An Ode to the Love Letter

Love Letter 4Andrea/Cara here, I recently came upon a delightful post on the Jane Austen Center website—a History of the Love Letter. And as it’s still February, the month of Love, I’d thought I’d muse a little on the subject, too.

The post got me to thinking that it’s rather amazing that the art form of the love letter inspires people who would likely claim they have absolutely no talent for writing to express themselves with a passion and a use of imagery and language that they would never display elsewhere. (The Muse, one might say, is a powerful creative force!) 



LettershelleyThere’s a heartfelt honesty in a missive meant only for a true love’s eyes. All the everyday fears of appearing foolish seems stripped away, allowing words and emotions to come unfiltered. To an outsider, they may often seem over the top. But that daring to let down our guard and express our innermost feelings really does show most of us possess a personal poetry we never dreamed we had. It's one of Love's many wonderful lessons—sometimes it's worth making yourself vulnerable and taking a chance.

Love Letter 7The post also got me feeling a little wistful that the proverbial bundle of old-fashioned love letters in the attic, tied in a red ribbon and maybe smelling faintly of perfume, is becoming rarer than hen’s teeth. On one hand, we have the ease and convenience of dashing off a love note and pressing a button for instant connection across cities and oceans and continents. But most of those messages will simply be lost in the ether. That sweet discovery—the magic of reading how wonderfully human our parents or grandparents were—won't be there for future generations. And think about how much we've learned about the history of an era by reading the letters of of people baring their soul.

Here’s a few examples of love letters from the early 1800s. Wouldn’t it be a shame if we couldn’t read these and smile:

Love letter 1Lord Byron:

"I have read this book in your garden;–my love, you were absent, or else I could not have read it. It is a favourite book of yours, and the writer was a friend of mine. You will not understand these English words, and others will not understand them,–which is the reason I have not scrawled them in Italian. But you will recognize the handwriting of him who passionately loved you, and you will divine that, over a book which was yours, he could only think of love.
In that word, beautiful in all languages, but most so in yours–Amor mio–is comprised my existence here and hereafter. I feel I exist here, and I feel I shall exist hereafter,–to what purpose you will decide; my destiny rests with you, and you are a woman, eighteen years of age, and two out of a convent. I love you, and you love me,–at least, you say so, and act as if you did so, which last is a great consolation in all events . . ."

Love Letter 2Napoleon:

"A few days ago I thought I loved you; but since I last saw you I feel I love you a thousand times more. All the time I have known you, I adore you more each day; that just shows how wrong was La Bruyére’s maxim that love comes all at once. Everything in nature has its own life and different stages of growth. I beg you, let me see some of your faults: be less beautiful, less graceful, less kind, less good…

My one and only Josephine, apart from you there is no joy; away from you the world is a desert where I am alone and cannot open my heart. You have taken more than my soul; you are the one thought of my life. When I am tired of the worry of work, when I fear the outcome, when men annoy me, when I am ready to curse being alive, I put my hand on my heart; your portrait hangs there, I look at it, and love brings me perfect happiness…Oh, my adorable wife! I don’t know what fate has in store for me, but if it keeps me apart from you any longer, it will be unbearable! My courage is not enough for that."

Love Letter 3John Keats:
"You fear, sometimes, I do not love you so much as you wish? My dear Girl I love you ever and ever and without reserve. The more I have known you the more have I lov’d. In every way – even my jealousies have been agonies of Love, in the hottest fit I ever had I would have died for you. I have vex’d you too much. But for Love! Can I help it? You are always new. The last of your kisses was ever the sweetest; the last smile the brightest; the last movement the gracefullest. When you pass’d my window home yesterday, I was fill’d with as much admiration as if I had then seen you for the first time."

Love Letter 6So what about you? Do you still write a real, old-fashioned love letter on occasion? Or do you send them via e-mail? Do you have a favorite one from history?  I still enjoy Darcy’s missive to Elizabeth Bennett, even though I’ve read it a zillion times.

