The Animals in Our Lives

Joanna here, talking about some of the animals who share the Wenches' Worlds. 

I moved up to the mountains not so very long ago and, in the fullness of
time, spring came tripping over the threshold.  Along about April I
generally fill the hummingbird feeder and mount it on a pole.

This year I figgered it was kinda useless trying to attract hummingbirds.  I'm fairly high up.


Less appealing than Australian possums

I'm a dreamer at heart, so I set out the nectar.
I called them and they came. 

Beautiful humming
birds were weaving back and forth in the air a half hour after I offered
them a place to feed.  Lovely colors.  So magical.  So amazing.

Then there's my possum. 
He doesn't show up as much since I stopped waking up in the morning,
shivering, stoking the woodstove, and opening the door to scatter two
handfuls of seed out across the top of the snow for the birds up here. 

All this before I got a cup of coffee.

There
are those who advocate arising with the dawn and sitting down at the
computer while the trailing mists of dreams still linger in the
mind.  Somehow I never seem to manage this.

  Mary Jo appreciates hummingbirds.  And cats.  She says:

I’m
another animal lover who always stops and holds my breath when I see a
graceful deer behind my house, even if it’s munching my shrubs.
<G>  I love watching hummingbirds and never cease to be amazed at
how fast chipmunks can move with those little short legs.  I sort of
like squirrels, but that’s tempered
Mark twain and cat 2 by the fact they made me give
up feeding the birds because the little sneaks totally defeated my
squirrel-proof feeders.
 
But most of all, I love cats.  I was
raised with them, and we generally averaged about five when I was
growing up.  I love their warmth, their grace, their purrs, and their
highly individual personalities.
 

Grady the GrayGuy and PandaMax

I currently have four cats, all
rescues.  Sometimes it seems like more than that.  <G>  But I
love them all, even Lacey, aka “Miss Crankypants,” whose temper has not
improved with age.  And then there’s Reggie the Rascal, a young souled
feline who eats dry food too fast, then barfs it up virtually
unprocessed.  He also pounces on all the other cats. But he’s friendly
and has an amazing purr.

Here’s a picture of Grady the Gray Guy,
my senior tom, and the newest addition to the family, PandaMax, the big
black and white cat.  Panda lived rough for a couple of years, so he’s
extremely food insecure, which means he wants to eat all the time. 
Despite his size and rather thug-like look, he’s actually very friendly
and rather timid.
 
Now that PandaMax has adjusted to life at my
house, he’s a great lap cat.  He oozes up over the back of the armrest
of the loveseat, then become a slow motion avalanche of  black and white
fur as he settles on my lap.  Apart from an unfortunate trouble with
boundaries—that is, he has trouble distinguishing between HIS food and
MY food—he’s a complete sweetheart.

Lorikeet, probably screeching

Anne says:. 

Sadly
there are no animals living at my house at the moment. I haven't yet
felt able to get another dog, since my Chloe died, and it feels very
strange, because I've had animals all my life. 

Still, I'm
lucky because even though I live close in to the city in a fairly
densely-built neighborhood, I can engage with some wildlife. 

 

brush-tailed possum

In
the mornings I wake to birdsong — my two favorites are magpies, with
their joyous carolling to the morning sun, and rainbow lorikeets, just
as joyous but not quite so melodious. The lorikeets chortle and chatter
and screech. I love them, not just because they're so pretty, but
because they're so exuberant and playful as they swoop and dart and then
hang upside-down in a tree feeding off nectar or fruit. There are
plenty of other birds, but those are my favorites.

I also have a
family of shy little skinks — tiny coppery-skinned lizards that live in
the rocks and leaf litter under the lilly-pilly tree in my back yard.
They come out to sunbathe and when I go outside they either freeze and
pretend to be a stick, or whisk themselves back into some tiny crevasse.

As
well, in the big gum tree out the front lives a brush-tailed possum. I
don't often see it, but A few weeks ago I saw its silhouette against the
night sky and thought it might have a baby on its back. Our possums
carry babies in the pouch (like kangaroos and koalas) and when the
babies get big enough, they ride on their mother's back.

Joanna here, just adding that the Australian possum is not at all like American possums.  Wholly different species. The Australians got the pretty ones.

Pat's another author surrounded by the wild:

Not actually Pat's turkeys

Pat says: 
Like Anne, I have no animals inside my house. We lost our aging
peke-a-poo just before we moved to North Carolina and knowing we'd be
moving again and again, we haven't tried to replace him.

That
doesn't mean we don't have animals in our lives! Sometimes, I could use a
few less. Although our birds aren't as colorful as Anne's, Missouri is
on the migration route for most midwestern birds, so we can have
everything from tanagers to goldfinches feasting at our feeders.

We've had turkeys and geese nesting in the bushes. Cardinals populate the trees all year around.   And all winter long I can watch squirrel acrobatics as the little darlings attempt to raid our squirrel-proof feeders!

Chipmunks
natter from the patio and moles…sigh, we will not go into moles. Or
deer. We've had beautiful twin fawns napping in the warmth of our garden
wall. I'm quite certain they came back to nip our rose buds and hostas a
few months later. In spring, we have a frog in our pond and a box
turtle that waddles through our periwinkle.

Now, Nicola has foxes. 
I'm jealous.  I know I must have foxes round about, but I never see them.

Nicola says: 
Living where we do in the middle of the English countryside, we’re
surrounded by wildlife, from the herds of fallow deer that graze in the
fields behind the house to the foxes, badgers and hedgehogs we glimpse
at night.  During the spring one of my favourite sights is the hares
boxing and playing together, living up to their reputation for madness. 

Then
there are the birds. My favourites are the red kites I frequently
glimpse from the window when I am writing. They are magnificent. In the
18th century they scavenged for food in the cities but they died out in
England and were re-introduced last century. Now they are birds of the
countryside. And often in the dusk we have the barn owls gliding low
over the fields and sometimes flying straight down our lane, silent and
deadly on the hunt.

Curiously for someone who loves animals I
seldom feature them in my books although there was a gorgeous
Labrador-type dog called Sal for Salamanca in one of my early books.
Usually the animals just have a walk on part."

Jo has her own hummingbird stories:
 

Jo says
I'm not a pet person, but I enjoy wildlife, especially birds and the
better sort of insect. We have plenty of both here in Devon, but I do
miss hummingbirds. They're tough little critters. It used to be amazing
to watch them feeding during a winter storm in Victoria, with the feeder
swaying in the wind. But they managed. In very cold weather we used to
bring the feeder in a few times a day to warm it up for them.

They
love scarlet runner beans. My sister from England was amazed and
delighted when they'd come to feed nearby as she was picking beans. They
never seem to be the slightest bit afraid of people. One terrified a
visiting German lad by getting right in his face for some reason,
warning him away.

Alas, I can't include them in books as there are none over here. Deer in snow 2

 

 

Do you have wild (or otherwise) animals in your life that amaze you and lift your spirit?  

Do you like to see animals turn up in Romance books?

185 thoughts on “The Animals in Our Lives”

  1. Does a roguish three year old boy count as wild life? If so then yes, I do have wild life at my house…. In addition to tame life that comes in the person of a very large, very hairy, very placid and long-suffering dog! She’s a six year old husky- Irish wolfhound- heaven only knows what else cross and endures the “loving” attention of our tiny tyrant admirably well. Her patience often outlasts mine! We live in a new neighbourhood with baby trees and not much real wildlife to speak of. I miss it a bit, watching the nesting robins or curious squirrels with my mom is favourite childhood memory.

    Reply
  2. Does a roguish three year old boy count as wild life? If so then yes, I do have wild life at my house…. In addition to tame life that comes in the person of a very large, very hairy, very placid and long-suffering dog! She’s a six year old husky- Irish wolfhound- heaven only knows what else cross and endures the “loving” attention of our tiny tyrant admirably well. Her patience often outlasts mine! We live in a new neighbourhood with baby trees and not much real wildlife to speak of. I miss it a bit, watching the nesting robins or curious squirrels with my mom is favourite childhood memory.

    Reply
  3. Does a roguish three year old boy count as wild life? If so then yes, I do have wild life at my house…. In addition to tame life that comes in the person of a very large, very hairy, very placid and long-suffering dog! She’s a six year old husky- Irish wolfhound- heaven only knows what else cross and endures the “loving” attention of our tiny tyrant admirably well. Her patience often outlasts mine! We live in a new neighbourhood with baby trees and not much real wildlife to speak of. I miss it a bit, watching the nesting robins or curious squirrels with my mom is favourite childhood memory.

    Reply
  4. Does a roguish three year old boy count as wild life? If so then yes, I do have wild life at my house…. In addition to tame life that comes in the person of a very large, very hairy, very placid and long-suffering dog! She’s a six year old husky- Irish wolfhound- heaven only knows what else cross and endures the “loving” attention of our tiny tyrant admirably well. Her patience often outlasts mine! We live in a new neighbourhood with baby trees and not much real wildlife to speak of. I miss it a bit, watching the nesting robins or curious squirrels with my mom is favourite childhood memory.

    Reply
  5. Does a roguish three year old boy count as wild life? If so then yes, I do have wild life at my house…. In addition to tame life that comes in the person of a very large, very hairy, very placid and long-suffering dog! She’s a six year old husky- Irish wolfhound- heaven only knows what else cross and endures the “loving” attention of our tiny tyrant admirably well. Her patience often outlasts mine! We live in a new neighbourhood with baby trees and not much real wildlife to speak of. I miss it a bit, watching the nesting robins or curious squirrels with my mom is favourite childhood memory.

    Reply
  6. We live down a long dirt drive through the woods on a lake, and my son-in-law the great white hunter/fisherman informs me we have everything. So far I’ve just seen eagles, foxes, raccoons (cheeky little buggers who come right up the porch to knock on the front door)and teams of wild turkeys. The moose and deer visit when I’m asleep. Hummingbirds abound on my deck pots, and people catch fish and see turtles at my dock.Last year we built a garage, and a poor mama turtle waddled up from the lake and had to be relocated three times since she wanted to lay her eggs in the soft sand the builders had dug up.
    Since we rescued a border collie mix puppy recently, I expect Fitz to either round everything up or drive it all away. He’s been enlisted to deter the squirrels who eat the birdseed, but I don’t think anything deters squirrels for long.
    Fun post!

