library. Can’t wait to get it. Of course, winning a copy would be even better.

    Reply
  73. I love animals in stories. They show a side of characters that we might not see otherwise. Thanks for these books. I’ve got The Spring Bride on hold at the library. Can’t wait to get it. Of course, winning a copy would be even better.

    Reply
  74. I love animals in stories. They show a side of characters that we might not see otherwise. Thanks for these books. I’ve got The Spring Bride on hold at the library. Can’t wait to get it. Of course, winning a copy would be even better.

    Reply
  75. I love animals in stories. They show a side of characters that we might not see otherwise. Thanks for these books. I’ve got The Spring Bride on hold at the library. Can’t wait to get it. Of course, winning a copy would be even better.

    Reply
  76. I adore animals in a story. They give substance to the characters, the surroundings, e.g. deerhound in Scotland, or mutt in London. And the characters interaction with animals is often priceless in your authors’ hands. Just love ’em.

    Reply
  77. I adore animals in a story. They give substance to the characters, the surroundings, e.g. deerhound in Scotland, or mutt in London. And the characters interaction with animals is often priceless in your authors’ hands. Just love ’em.

    Reply
  78. I adore animals in a story. They give substance to the characters, the surroundings, e.g. deerhound in Scotland, or mutt in London. And the characters interaction with animals is often priceless in your authors’ hands. Just love ’em.

    Reply
  79. I adore animals in a story. They give substance to the characters, the surroundings, e.g. deerhound in Scotland, or mutt in London. And the characters interaction with animals is often priceless in your authors’ hands. Just love ’em.

    Reply
  80. I adore animals in a story. They give substance to the characters, the surroundings, e.g. deerhound in Scotland, or mutt in London. And the characters interaction with animals is often priceless in your authors’ hands. Just love ’em.

    Reply
  81. Some characters are redeemed by their kindness to animals– though villains have been known to be good to horses and their pets, generally a person who is kind to animals has some good in them. A person who kicks the cat or mistreats a dog is bad to the bone. I like animals in a story if they play a part. Sometimes a man or woman needs to have pet to talk to or take for a walk so the character can think.
    Then sometimes the antics of the pet can move the plot along.

    Reply
  82. Some characters are redeemed by their kindness to animals– though villains have been known to be good to horses and their pets, generally a person who is kind to animals has some good in them. A person who kicks the cat or mistreats a dog is bad to the bone. I like animals in a story if they play a part. Sometimes a man or woman needs to have pet to talk to or take for a walk so the character can think.
    Then sometimes the antics of the pet can move the plot along.

    Reply
  83. Some characters are redeemed by their kindness to animals– though villains have been known to be good to horses and their pets, generally a person who is kind to animals has some good in them. A person who kicks the cat or mistreats a dog is bad to the bone. I like animals in a story if they play a part. Sometimes a man or woman needs to have pet to talk to or take for a walk so the character can think.
    Then sometimes the antics of the pet can move the plot along.

    Reply
  84. Some characters are redeemed by their kindness to animals– though villains have been known to be good to horses and their pets, generally a person who is kind to animals has some good in them. A person who kicks the cat or mistreats a dog is bad to the bone. I like animals in a story if they play a part. Sometimes a man or woman needs to have pet to talk to or take for a walk so the character can think.
    Then sometimes the antics of the pet can move the plot along.

    Reply
  85. Some characters are redeemed by their kindness to animals– though villains have been known to be good to horses and their pets, generally a person who is kind to animals has some good in them. A person who kicks the cat or mistreats a dog is bad to the bone. I like animals in a story if they play a part. Sometimes a man or woman needs to have pet to talk to or take for a walk so the character can think.
    Then sometimes the antics of the pet can move the plot along.

    Reply
  86. ++ A person who kicks the cat or mistreats a dog is bad to the bone.++
    So true! But it’s also a way showing that an apparent baddie may be redeemable. (Thinking of Patricia Veryan here….)

    Reply
  87. ++ A person who kicks the cat or mistreats a dog is bad to the bone.++
    So true! But it’s also a way showing that an apparent baddie may be redeemable. (Thinking of Patricia Veryan here….)

    Reply
  88. ++ A person who kicks the cat or mistreats a dog is bad to the bone.++
    So true! But it’s also a way showing that an apparent baddie may be redeemable. (Thinking of Patricia Veryan here….)

    Reply
  89. ++ A person who kicks the cat or mistreats a dog is bad to the bone.++
    So true! But it’s also a way showing that an apparent baddie may be redeemable. (Thinking of Patricia Veryan here….)

    Reply
  90. ++ A person who kicks the cat or mistreats a dog is bad to the bone.++
    So true! But it’s also a way showing that an apparent baddie may be redeemable. (Thinking of Patricia Veryan here….)

    Reply
  91. I like animals, particularly dogs, who have a real presence in the story and are not merely generic pets. Heyer’s Lufra, the Baluchistan hound, and Ulysses, the mutt, are the ones I always think of first. In fact, in the First Look at The Spring Bride, which I wrote for Heroes & Heartbreakers, I mention that Arabella Tallant would be delighted with Jane. 🙂
    Barbara Metzger and Laura Kinsale have created many memorable animals, perhaps most notably Pansy the pig in Metzger’s Christmas Wishes and Toot the ferret in Kinsale’s My Sweet Folly. Oyster, the dog in Eloisa James’s A Duke of Her Own has an unforgettable role in that story. Among contemporary authors, Jennifer Crusie’s dogs, especially Fred from Anyone But You, are favorites, and I count on Kristan Higgins for a least one dog character to love in each book.