135 thoughts on “An Ode to the Love Letter”

  1. I have never wrote or received a love letter, but I’m old enough to remember the joy of letter writing. And even more, the joy of receiving letters.
    One of my earliest memories is kneeling on a chair at the kitchen table with a crayon and a piece of paper “writing” a letter to my grandma in California. My mom would put it in with the letter she was sending.
    Of course, it was nothing but squiggles and lines because I didn’t even know my alphabet yet. But my grandma would always send a little letter for me when she wrote back to my mom.
    You know, I guess those were love letters.

    Reply
  2. I have never wrote or received a love letter, but I’m old enough to remember the joy of letter writing. And even more, the joy of receiving letters.
    One of my earliest memories is kneeling on a chair at the kitchen table with a crayon and a piece of paper “writing” a letter to my grandma in California. My mom would put it in with the letter she was sending.
    Of course, it was nothing but squiggles and lines because I didn’t even know my alphabet yet. But my grandma would always send a little letter for me when she wrote back to my mom.
    You know, I guess those were love letters.

    Reply
  3. I have never wrote or received a love letter, but I’m old enough to remember the joy of letter writing. And even more, the joy of receiving letters.
    One of my earliest memories is kneeling on a chair at the kitchen table with a crayon and a piece of paper “writing” a letter to my grandma in California. My mom would put it in with the letter she was sending.
    Of course, it was nothing but squiggles and lines because I didn’t even know my alphabet yet. But my grandma would always send a little letter for me when she wrote back to my mom.
    You know, I guess those were love letters.

    Reply
  4. I have never wrote or received a love letter, but I’m old enough to remember the joy of letter writing. And even more, the joy of receiving letters.
    One of my earliest memories is kneeling on a chair at the kitchen table with a crayon and a piece of paper “writing” a letter to my grandma in California. My mom would put it in with the letter she was sending.
    Of course, it was nothing but squiggles and lines because I didn’t even know my alphabet yet. But my grandma would always send a little letter for me when she wrote back to my mom.
    You know, I guess those were love letters.

    Reply
  5. I have never wrote or received a love letter, but I’m old enough to remember the joy of letter writing. And even more, the joy of receiving letters.
    One of my earliest memories is kneeling on a chair at the kitchen table with a crayon and a piece of paper “writing” a letter to my grandma in California. My mom would put it in with the letter she was sending.
    Of course, it was nothing but squiggles and lines because I didn’t even know my alphabet yet. But my grandma would always send a little letter for me when she wrote back to my mom.
    You know, I guess those were love letters.

    Reply
  6. Love this post. Being an incurable romantic all my life, at the age of nearly 70, yes! I do still write a love letter! And occasionally receive one! Precious … Rosemary x

    Reply
  7. Love this post. Being an incurable romantic all my life, at the age of nearly 70, yes! I do still write a love letter! And occasionally receive one! Precious … Rosemary x

    Reply
  8. Love this post. Being an incurable romantic all my life, at the age of nearly 70, yes! I do still write a love letter! And occasionally receive one! Precious … Rosemary x

    Reply
  9. Love this post. Being an incurable romantic all my life, at the age of nearly 70, yes! I do still write a love letter! And occasionally receive one! Precious … Rosemary x

    Reply
  10. Love this post. Being an incurable romantic all my life, at the age of nearly 70, yes! I do still write a love letter! And occasionally receive one! Precious … Rosemary x

    Reply
  11. I don’t think I could write a letter like that. Even though I read a lot of romance and poetry I don’t think I’m very romantic myself. The letter Captain Wentworth wrote to Ann is one of the loveliest I ever read.

    Reply
  12. I don’t think I could write a letter like that. Even though I read a lot of romance and poetry I don’t think I’m very romantic myself. The letter Captain Wentworth wrote to Ann is one of the loveliest I ever read.

    Reply
  13. I don’t think I could write a letter like that. Even though I read a lot of romance and poetry I don’t think I’m very romantic myself. The letter Captain Wentworth wrote to Ann is one of the loveliest I ever read.

