And So to Bed

Wench the_artist_in_his_room_at_the_villa_medici _rome-cogniet 1817 copy

In 1817, some beds are this high and this narrow

If you want to change the world, start off by making your bed.
    
William H. McRaven

 

I’m in the process of moving, having acquired a new house. This house, in the manner of houses since the beginning of time, is in some ways unsatisfactory and must be modified.

I would guess the first sensible person to move from one cave to another immediately started rolling rocks around till they were in a position more conducive to comfortable living.

That is, in essence, what I’m doing. Rolling rocks. Washing walls; matching the dark color of the old mopboard and window surrounds; spackling cracks; priming walls and, in the fullness of time, picking a wall shade more beautiful than any other, and painting.

The way in which this relates to beds is that I don’t want one underfoot when I am doing all

Wench air mattress

What I sleep on

this. I don’t want a big ole heavy piece of furniture I have to move about from room to room, one step ahead of my wall washing. I don’t want a mattress and bedding getting covered with paint. And I don’t want to carry that major bit of furniture down the mountain from my old house to my new one right now when I’m so busy.

So I bought an air mattress and I’m living in the new house with my air mattress and folding chairs of the sort one takes to amateur sporting events or concerts in the park and six or seven dishes and a towel.

Wench cat

Yes, I brought my cat. Why do you ask?

Air mattresses led me to think of beds and that’s what this posting is about.

The bed is the ultimate personal space. That cave — the one the careful newcomer is rearranging — will have a nest for everybody to sleep in, alone or by twos and threes. The first beds, constructed of leaves or a pile of hay or snuggly furs or a woven reed mat, were the inevitable product of the first semi-permanent dwellings.

That little sleep haven gathered together from whatever was handy and piled in a corner of the cave is one end of the spectrum. Plastic-wrapped air blown up by an inset pump is the other.

About midway in between, technology-wise, were our Regency folk.

Wench Greuze  Jean-Baptiste; Girl with a Birdcage Seated on a Bed;

A thin single bed for this young woman.
Some beds are this low.

How did the middling people of the Regency era sleep in 1800?

Well, first off, in England and in Europe in general, a bed is somewhat a platform to get sleeping bodies off the floor. While many parts of the world live sociably at ground level, in England it was a poor man indeed who couldn’t manage to get himself elevated a foot or two at bedtime.

People liked a bit of height for a couple of reasons. Some was purely cultural. European life was lived standing or sitting in chairs. Desks and tables were waist high. Beds took their cue from the rest of the furniture.

But aside from lifestyle preferences, there are arguably two practical reasons for sleeping high up. Height makes it more of a challenge for the bugs to get to you. Creepy crawlies stare upward, baffled. Even athletic fleas — you will be pleased to know this — only jump eight inches high.
Also, floors tend to be cold if the house is cold.

Wench The Man-Servant of Limier Rising from Bed |c. 1818 Horace Vernet  copy

A middling sort of fellow in 1818. A respectable servant in his narrow bed.
He might have an upper feather and a lower straw mattress.

The most common bed sold in Europe and America is queen sized. Your 1800s bed would be custom built rather than set to any standard size, but paintings show them as narrow. When we’re not looking at lords and ladies but at ordinary, everyday folks, single people seem to be in what we’d think of as a twin bed. For two folks, the bed is no wider than a modern double.

Now why is this?

One possibility is that the room your middling sort of 1800s person slept in might well have been small. Small bed chambers would be easier to heat.

Or were Regency people were simply shorter and smaller than modern folks. Small beds for smaller folks …

I dunnoh.
Talking relative size of Modern and Regency folk, arguments run both ways. I remain puzzled and uncertain.

Okay. Those beds could be small to save on materials. Artificial materials that are relatively cheap equals big beds. Natural, hand-made materials give us small beds.

Were Regency beds relatively more expensive? Did they take Regency folks more hours of work to pay for …

Wench mother given birth ca 1800 wellcome

This might be a two-person bed she's sitting in. Not big. And note the bed hangings.

Well. Yes.
I think the cost was not so much in the wood supporting the bed structure, as in all that soft bedding stuff.

The wood and the material of the sturdy fabric bag that contained the feathers or other soft stuff weren't expensive. But everything else was. There'd be the down- or feather- stuffed pillows and mattress. The linen or cotton sheets, the wool blankets or the cotton quilt, the bed's coverlet. All pricey.

If the bed was curtained to keep warmth within and cold drafts out — still common at the beginning of the Nineteenth Century; less common by the end — the material that formed the canopy and draped sides of the bed might be quite luxurious.

A comfy bed was a major investment in furniture. In 1800, your ordinary working family didn't supersize it.

Wench edmond du lac prindess and pea

A fairy tale with a variety of mattresses and somewhere underneath, a pea

Long as I'm here. Just to revisit what stuffed the mattress.
Not all mattresses were stuffed with feathers. For the poorer sort of middling person, barley straw or straw and chaff mixed might be inside the ticking. It’s a traditional way of making a mattress. Nice to sleep on, really. A straw mattress could also be used as a second layer below the more expensive feather mattress.

And for the forward thinking mattress stuffer, consider horsehair.

A mattress filled with horse-hair is preferable to a feather-bed, which heats and relaxes the body, and disposes it to pulmonary and hectic complaints. The bolster should be stuffed with horse-hair, and covered with a small pillow filled with feathers.

     The Domestic Encyclopedia,  a Dictionary of Facts and Useful Knowledge, Anthony Willich, 1802.


I’ve slept on the ground and on carpets on the floor, on gym mats, in narrow bunks at sea, on futons, in the back of cars, and on a water bed. I suppose one can get used to anything.

… well. Not hammocks.

Would I be comfortable in an 1800 bed?
Probably not.
I’m allergic to feathers and I’d be sneezing all night.

 

What about you?  What sort of bed do you want to slumber in, in your imagination?

 

170 thoughts on “And So to Bed”

  1. Our bed is queen size, with a modern no-need-to-turn mattress. It’s quite comfortable.
    But I would like to talk about a 19th century bed I own. It is younger than regency; made by my great-uncle and given to his niece sometime after she married my grandfather (they were born in 1858; I’m unsure of their marriage date. As you said, it is the size Uncle Darius made it. Wider than a twin size, but not as wide as a full bed. And much shorter than modern beds. The side rails have notches for slats upon which to place the mattress. When the mattress I had as a child wore out, i replaced it with a futon, sitting on the slats.
    One of the turnings in the headboard squeaks when you twist it. Generations of children have loved that bed.

    Reply
  2. Our bed is queen size, with a modern no-need-to-turn mattress. It’s quite comfortable.
    But I would like to talk about a 19th century bed I own. It is younger than regency; made by my great-uncle and given to his niece sometime after she married my grandfather (they were born in 1858; I’m unsure of their marriage date. As you said, it is the size Uncle Darius made it. Wider than a twin size, but not as wide as a full bed. And much shorter than modern beds. The side rails have notches for slats upon which to place the mattress. When the mattress I had as a child wore out, i replaced it with a futon, sitting on the slats.
    One of the turnings in the headboard squeaks when you twist it. Generations of children have loved that bed.

    Reply
  3. Our bed is queen size, with a modern no-need-to-turn mattress. It’s quite comfortable.
    But I would like to talk about a 19th century bed I own. It is younger than regency; made by my great-uncle and given to his niece sometime after she married my grandfather (they were born in 1858; I’m unsure of their marriage date. As you said, it is the size Uncle Darius made it. Wider than a twin size, but not as wide as a full bed. And much shorter than modern beds. The side rails have notches for slats upon which to place the mattress. When the mattress I had as a child wore out, i replaced it with a futon, sitting on the slats.
    One of the turnings in the headboard squeaks when you twist it. Generations of children have loved that bed.