    Reply
  92. I like animals, particularly dogs, who have a real presence in the story and are not merely generic pets. Heyer’s Lufra, the Baluchistan hound, and Ulysses, the mutt, are the ones I always think of first. In fact, in the First Look at The Spring Bride, which I wrote for Heroes & Heartbreakers, I mention that Arabella Tallant would be delighted with Jane. 🙂
    Barbara Metzger and Laura Kinsale have created many memorable animals, perhaps most notably Pansy the pig in Metzger’s Christmas Wishes and Toot the ferret in Kinsale’s My Sweet Folly. Oyster, the dog in Eloisa James’s A Duke of Her Own has an unforgettable role in that story. Among contemporary authors, Jennifer Crusie’s dogs, especially Fred from Anyone But You, are favorites, and I count on Kristan Higgins for a least one dog character to love in each book.

    Reply
  93. I like animals, particularly dogs, who have a real presence in the story and are not merely generic pets. Heyer’s Lufra, the Baluchistan hound, and Ulysses, the mutt, are the ones I always think of first. In fact, in the First Look at The Spring Bride, which I wrote for Heroes & Heartbreakers, I mention that Arabella Tallant would be delighted with Jane. 🙂
    Barbara Metzger and Laura Kinsale have created many memorable animals, perhaps most notably Pansy the pig in Metzger’s Christmas Wishes and Toot the ferret in Kinsale’s My Sweet Folly. Oyster, the dog in Eloisa James’s A Duke of Her Own has an unforgettable role in that story. Among contemporary authors, Jennifer Crusie’s dogs, especially Fred from Anyone But You, are favorites, and I count on Kristan Higgins for a least one dog character to love in each book.

    Reply
  94. I like animals, particularly dogs, who have a real presence in the story and are not merely generic pets. Heyer’s Lufra, the Baluchistan hound, and Ulysses, the mutt, are the ones I always think of first. In fact, in the First Look at The Spring Bride, which I wrote for Heroes & Heartbreakers, I mention that Arabella Tallant would be delighted with Jane. 🙂
    Barbara Metzger and Laura Kinsale have created many memorable animals, perhaps most notably Pansy the pig in Metzger’s Christmas Wishes and Toot the ferret in Kinsale’s My Sweet Folly. Oyster, the dog in Eloisa James’s A Duke of Her Own has an unforgettable role in that story. Among contemporary authors, Jennifer Crusie’s dogs, especially Fred from Anyone But You, are favorites, and I count on Kristan Higgins for a least one dog character to love in each book.

    Reply
  95. I like animals, particularly dogs, who have a real presence in the story and are not merely generic pets. Heyer’s Lufra, the Baluchistan hound, and Ulysses, the mutt, are the ones I always think of first. In fact, in the First Look at The Spring Bride, which I wrote for Heroes & Heartbreakers, I mention that Arabella Tallant would be delighted with Jane. 🙂
    Barbara Metzger and Laura Kinsale have created many memorable animals, perhaps most notably Pansy the pig in Metzger’s Christmas Wishes and Toot the ferret in Kinsale’s My Sweet Folly. Oyster, the dog in Eloisa James’s A Duke of Her Own has an unforgettable role in that story. Among contemporary authors, Jennifer Crusie’s dogs, especially Fred from Anyone But You, are favorites, and I count on Kristan Higgins for a least one dog character to love in each book.

    Reply
  96. Generally speaking, I enjoy animals in a story. My all-time favourite animal in a story is Hairy, the Chinese Crested dog, in Susan Donovan’s Take A Chance on Me. In fact, I have re-read this book several times just because of Hairy! Also like the cat, Galahad, in the In Death series, especially his role in Naked in Death. Several of the animals already mentioned brought a smile of remembrance to my face.

    Reply
  97. Generally speaking, I enjoy animals in a story. My all-time favourite animal in a story is Hairy, the Chinese Crested dog, in Susan Donovan’s Take A Chance on Me. In fact, I have re-read this book several times just because of Hairy! Also like the cat, Galahad, in the In Death series, especially his role in Naked in Death. Several of the animals already mentioned brought a smile of remembrance to my face.

    Reply
  98. Generally speaking, I enjoy animals in a story. My all-time favourite animal in a story is Hairy, the Chinese Crested dog, in Susan Donovan’s Take A Chance on Me. In fact, I have re-read this book several times just because of Hairy! Also like the cat, Galahad, in the In Death series, especially his role in Naked in Death. Several of the animals already mentioned brought a smile of remembrance to my face.

    Reply
  99. Generally speaking, I enjoy animals in a story. My all-time favourite animal in a story is Hairy, the Chinese Crested dog, in Susan Donovan’s Take A Chance on Me. In fact, I have re-read this book several times just because of Hairy! Also like the cat, Galahad, in the In Death series, especially his role in Naked in Death. Several of the animals already mentioned brought a smile of remembrance to my face.

    Reply
  100. Generally speaking, I enjoy animals in a story. My all-time favourite animal in a story is Hairy, the Chinese Crested dog, in Susan Donovan’s Take A Chance on Me. In fact, I have re-read this book several times just because of Hairy! Also like the cat, Galahad, in the In Death series, especially his role in Naked in Death. Several of the animals already mentioned brought a smile of remembrance to my face.