    Reply
  7. We live down a long dirt drive through the woods on a lake, and my son-in-law the great white hunter/fisherman informs me we have everything. So far I’ve just seen eagles, foxes, raccoons (cheeky little buggers who come right up the porch to knock on the front door)and teams of wild turkeys. The moose and deer visit when I’m asleep. Hummingbirds abound on my deck pots, and people catch fish and see turtles at my dock.Last year we built a garage, and a poor mama turtle waddled up from the lake and had to be relocated three times since she wanted to lay her eggs in the soft sand the builders had dug up.
    Since we rescued a border collie mix puppy recently, I expect Fitz to either round everything up or drive it all away. He’s been enlisted to deter the squirrels who eat the birdseed, but I don’t think anything deters squirrels for long.
    Fun post!

    Reply
  8. We live down a long dirt drive through the woods on a lake, and my son-in-law the great white hunter/fisherman informs me we have everything. So far I’ve just seen eagles, foxes, raccoons (cheeky little buggers who come right up the porch to knock on the front door)and teams of wild turkeys. The moose and deer visit when I’m asleep. Hummingbirds abound on my deck pots, and people catch fish and see turtles at my dock.Last year we built a garage, and a poor mama turtle waddled up from the lake and had to be relocated three times since she wanted to lay her eggs in the soft sand the builders had dug up.
    Since we rescued a border collie mix puppy recently, I expect Fitz to either round everything up or drive it all away. He’s been enlisted to deter the squirrels who eat the birdseed, but I don’t think anything deters squirrels for long.
    Fun post!

    Reply
  9. We live down a long dirt drive through the woods on a lake, and my son-in-law the great white hunter/fisherman informs me we have everything. So far I’ve just seen eagles, foxes, raccoons (cheeky little buggers who come right up the porch to knock on the front door)and teams of wild turkeys. The moose and deer visit when I’m asleep. Hummingbirds abound on my deck pots, and people catch fish and see turtles at my dock.Last year we built a garage, and a poor mama turtle waddled up from the lake and had to be relocated three times since she wanted to lay her eggs in the soft sand the builders had dug up.
    Since we rescued a border collie mix puppy recently, I expect Fitz to either round everything up or drive it all away. He’s been enlisted to deter the squirrels who eat the birdseed, but I don’t think anything deters squirrels for long.
    Fun post!

    Reply
  10. We live down a long dirt drive through the woods on a lake, and my son-in-law the great white hunter/fisherman informs me we have everything. So far I’ve just seen eagles, foxes, raccoons (cheeky little buggers who come right up the porch to knock on the front door)and teams of wild turkeys. The moose and deer visit when I’m asleep. Hummingbirds abound on my deck pots, and people catch fish and see turtles at my dock.Last year we built a garage, and a poor mama turtle waddled up from the lake and had to be relocated three times since she wanted to lay her eggs in the soft sand the builders had dug up.
    Since we rescued a border collie mix puppy recently, I expect Fitz to either round everything up or drive it all away. He’s been enlisted to deter the squirrels who eat the birdseed, but I don’t think anything deters squirrels for long.
    Fun post!

    Reply
  11. Thanks for compiling this, Joanna!
    Yes, Jana, I think a 3-year-old qualifies as one of the Wild Things. “G” And Maggie, I’m so envious of your location! We used to do country but we don’t like all that driving anymore. And nothing deters a determined squirrel, I’m here to attest!

    Reply
  12. Thanks for compiling this, Joanna!
    Yes, Jana, I think a 3-year-old qualifies as one of the Wild Things. “G” And Maggie, I’m so envious of your location! We used to do country but we don’t like all that driving anymore. And nothing deters a determined squirrel, I’m here to attest!

    Reply
  13. Thanks for compiling this, Joanna!
    Yes, Jana, I think a 3-year-old qualifies as one of the Wild Things. “G” And Maggie, I’m so envious of your location! We used to do country but we don’t like all that driving anymore. And nothing deters a determined squirrel, I’m here to attest!

    Reply
  14. Thanks for compiling this, Joanna!
    Yes, Jana, I think a 3-year-old qualifies as one of the Wild Things. “G” And Maggie, I’m so envious of your location! We used to do country but we don’t like all that driving anymore. And nothing deters a determined squirrel, I’m here to attest!

    Reply
  15. Thanks for compiling this, Joanna!
    Yes, Jana, I think a 3-year-old qualifies as one of the Wild Things. “G” And Maggie, I’m so envious of your location! We used to do country but we don’t like all that driving anymore. And nothing deters a determined squirrel, I’m here to attest!

    Reply
  16. Wild life is rather magical just because it is wild, and hence unpredictable. My next door neighbor used to have a mama fox and kits playing on her lower lawn, where I occasionally saw them. The same neighbor would also go out with banging pot lids to drive off the deer, with limited success because deer have moved into the more woodsy Maryland suburbs, and found it good. *G* And I love the honking of the autumn geese in dusky skies as they fly south. Lovely.

    Reply
  17. Wild life is rather magical just because it is wild, and hence unpredictable. My next door neighbor used to have a mama fox and kits playing on her lower lawn, where I occasionally saw them. The same neighbor would also go out with banging pot lids to drive off the deer, with limited success because deer have moved into the more woodsy Maryland suburbs, and found it good. *G* And I love the honking of the autumn geese in dusky skies as they fly south. Lovely.

    Reply
  18. Wild life is rather magical just because it is wild, and hence unpredictable. My next door neighbor used to have a mama fox and kits playing on her lower lawn, where I occasionally saw them. The same neighbor would also go out with banging pot lids to drive off the deer, with limited success because deer have moved into the more woodsy Maryland suburbs, and found it good. *G* And I love the honking of the autumn geese in dusky skies as they fly south. Lovely.

    Reply
  19. Wild life is rather magical just because it is wild, and hence unpredictable. My next door neighbor used to have a mama fox and kits playing on her lower lawn, where I occasionally saw them. The same neighbor would also go out with banging pot lids to drive off the deer, with limited success because deer have moved into the more woodsy Maryland suburbs, and found it good. *G* And I love the honking of the autumn geese in dusky skies as they fly south. Lovely.

    Reply
  20. Wild life is rather magical just because it is wild, and hence unpredictable. My next door neighbor used to have a mama fox and kits playing on her lower lawn, where I occasionally saw them. The same neighbor would also go out with banging pot lids to drive off the deer, with limited success because deer have moved into the more woodsy Maryland suburbs, and found it good. *G* And I love the honking of the autumn geese in dusky skies as they fly south. Lovely.

    Reply
  21. We don’t have a pet anymore. We are traveling and attending grad school, so we are waiting before getting another dog. However, we live just east of the Blue Ridge Mountains (hi neighbor Joanne) and now have a family of foxes (2 adults and 4 kits) living under our woodpile. We have a bear, bobcat and a mountain lion wanders by sometimes. Of course we have our share of herbivores, with herds of deer, squirrels and other little rodents scurrying in the leaf litter. They unfortunately attract snakes, though the foxes left a six foot snake skeleton in front of the garage.As for birds, we have hawks, vultures, hummingbirds and lovely song birds. I would love to feed them, but that would also attract the bear to the deck. So we now don’t bother going to the zoo that much anymore, just look out the windows.
    I like adding wildlife and pets to your novels. It gives an added touch to the world your characters live. I like when you mention the delight in seeing hummingbirds and fireflies when characters travel across the pond. I take all these critters for granted and it is nice to be reminded by your characters to take a new look.

    Reply
  22. We don’t have a pet anymore. We are traveling and attending grad school, so we are waiting before getting another dog. However, we live just east of the Blue Ridge Mountains (hi neighbor Joanne) and now have a family of foxes (2 adults and 4 kits) living under our woodpile. We have a bear, bobcat and a mountain lion wanders by sometimes. Of course we have our share of herbivores, with herds of deer, squirrels and other little rodents scurrying in the leaf litter. They unfortunately attract snakes, though the foxes left a six foot snake skeleton in front of the garage.As for birds, we have hawks, vultures, hummingbirds and lovely song birds. I would love to feed them, but that would also attract the bear to the deck. So we now don’t bother going to the zoo that much anymore, just look out the windows.
    I like adding wildlife and pets to your novels. It gives an added touch to the world your characters live. I like when you mention the delight in seeing hummingbirds and fireflies when characters travel across the pond. I take all these critters for granted and it is nice to be reminded by your characters to take a new look.

    Reply
  23. We don’t have a pet anymore. We are traveling and attending grad school, so we are waiting before getting another dog. However, we live just east of the Blue Ridge Mountains (hi neighbor Joanne) and now have a family of foxes (2 adults and 4 kits) living under our woodpile. We have a bear, bobcat and a mountain lion wanders by sometimes. Of course we have our share of herbivores, with herds of deer, squirrels and other little rodents scurrying in the leaf litter. They unfortunately attract snakes, though the foxes left a six foot snake skeleton in front of the garage.As for birds, we have hawks, vultures, hummingbirds and lovely song birds. I would love to feed them, but that would also attract the bear to the deck. So we now don’t bother going to the zoo that much anymore, just look out the windows.
    I like adding wildlife and pets to your novels. It gives an added touch to the world your characters live. I like when you mention the delight in seeing hummingbirds and fireflies when characters travel across the pond. I take all these critters for granted and it is nice to be reminded by your characters to take a new look.

    Reply
  24. We don’t have a pet anymore. We are traveling and attending grad school, so we are waiting before getting another dog. However, we live just east of the Blue Ridge Mountains (hi neighbor Joanne) and now have a family of foxes (2 adults and 4 kits) living under our woodpile. We have a bear, bobcat and a mountain lion wanders by sometimes. Of course we have our share of herbivores, with herds of deer, squirrels and other little rodents scurrying in the leaf litter. They unfortunately attract snakes, though the foxes left a six foot snake skeleton in front of the garage.As for birds, we have hawks, vultures, hummingbirds and lovely song birds. I would love to feed them, but that would also attract the bear to the deck. So we now don’t bother going to the zoo that much anymore, just look out the windows.
    I like adding wildlife and pets to your novels. It gives an added touch to the world your characters live. I like when you mention the delight in seeing hummingbirds and fireflies when characters travel across the pond. I take all these critters for granted and it is nice to be reminded by your characters to take a new look.