    Reply
  4. Our bed is queen size, with a modern no-need-to-turn mattress. It’s quite comfortable.
    But I would like to talk about a 19th century bed I own. It is younger than regency; made by my great-uncle and given to his niece sometime after she married my grandfather (they were born in 1858; I’m unsure of their marriage date. As you said, it is the size Uncle Darius made it. Wider than a twin size, but not as wide as a full bed. And much shorter than modern beds. The side rails have notches for slats upon which to place the mattress. When the mattress I had as a child wore out, i replaced it with a futon, sitting on the slats.
    One of the turnings in the headboard squeaks when you twist it. Generations of children have loved that bed.

    Reply
  5. Our bed is queen size, with a modern no-need-to-turn mattress. It’s quite comfortable.
    But I would like to talk about a 19th century bed I own. It is younger than regency; made by my great-uncle and given to his niece sometime after she married my grandfather (they were born in 1858; I’m unsure of their marriage date. As you said, it is the size Uncle Darius made it. Wider than a twin size, but not as wide as a full bed. And much shorter than modern beds. The side rails have notches for slats upon which to place the mattress. When the mattress I had as a child wore out, i replaced it with a futon, sitting on the slats.
    One of the turnings in the headboard squeaks when you twist it. Generations of children have loved that bed.

    Reply
  6. Happy holidays, Joanne, and I hope your new “cave,” once you get it all spruced up and the rocks arranged just the way you like them, makes an even cozier and more comfortable nest for you and your critters.
    And happy holidays, to you and all the Wenches.

    Reply
  7. Happy holidays, Joanne, and I hope your new “cave,” once you get it all spruced up and the rocks arranged just the way you like them, makes an even cozier and more comfortable nest for you and your critters.
    And happy holidays, to you and all the Wenches.

    Reply
  8. Happy holidays, Joanne, and I hope your new “cave,” once you get it all spruced up and the rocks arranged just the way you like them, makes an even cozier and more comfortable nest for you and your critters.
    And happy holidays, to you and all the Wenches.

    Reply
  9. Happy holidays, Joanne, and I hope your new “cave,” once you get it all spruced up and the rocks arranged just the way you like them, makes an even cozier and more comfortable nest for you and your critters.
    And happy holidays, to you and all the Wenches.

    Reply
  10. Happy holidays, Joanne, and I hope your new “cave,” once you get it all spruced up and the rocks arranged just the way you like them, makes an even cozier and more comfortable nest for you and your critters.
    And happy holidays, to you and all the Wenches.

    Reply
  11. I keep having to post ooopses on the Wench site these days…Sorry for the “Joanne.” I’m zipping through my posts this morning, and consulted the links at the bottom of your post instead of what I know darn well is the correct spelling: Joanna.
    Abject, humble apologies, but the good wishes remain the same.
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  12. I keep having to post ooopses on the Wench site these days…Sorry for the “Joanne.” I’m zipping through my posts this morning, and consulted the links at the bottom of your post instead of what I know darn well is the correct spelling: Joanna.
    Abject, humble apologies, but the good wishes remain the same.
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  13. I keep having to post ooopses on the Wench site these days…Sorry for the “Joanne.” I’m zipping through my posts this morning, and consulted the links at the bottom of your post instead of what I know darn well is the correct spelling: Joanna.
    Abject, humble apologies, but the good wishes remain the same.
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  14. I keep having to post ooopses on the Wench site these days…Sorry for the “Joanne.” I’m zipping through my posts this morning, and consulted the links at the bottom of your post instead of what I know darn well is the correct spelling: Joanna.
    Abject, humble apologies, but the good wishes remain the same.
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  15. I keep having to post ooopses on the Wench site these days…Sorry for the “Joanne.” I’m zipping through my posts this morning, and consulted the links at the bottom of your post instead of what I know darn well is the correct spelling: Joanna.
    Abject, humble apologies, but the good wishes remain the same.
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  16. I don’t dream of any particular type of bed but, like Goldilocks, I want it just right.
    I remember the bed I had when a Peace Corps volunteer in Afghanistan, years ago. It was a simple wood frame with a rope “spring”. The mattress was stuffed with cotton batting and after a while, and repeated body pressure, it would compact to a hard mass. We then hired the “cotton fluffer”, (I am sure there was a name for this job but, if so, I forgot it). He would take the cotton out of the mattress, take it outside and with an apparatus that looked like a very large bow, would flick bits of the cotton into the air, off the string of the “bow”. He repeated this until all the cotton was fluffed and then re-stuff the mattress cover. It took him the better part of a day to do 4 mattresses. When done, what bliss to sleep in the softness of our rejuvenated beds.
    May your new home bring you joy and fewer, or no, days without electricity.
    Happy New Year to all the Wenches, and readers.

    Reply
  17. I don’t dream of any particular type of bed but, like Goldilocks, I want it just right.
    I remember the bed I had when a Peace Corps volunteer in Afghanistan, years ago. It was a simple wood frame with a rope “spring”. The mattress was stuffed with cotton batting and after a while, and repeated body pressure, it would compact to a hard mass. We then hired the “cotton fluffer”, (I am sure there was a name for this job but, if so, I forgot it). He would take the cotton out of the mattress, take it outside and with an apparatus that looked like a very large bow, would flick bits of the cotton into the air, off the string of the “bow”. He repeated this until all the cotton was fluffed and then re-stuff the mattress cover. It took him the better part of a day to do 4 mattresses. When done, what bliss to sleep in the softness of our rejuvenated beds.
    May your new home bring you joy and fewer, or no, days without electricity.
    Happy New Year to all the Wenches, and readers.

    Reply
  18. I don’t dream of any particular type of bed but, like Goldilocks, I want it just right.
    I remember the bed I had when a Peace Corps volunteer in Afghanistan, years ago. It was a simple wood frame with a rope “spring”. The mattress was stuffed with cotton batting and after a while, and repeated body pressure, it would compact to a hard mass. We then hired the “cotton fluffer”, (I am sure there was a name for this job but, if so, I forgot it). He would take the cotton out of the mattress, take it outside and with an apparatus that looked like a very large bow, would flick bits of the cotton into the air, off the string of the “bow”. He repeated this until all the cotton was fluffed and then re-stuff the mattress cover. It took him the better part of a day to do 4 mattresses. When done, what bliss to sleep in the softness of our rejuvenated beds.
    May your new home bring you joy and fewer, or no, days without electricity.
    Happy New Year to all the Wenches, and readers.

    Reply
  19. I don’t dream of any particular type of bed but, like Goldilocks, I want it just right.
    I remember the bed I had when a Peace Corps volunteer in Afghanistan, years ago. It was a simple wood frame with a rope “spring”. The mattress was stuffed with cotton batting and after a while, and repeated body pressure, it would compact to a hard mass. We then hired the “cotton fluffer”, (I am sure there was a name for this job but, if so, I forgot it). He would take the cotton out of the mattress, take it outside and with an apparatus that looked like a very large bow, would flick bits of the cotton into the air, off the string of the “bow”. He repeated this until all the cotton was fluffed and then re-stuff the mattress cover. It took him the better part of a day to do 4 mattresses. When done, what bliss to sleep in the softness of our rejuvenated beds.
    May your new home bring you joy and fewer, or no, days without electricity.
    Happy New Year to all the Wenches, and readers.

    Reply
  20. I don’t dream of any particular type of bed but, like Goldilocks, I want it just right.
    I remember the bed I had when a Peace Corps volunteer in Afghanistan, years ago. It was a simple wood frame with a rope “spring”. The mattress was stuffed with cotton batting and after a while, and repeated body pressure, it would compact to a hard mass. We then hired the “cotton fluffer”, (I am sure there was a name for this job but, if so, I forgot it). He would take the cotton out of the mattress, take it outside and with an apparatus that looked like a very large bow, would flick bits of the cotton into the air, off the string of the “bow”. He repeated this until all the cotton was fluffed and then re-stuff the mattress cover. It took him the better part of a day to do 4 mattresses. When done, what bliss to sleep in the softness of our rejuvenated beds.
    May your new home bring you joy and fewer, or no, days without electricity.
    Happy New Year to all the Wenches, and readers.