    Reply
  101. Jock of the Bushveld sounds Sth African, Laura. I haven’t read many St African stories. I devoured animal stories as a kid, and the Incredible Journey was one of them. And you’re right — making us empatthize with a spider is a big achievement — though I was brought up to call hunsmen spiders (which are big and scary looking) as “spinnies” and regard them as benign and good luck.
    I’m glad you liked the excerpt — and I suspect teasing is what it’s supposed to do. 🙂

    Reply
  102. Jock of the Bushveld sounds Sth African, Laura. I haven’t read many St African stories. I devoured animal stories as a kid, and the Incredible Journey was one of them. And you’re right — making us empatthize with a spider is a big achievement — though I was brought up to call hunsmen spiders (which are big and scary looking) as “spinnies” and regard them as benign and good luck.
    I’m glad you liked the excerpt — and I suspect teasing is what it’s supposed to do. 🙂

    Reply
  103. Jock of the Bushveld sounds Sth African, Laura. I haven’t read many St African stories. I devoured animal stories as a kid, and the Incredible Journey was one of them. And you’re right — making us empatthize with a spider is a big achievement — though I was brought up to call hunsmen spiders (which are big and scary looking) as “spinnies” and regard them as benign and good luck.
    I’m glad you liked the excerpt — and I suspect teasing is what it’s supposed to do. 🙂

    Reply
  104. Jock of the Bushveld sounds Sth African, Laura. I haven’t read many St African stories. I devoured animal stories as a kid, and the Incredible Journey was one of them. And you’re right — making us empatthize with a spider is a big achievement — though I was brought up to call hunsmen spiders (which are big and scary looking) as “spinnies” and regard them as benign and good luck.
    I’m glad you liked the excerpt — and I suspect teasing is what it’s supposed to do. 🙂

    Reply
  105. Jock of the Bushveld sounds Sth African, Laura. I haven’t read many St African stories. I devoured animal stories as a kid, and the Incredible Journey was one of them. And you’re right — making us empatthize with a spider is a big achievement — though I was brought up to call hunsmen spiders (which are big and scary looking) as “spinnies” and regard them as benign and good luck.
    I’m glad you liked the excerpt — and I suspect teasing is what it’s supposed to do. 🙂

    Reply
  106. Quantum, I haven’t read that book by Jojo Moyes, but I’m going to have to chase it up now. It sounds just my cup of tea.
    Actually I don’t mind a semi-decapitated hero or heroine. I think I had one of the first ones, many years ago on An Honorable Thief, and I could tell the hero wouldn’t have looked at all like my hero, but semi-decapitated, it left the face to the imagination, which suited me.
    I think the plants in both covers are supposed to be blossoms lying on the ground. I would have loved a sea of bluebells. Ever since I read The Grand Sophy (Heyer) I’ve wanted to visit a bluebell wood, but alas, I’ve never been to England at the right time of year. I grow my own bluebells instead — the legacy of a bag of corms/bulbs from my godmother.

    Reply
  107. Quantum, I haven’t read that book by Jojo Moyes, but I’m going to have to chase it up now. It sounds just my cup of tea.
    Actually I don’t mind a semi-decapitated hero or heroine. I think I had one of the first ones, many years ago on An Honorable Thief, and I could tell the hero wouldn’t have looked at all like my hero, but semi-decapitated, it left the face to the imagination, which suited me.
    I think the plants in both covers are supposed to be blossoms lying on the ground. I would have loved a sea of bluebells. Ever since I read The Grand Sophy (Heyer) I’ve wanted to visit a bluebell wood, but alas, I’ve never been to England at the right time of year. I grow my own bluebells instead — the legacy of a bag of corms/bulbs from my godmother.

    Reply
  108. Quantum, I haven’t read that book by Jojo Moyes, but I’m going to have to chase it up now. It sounds just my cup of tea.
    Actually I don’t mind a semi-decapitated hero or heroine. I think I had one of the first ones, many years ago on An Honorable Thief, and I could tell the hero wouldn’t have looked at all like my hero, but semi-decapitated, it left the face to the imagination, which suited me.
    I think the plants in both covers are supposed to be blossoms lying on the ground. I would have loved a sea of bluebells. Ever since I read The Grand Sophy (Heyer) I’ve wanted to visit a bluebell wood, but alas, I’ve never been to England at the right time of year. I grow my own bluebells instead — the legacy of a bag of corms/bulbs from my godmother.

    Reply
  109. Quantum, I haven’t read that book by Jojo Moyes, but I’m going to have to chase it up now. It sounds just my cup of tea.
    Actually I don’t mind a semi-decapitated hero or heroine. I think I had one of the first ones, many years ago on An Honorable Thief, and I could tell the hero wouldn’t have looked at all like my hero, but semi-decapitated, it left the face to the imagination, which suited me.
    I think the plants in both covers are supposed to be blossoms lying on the ground. I would have loved a sea of bluebells. Ever since I read The Grand Sophy (Heyer) I’ve wanted to visit a bluebell wood, but alas, I’ve never been to England at the right time of year. I grow my own bluebells instead — the legacy of a bag of corms/bulbs from my godmother.

    Reply
  110. Quantum, I haven’t read that book by Jojo Moyes, but I’m going to have to chase it up now. It sounds just my cup of tea.
    Actually I don’t mind a semi-decapitated hero or heroine. I think I had one of the first ones, many years ago on An Honorable Thief, and I could tell the hero wouldn’t have looked at all like my hero, but semi-decapitated, it left the face to the imagination, which suited me.
    I think the plants in both covers are supposed to be blossoms lying on the ground. I would have loved a sea of bluebells. Ever since I read The Grand Sophy (Heyer) I’ve wanted to visit a bluebell wood, but alas, I’ve never been to England at the right time of year. I grow my own bluebells instead — the legacy of a bag of corms/bulbs from my godmother.

    Reply
  111. Thanks, Cynthia — I agree with you — they have to belong in the story and have a reason for being in any scene. I hope you’ll agree that this dog — and the cats — belong. Best of luck with finishing your own story.