    Reply
  14. I don’t think I could write a letter like that. Even though I read a lot of romance and poetry I don’t think I’m very romantic myself. The letter Captain Wentworth wrote to Ann is one of the loveliest I ever read.

    Reply
  15. I don’t think I could write a letter like that. Even though I read a lot of romance and poetry I don’t think I’m very romantic myself. The letter Captain Wentworth wrote to Ann is one of the loveliest I ever read.

    Reply
  16. I don’t think I am very romantic. I made two or three home-created cards for my husband, which are still around somewhere, but romantic communication has never been my strong point. (Oh, yes — Austen! I treasure both Darcy’s letter and Captain Wentworth’s letter.)
    But, as for internet communication; I save important emails. I even print them out and put the printouts in notebooks. This is mostly genealogy, but it can be anything important to me. If it is important, I save it. Internet does not need to be transient.
    On the other hand, while the treasure those saved letters the written letter was mostly transient also. It was read, answered, and discarded more often than it was saved.

    Reply
  17. I don’t think I am very romantic. I made two or three home-created cards for my husband, which are still around somewhere, but romantic communication has never been my strong point. (Oh, yes — Austen! I treasure both Darcy’s letter and Captain Wentworth’s letter.)
    But, as for internet communication; I save important emails. I even print them out and put the printouts in notebooks. This is mostly genealogy, but it can be anything important to me. If it is important, I save it. Internet does not need to be transient.
    On the other hand, while the treasure those saved letters the written letter was mostly transient also. It was read, answered, and discarded more often than it was saved.

    Reply
  18. I don’t think I am very romantic. I made two or three home-created cards for my husband, which are still around somewhere, but romantic communication has never been my strong point. (Oh, yes — Austen! I treasure both Darcy’s letter and Captain Wentworth’s letter.)
    But, as for internet communication; I save important emails. I even print them out and put the printouts in notebooks. This is mostly genealogy, but it can be anything important to me. If it is important, I save it. Internet does not need to be transient.
    On the other hand, while the treasure those saved letters the written letter was mostly transient also. It was read, answered, and discarded more often than it was saved.

    Reply
  19. I don’t think I am very romantic. I made two or three home-created cards for my husband, which are still around somewhere, but romantic communication has never been my strong point. (Oh, yes — Austen! I treasure both Darcy’s letter and Captain Wentworth’s letter.)
    But, as for internet communication; I save important emails. I even print them out and put the printouts in notebooks. This is mostly genealogy, but it can be anything important to me. If it is important, I save it. Internet does not need to be transient.
    On the other hand, while the treasure those saved letters the written letter was mostly transient also. It was read, answered, and discarded more often than it was saved.

    Reply
  20. I don’t think I am very romantic. I made two or three home-created cards for my husband, which are still around somewhere, but romantic communication has never been my strong point. (Oh, yes — Austen! I treasure both Darcy’s letter and Captain Wentworth’s letter.)
    But, as for internet communication; I save important emails. I even print them out and put the printouts in notebooks. This is mostly genealogy, but it can be anything important to me. If it is important, I save it. Internet does not need to be transient.
    On the other hand, while the treasure those saved letters the written letter was mostly transient also. It was read, answered, and discarded more often than it was saved.

    Reply
  21. Those are the sort of love letters the heart remembers forever 🙂 I have a few notes from mother and brothers and old friends in my Memory Box and they are treasures. I don’t need to look at them to remember them, but I do sometimes.
    The other side of the coin was a creepy stalker sort of letter I got from some anonymous kid when I was in the 7th grade. It scared me badly. In those days it was easy to find out a kid’s home address; now I suspect it would be more difficult. I went around haunted for days wondering who could have sent me such a thing. I was afraid to walk home from school, and afraid even to tell my mom because somebody might have thought I had done something to bring that on, and I knew my brothers would be angry with me more than whatever boy had written it. I had my suspicions but nothing ever came of it and I never knew for sure who had sent it. I’m sure that to whoever it was, it was just a giggle, something to tease a girl who was a bit shy and that made her pushy sometimes — a girl who didn’t know how to act like the other girls yet. Eventually I burned it when it looked like nothing could or would be done.
    For a long time after that I was scared to open a letter that had no return address. So if someone had sent me an anonymous love letter, I probably would never have opened it and never known.