    Reply
  21. I’m not particular about the bed, but for some reason I very often end up with platform bed. My childhood bed was a wooden platform bed made by a local carpenter who was a friend of the family, and it had two big storage drawers that were great, for stashing all my toys in one and bedding in the other.

    Reply
  22. I’m not particular about the bed, but for some reason I very often end up with platform bed. My childhood bed was a wooden platform bed made by a local carpenter who was a friend of the family, and it had two big storage drawers that were great, for stashing all my toys in one and bedding in the other.

    Reply
  23. I’m not particular about the bed, but for some reason I very often end up with platform bed. My childhood bed was a wooden platform bed made by a local carpenter who was a friend of the family, and it had two big storage drawers that were great, for stashing all my toys in one and bedding in the other.

    Reply
  24. I’m not particular about the bed, but for some reason I very often end up with platform bed. My childhood bed was a wooden platform bed made by a local carpenter who was a friend of the family, and it had two big storage drawers that were great, for stashing all my toys in one and bedding in the other.

    Reply
  25. I’m not particular about the bed, but for some reason I very often end up with platform bed. My childhood bed was a wooden platform bed made by a local carpenter who was a friend of the family, and it had two big storage drawers that were great, for stashing all my toys in one and bedding in the other.

    Reply
  26. I’m not particular about the bed, though I do have a good quality foam mattress on the one I have now. What matters to me is its direction: the head of the bed must be oriented to the north. I cannot sleep in an east/west bed, nor with my head to the south; it just “feels wrong”.
    I was in hospital for a few days last year and the beds they gave me were the “wrong way” (they were hard crummy beds too). I slept very little. I couldn’t get them to loan me a cane so I could get to the bathroom by myself; I knew there was no hope at all of getting a bed realigned. No hope for hot coffee either. So many people running around and nobody attending to the patients. How I wished for some good old fashioned regency nursing, where somebody is always with the patient — they may not be able to do as much, but I’m sure they made the patient feel she mattered.

    Reply
  27. I’m not particular about the bed, though I do have a good quality foam mattress on the one I have now. What matters to me is its direction: the head of the bed must be oriented to the north. I cannot sleep in an east/west bed, nor with my head to the south; it just “feels wrong”.
    I was in hospital for a few days last year and the beds they gave me were the “wrong way” (they were hard crummy beds too). I slept very little. I couldn’t get them to loan me a cane so I could get to the bathroom by myself; I knew there was no hope at all of getting a bed realigned. No hope for hot coffee either. So many people running around and nobody attending to the patients. How I wished for some good old fashioned regency nursing, where somebody is always with the patient — they may not be able to do as much, but I’m sure they made the patient feel she mattered.

    Reply
  28. I’m not particular about the bed, though I do have a good quality foam mattress on the one I have now. What matters to me is its direction: the head of the bed must be oriented to the north. I cannot sleep in an east/west bed, nor with my head to the south; it just “feels wrong”.
    I was in hospital for a few days last year and the beds they gave me were the “wrong way” (they were hard crummy beds too). I slept very little. I couldn’t get them to loan me a cane so I could get to the bathroom by myself; I knew there was no hope at all of getting a bed realigned. No hope for hot coffee either. So many people running around and nobody attending to the patients. How I wished for some good old fashioned regency nursing, where somebody is always with the patient — they may not be able to do as much, but I’m sure they made the patient feel she mattered.

    Reply
  29. I’m not particular about the bed, though I do have a good quality foam mattress on the one I have now. What matters to me is its direction: the head of the bed must be oriented to the north. I cannot sleep in an east/west bed, nor with my head to the south; it just “feels wrong”.
    I was in hospital for a few days last year and the beds they gave me were the “wrong way” (they were hard crummy beds too). I slept very little. I couldn’t get them to loan me a cane so I could get to the bathroom by myself; I knew there was no hope at all of getting a bed realigned. No hope for hot coffee either. So many people running around and nobody attending to the patients. How I wished for some good old fashioned regency nursing, where somebody is always with the patient — they may not be able to do as much, but I’m sure they made the patient feel she mattered.

    Reply
  30. I’m not particular about the bed, though I do have a good quality foam mattress on the one I have now. What matters to me is its direction: the head of the bed must be oriented to the north. I cannot sleep in an east/west bed, nor with my head to the south; it just “feels wrong”.
    I was in hospital for a few days last year and the beds they gave me were the “wrong way” (they were hard crummy beds too). I slept very little. I couldn’t get them to loan me a cane so I could get to the bathroom by myself; I knew there was no hope at all of getting a bed realigned. No hope for hot coffee either. So many people running around and nobody attending to the patients. How I wished for some good old fashioned regency nursing, where somebody is always with the patient — they may not be able to do as much, but I’m sure they made the patient feel she mattered.

    Reply
  31. Is it true that colonists slept on mattresses made of corn cobs? I can’t imagine that! Not only would it have been terribly uncomfortable, but wouldn’t it have attracted mice? Mice in your mattress is the stuff of nightmares.

    Reply
  32. Is it true that colonists slept on mattresses made of corn cobs? I can’t imagine that! Not only would it have been terribly uncomfortable, but wouldn’t it have attracted mice? Mice in your mattress is the stuff of nightmares.

    Reply
  33. Is it true that colonists slept on mattresses made of corn cobs? I can’t imagine that! Not only would it have been terribly uncomfortable, but wouldn’t it have attracted mice? Mice in your mattress is the stuff of nightmares.

    Reply
  34. Is it true that colonists slept on mattresses made of corn cobs? I can’t imagine that! Not only would it have been terribly uncomfortable, but wouldn’t it have attracted mice? Mice in your mattress is the stuff of nightmares.

    Reply
  35. Is it true that colonists slept on mattresses made of corn cobs? I can’t imagine that! Not only would it have been terribly uncomfortable, but wouldn’t it have attracted mice? Mice in your mattress is the stuff of nightmares.

    Reply
  36. I was wondering if the bed were intended to sleep one or two people. Perhaps two children, keeping each other warm.
    I love the idea of generations of kids ling in bed turning the little knob on the headboard … squeak … squeak …

    Reply
  37. I was wondering if the bed were intended to sleep one or two people. Perhaps two children, keeping each other warm.
    I love the idea of generations of kids ling in bed turning the little knob on the headboard … squeak … squeak …

    Reply
  38. I was wondering if the bed were intended to sleep one or two people. Perhaps two children, keeping each other warm.
    I love the idea of generations of kids ling in bed turning the little knob on the headboard … squeak … squeak …

    Reply
  39. I was wondering if the bed were intended to sleep one or two people. Perhaps two children, keeping each other warm.
    I love the idea of generations of kids ling in bed turning the little knob on the headboard … squeak … squeak …

    Reply
  40. I was wondering if the bed were intended to sleep one or two people. Perhaps two children, keeping each other warm.
    I love the idea of generations of kids ling in bed turning the little knob on the headboard … squeak … squeak …

    Reply
  41. Thank you so much for the kind words. Hope your own holidays are perfectly lovely.
    I am watching yourtube videos about how to paint walls. I am totally cowed by the expertise of these folks.

    Reply
  42. Thank you so much for the kind words. Hope your own holidays are perfectly lovely.
    I am watching yourtube videos about how to paint walls. I am totally cowed by the expertise of these folks.

    Reply
  43. Thank you so much for the kind words. Hope your own holidays are perfectly lovely.
    I am watching yourtube videos about how to paint walls. I am totally cowed by the expertise of these folks.

    Reply
  44. Thank you so much for the kind words. Hope your own holidays are perfectly lovely.
    I am watching yourtube videos about how to paint walls. I am totally cowed by the expertise of these folks.

    Reply
  45. Thank you so much for the kind words. Hope your own holidays are perfectly lovely.
    I am watching yourtube videos about how to paint walls. I am totally cowed by the expertise of these folks.

    Reply
  46. No. No. No worries. I’m not particular about ho the name is spelled or pronounced.
    For many years I lived where they pronounced the ‘J’ with a ‘Y’ sound and the ‘B’ in my last name as a ‘P’.
    I found it lovely.