    Reply
  25. We don’t have a pet anymore. We are traveling and attending grad school, so we are waiting before getting another dog. However, we live just east of the Blue Ridge Mountains (hi neighbor Joanne) and now have a family of foxes (2 adults and 4 kits) living under our woodpile. We have a bear, bobcat and a mountain lion wanders by sometimes. Of course we have our share of herbivores, with herds of deer, squirrels and other little rodents scurrying in the leaf litter. They unfortunately attract snakes, though the foxes left a six foot snake skeleton in front of the garage.As for birds, we have hawks, vultures, hummingbirds and lovely song birds. I would love to feed them, but that would also attract the bear to the deck. So we now don’t bother going to the zoo that much anymore, just look out the windows.
    I like adding wildlife and pets to your novels. It gives an added touch to the world your characters live. I like when you mention the delight in seeing hummingbirds and fireflies when characters travel across the pond. I take all these critters for granted and it is nice to be reminded by your characters to take a new look.

    Reply
  26. I enjoyed this post so much! I’m an inveterate critter-watcher and pet owner, and have missed the abundant wildlife I used to see in the Pacific Northwest of the US.
    However, we do have some nesting Osprey across the street from our New England home … you should hear the devoted parents shouting instructions to their young’uns during flying lessons. Reminds me of my dad when he was teaching me how to ride a bike, back in the olden days.

    Reply
  27. I enjoyed this post so much! I’m an inveterate critter-watcher and pet owner, and have missed the abundant wildlife I used to see in the Pacific Northwest of the US.
    However, we do have some nesting Osprey across the street from our New England home … you should hear the devoted parents shouting instructions to their young’uns during flying lessons. Reminds me of my dad when he was teaching me how to ride a bike, back in the olden days.

    Reply
  28. I enjoyed this post so much! I’m an inveterate critter-watcher and pet owner, and have missed the abundant wildlife I used to see in the Pacific Northwest of the US.
    However, we do have some nesting Osprey across the street from our New England home … you should hear the devoted parents shouting instructions to their young’uns during flying lessons. Reminds me of my dad when he was teaching me how to ride a bike, back in the olden days.

    Reply
  29. I enjoyed this post so much! I’m an inveterate critter-watcher and pet owner, and have missed the abundant wildlife I used to see in the Pacific Northwest of the US.
    However, we do have some nesting Osprey across the street from our New England home … you should hear the devoted parents shouting instructions to their young’uns during flying lessons. Reminds me of my dad when he was teaching me how to ride a bike, back in the olden days.

    Reply
  30. I enjoyed this post so much! I’m an inveterate critter-watcher and pet owner, and have missed the abundant wildlife I used to see in the Pacific Northwest of the US.
    However, we do have some nesting Osprey across the street from our New England home … you should hear the devoted parents shouting instructions to their young’uns during flying lessons. Reminds me of my dad when he was teaching me how to ride a bike, back in the olden days.

    Reply
  31. I live in a 3-story condo. My wildlife adventures are limited to the birds. We have the Sparrow Squadron, the Mockingbird Militia (very territorial!), the Parrot Patrol (naturalized escapees), crows who occasionally engage the mockingbirds in aerial combat, ibises, ospreys, brown pelicans, anhingas, terns, two sizes of egrets, small green cranes, the ever-present gulls, and the occasional bald eagle with fish in his talons. I’ve learned a bit about crows and I rather like them. A visitor was having her sandwich out on the walkway and a crow came up and sat there. (“Are you going to finish that?”) Twice a year we are swarmed by migrating blackbirds. A nearby park with pond hosts several varieties of ducks, including Muscovy. Local ordinance forbids feeding birds because they can become a nuisance and it’s true. The sparrows found an excellent nesting site in my carport, but after a couple of seasons I had to have it blocked because of the guano.

    Reply
  32. I live in a 3-story condo. My wildlife adventures are limited to the birds. We have the Sparrow Squadron, the Mockingbird Militia (very territorial!), the Parrot Patrol (naturalized escapees), crows who occasionally engage the mockingbirds in aerial combat, ibises, ospreys, brown pelicans, anhingas, terns, two sizes of egrets, small green cranes, the ever-present gulls, and the occasional bald eagle with fish in his talons. I’ve learned a bit about crows and I rather like them. A visitor was having her sandwich out on the walkway and a crow came up and sat there. (“Are you going to finish that?”) Twice a year we are swarmed by migrating blackbirds. A nearby park with pond hosts several varieties of ducks, including Muscovy. Local ordinance forbids feeding birds because they can become a nuisance and it’s true. The sparrows found an excellent nesting site in my carport, but after a couple of seasons I had to have it blocked because of the guano.

    Reply
  33. I live in a 3-story condo. My wildlife adventures are limited to the birds. We have the Sparrow Squadron, the Mockingbird Militia (very territorial!), the Parrot Patrol (naturalized escapees), crows who occasionally engage the mockingbirds in aerial combat, ibises, ospreys, brown pelicans, anhingas, terns, two sizes of egrets, small green cranes, the ever-present gulls, and the occasional bald eagle with fish in his talons. I’ve learned a bit about crows and I rather like them. A visitor was having her sandwich out on the walkway and a crow came up and sat there. (“Are you going to finish that?”) Twice a year we are swarmed by migrating blackbirds. A nearby park with pond hosts several varieties of ducks, including Muscovy. Local ordinance forbids feeding birds because they can become a nuisance and it’s true. The sparrows found an excellent nesting site in my carport, but after a couple of seasons I had to have it blocked because of the guano.

    Reply
  34. I live in a 3-story condo. My wildlife adventures are limited to the birds. We have the Sparrow Squadron, the Mockingbird Militia (very territorial!), the Parrot Patrol (naturalized escapees), crows who occasionally engage the mockingbirds in aerial combat, ibises, ospreys, brown pelicans, anhingas, terns, two sizes of egrets, small green cranes, the ever-present gulls, and the occasional bald eagle with fish in his talons. I’ve learned a bit about crows and I rather like them. A visitor was having her sandwich out on the walkway and a crow came up and sat there. (“Are you going to finish that?”) Twice a year we are swarmed by migrating blackbirds. A nearby park with pond hosts several varieties of ducks, including Muscovy. Local ordinance forbids feeding birds because they can become a nuisance and it’s true. The sparrows found an excellent nesting site in my carport, but after a couple of seasons I had to have it blocked because of the guano.

    Reply
  35. I live in a 3-story condo. My wildlife adventures are limited to the birds. We have the Sparrow Squadron, the Mockingbird Militia (very territorial!), the Parrot Patrol (naturalized escapees), crows who occasionally engage the mockingbirds in aerial combat, ibises, ospreys, brown pelicans, anhingas, terns, two sizes of egrets, small green cranes, the ever-present gulls, and the occasional bald eagle with fish in his talons. I’ve learned a bit about crows and I rather like them. A visitor was having her sandwich out on the walkway and a crow came up and sat there. (“Are you going to finish that?”) Twice a year we are swarmed by migrating blackbirds. A nearby park with pond hosts several varieties of ducks, including Muscovy. Local ordinance forbids feeding birds because they can become a nuisance and it’s true. The sparrows found an excellent nesting site in my carport, but after a couple of seasons I had to have it blocked because of the guano.

    Reply
  36. Hi Jana —
    >>>husky- Irish wolfhound- heaven only knows what else cross<<< Ye gods that must be a big ole dog. I hope the neighborhood grows up around you and becomes more wild and lovely. It can happen.

    Reply
  37. Hi Jana —
    >>>husky- Irish wolfhound- heaven only knows what else cross<<< Ye gods that must be a big ole dog. I hope the neighborhood grows up around you and becomes more wild and lovely. It can happen.

    Reply
  38. Hi Jana —
    >>>husky- Irish wolfhound- heaven only knows what else cross<<< Ye gods that must be a big ole dog. I hope the neighborhood grows up around you and becomes more wild and lovely. It can happen.

    Reply
  39. Hi Jana —
    >>>husky- Irish wolfhound- heaven only knows what else cross<<< Ye gods that must be a big ole dog. I hope the neighborhood grows up around you and becomes more wild and lovely. It can happen.

    Reply
  40. Hi Jana —
    >>>husky- Irish wolfhound- heaven only knows what else cross<<< Ye gods that must be a big ole dog. I hope the neighborhood grows up around you and becomes more wild and lovely. It can happen.

    Reply
  41. Hi Maggie —
    I saw a wild turkey just this morning. Made me so happy. But I don’t seem to have racoons. I can do without racoons, actually.
    I’m hoping we don’t have skunks.

    Reply
  42. Hi Maggie —
    I saw a wild turkey just this morning. Made me so happy. But I don’t seem to have racoons. I can do without racoons, actually.
    I’m hoping we don’t have skunks.

    Reply
  43. Hi Maggie —
    I saw a wild turkey just this morning. Made me so happy. But I don’t seem to have racoons. I can do without racoons, actually.
    I’m hoping we don’t have skunks.

    Reply
  44. Hi Maggie —
    I saw a wild turkey just this morning. Made me so happy. But I don’t seem to have racoons. I can do without racoons, actually.
    I’m hoping we don’t have skunks.

    Reply
  45. Hi Maggie —
    I saw a wild turkey just this morning. Made me so happy. But I don’t seem to have racoons. I can do without racoons, actually.
    I’m hoping we don’t have skunks.

    Reply
  46. Hi Pat —
    Squirrels. My dog is just utterly convinced she can catch squirrels. She bounds out of the door like greased lightning.

    Reply
  47. Hi Pat —
    Squirrels. My dog is just utterly convinced she can catch squirrels. She bounds out of the door like greased lightning.

    Reply
  48. Hi Pat —
    Squirrels. My dog is just utterly convinced she can catch squirrels. She bounds out of the door like greased lightning.

    Reply
  49. Hi Pat —
    Squirrels. My dog is just utterly convinced she can catch squirrels. She bounds out of the door like greased lightning.

    Reply
  50. Hi Pat —
    Squirrels. My dog is just utterly convinced she can catch squirrels. She bounds out of the door like greased lightning.

    Reply
  51. Hi Mary Jo —
    There is nothing like the geese migrating. It must be embedded deep in the human psyche.
    Though maybe it’s just our distant ancestors thinking “Rats, there goes dinner.”

    Reply
  52. Hi Mary Jo —
    There is nothing like the geese migrating. It must be embedded deep in the human psyche.
    Though maybe it’s just our distant ancestors thinking “Rats, there goes dinner.”

    Reply
  53. Hi Mary Jo —
    There is nothing like the geese migrating. It must be embedded deep in the human psyche.
    Though maybe it’s just our distant ancestors thinking “Rats, there goes dinner.”

    Reply
  54. Hi Mary Jo —
    There is nothing like the geese migrating. It must be embedded deep in the human psyche.
    Though maybe it’s just our distant ancestors thinking “Rats, there goes dinner.”