    Reply
  22. Those are the sort of love letters the heart remembers forever 🙂 I have a few notes from mother and brothers and old friends in my Memory Box and they are treasures. I don’t need to look at them to remember them, but I do sometimes.
    The other side of the coin was a creepy stalker sort of letter I got from some anonymous kid when I was in the 7th grade. It scared me badly. In those days it was easy to find out a kid’s home address; now I suspect it would be more difficult. I went around haunted for days wondering who could have sent me such a thing. I was afraid to walk home from school, and afraid even to tell my mom because somebody might have thought I had done something to bring that on, and I knew my brothers would be angry with me more than whatever boy had written it. I had my suspicions but nothing ever came of it and I never knew for sure who had sent it. I’m sure that to whoever it was, it was just a giggle, something to tease a girl who was a bit shy and that made her pushy sometimes — a girl who didn’t know how to act like the other girls yet. Eventually I burned it when it looked like nothing could or would be done.
    For a long time after that I was scared to open a letter that had no return address. So if someone had sent me an anonymous love letter, I probably would never have opened it and never known.

    Reply
  23. Those are the sort of love letters the heart remembers forever 🙂 I have a few notes from mother and brothers and old friends in my Memory Box and they are treasures. I don’t need to look at them to remember them, but I do sometimes.
    The other side of the coin was a creepy stalker sort of letter I got from some anonymous kid when I was in the 7th grade. It scared me badly. In those days it was easy to find out a kid’s home address; now I suspect it would be more difficult. I went around haunted for days wondering who could have sent me such a thing. I was afraid to walk home from school, and afraid even to tell my mom because somebody might have thought I had done something to bring that on, and I knew my brothers would be angry with me more than whatever boy had written it. I had my suspicions but nothing ever came of it and I never knew for sure who had sent it. I’m sure that to whoever it was, it was just a giggle, something to tease a girl who was a bit shy and that made her pushy sometimes — a girl who didn’t know how to act like the other girls yet. Eventually I burned it when it looked like nothing could or would be done.
    For a long time after that I was scared to open a letter that had no return address. So if someone had sent me an anonymous love letter, I probably would never have opened it and never known.

    Reply
  24. Those are the sort of love letters the heart remembers forever 🙂 I have a few notes from mother and brothers and old friends in my Memory Box and they are treasures. I don’t need to look at them to remember them, but I do sometimes.
    The other side of the coin was a creepy stalker sort of letter I got from some anonymous kid when I was in the 7th grade. It scared me badly. In those days it was easy to find out a kid’s home address; now I suspect it would be more difficult. I went around haunted for days wondering who could have sent me such a thing. I was afraid to walk home from school, and afraid even to tell my mom because somebody might have thought I had done something to bring that on, and I knew my brothers would be angry with me more than whatever boy had written it. I had my suspicions but nothing ever came of it and I never knew for sure who had sent it. I’m sure that to whoever it was, it was just a giggle, something to tease a girl who was a bit shy and that made her pushy sometimes — a girl who didn’t know how to act like the other girls yet. Eventually I burned it when it looked like nothing could or would be done.
    For a long time after that I was scared to open a letter that had no return address. So if someone had sent me an anonymous love letter, I probably would never have opened it and never known.