    Reply
  47. No. No. No worries. I’m not particular about ho the name is spelled or pronounced.
    For many years I lived where they pronounced the ‘J’ with a ‘Y’ sound and the ‘B’ in my last name as a ‘P’.
    I found it lovely.

    Reply
  48. No. No. No worries. I’m not particular about ho the name is spelled or pronounced.
    For many years I lived where they pronounced the ‘J’ with a ‘Y’ sound and the ‘B’ in my last name as a ‘P’.
    I found it lovely.

    Reply
  49. No. No. No worries. I’m not particular about ho the name is spelled or pronounced.
    For many years I lived where they pronounced the ‘J’ with a ‘Y’ sound and the ‘B’ in my last name as a ‘P’.
    I found it lovely.

    Reply
  50. No. No. No worries. I’m not particular about ho the name is spelled or pronounced.
    For many years I lived where they pronounced the ‘J’ with a ‘Y’ sound and the ‘B’ in my last name as a ‘P’.
    I found it lovely.

    Reply
  51. I hope that you are soon comfortable and cozy in your new home, Joanna.
    I sympathize with the idea of you being allergic to feathers and sneezing all night. I think of my husband who is horribly allergic to horses. We’ve discussed before the idea that he wouldn’t have survived living in the western world prior to the 20th century given the prevalence of horses for travel, but I’ll admit that I never once considered horsehair furnishings.

    Reply
  52. I hope that you are soon comfortable and cozy in your new home, Joanna.
    I sympathize with the idea of you being allergic to feathers and sneezing all night. I think of my husband who is horribly allergic to horses. We’ve discussed before the idea that he wouldn’t have survived living in the western world prior to the 20th century given the prevalence of horses for travel, but I’ll admit that I never once considered horsehair furnishings.

    Reply
  53. I hope that you are soon comfortable and cozy in your new home, Joanna.
    I sympathize with the idea of you being allergic to feathers and sneezing all night. I think of my husband who is horribly allergic to horses. We’ve discussed before the idea that he wouldn’t have survived living in the western world prior to the 20th century given the prevalence of horses for travel, but I’ll admit that I never once considered horsehair furnishings.

    Reply
  54. I hope that you are soon comfortable and cozy in your new home, Joanna.
    I sympathize with the idea of you being allergic to feathers and sneezing all night. I think of my husband who is horribly allergic to horses. We’ve discussed before the idea that he wouldn’t have survived living in the western world prior to the 20th century given the prevalence of horses for travel, but I’ll admit that I never once considered horsehair furnishings.

    Reply
  55. I hope that you are soon comfortable and cozy in your new home, Joanna.
    I sympathize with the idea of you being allergic to feathers and sneezing all night. I think of my husband who is horribly allergic to horses. We’ve discussed before the idea that he wouldn’t have survived living in the western world prior to the 20th century given the prevalence of horses for travel, but I’ll admit that I never once considered horsehair furnishings.

    Reply
  56. I made the bed for one of my kids into a sort of storage bed.
    I had some old childrens’ wooden wagons, low things with a pull chain. These fit neatly under the bed and pulled out. Stored all sorts of nifty stuff.

    Reply
  57. I made the bed for one of my kids into a sort of storage bed.
    I had some old childrens’ wooden wagons, low things with a pull chain. These fit neatly under the bed and pulled out. Stored all sorts of nifty stuff.

    Reply
  58. I made the bed for one of my kids into a sort of storage bed.
    I had some old childrens’ wooden wagons, low things with a pull chain. These fit neatly under the bed and pulled out. Stored all sorts of nifty stuff.

    Reply
  59. I made the bed for one of my kids into a sort of storage bed.
    I had some old childrens’ wooden wagons, low things with a pull chain. These fit neatly under the bed and pulled out. Stored all sorts of nifty stuff.

    Reply
  60. I made the bed for one of my kids into a sort of storage bed.
    I had some old childrens’ wooden wagons, low things with a pull chain. These fit neatly under the bed and pulled out. Stored all sorts of nifty stuff.

    Reply
  61. North-South but not East-West.
    How cool and interesting.
    I don’t think I’d be at all happy sleeping in a room where my head, rather than my feet, pointed toward the door.
    Part of mursing is making the patient know she matters. True in the Regency. True now. I hate to think we may be forgetting this.

    Reply
  62. North-South but not East-West.
    How cool and interesting.
    I don’t think I’d be at all happy sleeping in a room where my head, rather than my feet, pointed toward the door.
    Part of mursing is making the patient know she matters. True in the Regency. True now. I hate to think we may be forgetting this.

    Reply
  63. North-South but not East-West.
    How cool and interesting.
    I don’t think I’d be at all happy sleeping in a room where my head, rather than my feet, pointed toward the door.
    Part of mursing is making the patient know she matters. True in the Regency. True now. I hate to think we may be forgetting this.

    Reply
  64. North-South but not East-West.
    How cool and interesting.
    I don’t think I’d be at all happy sleeping in a room where my head, rather than my feet, pointed toward the door.
    Part of mursing is making the patient know she matters. True in the Regency. True now. I hate to think we may be forgetting this.

    Reply
  65. North-South but not East-West.
    How cool and interesting.
    I don’t think I’d be at all happy sleeping in a room where my head, rather than my feet, pointed toward the door.
    Part of mursing is making the patient know she matters. True in the Regency. True now. I hate to think we may be forgetting this.

    Reply
  66. I was talking to one of my sisters about this and she said a docent at a historical site in New England once told her it was most perfectly true.
    I’m with you on thinking this would be lumpy and unpleasant.

    Reply
  67. I was talking to one of my sisters about this and she said a docent at a historical site in New England once told her it was most perfectly true.
    I’m with you on thinking this would be lumpy and unpleasant.

    Reply
  68. I was talking to one of my sisters about this and she said a docent at a historical site in New England once told her it was most perfectly true.
    I’m with you on thinking this would be lumpy and unpleasant.

    Reply
  69. I was talking to one of my sisters about this and she said a docent at a historical site in New England once told her it was most perfectly true.
    I’m with you on thinking this would be lumpy and unpleasant.

    Reply
  70. I was talking to one of my sisters about this and she said a docent at a historical site in New England once told her it was most perfectly true.
    I’m with you on thinking this would be lumpy and unpleasant.

    Reply
  71. Maybe it’s time to get the band back together and, with my truck, get your stuff moved! Might need to do another load o’ firewood too, eh? Just lemme know! Piper

    Reply
  72. Maybe it’s time to get the band back together and, with my truck, get your stuff moved! Might need to do another load o’ firewood too, eh? Just lemme know! Piper

    Reply
  73. Maybe it’s time to get the band back together and, with my truck, get your stuff moved! Might need to do another load o’ firewood too, eh? Just lemme know! Piper

    Reply
  74. Maybe it’s time to get the band back together and, with my truck, get your stuff moved! Might need to do another load o’ firewood too, eh? Just lemme know! Piper

    Reply
  75. Maybe it’s time to get the band back together and, with my truck, get your stuff moved! Might need to do another load o’ firewood too, eh? Just lemme know! Piper

    Reply
  76. Two things about beds in the U.S. I visited Mount Vernon, George Washington’s home in Virginia, a number of years ago. His bed was both narrow and short, and he was a tall man. The docent said he had to sleep in it at an angle. It was pretty clear that Mrs. Washington didn’t share it with him. Also, he was relatively wealthy. Why didn’t he have a bigger bed made?
    I also once had the antique “sleigh” bed frame that my parents had slept in when they first married. It probably dated to about 1890. I had thought of using it as a guest bed, but it turned out to be a nonstandard size – less than a full size but larger than a twin size, so I would have had to have a mattress custom made for it and I didn’t want to spend the money.

    Reply
  77. Two things about beds in the U.S. I visited Mount Vernon, George Washington’s home in Virginia, a number of years ago. His bed was both narrow and short, and he was a tall man. The docent said he had to sleep in it at an angle. It was pretty clear that Mrs. Washington didn’t share it with him. Also, he was relatively wealthy. Why didn’t he have a bigger bed made?
    I also once had the antique “sleigh” bed frame that my parents had slept in when they first married. It probably dated to about 1890. I had thought of using it as a guest bed, but it turned out to be a nonstandard size – less than a full size but larger than a twin size, so I would have had to have a mattress custom made for it and I didn’t want to spend the money.