    Reply
  112. Thanks, Cynthia — I agree with you — they have to belong in the story and have a reason for being in any scene. I hope you’ll agree that this dog — and the cats — belong. Best of luck with finishing your own story.

    Reply
  113. Thanks, Cynthia — I agree with you — they have to belong in the story and have a reason for being in any scene. I hope you’ll agree that this dog — and the cats — belong. Best of luck with finishing your own story.

    Reply
  114. Thanks, Cynthia — I agree with you — they have to belong in the story and have a reason for being in any scene. I hope you’ll agree that this dog — and the cats — belong. Best of luck with finishing your own story.

    Reply
  115. Thanks, Cynthia — I agree with you — they have to belong in the story and have a reason for being in any scene. I hope you’ll agree that this dog — and the cats — belong. Best of luck with finishing your own story.

    Reply
  116. Hi Anne and Mary-Jo
    What a lovely interview I also loved this story Zach is way up there on my best Hero list 🙂 and I loved Jane (as I have the other stories in this series)
    For me Anne you write magical stories that take me back in time and make me smile and tear up at times and I really feel the emotions that you write thank you.
    And as for the question yes I love animals in stories I always think they add so much.
    Woohoo congrats on another keeper for my shelf along with all of you books 🙂
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  117. Hi Anne and Mary-Jo
    What a lovely interview I also loved this story Zach is way up there on my best Hero list 🙂 and I loved Jane (as I have the other stories in this series)
    For me Anne you write magical stories that take me back in time and make me smile and tear up at times and I really feel the emotions that you write thank you.
    And as for the question yes I love animals in stories I always think they add so much.
    Woohoo congrats on another keeper for my shelf along with all of you books 🙂
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  118. Hi Anne and Mary-Jo
    What a lovely interview I also loved this story Zach is way up there on my best Hero list 🙂 and I loved Jane (as I have the other stories in this series)
    For me Anne you write magical stories that take me back in time and make me smile and tear up at times and I really feel the emotions that you write thank you.
    And as for the question yes I love animals in stories I always think they add so much.
    Woohoo congrats on another keeper for my shelf along with all of you books 🙂
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  119. Hi Anne and Mary-Jo
    What a lovely interview I also loved this story Zach is way up there on my best Hero list 🙂 and I loved Jane (as I have the other stories in this series)
    For me Anne you write magical stories that take me back in time and make me smile and tear up at times and I really feel the emotions that you write thank you.
    And as for the question yes I love animals in stories I always think they add so much.
    Woohoo congrats on another keeper for my shelf along with all of you books 🙂
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  120. Hi Anne and Mary-Jo
    What a lovely interview I also loved this story Zach is way up there on my best Hero list 🙂 and I loved Jane (as I have the other stories in this series)
    For me Anne you write magical stories that take me back in time and make me smile and tear up at times and I really feel the emotions that you write thank you.
    And as for the question yes I love animals in stories I always think they add so much.
    Woohoo congrats on another keeper for my shelf along with all of you books 🙂
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  121. Kanchb, I haven’t read A Parfit Knight — a parrot sounds delightful. When I was a kid I loved Enid B;lyton’s “Adventure” series with Kiki the cockatoo. Some years later I brought home a tame cockatoo that had been cruelly released into the wild (it wouldn’t have survived) and he had SUCH personality — he was mischievous and a real joker. Nobody can tell me a cockatoo can’t have a sense of humor.
    And I’d forgotten about the penguins in Thunder and Roses. Time for a re-read. Thanks.

    Reply
  122. Kanchb, I haven’t read A Parfit Knight — a parrot sounds delightful. When I was a kid I loved Enid B;lyton’s “Adventure” series with Kiki the cockatoo. Some years later I brought home a tame cockatoo that had been cruelly released into the wild (it wouldn’t have survived) and he had SUCH personality — he was mischievous and a real joker. Nobody can tell me a cockatoo can’t have a sense of humor.
    And I’d forgotten about the penguins in Thunder and Roses. Time for a re-read. Thanks.

    Reply
  123. Kanchb, I haven’t read A Parfit Knight — a parrot sounds delightful. When I was a kid I loved Enid B;lyton’s “Adventure” series with Kiki the cockatoo. Some years later I brought home a tame cockatoo that had been cruelly released into the wild (it wouldn’t have survived) and he had SUCH personality — he was mischievous and a real joker. Nobody can tell me a cockatoo can’t have a sense of humor.
    And I’d forgotten about the penguins in Thunder and Roses. Time for a re-read. Thanks.

    Reply
  124. Kanchb, I haven’t read A Parfit Knight — a parrot sounds delightful. When I was a kid I loved Enid B;lyton’s “Adventure” series with Kiki the cockatoo. Some years later I brought home a tame cockatoo that had been cruelly released into the wild (it wouldn’t have survived) and he had SUCH personality — he was mischievous and a real joker. Nobody can tell me a cockatoo can’t have a sense of humor.
    And I’d forgotten about the penguins in Thunder and Roses. Time for a re-read. Thanks.

    Reply
  125. Kanchb, I haven’t read A Parfit Knight — a parrot sounds delightful. When I was a kid I loved Enid B;lyton’s “Adventure” series with Kiki the cockatoo. Some years later I brought home a tame cockatoo that had been cruelly released into the wild (it wouldn’t have survived) and he had SUCH personality — he was mischievous and a real joker. Nobody can tell me a cockatoo can’t have a sense of humor.
    And I’d forgotten about the penguins in Thunder and Roses. Time for a re-read. Thanks.

    Reply
  126. Juanita, I know exactly how you feel. I love my little Molly-dog, but I still miss my beloved Chloe-dog so much. All pets are special, but some of them give just that little bit extra.