    Reply
  55. Hi Mary Jo —
    There is nothing like the geese migrating. It must be embedded deep in the human psyche.
    Though maybe it’s just our distant ancestors thinking “Rats, there goes dinner.”

    Reply
  56. Here in St Thomas, I have an array of geckos, green iguana, and parots, as well as the three cats and a great dane. We have seasonal British Laughing Guls, that come in the spring and summer. Most of our pelicans have already migrated along with the brown and white boobies. We had baby dolphins in the bay last week, and whales a month or so ago.

    Reply
  57. Here in St Thomas, I have an array of geckos, green iguana, and parots, as well as the three cats and a great dane. We have seasonal British Laughing Guls, that come in the spring and summer. Most of our pelicans have already migrated along with the brown and white boobies. We had baby dolphins in the bay last week, and whales a month or so ago.

    Reply
  58. Here in St Thomas, I have an array of geckos, green iguana, and parots, as well as the three cats and a great dane. We have seasonal British Laughing Guls, that come in the spring and summer. Most of our pelicans have already migrated along with the brown and white boobies. We had baby dolphins in the bay last week, and whales a month or so ago.

    Reply
  59. Here in St Thomas, I have an array of geckos, green iguana, and parots, as well as the three cats and a great dane. We have seasonal British Laughing Guls, that come in the spring and summer. Most of our pelicans have already migrated along with the brown and white boobies. We had baby dolphins in the bay last week, and whales a month or so ago.

    Reply
  60. Here in St Thomas, I have an array of geckos, green iguana, and parots, as well as the three cats and a great dane. We have seasonal British Laughing Guls, that come in the spring and summer. Most of our pelicans have already migrated along with the brown and white boobies. We had baby dolphins in the bay last week, and whales a month or so ago.

    Reply
  61. Hi Lynn —
    I envy you your foxes … though I suspect a family of local foxes would snack on my cat.
    I was afraid the bird feeding would attract bear — and I know we have bear because I see the scat — but it hasn’t so far.

    Reply
  62. Hi Lynn —
    I envy you your foxes … though I suspect a family of local foxes would snack on my cat.
    I was afraid the bird feeding would attract bear — and I know we have bear because I see the scat — but it hasn’t so far.

    Reply
  63. Hi Lynn —
    I envy you your foxes … though I suspect a family of local foxes would snack on my cat.
    I was afraid the bird feeding would attract bear — and I know we have bear because I see the scat — but it hasn’t so far.

    Reply
  64. Hi Lynn —
    I envy you your foxes … though I suspect a family of local foxes would snack on my cat.
    I was afraid the bird feeding would attract bear — and I know we have bear because I see the scat — but it hasn’t so far.

    Reply
  65. Hi Lynn —
    I envy you your foxes … though I suspect a family of local foxes would snack on my cat.
    I was afraid the bird feeding would attract bear — and I know we have bear because I see the scat — but it hasn’t so far.

    Reply
  66. Hi Faith —
    I’m wondering if I should get a bat box or two. I don’t see any bats in the evening, but they must be out there.
    I envy you your osprey. Cool.

    Reply
  67. Hi Faith —
    I’m wondering if I should get a bat box or two. I don’t see any bats in the evening, but they must be out there.
    I envy you your osprey. Cool.

    Reply
  68. Hi Faith —
    I’m wondering if I should get a bat box or two. I don’t see any bats in the evening, but they must be out there.
    I envy you your osprey. Cool.

    Reply
  69. Hi Faith —
    I’m wondering if I should get a bat box or two. I don’t see any bats in the evening, but they must be out there.
    I envy you your osprey. Cool.

    Reply
  70. Hi Faith —
    I’m wondering if I should get a bat box or two. I don’t see any bats in the evening, but they must be out there.
    I envy you your osprey. Cool.

    Reply
  71. Hi Artemisia —
    Even when the place is built up, there’s a wildness just from being near the water. I love it.

    Reply
  72. Hi Artemisia —
    Even when the place is built up, there’s a wildness just from being near the water. I love it.

    Reply
  73. Hi Artemisia —
    Even when the place is built up, there’s a wildness just from being near the water. I love it.

    Reply
  74. Hi Artemisia —
    Even when the place is built up, there’s a wildness just from being near the water. I love it.

    Reply
  75. Hi Artemisia —
    Even when the place is built up, there’s a wildness just from being near the water. I love it.

    Reply
  76. Hi Ella —
    Dolphins. I love dolphins. I used to spend a lot of time on the water and sometimes the dolphins would come play in the wake of the boat. You could just see them enjoying themselves.

    Reply
  77. Hi Ella —
    Dolphins. I love dolphins. I used to spend a lot of time on the water and sometimes the dolphins would come play in the wake of the boat. You could just see them enjoying themselves.

    Reply
  78. Hi Ella —
    Dolphins. I love dolphins. I used to spend a lot of time on the water and sometimes the dolphins would come play in the wake of the boat. You could just see them enjoying themselves.

    Reply
  79. Hi Ella —
    Dolphins. I love dolphins. I used to spend a lot of time on the water and sometimes the dolphins would come play in the wake of the boat. You could just see them enjoying themselves.

    Reply
  80. Hi Ella —
    Dolphins. I love dolphins. I used to spend a lot of time on the water and sometimes the dolphins would come play in the wake of the boat. You could just see them enjoying themselves.

    Reply
  81. LOL at Jo’s, “…the better sort of insect.”
    And Pat, for moles, put sticks of Juicy Fruit gum down the holes (sorry for sounding cruel, but they will destroy a garden).
    I live in a condo with two rescue cats. But a mother squirrel took up residence inside of my balcony half-wall. She enlarged a carpenter bee hole to get in and out. I talked to her when I saw her, calling her Girly-Squirrely. It got so she would hang out of the hole when she heard me drive in in the afternoon. So I’d have the cats looking out of the window by the door and the squirrel watching me from above. My family…

    Reply
  82. LOL at Jo’s, “…the better sort of insect.”
    And Pat, for moles, put sticks of Juicy Fruit gum down the holes (sorry for sounding cruel, but they will destroy a garden).
    I live in a condo with two rescue cats. But a mother squirrel took up residence inside of my balcony half-wall. She enlarged a carpenter bee hole to get in and out. I talked to her when I saw her, calling her Girly-Squirrely. It got so she would hang out of the hole when she heard me drive in in the afternoon. So I’d have the cats looking out of the window by the door and the squirrel watching me from above. My family…

    Reply
  83. LOL at Jo’s, “…the better sort of insect.”
    And Pat, for moles, put sticks of Juicy Fruit gum down the holes (sorry for sounding cruel, but they will destroy a garden).
    I live in a condo with two rescue cats. But a mother squirrel took up residence inside of my balcony half-wall. She enlarged a carpenter bee hole to get in and out. I talked to her when I saw her, calling her Girly-Squirrely. It got so she would hang out of the hole when she heard me drive in in the afternoon. So I’d have the cats looking out of the window by the door and the squirrel watching me from above. My family…

    Reply
  84. LOL at Jo’s, “…the better sort of insect.”
    And Pat, for moles, put sticks of Juicy Fruit gum down the holes (sorry for sounding cruel, but they will destroy a garden).
    I live in a condo with two rescue cats. But a mother squirrel took up residence inside of my balcony half-wall. She enlarged a carpenter bee hole to get in and out. I talked to her when I saw her, calling her Girly-Squirrely. It got so she would hang out of the hole when she heard me drive in in the afternoon. So I’d have the cats looking out of the window by the door and the squirrel watching me from above. My family…

    Reply
  85. LOL at Jo’s, “…the better sort of insect.”
    And Pat, for moles, put sticks of Juicy Fruit gum down the holes (sorry for sounding cruel, but they will destroy a garden).
    I live in a condo with two rescue cats. But a mother squirrel took up residence inside of my balcony half-wall. She enlarged a carpenter bee hole to get in and out. I talked to her when I saw her, calling her Girly-Squirrely. It got so she would hang out of the hole when she heard me drive in in the afternoon. So I’d have the cats looking out of the window by the door and the squirrel watching me from above. My family…

    Reply
  86. P. S. to Joanna – I lived in N. Va. for several years right in the middle of hunt country. The mama fox that lived in the big field next to us was always very friendly with my cats. The fox hounds… not so much.

    Reply
  87. P. S. to Joanna – I lived in N. Va. for several years right in the middle of hunt country. The mama fox that lived in the big field next to us was always very friendly with my cats. The fox hounds… not so much.

    Reply
  88. P. S. to Joanna – I lived in N. Va. for several years right in the middle of hunt country. The mama fox that lived in the big field next to us was always very friendly with my cats. The fox hounds… not so much.

    Reply
  89. P. S. to Joanna – I lived in N. Va. for several years right in the middle of hunt country. The mama fox that lived in the big field next to us was always very friendly with my cats. The fox hounds… not so much.

    Reply
  90. P. S. to Joanna – I lived in N. Va. for several years right in the middle of hunt country. The mama fox that lived in the big field next to us was always very friendly with my cats. The fox hounds… not so much.

    Reply
  91. I live a very urban life, but there’s a wildlife corridor less than a mile from house and we have a lot of animals who have adapted to city life. I see deer and enormous wild turkeys if I drive for more than ten minutes in almost any direction. We have raccoons and possum galore in our yards and parks storm drains! Fox and coyote too if you head up to any of the parks along the wildlife corridor. And just a couple weeks ago I startled a big red-tailed hawk eating a pigeon in my backyard! And yes, we have loads of hummingbirds. I specially planted my yard with plants for them and native butterflies.
    And I’m a pet person. My house and life are ruled by my sweet, lazy mastiff.
    One of the coolest things we have though is a large flock of wild parrots. They’re famous as “The Parrots of Telegraph Hill”, but they don’t in fact live on that hill. That’s just where a guy who feeds them lives. They nest and sleep in a park right next to my office. So when I walk in to work or out to lunch, there’s this marvelous exotic chatter coming from the trees. They’re quite cheeky too. If you eat in the park, they have no scruples whatsoever about begging or outright stealing.
    And I want a bat box too! But first I need to get the house painted. Don’t want to disturb them once they’ve made a home for themselves.