    Reply
  78. Two things about beds in the U.S. I visited Mount Vernon, George Washington’s home in Virginia, a number of years ago. His bed was both narrow and short, and he was a tall man. The docent said he had to sleep in it at an angle. It was pretty clear that Mrs. Washington didn’t share it with him. Also, he was relatively wealthy. Why didn’t he have a bigger bed made?
    I also once had the antique “sleigh” bed frame that my parents had slept in when they first married. It probably dated to about 1890. I had thought of using it as a guest bed, but it turned out to be a nonstandard size – less than a full size but larger than a twin size, so I would have had to have a mattress custom made for it and I didn’t want to spend the money.

    Reply
  79. Two things about beds in the U.S. I visited Mount Vernon, George Washington’s home in Virginia, a number of years ago. His bed was both narrow and short, and he was a tall man. The docent said he had to sleep in it at an angle. It was pretty clear that Mrs. Washington didn’t share it with him. Also, he was relatively wealthy. Why didn’t he have a bigger bed made?
    I also once had the antique “sleigh” bed frame that my parents had slept in when they first married. It probably dated to about 1890. I had thought of using it as a guest bed, but it turned out to be a nonstandard size – less than a full size but larger than a twin size, so I would have had to have a mattress custom made for it and I didn’t want to spend the money.

    Reply
  80. Two things about beds in the U.S. I visited Mount Vernon, George Washington’s home in Virginia, a number of years ago. His bed was both narrow and short, and he was a tall man. The docent said he had to sleep in it at an angle. It was pretty clear that Mrs. Washington didn’t share it with him. Also, he was relatively wealthy. Why didn’t he have a bigger bed made?
    I also once had the antique “sleigh” bed frame that my parents had slept in when they first married. It probably dated to about 1890. I had thought of using it as a guest bed, but it turned out to be a nonstandard size – less than a full size but larger than a twin size, so I would have had to have a mattress custom made for it and I didn’t want to spend the money.

    Reply
  81. In reply to Joanne’s comment: My 19th century bed was planned for two adults. It was loaned to my parents as their first bed after their marriage, then given to me whenI was born. Both of my husbands shared the bed with me at the beginning of our marriages.

    Reply
  82. In reply to Joanne’s comment: My 19th century bed was planned for two adults. It was loaned to my parents as their first bed after their marriage, then given to me whenI was born. Both of my husbands shared the bed with me at the beginning of our marriages.

    Reply
  83. In reply to Joanne’s comment: My 19th century bed was planned for two adults. It was loaned to my parents as their first bed after their marriage, then given to me whenI was born. Both of my husbands shared the bed with me at the beginning of our marriages.

    Reply
  84. In reply to Joanne’s comment: My 19th century bed was planned for two adults. It was loaned to my parents as their first bed after their marriage, then given to me whenI was born. Both of my husbands shared the bed with me at the beginning of our marriages.

    Reply
  85. In reply to Joanne’s comment: My 19th century bed was planned for two adults. It was loaned to my parents as their first bed after their marriage, then given to me whenI was born. Both of my husbands shared the bed with me at the beginning of our marriages.

    Reply
  86. Would it be corn cobs, or corn husks? I’ve heard of using the husks, and like straw, they would be pretty logical if you stuffed enough of them in there. The only thing I ever heard of anybody using corn cobs for was starting fires, making pipes to smoke tobacco, and also–in the outhouse.
    ?? *shrugs* ??

    Reply
  87. Would it be corn cobs, or corn husks? I’ve heard of using the husks, and like straw, they would be pretty logical if you stuffed enough of them in there. The only thing I ever heard of anybody using corn cobs for was starting fires, making pipes to smoke tobacco, and also–in the outhouse.
    ?? *shrugs* ??

    Reply
  88. Would it be corn cobs, or corn husks? I’ve heard of using the husks, and like straw, they would be pretty logical if you stuffed enough of them in there. The only thing I ever heard of anybody using corn cobs for was starting fires, making pipes to smoke tobacco, and also–in the outhouse.
    ?? *shrugs* ??

    Reply
  89. Would it be corn cobs, or corn husks? I’ve heard of using the husks, and like straw, they would be pretty logical if you stuffed enough of them in there. The only thing I ever heard of anybody using corn cobs for was starting fires, making pipes to smoke tobacco, and also–in the outhouse.
    ?? *shrugs* ??

    Reply
  90. Would it be corn cobs, or corn husks? I’ve heard of using the husks, and like straw, they would be pretty logical if you stuffed enough of them in there. The only thing I ever heard of anybody using corn cobs for was starting fires, making pipes to smoke tobacco, and also–in the outhouse.
    ?? *shrugs* ??

    Reply
  91. I had a bed that my Mother called a 3/4 bed as a child, larger than a twin, smaller than a full. I don’t know how old it was but I believe it was left in our house ( 1898) by my great grandparents. It was comfy until the mattress wore out. They were unable to replace it.

    Reply
  92. I had a bed that my Mother called a 3/4 bed as a child, larger than a twin, smaller than a full. I don’t know how old it was but I believe it was left in our house ( 1898) by my great grandparents. It was comfy until the mattress wore out. They were unable to replace it.

    Reply
  93. I had a bed that my Mother called a 3/4 bed as a child, larger than a twin, smaller than a full. I don’t know how old it was but I believe it was left in our house ( 1898) by my great grandparents. It was comfy until the mattress wore out. They were unable to replace it.

    Reply
  94. I had a bed that my Mother called a 3/4 bed as a child, larger than a twin, smaller than a full. I don’t know how old it was but I believe it was left in our house ( 1898) by my great grandparents. It was comfy until the mattress wore out. They were unable to replace it.

    Reply
  95. I had a bed that my Mother called a 3/4 bed as a child, larger than a twin, smaller than a full. I don’t know how old it was but I believe it was left in our house ( 1898) by my great grandparents. It was comfy until the mattress wore out. They were unable to replace it.

    Reply
  96. Alison, when I was a little kid my grandmother used to do this with the flock (ie cotton-stuffed) mattresses. She’d unpick a seam, and tip out the stuffing, which had become lumpy. Then we kids would get to tease the lumps back to airy softness — nothing required except small fingers. It was pretty unpleasant work, as I recall. I think I was about 5 or 6.

    Reply
  97. Alison, when I was a little kid my grandmother used to do this with the flock (ie cotton-stuffed) mattresses. She’d unpick a seam, and tip out the stuffing, which had become lumpy. Then we kids would get to tease the lumps back to airy softness — nothing required except small fingers. It was pretty unpleasant work, as I recall. I think I was about 5 or 6.

    Reply
  98. Alison, when I was a little kid my grandmother used to do this with the flock (ie cotton-stuffed) mattresses. She’d unpick a seam, and tip out the stuffing, which had become lumpy. Then we kids would get to tease the lumps back to airy softness — nothing required except small fingers. It was pretty unpleasant work, as I recall. I think I was about 5 or 6.

    Reply
  99. Alison, when I was a little kid my grandmother used to do this with the flock (ie cotton-stuffed) mattresses. She’d unpick a seam, and tip out the stuffing, which had become lumpy. Then we kids would get to tease the lumps back to airy softness — nothing required except small fingers. It was pretty unpleasant work, as I recall. I think I was about 5 or 6.

    Reply
  100. Alison, when I was a little kid my grandmother used to do this with the flock (ie cotton-stuffed) mattresses. She’d unpick a seam, and tip out the stuffing, which had become lumpy. Then we kids would get to tease the lumps back to airy softness — nothing required except small fingers. It was pretty unpleasant work, as I recall. I think I was about 5 or 6.