    Reply
  127. Juanita, I know exactly how you feel. I love my little Molly-dog, but I still miss my beloved Chloe-dog so much. All pets are special, but some of them give just that little bit extra.

    Reply
  128. Juanita, I know exactly how you feel. I love my little Molly-dog, but I still miss my beloved Chloe-dog so much. All pets are special, but some of them give just that little bit extra.

    Reply
  129. Juanita, I know exactly how you feel. I love my little Molly-dog, but I still miss my beloved Chloe-dog so much. All pets are special, but some of them give just that little bit extra.

    Reply
  130. Juanita, I know exactly how you feel. I love my little Molly-dog, but I still miss my beloved Chloe-dog so much. All pets are special, but some of them give just that little bit extra.

    Reply
  131. Patrick certainly sounds like a character of a cat. And yes, I agree — they have to have a reason to be there — to serve the story, like every minor character. Thanks.

    Reply
  132. Patrick certainly sounds like a character of a cat. And yes, I agree — they have to have a reason to be there — to serve the story, like every minor character. Thanks.

    Reply
  133. Patrick certainly sounds like a character of a cat. And yes, I agree — they have to have a reason to be there — to serve the story, like every minor character. Thanks.

    Reply
  134. Patrick certainly sounds like a character of a cat. And yes, I agree — they have to have a reason to be there — to serve the story, like every minor character. Thanks.

    Reply
  135. Patrick certainly sounds like a character of a cat. And yes, I agree — they have to have a reason to be there — to serve the story, like every minor character. Thanks.

    Reply
  136. Ah the Baluchistan Hound. . . Vicki, I have been known to respond — when people ask me what breed my rescue dog is– “Balichistan Hound.” Alas, not one person has ever got the reference.
    I agree with you — when characters interact with animals it does reveal a side of their character that other situations might not. And yes, unlike in life, in a book, the animals need to have a reason to be there in the first place.

    Reply
  137. Ah the Baluchistan Hound. . . Vicki, I have been known to respond — when people ask me what breed my rescue dog is– “Balichistan Hound.” Alas, not one person has ever got the reference.
    I agree with you — when characters interact with animals it does reveal a side of their character that other situations might not. And yes, unlike in life, in a book, the animals need to have a reason to be there in the first place.

    Reply
  138. Ah the Baluchistan Hound. . . Vicki, I have been known to respond — when people ask me what breed my rescue dog is– “Balichistan Hound.” Alas, not one person has ever got the reference.
    I agree with you — when characters interact with animals it does reveal a side of their character that other situations might not. And yes, unlike in life, in a book, the animals need to have a reason to be there in the first place.

    Reply
  139. Ah the Baluchistan Hound. . . Vicki, I have been known to respond — when people ask me what breed my rescue dog is– “Balichistan Hound.” Alas, not one person has ever got the reference.
    I agree with you — when characters interact with animals it does reveal a side of their character that other situations might not. And yes, unlike in life, in a book, the animals need to have a reason to be there in the first place.

    Reply
  140. Ah the Baluchistan Hound. . . Vicki, I have been known to respond — when people ask me what breed my rescue dog is– “Balichistan Hound.” Alas, not one person has ever got the reference.
    I agree with you — when characters interact with animals it does reveal a side of their character that other situations might not. And yes, unlike in life, in a book, the animals need to have a reason to be there in the first place.

    Reply
  141. Thanks, Anne — and yes, in this case, I think when you see the hero interacting with the dog, you’ll smile.
    And now you have me thinking about a deerhound in London. I love deerhounds. I remember weeping at Beddgelert in Nth Wales, reading the story of the wonderful Gelert deerhound there. Molly (my doglet) and I meet the occasional deerhound at dog park–she’s wary, I gush — and last week we met a deerhound puppy at dog obedience, and it was soooo cute.

    Reply
  142. Thanks, Anne — and yes, in this case, I think when you see the hero interacting with the dog, you’ll smile.
    And now you have me thinking about a deerhound in London. I love deerhounds. I remember weeping at Beddgelert in Nth Wales, reading the story of the wonderful Gelert deerhound there. Molly (my doglet) and I meet the occasional deerhound at dog park–she’s wary, I gush — and last week we met a deerhound puppy at dog obedience, and it was soooo cute.

    Reply
  143. Thanks, Anne — and yes, in this case, I think when you see the hero interacting with the dog, you’ll smile.
    And now you have me thinking about a deerhound in London. I love deerhounds. I remember weeping at Beddgelert in Nth Wales, reading the story of the wonderful Gelert deerhound there. Molly (my doglet) and I meet the occasional deerhound at dog park–she’s wary, I gush — and last week we met a deerhound puppy at dog obedience, and it was soooo cute.

    Reply
  144. Thanks, Anne — and yes, in this case, I think when you see the hero interacting with the dog, you’ll smile.
    And now you have me thinking about a deerhound in London. I love deerhounds. I remember weeping at Beddgelert in Nth Wales, reading the story of the wonderful Gelert deerhound there. Molly (my doglet) and I meet the occasional deerhound at dog park–she’s wary, I gush — and last week we met a deerhound puppy at dog obedience, and it was soooo cute.

    Reply
  145. Thanks, Anne — and yes, in this case, I think when you see the hero interacting with the dog, you’ll smile.
    And now you have me thinking about a deerhound in London. I love deerhounds. I remember weeping at Beddgelert in Nth Wales, reading the story of the wonderful Gelert deerhound there. Molly (my doglet) and I meet the occasional deerhound at dog park–she’s wary, I gush — and last week we met a deerhound puppy at dog obedience, and it was soooo cute.