    Reply
  92. I live a very urban life, but there’s a wildlife corridor less than a mile from house and we have a lot of animals who have adapted to city life. I see deer and enormous wild turkeys if I drive for more than ten minutes in almost any direction. We have raccoons and possum galore in our yards and parks storm drains! Fox and coyote too if you head up to any of the parks along the wildlife corridor. And just a couple weeks ago I startled a big red-tailed hawk eating a pigeon in my backyard! And yes, we have loads of hummingbirds. I specially planted my yard with plants for them and native butterflies.
    And I’m a pet person. My house and life are ruled by my sweet, lazy mastiff.
    One of the coolest things we have though is a large flock of wild parrots. They’re famous as “The Parrots of Telegraph Hill”, but they don’t in fact live on that hill. That’s just where a guy who feeds them lives. They nest and sleep in a park right next to my office. So when I walk in to work or out to lunch, there’s this marvelous exotic chatter coming from the trees. They’re quite cheeky too. If you eat in the park, they have no scruples whatsoever about begging or outright stealing.
    And I want a bat box too! But first I need to get the house painted. Don’t want to disturb them once they’ve made a home for themselves.

    Reply
  93. I live a very urban life, but there’s a wildlife corridor less than a mile from house and we have a lot of animals who have adapted to city life. I see deer and enormous wild turkeys if I drive for more than ten minutes in almost any direction. We have raccoons and possum galore in our yards and parks storm drains! Fox and coyote too if you head up to any of the parks along the wildlife corridor. And just a couple weeks ago I startled a big red-tailed hawk eating a pigeon in my backyard! And yes, we have loads of hummingbirds. I specially planted my yard with plants for them and native butterflies.
    And I’m a pet person. My house and life are ruled by my sweet, lazy mastiff.
    One of the coolest things we have though is a large flock of wild parrots. They’re famous as “The Parrots of Telegraph Hill”, but they don’t in fact live on that hill. That’s just where a guy who feeds them lives. They nest and sleep in a park right next to my office. So when I walk in to work or out to lunch, there’s this marvelous exotic chatter coming from the trees. They’re quite cheeky too. If you eat in the park, they have no scruples whatsoever about begging or outright stealing.
    And I want a bat box too! But first I need to get the house painted. Don’t want to disturb them once they’ve made a home for themselves.

    Reply
  94. I live a very urban life, but there’s a wildlife corridor less than a mile from house and we have a lot of animals who have adapted to city life. I see deer and enormous wild turkeys if I drive for more than ten minutes in almost any direction. We have raccoons and possum galore in our yards and parks storm drains! Fox and coyote too if you head up to any of the parks along the wildlife corridor. And just a couple weeks ago I startled a big red-tailed hawk eating a pigeon in my backyard! And yes, we have loads of hummingbirds. I specially planted my yard with plants for them and native butterflies.
    And I’m a pet person. My house and life are ruled by my sweet, lazy mastiff.
    One of the coolest things we have though is a large flock of wild parrots. They’re famous as “The Parrots of Telegraph Hill”, but they don’t in fact live on that hill. That’s just where a guy who feeds them lives. They nest and sleep in a park right next to my office. So when I walk in to work or out to lunch, there’s this marvelous exotic chatter coming from the trees. They’re quite cheeky too. If you eat in the park, they have no scruples whatsoever about begging or outright stealing.
    And I want a bat box too! But first I need to get the house painted. Don’t want to disturb them once they’ve made a home for themselves.

    Reply
  95. I live a very urban life, but there’s a wildlife corridor less than a mile from house and we have a lot of animals who have adapted to city life. I see deer and enormous wild turkeys if I drive for more than ten minutes in almost any direction. We have raccoons and possum galore in our yards and parks storm drains! Fox and coyote too if you head up to any of the parks along the wildlife corridor. And just a couple weeks ago I startled a big red-tailed hawk eating a pigeon in my backyard! And yes, we have loads of hummingbirds. I specially planted my yard with plants for them and native butterflies.
    And I’m a pet person. My house and life are ruled by my sweet, lazy mastiff.
    One of the coolest things we have though is a large flock of wild parrots. They’re famous as “The Parrots of Telegraph Hill”, but they don’t in fact live on that hill. That’s just where a guy who feeds them lives. They nest and sleep in a park right next to my office. So when I walk in to work or out to lunch, there’s this marvelous exotic chatter coming from the trees. They’re quite cheeky too. If you eat in the park, they have no scruples whatsoever about begging or outright stealing.
    And I want a bat box too! But first I need to get the house painted. Don’t want to disturb them once they’ve made a home for themselves.

    Reply
  96. We have a pair of Roadrunners. They have raised one or two offspring for the last several years
    You haven’t lived until a pair of humming birds zoom past your ears while sitting on our deck. Little “buzzbombs”
    I have counted over 175 Crows on a flyover to the avocado grove across the canyon.
    They have robbed the eggs from chicken nests. I’m not too happy about that. I have pictures of about 65 sitting on the power lines.

    Reply
  97. We have a pair of Roadrunners. They have raised one or two offspring for the last several years
    You haven’t lived until a pair of humming birds zoom past your ears while sitting on our deck. Little “buzzbombs”
    I have counted over 175 Crows on a flyover to the avocado grove across the canyon.
    They have robbed the eggs from chicken nests. I’m not too happy about that. I have pictures of about 65 sitting on the power lines.

    Reply
  98. We have a pair of Roadrunners. They have raised one or two offspring for the last several years
    You haven’t lived until a pair of humming birds zoom past your ears while sitting on our deck. Little “buzzbombs”
    I have counted over 175 Crows on a flyover to the avocado grove across the canyon.
    They have robbed the eggs from chicken nests. I’m not too happy about that. I have pictures of about 65 sitting on the power lines.

    Reply
  99. We have a pair of Roadrunners. They have raised one or two offspring for the last several years
    You haven’t lived until a pair of humming birds zoom past your ears while sitting on our deck. Little “buzzbombs”
    I have counted over 175 Crows on a flyover to the avocado grove across the canyon.
    They have robbed the eggs from chicken nests. I’m not too happy about that. I have pictures of about 65 sitting on the power lines.

    Reply
  100. We have a pair of Roadrunners. They have raised one or two offspring for the last several years
    You haven’t lived until a pair of humming birds zoom past your ears while sitting on our deck. Little “buzzbombs”
    I have counted over 175 Crows on a flyover to the avocado grove across the canyon.
    They have robbed the eggs from chicken nests. I’m not too happy about that. I have pictures of about 65 sitting on the power lines.

    Reply
  101. Hi Donna —
    I hate to let the cat out after dark. Even if I trusted the foxes . . . I’m pretty sure we have coyotes. I hear them yip yip yipping up in the woods.

    Reply
  102. Hi Donna —
    I hate to let the cat out after dark. Even if I trusted the foxes . . . I’m pretty sure we have coyotes. I hear them yip yip yipping up in the woods.

    Reply
  103. Hi Donna —
    I hate to let the cat out after dark. Even if I trusted the foxes . . . I’m pretty sure we have coyotes. I hear them yip yip yipping up in the woods.

    Reply
  104. Hi Donna —
    I hate to let the cat out after dark. Even if I trusted the foxes . . . I’m pretty sure we have coyotes. I hear them yip yip yipping up in the woods.

    Reply
  105. Hi Donna —
    I hate to let the cat out after dark. Even if I trusted the foxes . . . I’m pretty sure we have coyotes. I hear them yip yip yipping up in the woods.

    Reply
  106. Hi Isobel —
    I cannot tell you how happy I am when folks have the time and space and love to take care of the big dog breeds.
    They are such wonderful fellows, those great hounds and mastiffs. They’ve been with us since Roman times, some of them. Living history.

    Reply
  107. Hi Isobel —
    I cannot tell you how happy I am when folks have the time and space and love to take care of the big dog breeds.
    They are such wonderful fellows, those great hounds and mastiffs. They’ve been with us since Roman times, some of them. Living history.

    Reply
  108. Hi Isobel —
    I cannot tell you how happy I am when folks have the time and space and love to take care of the big dog breeds.
    They are such wonderful fellows, those great hounds and mastiffs. They’ve been with us since Roman times, some of them. Living history.

    Reply
  109. Hi Isobel —
    I cannot tell you how happy I am when folks have the time and space and love to take care of the big dog breeds.
    They are such wonderful fellows, those great hounds and mastiffs. They’ve been with us since Roman times, some of them. Living history.

    Reply
  110. Hi Isobel —
    I cannot tell you how happy I am when folks have the time and space and love to take care of the big dog breeds.
    They are such wonderful fellows, those great hounds and mastiffs. They’ve been with us since Roman times, some of them. Living history.

    Reply
  111. Hi Louis —
    A murder of crows. So well named. Yes. Great birds and important in the general scheme of things, but I am not terribly fond of them.
    We have turkey buzzards here. Just huge old things. I would worry about my cat being carried off, but anything that grabbed her would just get a claw-full of fluff.

    Reply
  112. Hi Louis —
    A murder of crows. So well named. Yes. Great birds and important in the general scheme of things, but I am not terribly fond of them.
    We have turkey buzzards here. Just huge old things. I would worry about my cat being carried off, but anything that grabbed her would just get a claw-full of fluff.

    Reply
  113. Hi Louis —
    A murder of crows. So well named. Yes. Great birds and important in the general scheme of things, but I am not terribly fond of them.
    We have turkey buzzards here. Just huge old things. I would worry about my cat being carried off, but anything that grabbed her would just get a claw-full of fluff.

    Reply
  114. Hi Louis —
    A murder of crows. So well named. Yes. Great birds and important in the general scheme of things, but I am not terribly fond of them.
    We have turkey buzzards here. Just huge old things. I would worry about my cat being carried off, but anything that grabbed her would just get a claw-full of fluff.

    Reply
  115. Hi Louis —
    A murder of crows. So well named. Yes. Great birds and important in the general scheme of things, but I am not terribly fond of them.
    We have turkey buzzards here. Just huge old things. I would worry about my cat being carried off, but anything that grabbed her would just get a claw-full of fluff.

    Reply
  116. I have two cats inside. I live in a condo so don’t see much wild life. Sometimes I see a rabbit, chipmunks, and squirrels,
    I work down town on the 27th floor of a 28 story building and am sometimes privileged to see Falcons ( birds not football players) outside our windows. they used to come around more frequently before buildings went up on every side. However we might see them six times a year .
    One of my favorite memories is of walking my daughter home from her preschool when we would investigate dandelions, persimmons, camellias, Queen Anne’s Lace. Usually the only animals we saw were dogs.
    We used to have woodpeckers pecking at the shingles of the house and possums and rabbits in the backyard.