    Reply
  101. It seems to be cobs. And I’ll admit this is probably American rather than British.
    “The bed is to be a mattress, stuffed with husks of Indian corn. It is made in the following manner: After preparing the tick to suit the size of the bedstead, fill it evenly with the husks, well dried and cleared from the pieces of cobs that may stick to them, so that when finished the mattrass may be four, five or six inches thick. ”
    Transactions of the Society for the Promotion of Useful …, Volume 4, Issue 2
    By Society for the Promotion of Useful Arts, Albany, New York
    https://tinyurl.com/ybhh3tvl
    That’s an interesting reference on page 142 of exactly how to make a bed (as in making one from scratch) in 1819.

    Reply
  102. It seems to be cobs. And I’ll admit this is probably American rather than British.
    “The bed is to be a mattress, stuffed with husks of Indian corn. It is made in the following manner: After preparing the tick to suit the size of the bedstead, fill it evenly with the husks, well dried and cleared from the pieces of cobs that may stick to them, so that when finished the mattrass may be four, five or six inches thick. ”
    Transactions of the Society for the Promotion of Useful …, Volume 4, Issue 2
    By Society for the Promotion of Useful Arts, Albany, New York
    https://tinyurl.com/ybhh3tvl
    That’s an interesting reference on page 142 of exactly how to make a bed (as in making one from scratch) in 1819.

    Reply
  103. It seems to be cobs. And I’ll admit this is probably American rather than British.
    “The bed is to be a mattress, stuffed with husks of Indian corn. It is made in the following manner: After preparing the tick to suit the size of the bedstead, fill it evenly with the husks, well dried and cleared from the pieces of cobs that may stick to them, so that when finished the mattrass may be four, five or six inches thick. ”
    Transactions of the Society for the Promotion of Useful …, Volume 4, Issue 2
    By Society for the Promotion of Useful Arts, Albany, New York
    https://tinyurl.com/ybhh3tvl
    That’s an interesting reference on page 142 of exactly how to make a bed (as in making one from scratch) in 1819.

    Reply
  104. It seems to be cobs. And I’ll admit this is probably American rather than British.
    “The bed is to be a mattress, stuffed with husks of Indian corn. It is made in the following manner: After preparing the tick to suit the size of the bedstead, fill it evenly with the husks, well dried and cleared from the pieces of cobs that may stick to them, so that when finished the mattrass may be four, five or six inches thick. ”
    Transactions of the Society for the Promotion of Useful …, Volume 4, Issue 2
    By Society for the Promotion of Useful Arts, Albany, New York
    https://tinyurl.com/ybhh3tvl
    That’s an interesting reference on page 142 of exactly how to make a bed (as in making one from scratch) in 1819.

    Reply
  105. It seems to be cobs. And I’ll admit this is probably American rather than British.
    “The bed is to be a mattress, stuffed with husks of Indian corn. It is made in the following manner: After preparing the tick to suit the size of the bedstead, fill it evenly with the husks, well dried and cleared from the pieces of cobs that may stick to them, so that when finished the mattrass may be four, five or six inches thick. ”
    Transactions of the Society for the Promotion of Useful …, Volume 4, Issue 2
    By Society for the Promotion of Useful Arts, Albany, New York
    https://tinyurl.com/ybhh3tvl
    That’s an interesting reference on page 142 of exactly how to make a bed (as in making one from scratch) in 1819.

    Reply
  106. Joanne Bourne said:
    It seems to be cobs.
    And I’ll admit this is probably American rather than British.
    “The bed is to be a mattress, stuffed with husks of Indian corn. It is made in the following manner: After preparing the tick to suit the size of the bedstead, fill it evenly with the husks, well dried and cleared from the pieces of cobs that may stick to them, so that when finished the mattrass may be four, five or six inches thick.”
    Transactions of the Society for the Promotion of Useful …, Volume 4, Issue 2 By Society for the Promotion of Useful Arts, Albany, New York, 1817
    https://tinyurl.com/ybhh3tvl
    That’s an interesting reference on page 142 of exactly how to make a bed (as in making one from scratch) in 1819.

    Reply
  107. Joanne Bourne said:
    It seems to be cobs.
    And I’ll admit this is probably American rather than British.
    “The bed is to be a mattress, stuffed with husks of Indian corn. It is made in the following manner: After preparing the tick to suit the size of the bedstead, fill it evenly with the husks, well dried and cleared from the pieces of cobs that may stick to them, so that when finished the mattrass may be four, five or six inches thick.”
    Transactions of the Society for the Promotion of Useful …, Volume 4, Issue 2 By Society for the Promotion of Useful Arts, Albany, New York, 1817
    https://tinyurl.com/ybhh3tvl
    That’s an interesting reference on page 142 of exactly how to make a bed (as in making one from scratch) in 1819.

    Reply
  108. Joanne Bourne said:
    It seems to be cobs.
    And I’ll admit this is probably American rather than British.
    “The bed is to be a mattress, stuffed with husks of Indian corn. It is made in the following manner: After preparing the tick to suit the size of the bedstead, fill it evenly with the husks, well dried and cleared from the pieces of cobs that may stick to them, so that when finished the mattrass may be four, five or six inches thick.”
    Transactions of the Society for the Promotion of Useful …, Volume 4, Issue 2 By Society for the Promotion of Useful Arts, Albany, New York, 1817
    https://tinyurl.com/ybhh3tvl
    That’s an interesting reference on page 142 of exactly how to make a bed (as in making one from scratch) in 1819.

    Reply
  109. Joanne Bourne said:
    It seems to be cobs.
    And I’ll admit this is probably American rather than British.
    “The bed is to be a mattress, stuffed with husks of Indian corn. It is made in the following manner: After preparing the tick to suit the size of the bedstead, fill it evenly with the husks, well dried and cleared from the pieces of cobs that may stick to them, so that when finished the mattrass may be four, five or six inches thick.”
    Transactions of the Society for the Promotion of Useful …, Volume 4, Issue 2 By Society for the Promotion of Useful Arts, Albany, New York, 1817
    https://tinyurl.com/ybhh3tvl
    That’s an interesting reference on page 142 of exactly how to make a bed (as in making one from scratch) in 1819.

    Reply
  110. Joanne Bourne said:
    It seems to be cobs.
    And I’ll admit this is probably American rather than British.
    “The bed is to be a mattress, stuffed with husks of Indian corn. It is made in the following manner: After preparing the tick to suit the size of the bedstead, fill it evenly with the husks, well dried and cleared from the pieces of cobs that may stick to them, so that when finished the mattrass may be four, five or six inches thick.”
    Transactions of the Society for the Promotion of Useful …, Volume 4, Issue 2 By Society for the Promotion of Useful Arts, Albany, New York, 1817
    https://tinyurl.com/ybhh3tvl
    That’s an interesting reference on page 142 of exactly how to make a bed (as in making one from scratch) in 1819.

    Reply
  111. It is so good to hear from you.
    Come visit. At the moment I have two houses to offer. My mountain retreat which is not yet denuded of furniture and my new house in town which is not yet furnished.
    One may perch uncomfortably in either place and I would love to see you.
    Town is better and C’ville is a pretty place.
    No firewood. I am closing down the fireplace just as soon as I can. Some things are just murderous difficult to transport.
    Do come.

    Reply
  112. It is so good to hear from you.
    Come visit. At the moment I have two houses to offer. My mountain retreat which is not yet denuded of furniture and my new house in town which is not yet furnished.
    One may perch uncomfortably in either place and I would love to see you.
    Town is better and C’ville is a pretty place.
    No firewood. I am closing down the fireplace just as soon as I can. Some things are just murderous difficult to transport.
    Do come.

    Reply
  113. It is so good to hear from you.
    Come visit. At the moment I have two houses to offer. My mountain retreat which is not yet denuded of furniture and my new house in town which is not yet furnished.
    One may perch uncomfortably in either place and I would love to see you.
    Town is better and C’ville is a pretty place.
    No firewood. I am closing down the fireplace just as soon as I can. Some things are just murderous difficult to transport.
    Do come.