    Reply
  25. Those are the sort of love letters the heart remembers forever 🙂 I have a few notes from mother and brothers and old friends in my Memory Box and they are treasures. I don’t need to look at them to remember them, but I do sometimes.
    The other side of the coin was a creepy stalker sort of letter I got from some anonymous kid when I was in the 7th grade. It scared me badly. In those days it was easy to find out a kid’s home address; now I suspect it would be more difficult. I went around haunted for days wondering who could have sent me such a thing. I was afraid to walk home from school, and afraid even to tell my mom because somebody might have thought I had done something to bring that on, and I knew my brothers would be angry with me more than whatever boy had written it. I had my suspicions but nothing ever came of it and I never knew for sure who had sent it. I’m sure that to whoever it was, it was just a giggle, something to tease a girl who was a bit shy and that made her pushy sometimes — a girl who didn’t know how to act like the other girls yet. Eventually I burned it when it looked like nothing could or would be done.
    For a long time after that I was scared to open a letter that had no return address. So if someone had sent me an anonymous love letter, I probably would never have opened it and never known.

    Reply
  26. I do that too, Sue. I used to print stuff out, but there got to be too much of it. I don’t keep a diary, but I do have a separate file for each person important to me and I keep their emails in there, along with a note about any time we met, what we did, what their likes and dislikes are, and what gifts I’ve given them so I don’t screw up and give them the same thing every time. Not a dossier, just an informal account such as I might write in a diary if I kept one. Some of these people have passed, but as long as my Carbonite sub holds out, I’ll always be able to pretend they are just a click away 🙂

    Reply
  27. I do that too, Sue. I used to print stuff out, but there got to be too much of it. I don’t keep a diary, but I do have a separate file for each person important to me and I keep their emails in there, along with a note about any time we met, what we did, what their likes and dislikes are, and what gifts I’ve given them so I don’t screw up and give them the same thing every time. Not a dossier, just an informal account such as I might write in a diary if I kept one. Some of these people have passed, but as long as my Carbonite sub holds out, I’ll always be able to pretend they are just a click away 🙂

    Reply
  28. I do that too, Sue. I used to print stuff out, but there got to be too much of it. I don’t keep a diary, but I do have a separate file for each person important to me and I keep their emails in there, along with a note about any time we met, what we did, what their likes and dislikes are, and what gifts I’ve given them so I don’t screw up and give them the same thing every time. Not a dossier, just an informal account such as I might write in a diary if I kept one. Some of these people have passed, but as long as my Carbonite sub holds out, I’ll always be able to pretend they are just a click away 🙂

    Reply
  29. I do that too, Sue. I used to print stuff out, but there got to be too much of it. I don’t keep a diary, but I do have a separate file for each person important to me and I keep their emails in there, along with a note about any time we met, what we did, what their likes and dislikes are, and what gifts I’ve given them so I don’t screw up and give them the same thing every time. Not a dossier, just an informal account such as I might write in a diary if I kept one. Some of these people have passed, but as long as my Carbonite sub holds out, I’ll always be able to pretend they are just a click away 🙂

    Reply
  30. I do that too, Sue. I used to print stuff out, but there got to be too much of it. I don’t keep a diary, but I do have a separate file for each person important to me and I keep their emails in there, along with a note about any time we met, what we did, what their likes and dislikes are, and what gifts I’ve given them so I don’t screw up and give them the same thing every time. Not a dossier, just an informal account such as I might write in a diary if I kept one. Some of these people have passed, but as long as my Carbonite sub holds out, I’ll always be able to pretend they are just a click away 🙂

    Reply
  31. I’ve sent or received anything like that, more’s the pity. I did once send a “Dear John” letter…and on another occasion, got a “Dear Jane” letter. 🙁

    Reply
  32. I’ve sent or received anything like that, more’s the pity. I did once send a “Dear John” letter…and on another occasion, got a “Dear Jane” letter. 🙁

    Reply
  33. I’ve sent or received anything like that, more’s the pity. I did once send a “Dear John” letter…and on another occasion, got a “Dear Jane” letter. 🙁

    Reply
  34. I’ve sent or received anything like that, more’s the pity. I did once send a “Dear John” letter…and on another occasion, got a “Dear Jane” letter. 🙁

    Reply
  35. I’ve sent or received anything like that, more’s the pity. I did once send a “Dear John” letter…and on another occasion, got a “Dear Jane” letter. 🙁

    Reply
  36. Janice, I have treasured letters from family that I definitely think of as love letters, even when they are just the hi, how are you type. It’s the connection and sharing the everyday things that make them special.
    That’s a terrible story about the stalker letter. At that age, it was likely just a prank, and the writer didn’t realize its effect, but the angst it caused you is not nice The burning was a fitting way to exorcise its power over you.