    Reply
  146. Yes, Nancy — it’s a kind of code in books, isn’t it — a person who is kind to animals can’t be the villain even though life’s not like that.
    I think all of the things you mentioned take place at some part of the story, so I hope you enjoy it.

    Reply
  147. Yes, Nancy — it’s a kind of code in books, isn’t it — a person who is kind to animals can’t be the villain even though life’s not like that.
    I think all of the things you mentioned take place at some part of the story, so I hope you enjoy it.

    Reply
  148. Yes, Nancy — it’s a kind of code in books, isn’t it — a person who is kind to animals can’t be the villain even though life’s not like that.
    I think all of the things you mentioned take place at some part of the story, so I hope you enjoy it.

    Reply
  149. Yes, Nancy — it’s a kind of code in books, isn’t it — a person who is kind to animals can’t be the villain even though life’s not like that.
    I think all of the things you mentioned take place at some part of the story, so I hope you enjoy it.

    Reply
  150. Yes, Nancy — it’s a kind of code in books, isn’t it — a person who is kind to animals can’t be the villain even though life’s not like that.
    I think all of the things you mentioned take place at some part of the story, so I hope you enjoy it.

    Reply
  151. Janga, I have to admit that Ulysses was much in my mind as I wrote Spring Bride — though it wasn’t deliberate. But I talk to my dog, and when Zach talked to the dog it did make me think of Mr Beaumaris and Ulysses. A hero who talks to a dog is IMO irresistible. And yes, Arabella would be friends with Jane, I think. 🙂
    I haven’t read the Metzger or that particular Kinsale story with the ferret (makes note to self to track them down), but I did like Kinsale’s Pig in… forgotten the title, but it was a delightful book. And on pigs, I’ve been on a Wodehouse glom recently and there is a Pig in some of those stories — Lord Emsworth’s champion sow. And yes, Oyster is a delight, and Fred in Crusie’s Anyone But You, and I love all Kristan Higgin’s dogs (and books.)

    Reply
  152. Janga, I have to admit that Ulysses was much in my mind as I wrote Spring Bride — though it wasn’t deliberate. But I talk to my dog, and when Zach talked to the dog it did make me think of Mr Beaumaris and Ulysses. A hero who talks to a dog is IMO irresistible. And yes, Arabella would be friends with Jane, I think. 🙂
    I haven’t read the Metzger or that particular Kinsale story with the ferret (makes note to self to track them down), but I did like Kinsale’s Pig in… forgotten the title, but it was a delightful book. And on pigs, I’ve been on a Wodehouse glom recently and there is a Pig in some of those stories — Lord Emsworth’s champion sow. And yes, Oyster is a delight, and Fred in Crusie’s Anyone But You, and I love all Kristan Higgin’s dogs (and books.)

    Reply
  153. Janga, I have to admit that Ulysses was much in my mind as I wrote Spring Bride — though it wasn’t deliberate. But I talk to my dog, and when Zach talked to the dog it did make me think of Mr Beaumaris and Ulysses. A hero who talks to a dog is IMO irresistible. And yes, Arabella would be friends with Jane, I think. 🙂
    I haven’t read the Metzger or that particular Kinsale story with the ferret (makes note to self to track them down), but I did like Kinsale’s Pig in… forgotten the title, but it was a delightful book. And on pigs, I’ve been on a Wodehouse glom recently and there is a Pig in some of those stories — Lord Emsworth’s champion sow. And yes, Oyster is a delight, and Fred in Crusie’s Anyone But You, and I love all Kristan Higgin’s dogs (and books.)

    Reply
  154. Janga, I have to admit that Ulysses was much in my mind as I wrote Spring Bride — though it wasn’t deliberate. But I talk to my dog, and when Zach talked to the dog it did make me think of Mr Beaumaris and Ulysses. A hero who talks to a dog is IMO irresistible. And yes, Arabella would be friends with Jane, I think. 🙂
    I haven’t read the Metzger or that particular Kinsale story with the ferret (makes note to self to track them down), but I did like Kinsale’s Pig in… forgotten the title, but it was a delightful book. And on pigs, I’ve been on a Wodehouse glom recently and there is a Pig in some of those stories — Lord Emsworth’s champion sow. And yes, Oyster is a delight, and Fred in Crusie’s Anyone But You, and I love all Kristan Higgin’s dogs (and books.)

    Reply
  155. Janga, I have to admit that Ulysses was much in my mind as I wrote Spring Bride — though it wasn’t deliberate. But I talk to my dog, and when Zach talked to the dog it did make me think of Mr Beaumaris and Ulysses. A hero who talks to a dog is IMO irresistible. And yes, Arabella would be friends with Jane, I think. 🙂
    I haven’t read the Metzger or that particular Kinsale story with the ferret (makes note to self to track them down), but I did like Kinsale’s Pig in… forgotten the title, but it was a delightful book. And on pigs, I’ve been on a Wodehouse glom recently and there is a Pig in some of those stories — Lord Emsworth’s champion sow. And yes, Oyster is a delight, and Fred in Crusie’s Anyone But You, and I love all Kristan Higgin’s dogs (and books.)

    Reply
  156. Tomorrow! I can buy the book tomorrow!!! I like to have animals in books because they add depth to the story and to the characters. The animals in my own life have added so much. My daughters love our dogs and have learned patience and compassion from our pets. So, I am never averse to a well-written animal friend in a story line. I even named my bulldog Jack after the Jack in the Little House books.

    Reply
  157. Tomorrow! I can buy the book tomorrow!!! I like to have animals in books because they add depth to the story and to the characters. The animals in my own life have added so much. My daughters love our dogs and have learned patience and compassion from our pets. So, I am never averse to a well-written animal friend in a story line. I even named my bulldog Jack after the Jack in the Little House books.