    Reply
  114. It is so good to hear from you.
    Come visit. At the moment I have two houses to offer. My mountain retreat which is not yet denuded of furniture and my new house in town which is not yet furnished.
    One may perch uncomfortably in either place and I would love to see you.
    Town is better and C’ville is a pretty place.
    No firewood. I am closing down the fireplace just as soon as I can. Some things are just murderous difficult to transport.
    Do come.

    Reply
  115. It is so good to hear from you.
    Come visit. At the moment I have two houses to offer. My mountain retreat which is not yet denuded of furniture and my new house in town which is not yet furnished.
    One may perch uncomfortably in either place and I would love to see you.
    Town is better and C’ville is a pretty place.
    No firewood. I am closing down the fireplace just as soon as I can. Some things are just murderous difficult to transport.
    Do come.

    Reply
  116. My own impression agrees with you. Beds of the time seem to be very short.
    Look at the drawing of the huntsman above, drawing on his boots. Look at his height. Is he not long for that bed?
    I am told by docents that this is a visual illusion and the beds are as long in 1800 as they are today but I remain unconvinced by mere logic.
    I can just imagine George and Matha squabbling about this over the dinner table.
    George: Really should have John make me a new bed. We can put mine in the guest room.
    Martha: It’s a perfectly good bed.
    G: Short for me.
    M: Then bend your knees. Some soldier you are, complaining about a prfectly good bed. Do you think they’ll haul a bed frame and mattresses with you across the Delaware?
    G: Yes dear.

    Reply
  117. My own impression agrees with you. Beds of the time seem to be very short.
    Look at the drawing of the huntsman above, drawing on his boots. Look at his height. Is he not long for that bed?
    I am told by docents that this is a visual illusion and the beds are as long in 1800 as they are today but I remain unconvinced by mere logic.
    I can just imagine George and Matha squabbling about this over the dinner table.
    George: Really should have John make me a new bed. We can put mine in the guest room.
    Martha: It’s a perfectly good bed.
    G: Short for me.
    M: Then bend your knees. Some soldier you are, complaining about a prfectly good bed. Do you think they’ll haul a bed frame and mattresses with you across the Delaware?
    G: Yes dear.

    Reply
  118. My own impression agrees with you. Beds of the time seem to be very short.
    Look at the drawing of the huntsman above, drawing on his boots. Look at his height. Is he not long for that bed?
    I am told by docents that this is a visual illusion and the beds are as long in 1800 as they are today but I remain unconvinced by mere logic.
    I can just imagine George and Matha squabbling about this over the dinner table.
    George: Really should have John make me a new bed. We can put mine in the guest room.
    Martha: It’s a perfectly good bed.
    G: Short for me.
    M: Then bend your knees. Some soldier you are, complaining about a prfectly good bed. Do you think they’ll haul a bed frame and mattresses with you across the Delaware?
    G: Yes dear.

    Reply
  119. My own impression agrees with you. Beds of the time seem to be very short.
    Look at the drawing of the huntsman above, drawing on his boots. Look at his height. Is he not long for that bed?
    I am told by docents that this is a visual illusion and the beds are as long in 1800 as they are today but I remain unconvinced by mere logic.
    I can just imagine George and Matha squabbling about this over the dinner table.
    George: Really should have John make me a new bed. We can put mine in the guest room.
    Martha: It’s a perfectly good bed.
    G: Short for me.
    M: Then bend your knees. Some soldier you are, complaining about a prfectly good bed. Do you think they’ll haul a bed frame and mattresses with you across the Delaware?
    G: Yes dear.

    Reply
  120. My own impression agrees with you. Beds of the time seem to be very short.
    Look at the drawing of the huntsman above, drawing on his boots. Look at his height. Is he not long for that bed?
    I am told by docents that this is a visual illusion and the beds are as long in 1800 as they are today but I remain unconvinced by mere logic.
    I can just imagine George and Matha squabbling about this over the dinner table.
    George: Really should have John make me a new bed. We can put mine in the guest room.
    Martha: It’s a perfectly good bed.
    G: Short for me.
    M: Then bend your knees. Some soldier you are, complaining about a prfectly good bed. Do you think they’ll haul a bed frame and mattresses with you across the Delaware?
    G: Yes dear.

    Reply
  121. You folks obviously lucked out in getting a good, comfy sized bed.
    It’s a bit difficult to get images of two folks sleeping in the same bed … (and when I find one it’s generally been used as an excuse to show off the woman’s boobs which does not so much work on a family friendly blog.)
    But here’s examples of two-person sleeping situations in 1800 or so for the middling sort of people.
    https://tinyurl.com/yb6c6fuh
    https://www.jsnoelcollection.org/matrimonial-comforts–moutard-and-rowlandson.html

    Reply
  122. You folks obviously lucked out in getting a good, comfy sized bed.
    It’s a bit difficult to get images of two folks sleeping in the same bed … (and when I find one it’s generally been used as an excuse to show off the woman’s boobs which does not so much work on a family friendly blog.)
    But here’s examples of two-person sleeping situations in 1800 or so for the middling sort of people.
    https://tinyurl.com/yb6c6fuh
    https://www.jsnoelcollection.org/matrimonial-comforts–moutard-and-rowlandson.html

    Reply
  123. You folks obviously lucked out in getting a good, comfy sized bed.
    It’s a bit difficult to get images of two folks sleeping in the same bed … (and when I find one it’s generally been used as an excuse to show off the woman’s boobs which does not so much work on a family friendly blog.)
    But here’s examples of two-person sleeping situations in 1800 or so for the middling sort of people.
    https://tinyurl.com/yb6c6fuh
    https://www.jsnoelcollection.org/matrimonial-comforts–moutard-and-rowlandson.html

    Reply
  124. You folks obviously lucked out in getting a good, comfy sized bed.
    It’s a bit difficult to get images of two folks sleeping in the same bed … (and when I find one it’s generally been used as an excuse to show off the woman’s boobs which does not so much work on a family friendly blog.)
    But here’s examples of two-person sleeping situations in 1800 or so for the middling sort of people.
    https://tinyurl.com/yb6c6fuh
    https://www.jsnoelcollection.org/matrimonial-comforts–moutard-and-rowlandson.html

    Reply
  125. You folks obviously lucked out in getting a good, comfy sized bed.
    It’s a bit difficult to get images of two folks sleeping in the same bed … (and when I find one it’s generally been used as an excuse to show off the woman’s boobs which does not so much work on a family friendly blog.)
    But here’s examples of two-person sleeping situations in 1800 or so for the middling sort of people.
    https://tinyurl.com/yb6c6fuh
    https://www.jsnoelcollection.org/matrimonial-comforts–moutard-and-rowlandson.html

    Reply
  126. I’d love to. I will be in C’ville tomorrow with a friend, pursuing a fixed plan that doesn’t include visiting, alas. But yes, yes, I shall figure out another time and get down for a visit.

    Reply
  127. I’d love to. I will be in C’ville tomorrow with a friend, pursuing a fixed plan that doesn’t include visiting, alas. But yes, yes, I shall figure out another time and get down for a visit.

    Reply
  128. I’d love to. I will be in C’ville tomorrow with a friend, pursuing a fixed plan that doesn’t include visiting, alas. But yes, yes, I shall figure out another time and get down for a visit.

    Reply
  129. I’d love to. I will be in C’ville tomorrow with a friend, pursuing a fixed plan that doesn’t include visiting, alas. But yes, yes, I shall figure out another time and get down for a visit.

    Reply
  130. I’d love to. I will be in C’ville tomorrow with a friend, pursuing a fixed plan that doesn’t include visiting, alas. But yes, yes, I shall figure out another time and get down for a visit.

    Reply
  131. First—-good luck on the move. Moving is both stressful and freeing. Second, a decent bed becomes more important as I grow older. I sleep in a standard queen size bed. My husband and I decided separate beds and rooms made a lot of sense when we moved into our townhouse. My bed suits me—-the linens, the comforter and the pillows, all mine—hahaha! Third, in my historical studies, the shortness of beds in earlier years was attributed to the belief that lying down prone to sleep could lead to death. People slept semi erect braced up my pillows. Truth? Or not?