    Reply
  117. I have two cats inside. I live in a condo so don’t see much wild life. Sometimes I see a rabbit, chipmunks, and squirrels,
    I work down town on the 27th floor of a 28 story building and am sometimes privileged to see Falcons ( birds not football players) outside our windows. they used to come around more frequently before buildings went up on every side. However we might see them six times a year .
    One of my favorite memories is of walking my daughter home from her preschool when we would investigate dandelions, persimmons, camellias, Queen Anne’s Lace. Usually the only animals we saw were dogs.
    We used to have woodpeckers pecking at the shingles of the house and possums and rabbits in the backyard.

    Reply
  118. I have two cats inside. I live in a condo so don’t see much wild life. Sometimes I see a rabbit, chipmunks, and squirrels,
    I work down town on the 27th floor of a 28 story building and am sometimes privileged to see Falcons ( birds not football players) outside our windows. they used to come around more frequently before buildings went up on every side. However we might see them six times a year .
    One of my favorite memories is of walking my daughter home from her preschool when we would investigate dandelions, persimmons, camellias, Queen Anne’s Lace. Usually the only animals we saw were dogs.
    We used to have woodpeckers pecking at the shingles of the house and possums and rabbits in the backyard.

    Reply
  119. I have two cats inside. I live in a condo so don’t see much wild life. Sometimes I see a rabbit, chipmunks, and squirrels,
    I work down town on the 27th floor of a 28 story building and am sometimes privileged to see Falcons ( birds not football players) outside our windows. they used to come around more frequently before buildings went up on every side. However we might see them six times a year .
    One of my favorite memories is of walking my daughter home from her preschool when we would investigate dandelions, persimmons, camellias, Queen Anne’s Lace. Usually the only animals we saw were dogs.
    We used to have woodpeckers pecking at the shingles of the house and possums and rabbits in the backyard.

    Reply
  120. I have two cats inside. I live in a condo so don’t see much wild life. Sometimes I see a rabbit, chipmunks, and squirrels,
    I work down town on the 27th floor of a 28 story building and am sometimes privileged to see Falcons ( birds not football players) outside our windows. they used to come around more frequently before buildings went up on every side. However we might see them six times a year .
    One of my favorite memories is of walking my daughter home from her preschool when we would investigate dandelions, persimmons, camellias, Queen Anne’s Lace. Usually the only animals we saw were dogs.
    We used to have woodpeckers pecking at the shingles of the house and possums and rabbits in the backyard.

    Reply
  121. Sadly, I have one less dog in my life as we had to put our older Dobe down a week and a half ago. It’s been very, very hard adjusting, more than I thought. I go in the bedroom and the raggy old loveseat they slept on is there and I think I catch Chance out of the corner of my eye, but he’s gone. My younger Dobe has lost a bit of the spring in her step, but I think she’ll adjust eventually. We all will. Our border cat just takes things in stride.
    I’m a mile from the mall though my property goes 150 feet into a nature preserve so I still have deer, fox, and even coyote in my backyard. I hung my hummer feeder out at the beginning of May and they started showing up two days after. The cat sits on one side of the screen, fascinated while on the other, the hummers tap against it just to irritate her.
    I don’t have a lot of squirrels and chipmunks anymore though thanks to the red-tail hawk and the pair of owls living behind me.

    Reply
  122. Sadly, I have one less dog in my life as we had to put our older Dobe down a week and a half ago. It’s been very, very hard adjusting, more than I thought. I go in the bedroom and the raggy old loveseat they slept on is there and I think I catch Chance out of the corner of my eye, but he’s gone. My younger Dobe has lost a bit of the spring in her step, but I think she’ll adjust eventually. We all will. Our border cat just takes things in stride.
    I’m a mile from the mall though my property goes 150 feet into a nature preserve so I still have deer, fox, and even coyote in my backyard. I hung my hummer feeder out at the beginning of May and they started showing up two days after. The cat sits on one side of the screen, fascinated while on the other, the hummers tap against it just to irritate her.
    I don’t have a lot of squirrels and chipmunks anymore though thanks to the red-tail hawk and the pair of owls living behind me.

    Reply
  123. Sadly, I have one less dog in my life as we had to put our older Dobe down a week and a half ago. It’s been very, very hard adjusting, more than I thought. I go in the bedroom and the raggy old loveseat they slept on is there and I think I catch Chance out of the corner of my eye, but he’s gone. My younger Dobe has lost a bit of the spring in her step, but I think she’ll adjust eventually. We all will. Our border cat just takes things in stride.
    I’m a mile from the mall though my property goes 150 feet into a nature preserve so I still have deer, fox, and even coyote in my backyard. I hung my hummer feeder out at the beginning of May and they started showing up two days after. The cat sits on one side of the screen, fascinated while on the other, the hummers tap against it just to irritate her.
    I don’t have a lot of squirrels and chipmunks anymore though thanks to the red-tail hawk and the pair of owls living behind me.

    Reply
  124. Sadly, I have one less dog in my life as we had to put our older Dobe down a week and a half ago. It’s been very, very hard adjusting, more than I thought. I go in the bedroom and the raggy old loveseat they slept on is there and I think I catch Chance out of the corner of my eye, but he’s gone. My younger Dobe has lost a bit of the spring in her step, but I think she’ll adjust eventually. We all will. Our border cat just takes things in stride.
    I’m a mile from the mall though my property goes 150 feet into a nature preserve so I still have deer, fox, and even coyote in my backyard. I hung my hummer feeder out at the beginning of May and they started showing up two days after. The cat sits on one side of the screen, fascinated while on the other, the hummers tap against it just to irritate her.
    I don’t have a lot of squirrels and chipmunks anymore though thanks to the red-tail hawk and the pair of owls living behind me.

    Reply
  125. Sadly, I have one less dog in my life as we had to put our older Dobe down a week and a half ago. It’s been very, very hard adjusting, more than I thought. I go in the bedroom and the raggy old loveseat they slept on is there and I think I catch Chance out of the corner of my eye, but he’s gone. My younger Dobe has lost a bit of the spring in her step, but I think she’ll adjust eventually. We all will. Our border cat just takes things in stride.
    I’m a mile from the mall though my property goes 150 feet into a nature preserve so I still have deer, fox, and even coyote in my backyard. I hung my hummer feeder out at the beginning of May and they started showing up two days after. The cat sits on one side of the screen, fascinated while on the other, the hummers tap against it just to irritate her.
    I don’t have a lot of squirrels and chipmunks anymore though thanks to the red-tail hawk and the pair of owls living behind me.

    Reply
  126. Hi Nancy —
    I understand that some town put up nesting boxes for hawks, who then live on the city pigeons. Seems like a win-win solution for everybody, except the pigeons.

    Reply
  127. Hi Nancy —
    I understand that some town put up nesting boxes for hawks, who then live on the city pigeons. Seems like a win-win solution for everybody, except the pigeons.

    Reply
  128. Hi Nancy —
    I understand that some town put up nesting boxes for hawks, who then live on the city pigeons. Seems like a win-win solution for everybody, except the pigeons.

    Reply
  129. Hi Nancy —
    I understand that some town put up nesting boxes for hawks, who then live on the city pigeons. Seems like a win-win solution for everybody, except the pigeons.

    Reply
  130. Hi Nancy —
    I understand that some town put up nesting boxes for hawks, who then live on the city pigeons. Seems like a win-win solution for everybody, except the pigeons.

    Reply
  131. Hi Theo —
    I am so sorry. I had to do the same last month. It was very hard.
    I think I would rather have red-tailed hawk than squirrels. (jo thinks it over.) No. I am SURE I would rather have owl and re-tailed hawk than Squirrels.
    I have heard an owl in the woods once or twice. I’d be glad to see a few closer.

    Reply
  132. Hi Theo —
    I am so sorry. I had to do the same last month. It was very hard.
    I think I would rather have red-tailed hawk than squirrels. (jo thinks it over.) No. I am SURE I would rather have owl and re-tailed hawk than Squirrels.
    I have heard an owl in the woods once or twice. I’d be glad to see a few closer.

    Reply
  133. Hi Theo —
    I am so sorry. I had to do the same last month. It was very hard.
    I think I would rather have red-tailed hawk than squirrels. (jo thinks it over.) No. I am SURE I would rather have owl and re-tailed hawk than Squirrels.
    I have heard an owl in the woods once or twice. I’d be glad to see a few closer.

    Reply
  134. Hi Theo —
    I am so sorry. I had to do the same last month. It was very hard.
    I think I would rather have red-tailed hawk than squirrels. (jo thinks it over.) No. I am SURE I would rather have owl and re-tailed hawk than Squirrels.
    I have heard an owl in the woods once or twice. I’d be glad to see a few closer.

    Reply
  135. Hi Theo —
    I am so sorry. I had to do the same last month. It was very hard.
    I think I would rather have red-tailed hawk than squirrels. (jo thinks it over.) No. I am SURE I would rather have owl and re-tailed hawk than Squirrels.
    I have heard an owl in the woods once or twice. I’d be glad to see a few closer.

    Reply
  136. Joanna, thanks so much for putting this together. I’ve been so enjoying all the tales of wild and not so wild animals — and toddlers When I was in Maryland, my most magical memories were of hummingbirds feeding from plants in hanging baskets right outside the window, and also of early morning deer.
    Theo — hugs on having to say goodbye to your beloved old Dobe. They do leave such a hole in our lives when they’re gone, don’t they?

    Reply
  137. Joanna, thanks so much for putting this together. I’ve been so enjoying all the tales of wild and not so wild animals — and toddlers When I was in Maryland, my most magical memories were of hummingbirds feeding from plants in hanging baskets right outside the window, and also of early morning deer.
    Theo — hugs on having to say goodbye to your beloved old Dobe. They do leave such a hole in our lives when they’re gone, don’t they?

    Reply
  138. Joanna, thanks so much for putting this together. I’ve been so enjoying all the tales of wild and not so wild animals — and toddlers When I was in Maryland, my most magical memories were of hummingbirds feeding from plants in hanging baskets right outside the window, and also of early morning deer.
    Theo — hugs on having to say goodbye to your beloved old Dobe. They do leave such a hole in our lives when they’re gone, don’t they?

    Reply
  139. Joanna, thanks so much for putting this together. I’ve been so enjoying all the tales of wild and not so wild animals — and toddlers When I was in Maryland, my most magical memories were of hummingbirds feeding from plants in hanging baskets right outside the window, and also of early morning deer.
    Theo — hugs on having to say goodbye to your beloved old Dobe. They do leave such a hole in our lives when they’re gone, don’t they?