    Reply
  158. Tomorrow! I can buy the book tomorrow!!! I like to have animals in books because they add depth to the story and to the characters. The animals in my own life have added so much. My daughters love our dogs and have learned patience and compassion from our pets. So, I am never averse to a well-written animal friend in a story line. I even named my bulldog Jack after the Jack in the Little House books.

    Reply
  159. Tomorrow! I can buy the book tomorrow!!! I like to have animals in books because they add depth to the story and to the characters. The animals in my own life have added so much. My daughters love our dogs and have learned patience and compassion from our pets. So, I am never averse to a well-written animal friend in a story line. I even named my bulldog Jack after the Jack in the Little House books.

    Reply
  160. Tomorrow! I can buy the book tomorrow!!! I like to have animals in books because they add depth to the story and to the characters. The animals in my own life have added so much. My daughters love our dogs and have learned patience and compassion from our pets. So, I am never averse to a well-written animal friend in a story line. I even named my bulldog Jack after the Jack in the Little House books.

    Reply
  161. I do love animals in books – as long as they aren’t forced characters. I really do believe that having animals in a book adds dimension to characters. Maybe because animals have always been a big part of my life, I find it hard to understand when no one in a group of people has any animals. 😉

    Reply
  162. I do love animals in books – as long as they aren’t forced characters. I really do believe that having animals in a book adds dimension to characters. Maybe because animals have always been a big part of my life, I find it hard to understand when no one in a group of people has any animals. 😉

    Reply
  163. I do love animals in books – as long as they aren’t forced characters. I really do believe that having animals in a book adds dimension to characters. Maybe because animals have always been a big part of my life, I find it hard to understand when no one in a group of people has any animals. 😉

    Reply
  164. I do love animals in books – as long as they aren’t forced characters. I really do believe that having animals in a book adds dimension to characters. Maybe because animals have always been a big part of my life, I find it hard to understand when no one in a group of people has any animals. 😉

    Reply
  165. I do love animals in books – as long as they aren’t forced characters. I really do believe that having animals in a book adds dimension to characters. Maybe because animals have always been a big part of my life, I find it hard to understand when no one in a group of people has any animals. 😉

    Reply
  166. I love animals in books. They add so much love and humor. I wish I could remember the name of one of Barbara Metzger’s books; it was written completely from the viewpoint of the dog!

    Reply
  167. I love animals in books. They add so much love and humor. I wish I could remember the name of one of Barbara Metzger’s books; it was written completely from the viewpoint of the dog!

    Reply
  168. I love animals in books. They add so much love and humor. I wish I could remember the name of one of Barbara Metzger’s books; it was written completely from the viewpoint of the dog!

    Reply
  169. I love animals in books. They add so much love and humor. I wish I could remember the name of one of Barbara Metzger’s books; it was written completely from the viewpoint of the dog!

    Reply
  170. I love animals in books. They add so much love and humor. I wish I could remember the name of one of Barbara Metzger’s books; it was written completely from the viewpoint of the dog!

    Reply
  171. Linnea, I so agree with you that you learn so much from animals — and it’s not only children who learn. My dog reminds me daily to take joy in the small moments and to live “in the now” — a priceless gift. Thanks for adding to the conversation.

    Reply
  172. Linnea, I so agree with you that you learn so much from animals — and it’s not only children who learn. My dog reminds me daily to take joy in the small moments and to live “in the now” — a priceless gift. Thanks for adding to the conversation.

    Reply
  173. Linnea, I so agree with you that you learn so much from animals — and it’s not only children who learn. My dog reminds me daily to take joy in the small moments and to live “in the now” — a priceless gift. Thanks for adding to the conversation.

    Reply
  174. Linnea, I so agree with you that you learn so much from animals — and it’s not only children who learn. My dog reminds me daily to take joy in the small moments and to live “in the now” — a priceless gift. Thanks for adding to the conversation.

    Reply
  175. Linnea, I so agree with you that you learn so much from animals — and it’s not only children who learn. My dog reminds me daily to take joy in the small moments and to live “in the now” — a priceless gift. Thanks for adding to the conversation.

    Reply
  176. Glenda, I agree. Having also grown up with animals, my inclination is to have animals in every book, but I can’t do it a lot of the time, because they need a story reason to be there. I have had a few in the background — Nell from His Captive Lady had a dog who was precious to her, but the dog didn’t play a central role.

    Reply
  177. Glenda, I agree. Having also grown up with animals, my inclination is to have animals in every book, but I can’t do it a lot of the time, because they need a story reason to be there. I have had a few in the background — Nell from His Captive Lady had a dog who was precious to her, but the dog didn’t play a central role.

    Reply
  178. Glenda, I agree. Having also grown up with animals, my inclination is to have animals in every book, but I can’t do it a lot of the time, because they need a story reason to be there. I have had a few in the background — Nell from His Captive Lady had a dog who was precious to her, but the dog didn’t play a central role.

    Reply
  179. Glenda, I agree. Having also grown up with animals, my inclination is to have animals in every book, but I can’t do it a lot of the time, because they need a story reason to be there. I have had a few in the background — Nell from His Captive Lady had a dog who was precious to her, but the dog didn’t play a central role.

    Reply
  180. Glenda, I agree. Having also grown up with animals, my inclination is to have animals in every book, but I can’t do it a lot of the time, because they need a story reason to be there. I have had a few in the background — Nell from His Captive Lady had a dog who was precious to her, but the dog didn’t play a central role.

    Reply
  181. I love romance stories with animals. It lends character to the story & I have a soft spot for a hero/heroine who is an animal lover. I’ve read & enjoyed quite a few; the one that comes immediately to mind is Lisa Kleypas’ Love in the Afternoon.