    Reply
  132. First—-good luck on the move. Moving is both stressful and freeing. Second, a decent bed becomes more important as I grow older. I sleep in a standard queen size bed. My husband and I decided separate beds and rooms made a lot of sense when we moved into our townhouse. My bed suits me—-the linens, the comforter and the pillows, all mine—hahaha! Third, in my historical studies, the shortness of beds in earlier years was attributed to the belief that lying down prone to sleep could lead to death. People slept semi erect braced up my pillows. Truth? Or not?

    Reply
  133. First—-good luck on the move. Moving is both stressful and freeing. Second, a decent bed becomes more important as I grow older. I sleep in a standard queen size bed. My husband and I decided separate beds and rooms made a lot of sense when we moved into our townhouse. My bed suits me—-the linens, the comforter and the pillows, all mine—hahaha! Third, in my historical studies, the shortness of beds in earlier years was attributed to the belief that lying down prone to sleep could lead to death. People slept semi erect braced up my pillows. Truth? Or not?

    Reply
  134. First—-good luck on the move. Moving is both stressful and freeing. Second, a decent bed becomes more important as I grow older. I sleep in a standard queen size bed. My husband and I decided separate beds and rooms made a lot of sense when we moved into our townhouse. My bed suits me—-the linens, the comforter and the pillows, all mine—hahaha! Third, in my historical studies, the shortness of beds in earlier years was attributed to the belief that lying down prone to sleep could lead to death. People slept semi erect braced up my pillows. Truth? Or not?

    Reply
  135. First—-good luck on the move. Moving is both stressful and freeing. Second, a decent bed becomes more important as I grow older. I sleep in a standard queen size bed. My husband and I decided separate beds and rooms made a lot of sense when we moved into our townhouse. My bed suits me—-the linens, the comforter and the pillows, all mine—hahaha! Third, in my historical studies, the shortness of beds in earlier years was attributed to the belief that lying down prone to sleep could lead to death. People slept semi erect braced up my pillows. Truth? Or not?

    Reply
  136. >>>> in my historical studies, the shortness of beds in earlier years was attributed to the belief that lying down prone to sleep could lead to death. People slept semi erect braced up my pillows. Truth? Or not? <<< Fascinatng thought. It would certainly account for all these folks who ARE obviously sleeping upright in what seems to me a very uncomfortable way.

    Reply
  137. >>>> in my historical studies, the shortness of beds in earlier years was attributed to the belief that lying down prone to sleep could lead to death. People slept semi erect braced up my pillows. Truth? Or not? <<< Fascinatng thought. It would certainly account for all these folks who ARE obviously sleeping upright in what seems to me a very uncomfortable way.

    Reply
  138. >>>> in my historical studies, the shortness of beds in earlier years was attributed to the belief that lying down prone to sleep could lead to death. People slept semi erect braced up my pillows. Truth? Or not? <<< Fascinatng thought. It would certainly account for all these folks who ARE obviously sleeping upright in what seems to me a very uncomfortable way.

    Reply
  139. >>>> in my historical studies, the shortness of beds in earlier years was attributed to the belief that lying down prone to sleep could lead to death. People slept semi erect braced up my pillows. Truth? Or not? <<< Fascinatng thought. It would certainly account for all these folks who ARE obviously sleeping upright in what seems to me a very uncomfortable way.

    Reply
  140. >>>> in my historical studies, the shortness of beds in earlier years was attributed to the belief that lying down prone to sleep could lead to death. People slept semi erect braced up my pillows. Truth? Or not? <<< Fascinatng thought. It would certainly account for all these folks who ARE obviously sleeping upright in what seems to me a very uncomfortable way.

    Reply
  141. I have a spool bed (which I think is also called a Jenny Lind bed) that now is called a 3/4 bed which for a single person is okay. I would like a bigger bed, but I love the frame. The only problem is that fitted sheets and other bedding don’t really fit. Small price to pay. I sometimes wonder if a women grabbed the spools during child birth. I wouldn’t be surprised.
    What do you all think about Shakespeare’s leaving his “second best bed” to his wife? I can’t imagine that his favored daughter (momentarily forgotten her name) got all his furniture automatically, and so he made a special designation for her. My bet is that it was a bed that had special meaning for them. Unfortunately, it is the basis for a lot of assumptions about her (she was a harridan and drove him out of Stratford-on-Avon).

    Reply
  142. I have a spool bed (which I think is also called a Jenny Lind bed) that now is called a 3/4 bed which for a single person is okay. I would like a bigger bed, but I love the frame. The only problem is that fitted sheets and other bedding don’t really fit. Small price to pay. I sometimes wonder if a women grabbed the spools during child birth. I wouldn’t be surprised.
    What do you all think about Shakespeare’s leaving his “second best bed” to his wife? I can’t imagine that his favored daughter (momentarily forgotten her name) got all his furniture automatically, and so he made a special designation for her. My bet is that it was a bed that had special meaning for them. Unfortunately, it is the basis for a lot of assumptions about her (she was a harridan and drove him out of Stratford-on-Avon).

    Reply
  143. I have a spool bed (which I think is also called a Jenny Lind bed) that now is called a 3/4 bed which for a single person is okay. I would like a bigger bed, but I love the frame. The only problem is that fitted sheets and other bedding don’t really fit. Small price to pay. I sometimes wonder if a women grabbed the spools during child birth. I wouldn’t be surprised.
    What do you all think about Shakespeare’s leaving his “second best bed” to his wife? I can’t imagine that his favored daughter (momentarily forgotten her name) got all his furniture automatically, and so he made a special designation for her. My bet is that it was a bed that had special meaning for them. Unfortunately, it is the basis for a lot of assumptions about her (she was a harridan and drove him out of Stratford-on-Avon).

    Reply
  144. I have a spool bed (which I think is also called a Jenny Lind bed) that now is called a 3/4 bed which for a single person is okay. I would like a bigger bed, but I love the frame. The only problem is that fitted sheets and other bedding don’t really fit. Small price to pay. I sometimes wonder if a women grabbed the spools during child birth. I wouldn’t be surprised.
    What do you all think about Shakespeare’s leaving his “second best bed” to his wife? I can’t imagine that his favored daughter (momentarily forgotten her name) got all his furniture automatically, and so he made a special designation for her. My bet is that it was a bed that had special meaning for them. Unfortunately, it is the basis for a lot of assumptions about her (she was a harridan and drove him out of Stratford-on-Avon).

    Reply
  145. I have a spool bed (which I think is also called a Jenny Lind bed) that now is called a 3/4 bed which for a single person is okay. I would like a bigger bed, but I love the frame. The only problem is that fitted sheets and other bedding don’t really fit. Small price to pay. I sometimes wonder if a women grabbed the spools during child birth. I wouldn’t be surprised.
    What do you all think about Shakespeare’s leaving his “second best bed” to his wife? I can’t imagine that his favored daughter (momentarily forgotten her name) got all his furniture automatically, and so he made a special designation for her. My bet is that it was a bed that had special meaning for them. Unfortunately, it is the basis for a lot of assumptions about her (she was a harridan and drove him out of Stratford-on-Avon).

    Reply
  146. Another comment on the short bed. The Lincoln house in Springfield, Illinois has a short bed. We were told that Lincoln slept sitting up, but no reason was given.

    Reply
  147. Another comment on the short bed. The Lincoln house in Springfield, Illinois has a short bed. We were told that Lincoln slept sitting up, but no reason was given.

    Reply
  148. Another comment on the short bed. The Lincoln house in Springfield, Illinois has a short bed. We were told that Lincoln slept sitting up, but no reason was given.

    Reply
  149. Another comment on the short bed. The Lincoln house in Springfield, Illinois has a short bed. We were told that Lincoln slept sitting up, but no reason was given.

    Reply
  150. Another comment on the short bed. The Lincoln house in Springfield, Illinois has a short bed. We were told that Lincoln slept sitting up, but no reason was given.

    Reply

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