    Reply
  140. Joanna, thanks so much for putting this together. I’ve been so enjoying all the tales of wild and not so wild animals — and toddlers When I was in Maryland, my most magical memories were of hummingbirds feeding from plants in hanging baskets right outside the window, and also of early morning deer.
    Theo — hugs on having to say goodbye to your beloved old Dobe. They do leave such a hole in our lives when they’re gone, don’t they?

    Reply
  141. Yes. Once in a while we will have a mother dolphin teaching her baby how to hunt. Our little dock area is quite shallow, but the calf will come in to nose around. The adult will swim back and forth further out in the deeper water, keeping guard. Others swear they have seen a manatee, but I never have.
    Tarpon also occasionally use our marina area for mating activities and that is something to see! They leap and twist and dance!

    Reply
  142. Yes. Once in a while we will have a mother dolphin teaching her baby how to hunt. Our little dock area is quite shallow, but the calf will come in to nose around. The adult will swim back and forth further out in the deeper water, keeping guard. Others swear they have seen a manatee, but I never have.
    Tarpon also occasionally use our marina area for mating activities and that is something to see! They leap and twist and dance!

    Reply
  143. Yes. Once in a while we will have a mother dolphin teaching her baby how to hunt. Our little dock area is quite shallow, but the calf will come in to nose around. The adult will swim back and forth further out in the deeper water, keeping guard. Others swear they have seen a manatee, but I never have.
    Tarpon also occasionally use our marina area for mating activities and that is something to see! They leap and twist and dance!

    Reply
  144. Yes. Once in a while we will have a mother dolphin teaching her baby how to hunt. Our little dock area is quite shallow, but the calf will come in to nose around. The adult will swim back and forth further out in the deeper water, keeping guard. Others swear they have seen a manatee, but I never have.
    Tarpon also occasionally use our marina area for mating activities and that is something to see! They leap and twist and dance!

    Reply
  145. Yes. Once in a while we will have a mother dolphin teaching her baby how to hunt. Our little dock area is quite shallow, but the calf will come in to nose around. The adult will swim back and forth further out in the deeper water, keeping guard. Others swear they have seen a manatee, but I never have.
    Tarpon also occasionally use our marina area for mating activities and that is something to see! They leap and twist and dance!

    Reply
  146. Tarpon mating … now that has a place in some contemporary Romance.
    I don’t add as much wildlife to my books as I should, probably. There’s ways it could be part of the story …

    Reply
  147. Tarpon mating … now that has a place in some contemporary Romance.
    I don’t add as much wildlife to my books as I should, probably. There’s ways it could be part of the story …

    Reply
  148. Tarpon mating … now that has a place in some contemporary Romance.
    I don’t add as much wildlife to my books as I should, probably. There’s ways it could be part of the story …

    Reply
  149. Tarpon mating … now that has a place in some contemporary Romance.
    I don’t add as much wildlife to my books as I should, probably. There’s ways it could be part of the story …

    Reply
  150. Tarpon mating … now that has a place in some contemporary Romance.
    I don’t add as much wildlife to my books as I should, probably. There’s ways it could be part of the story …

    Reply
  151. Juicy Fruit for moles! Yes, I remember trying that once some time back. If I recall, it might have got one of the critters. I think the rest learned a lesson. That’s the thing about critters, they’re really not as dumb as we’d like to think.

    Reply
  152. Juicy Fruit for moles! Yes, I remember trying that once some time back. If I recall, it might have got one of the critters. I think the rest learned a lesson. That’s the thing about critters, they’re really not as dumb as we’d like to think.

    Reply
  153. Juicy Fruit for moles! Yes, I remember trying that once some time back. If I recall, it might have got one of the critters. I think the rest learned a lesson. That’s the thing about critters, they’re really not as dumb as we’d like to think.

    Reply
  154. Juicy Fruit for moles! Yes, I remember trying that once some time back. If I recall, it might have got one of the critters. I think the rest learned a lesson. That’s the thing about critters, they’re really not as dumb as we’d like to think.

    Reply
  155. Juicy Fruit for moles! Yes, I remember trying that once some time back. If I recall, it might have got one of the critters. I think the rest learned a lesson. That’s the thing about critters, they’re really not as dumb as we’d like to think.

    Reply
  156. Joanna, I’m so sorry for your loss as well. And thank you and Anne too. We’re getting a bit better every day…
    I failed to mention the mouse that has moved in! Our border cat seems to think it’s a friend instead of something to be dispatched. I have tried peanut butter, seeds, cooked egg…it’s WAY smarter than I am though because all it did when the visiting cat did was disappear until he left. Now, the border cat just watches the mouse wander around…
    And I don’t have the heart to kill the mouse. I just can’t.

    Reply
  157. Joanna, I’m so sorry for your loss as well. And thank you and Anne too. We’re getting a bit better every day…
    I failed to mention the mouse that has moved in! Our border cat seems to think it’s a friend instead of something to be dispatched. I have tried peanut butter, seeds, cooked egg…it’s WAY smarter than I am though because all it did when the visiting cat did was disappear until he left. Now, the border cat just watches the mouse wander around…
    And I don’t have the heart to kill the mouse. I just can’t.

    Reply
  158. Joanna, I’m so sorry for your loss as well. And thank you and Anne too. We’re getting a bit better every day…
    I failed to mention the mouse that has moved in! Our border cat seems to think it’s a friend instead of something to be dispatched. I have tried peanut butter, seeds, cooked egg…it’s WAY smarter than I am though because all it did when the visiting cat did was disappear until he left. Now, the border cat just watches the mouse wander around…
    And I don’t have the heart to kill the mouse. I just can’t.

    Reply
  159. Joanna, I’m so sorry for your loss as well. And thank you and Anne too. We’re getting a bit better every day…
    I failed to mention the mouse that has moved in! Our border cat seems to think it’s a friend instead of something to be dispatched. I have tried peanut butter, seeds, cooked egg…it’s WAY smarter than I am though because all it did when the visiting cat did was disappear until he left. Now, the border cat just watches the mouse wander around…
    And I don’t have the heart to kill the mouse. I just can’t.

    Reply
  160. Joanna, I’m so sorry for your loss as well. And thank you and Anne too. We’re getting a bit better every day…
    I failed to mention the mouse that has moved in! Our border cat seems to think it’s a friend instead of something to be dispatched. I have tried peanut butter, seeds, cooked egg…it’s WAY smarter than I am though because all it did when the visiting cat did was disappear until he left. Now, the border cat just watches the mouse wander around…
    And I don’t have the heart to kill the mouse. I just can’t.

    Reply
  161. Hi Theo —
    I’ve had cat who caught mice. I’ve had cats who yawned and said, “Whatever.”
    My current cat — who looks totally useless — is a mondo mouse killer.
    Nokill Mouse trap:
    — Get a trash bin. A full sized one.
    — Take a ruler or yardstick or equivalent bit of wood.
    — Put peanut butter on one end.
    –Prop it nice and steady with the peanut butter end out over the bin.

    Reply
  162. Hi Theo —
    I’ve had cat who caught mice. I’ve had cats who yawned and said, “Whatever.”
    My current cat — who looks totally useless — is a mondo mouse killer.
    Nokill Mouse trap:
    — Get a trash bin. A full sized one.
    — Take a ruler or yardstick or equivalent bit of wood.
    — Put peanut butter on one end.
    –Prop it nice and steady with the peanut butter end out over the bin.

    Reply
  163. Hi Theo —
    I’ve had cat who caught mice. I’ve had cats who yawned and said, “Whatever.”
    My current cat — who looks totally useless — is a mondo mouse killer.
    Nokill Mouse trap:
    — Get a trash bin. A full sized one.
    — Take a ruler or yardstick or equivalent bit of wood.
    — Put peanut butter on one end.
    –Prop it nice and steady with the peanut butter end out over the bin.

    Reply
  164. Hi Theo —
    I’ve had cat who caught mice. I’ve had cats who yawned and said, “Whatever.”
    My current cat — who looks totally useless — is a mondo mouse killer.
    Nokill Mouse trap:
    — Get a trash bin. A full sized one.
    — Take a ruler or yardstick or equivalent bit of wood.
    — Put peanut butter on one end.
    –Prop it nice and steady with the peanut butter end out over the bin.

    Reply
  165. Hi Theo —
    I’ve had cat who caught mice. I’ve had cats who yawned and said, “Whatever.”
    My current cat — who looks totally useless — is a mondo mouse killer.
    Nokill Mouse trap:
    — Get a trash bin. A full sized one.
    — Take a ruler or yardstick or equivalent bit of wood.
    — Put peanut butter on one end.
    –Prop it nice and steady with the peanut butter end out over the bin.

    Reply
  166. Sherrie, here.
    I live deep in the country, so I have tons of wildlife around here: bears (lots of bears!), coyotes, raccoons, cougars (the sound of a cougar’s call is exactly like a woman screaming, and it’ll make the hairs on the back of your neck go rigid with alarm!), owls, hawks, bald eagles, etc. And of course I have my pets: a Doberman and a Boxer, a tabby cat, and until he died a few weeks ago, a horse I’d owned for 30 years, ever since he was an embryo.
    I used to work in downtown Tacoma, Washington, where they have a tall Sheraton Hotel with a ritzy restaurant on the top floor. Peregrine falcons used to bring their kills (usually pigeons) to the ledge outside the restaurant’s windows, and then pluck and dismember the kill . . . in front of dozens of horrified lunch-goers. *g* I know it’s rude of me to laugh, but I found that hilarious!

    Reply
  167. Sherrie, here.
    I live deep in the country, so I have tons of wildlife around here: bears (lots of bears!), coyotes, raccoons, cougars (the sound of a cougar’s call is exactly like a woman screaming, and it’ll make the hairs on the back of your neck go rigid with alarm!), owls, hawks, bald eagles, etc. And of course I have my pets: a Doberman and a Boxer, a tabby cat, and until he died a few weeks ago, a horse I’d owned for 30 years, ever since he was an embryo.
    I used to work in downtown Tacoma, Washington, where they have a tall Sheraton Hotel with a ritzy restaurant on the top floor. Peregrine falcons used to bring their kills (usually pigeons) to the ledge outside the restaurant’s windows, and then pluck and dismember the kill . . . in front of dozens of horrified lunch-goers. *g* I know it’s rude of me to laugh, but I found that hilarious!