    Reply
  182. I love romance stories with animals. It lends character to the story & I have a soft spot for a hero/heroine who is an animal lover. I’ve read & enjoyed quite a few; the one that comes immediately to mind is Lisa Kleypas’ Love in the Afternoon.

    Reply
  183. I love romance stories with animals. It lends character to the story & I have a soft spot for a hero/heroine who is an animal lover. I’ve read & enjoyed quite a few; the one that comes immediately to mind is Lisa Kleypas’ Love in the Afternoon.

    Reply
  184. I love romance stories with animals. It lends character to the story & I have a soft spot for a hero/heroine who is an animal lover. I’ve read & enjoyed quite a few; the one that comes immediately to mind is Lisa Kleypas’ Love in the Afternoon.

    Reply
  185. I love romance stories with animals. It lends character to the story & I have a soft spot for a hero/heroine who is an animal lover. I’ve read & enjoyed quite a few; the one that comes immediately to mind is Lisa Kleypas’ Love in the Afternoon.

    Reply
  186. Heh – I heard you talk about the inspiration for the series in Canberra in March. I feel like I have insider knowledge…
    Also, I read The Spring Bride a few months ago! Loved it (but I said that already!).
    I must say, my favourite thing about this book is that the characters actually FELL IN LOVE. That is so rare in books now, where the characters are in bed together on page four!
    I’m becoming more and more in love with animals in books, ever since my life took a weird turn and I started looking after and loving stray cats (I used to hate cats). So now, animals in books (especially strays!) really mean something to me.
    Don’t enter me in this. I’ve already read it a couple of times. 🙂

    Reply
  187. Heh – I heard you talk about the inspiration for the series in Canberra in March. I feel like I have insider knowledge…
    Also, I read The Spring Bride a few months ago! Loved it (but I said that already!).
    I must say, my favourite thing about this book is that the characters actually FELL IN LOVE. That is so rare in books now, where the characters are in bed together on page four!
    I’m becoming more and more in love with animals in books, ever since my life took a weird turn and I started looking after and loving stray cats (I used to hate cats). So now, animals in books (especially strays!) really mean something to me.
    Don’t enter me in this. I’ve already read it a couple of times. 🙂

    Reply
  188. Heh – I heard you talk about the inspiration for the series in Canberra in March. I feel like I have insider knowledge…
    Also, I read The Spring Bride a few months ago! Loved it (but I said that already!).
    I must say, my favourite thing about this book is that the characters actually FELL IN LOVE. That is so rare in books now, where the characters are in bed together on page four!
    I’m becoming more and more in love with animals in books, ever since my life took a weird turn and I started looking after and loving stray cats (I used to hate cats). So now, animals in books (especially strays!) really mean something to me.
    Don’t enter me in this. I’ve already read it a couple of times. 🙂

    Reply
  189. Heh – I heard you talk about the inspiration for the series in Canberra in March. I feel like I have insider knowledge…
    Also, I read The Spring Bride a few months ago! Loved it (but I said that already!).
    I must say, my favourite thing about this book is that the characters actually FELL IN LOVE. That is so rare in books now, where the characters are in bed together on page four!
    I’m becoming more and more in love with animals in books, ever since my life took a weird turn and I started looking after and loving stray cats (I used to hate cats). So now, animals in books (especially strays!) really mean something to me.
    Don’t enter me in this. I’ve already read it a couple of times. 🙂

    Reply
  190. Heh – I heard you talk about the inspiration for the series in Canberra in March. I feel like I have insider knowledge…
    Also, I read The Spring Bride a few months ago! Loved it (but I said that already!).
    I must say, my favourite thing about this book is that the characters actually FELL IN LOVE. That is so rare in books now, where the characters are in bed together on page four!
    I’m becoming more and more in love with animals in books, ever since my life took a weird turn and I started looking after and loving stray cats (I used to hate cats). So now, animals in books (especially strays!) really mean something to me.
    Don’t enter me in this. I’ve already read it a couple of times. 🙂

    Reply
  191. Thanks, Sonya — yes, taking in a stray cat–or any lost and unloved animal– can change your life. Pets enrich our lives, I think.
    Thanks for your very kind words about Spring Bride, too.

    Reply
  192. Thanks, Sonya — yes, taking in a stray cat–or any lost and unloved animal– can change your life. Pets enrich our lives, I think.
    Thanks for your very kind words about Spring Bride, too.

    Reply
  193. Thanks, Sonya — yes, taking in a stray cat–or any lost and unloved animal– can change your life. Pets enrich our lives, I think.
    Thanks for your very kind words about Spring Bride, too.

    Reply
  194. Thanks, Sonya — yes, taking in a stray cat–or any lost and unloved animal– can change your life. Pets enrich our lives, I think.
    Thanks for your very kind words about Spring Bride, too.

    Reply
  195. Thanks, Sonya — yes, taking in a stray cat–or any lost and unloved animal– can change your life. Pets enrich our lives, I think.
    Thanks for your very kind words about Spring Bride, too.

    Reply
  196. I do love animals in stories – they often help show different sides to characters – like a stern Duke being gentle with an old beloved dog.

    Reply
  197. I do love animals in stories – they often help show different sides to characters – like a stern Duke being gentle with an old beloved dog.

    Reply
  198. I do love animals in stories – they often help show different sides to characters – like a stern Duke being gentle with an old beloved dog.

    Reply
  199. I do love animals in stories – they often help show different sides to characters – like a stern Duke being gentle with an old beloved dog.

    Reply
  200. I do love animals in stories – they often help show different sides to characters – like a stern Duke being gentle with an old beloved dog.

    Reply

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