    Reply
  168. Sherrie, here.
    I live deep in the country, so I have tons of wildlife around here: bears (lots of bears!), coyotes, raccoons, cougars (the sound of a cougar’s call is exactly like a woman screaming, and it’ll make the hairs on the back of your neck go rigid with alarm!), owls, hawks, bald eagles, etc. And of course I have my pets: a Doberman and a Boxer, a tabby cat, and until he died a few weeks ago, a horse I’d owned for 30 years, ever since he was an embryo.
    I used to work in downtown Tacoma, Washington, where they have a tall Sheraton Hotel with a ritzy restaurant on the top floor. Peregrine falcons used to bring their kills (usually pigeons) to the ledge outside the restaurant’s windows, and then pluck and dismember the kill . . . in front of dozens of horrified lunch-goers. *g* I know it’s rude of me to laugh, but I found that hilarious!

    Reply
  169. Sherrie, here.
    I live deep in the country, so I have tons of wildlife around here: bears (lots of bears!), coyotes, raccoons, cougars (the sound of a cougar’s call is exactly like a woman screaming, and it’ll make the hairs on the back of your neck go rigid with alarm!), owls, hawks, bald eagles, etc. And of course I have my pets: a Doberman and a Boxer, a tabby cat, and until he died a few weeks ago, a horse I’d owned for 30 years, ever since he was an embryo.
    I used to work in downtown Tacoma, Washington, where they have a tall Sheraton Hotel with a ritzy restaurant on the top floor. Peregrine falcons used to bring their kills (usually pigeons) to the ledge outside the restaurant’s windows, and then pluck and dismember the kill . . . in front of dozens of horrified lunch-goers. *g* I know it’s rude of me to laugh, but I found that hilarious!

    Reply
  170. Sherrie, here.
    I live deep in the country, so I have tons of wildlife around here: bears (lots of bears!), coyotes, raccoons, cougars (the sound of a cougar’s call is exactly like a woman screaming, and it’ll make the hairs on the back of your neck go rigid with alarm!), owls, hawks, bald eagles, etc. And of course I have my pets: a Doberman and a Boxer, a tabby cat, and until he died a few weeks ago, a horse I’d owned for 30 years, ever since he was an embryo.
    I used to work in downtown Tacoma, Washington, where they have a tall Sheraton Hotel with a ritzy restaurant on the top floor. Peregrine falcons used to bring their kills (usually pigeons) to the ledge outside the restaurant’s windows, and then pluck and dismember the kill . . . in front of dozens of horrified lunch-goers. *g* I know it’s rude of me to laugh, but I found that hilarious!

    Reply
  171. Hi Sherrie —
    The Peregrine thing is so funny. I’m like this with the cat. I do NOT want to know about what she does with all these mice.

    Reply
  172. Hi Sherrie —
    The Peregrine thing is so funny. I’m like this with the cat. I do NOT want to know about what she does with all these mice.

    Reply
  173. Hi Sherrie —
    The Peregrine thing is so funny. I’m like this with the cat. I do NOT want to know about what she does with all these mice.

    Reply
  174. Hi Sherrie —
    The Peregrine thing is so funny. I’m like this with the cat. I do NOT want to know about what she does with all these mice.

    Reply
  175. Hi Sherrie —
    The Peregrine thing is so funny. I’m like this with the cat. I do NOT want to know about what she does with all these mice.

    Reply
  176. Oh geez, Sherrie, is that funny about the falcons! I’m still laughing here.
    I caught our mousie this morning in a live trap (I tried the wastebasket and it would have nothing to do with that, so bought one of those little gray live trap thingies) and this morning it was sprung. Took the trap outside in the dark, turned on my flashlight and lifted the lid. Out comes fuzzy whiskers, giggling and wriggling, then a little pink nose followed, then GONE! That quick. Never even saw how big it was. But it will be happy in the woodpile and I’ll be happy not having to clean up after it anymore so it’s a win-win. The only one who will be upset is our visiting cat who is coming back this weekend to stay for a week. I bet his spends hours in front of the stove just waiting…

    Reply
  177. Oh geez, Sherrie, is that funny about the falcons! I’m still laughing here.
    I caught our mousie this morning in a live trap (I tried the wastebasket and it would have nothing to do with that, so bought one of those little gray live trap thingies) and this morning it was sprung. Took the trap outside in the dark, turned on my flashlight and lifted the lid. Out comes fuzzy whiskers, giggling and wriggling, then a little pink nose followed, then GONE! That quick. Never even saw how big it was. But it will be happy in the woodpile and I’ll be happy not having to clean up after it anymore so it’s a win-win. The only one who will be upset is our visiting cat who is coming back this weekend to stay for a week. I bet his spends hours in front of the stove just waiting…

    Reply
  178. Oh geez, Sherrie, is that funny about the falcons! I’m still laughing here.
    I caught our mousie this morning in a live trap (I tried the wastebasket and it would have nothing to do with that, so bought one of those little gray live trap thingies) and this morning it was sprung. Took the trap outside in the dark, turned on my flashlight and lifted the lid. Out comes fuzzy whiskers, giggling and wriggling, then a little pink nose followed, then GONE! That quick. Never even saw how big it was. But it will be happy in the woodpile and I’ll be happy not having to clean up after it anymore so it’s a win-win. The only one who will be upset is our visiting cat who is coming back this weekend to stay for a week. I bet his spends hours in front of the stove just waiting…

    Reply
  179. Oh geez, Sherrie, is that funny about the falcons! I’m still laughing here.
    I caught our mousie this morning in a live trap (I tried the wastebasket and it would have nothing to do with that, so bought one of those little gray live trap thingies) and this morning it was sprung. Took the trap outside in the dark, turned on my flashlight and lifted the lid. Out comes fuzzy whiskers, giggling and wriggling, then a little pink nose followed, then GONE! That quick. Never even saw how big it was. But it will be happy in the woodpile and I’ll be happy not having to clean up after it anymore so it’s a win-win. The only one who will be upset is our visiting cat who is coming back this weekend to stay for a week. I bet his spends hours in front of the stove just waiting…

    Reply
  180. Oh geez, Sherrie, is that funny about the falcons! I’m still laughing here.
    I caught our mousie this morning in a live trap (I tried the wastebasket and it would have nothing to do with that, so bought one of those little gray live trap thingies) and this morning it was sprung. Took the trap outside in the dark, turned on my flashlight and lifted the lid. Out comes fuzzy whiskers, giggling and wriggling, then a little pink nose followed, then GONE! That quick. Never even saw how big it was. But it will be happy in the woodpile and I’ll be happy not having to clean up after it anymore so it’s a win-win. The only one who will be upset is our visiting cat who is coming back this weekend to stay for a week. I bet his spends hours in front of the stove just waiting…

    Reply
  181. Hi, Theo. Let me again express my deepest sympathies on the passing of a very fine Doberman. You gave Chance a wonderful life, and I know you’ll have many memories to ease your pain.
    I’m glad someone else thought the peregrine falcons dismembering their kills in front of lunch-goers was funny. It even made the local newspapers. Peregrines are protected here, so the restaurant purchased huge drapes that could be pulled in case a peregrine began dining in front of the windows. *g*
    I hope your occasional cat isn’t too disappointed. My own cat has a new cat door, and this has opened a whole new world, hunting-wise. Now he doesn’t have to wait for me to let him out. Unfortanately, he brings his kills into the house while I’m sleeping. There’s nothing worse than getting up in the middle of the night and stepping on something soft and furry in the dark, and then turning yourself inside out and leaping around like a mad woman.

    Reply
  182. Hi, Theo. Let me again express my deepest sympathies on the passing of a very fine Doberman. You gave Chance a wonderful life, and I know you’ll have many memories to ease your pain.
    I’m glad someone else thought the peregrine falcons dismembering their kills in front of lunch-goers was funny. It even made the local newspapers. Peregrines are protected here, so the restaurant purchased huge drapes that could be pulled in case a peregrine began dining in front of the windows. *g*
    I hope your occasional cat isn’t too disappointed. My own cat has a new cat door, and this has opened a whole new world, hunting-wise. Now he doesn’t have to wait for me to let him out. Unfortanately, he brings his kills into the house while I’m sleeping. There’s nothing worse than getting up in the middle of the night and stepping on something soft and furry in the dark, and then turning yourself inside out and leaping around like a mad woman.

    Reply
  183. Hi, Theo. Let me again express my deepest sympathies on the passing of a very fine Doberman. You gave Chance a wonderful life, and I know you’ll have many memories to ease your pain.
    I’m glad someone else thought the peregrine falcons dismembering their kills in front of lunch-goers was funny. It even made the local newspapers. Peregrines are protected here, so the restaurant purchased huge drapes that could be pulled in case a peregrine began dining in front of the windows. *g*
    I hope your occasional cat isn’t too disappointed. My own cat has a new cat door, and this has opened a whole new world, hunting-wise. Now he doesn’t have to wait for me to let him out. Unfortanately, he brings his kills into the house while I’m sleeping. There’s nothing worse than getting up in the middle of the night and stepping on something soft and furry in the dark, and then turning yourself inside out and leaping around like a mad woman.

    Reply
  184. Hi, Theo. Let me again express my deepest sympathies on the passing of a very fine Doberman. You gave Chance a wonderful life, and I know you’ll have many memories to ease your pain.
    I’m glad someone else thought the peregrine falcons dismembering their kills in front of lunch-goers was funny. It even made the local newspapers. Peregrines are protected here, so the restaurant purchased huge drapes that could be pulled in case a peregrine began dining in front of the windows. *g*
    I hope your occasional cat isn’t too disappointed. My own cat has a new cat door, and this has opened a whole new world, hunting-wise. Now he doesn’t have to wait for me to let him out. Unfortanately, he brings his kills into the house while I’m sleeping. There’s nothing worse than getting up in the middle of the night and stepping on something soft and furry in the dark, and then turning yourself inside out and leaping around like a mad woman.

    Reply
  185. Hi, Theo. Let me again express my deepest sympathies on the passing of a very fine Doberman. You gave Chance a wonderful life, and I know you’ll have many memories to ease your pain.
    I’m glad someone else thought the peregrine falcons dismembering their kills in front of lunch-goers was funny. It even made the local newspapers. Peregrines are protected here, so the restaurant purchased huge drapes that could be pulled in case a peregrine began dining in front of the windows. *g*
    I hope your occasional cat isn’t too disappointed. My own cat has a new cat door, and this has opened a whole new world, hunting-wise. Now he doesn’t have to wait for me to let him out. Unfortanately, he brings his kills into the house while I’m sleeping. There’s nothing worse than getting up in the middle of the night and stepping on something soft and furry in the dark, and then turning yourself inside out and leaping around like a mad woman.

    Reply

Leave a Comment