    Reply
  37. Janice, I have treasured letters from family that I definitely think of as love letters, even when they are just the hi, how are you type. It’s the connection and sharing the everyday things that make them special.
    That’s a terrible story about the stalker letter. At that age, it was likely just a prank, and the writer didn’t realize its effect, but the angst it caused you is not nice The burning was a fitting way to exorcise its power over you.

    Reply
  38. Janice, I have treasured letters from family that I definitely think of as love letters, even when they are just the hi, how are you type. It’s the connection and sharing the everyday things that make them special.
    That’s a terrible story about the stalker letter. At that age, it was likely just a prank, and the writer didn’t realize its effect, but the angst it caused you is not nice The burning was a fitting way to exorcise its power over you.

    Reply
  39. Janice, I have treasured letters from family that I definitely think of as love letters, even when they are just the hi, how are you type. It’s the connection and sharing the everyday things that make them special.
    That’s a terrible story about the stalker letter. At that age, it was likely just a prank, and the writer didn’t realize its effect, but the angst it caused you is not nice The burning was a fitting way to exorcise its power over you.

    Reply
  40. Janice, I have treasured letters from family that I definitely think of as love letters, even when they are just the hi, how are you type. It’s the connection and sharing the everyday things that make them special.
    That’s a terrible story about the stalker letter. At that age, it was likely just a prank, and the writer didn’t realize its effect, but the angst it caused you is not nice The burning was a fitting way to exorcise its power over you.

    Reply
  41. Sue, I bet you are short-changing yourself! The handmade cards sound VERY romantic.
    As while I agree that one can easily print out e-mails, for me there’s something impersonal about the format and the printer paper that will never replace a handwritten letter. Yes, many are mundane and thrown away, but the ones you want to save have real personality.

    Reply
  42. Sue, I bet you are short-changing yourself! The handmade cards sound VERY romantic.
    As while I agree that one can easily print out e-mails, for me there’s something impersonal about the format and the printer paper that will never replace a handwritten letter. Yes, many are mundane and thrown away, but the ones you want to save have real personality.

    Reply
  43. Sue, I bet you are short-changing yourself! The handmade cards sound VERY romantic.
    As while I agree that one can easily print out e-mails, for me there’s something impersonal about the format and the printer paper that will never replace a handwritten letter. Yes, many are mundane and thrown away, but the ones you want to save have real personality.

    Reply
  44. Sue, I bet you are short-changing yourself! The handmade cards sound VERY romantic.
    As while I agree that one can easily print out e-mails, for me there’s something impersonal about the format and the printer paper that will never replace a handwritten letter. Yes, many are mundane and thrown away, but the ones you want to save have real personality.

    Reply
  45. Sue, I bet you are short-changing yourself! The handmade cards sound VERY romantic.
    As while I agree that one can easily print out e-mails, for me there’s something impersonal about the format and the printer paper that will never replace a handwritten letter. Yes, many are mundane and thrown away, but the ones you want to save have real personality.

    Reply
  46. Shortly after our first Christmas together hubby moved up North. It would take me 3 months before I could join him. I wrote him a stack of letters. He wrote me one amd sent it in the self-addressed-stamped-envelope I sent him that said, “Yes, this is a hint!” We spoke a lot on the phone so he didn’t understand my need for a letter. I said, “Because I can’t take out a phone call and re-read it at 3am when I’m missing you!” It was a short letter in cramped handwriting-a single sheet of note paper with a large part being x’s and 0’s at the bottom but is still precious after 33 years.

    Reply
  47. Shortly after our first Christmas together hubby moved up North. It would take me 3 months before I could join him. I wrote him a stack of letters. He wrote me one amd sent it in the self-addressed-stamped-envelope I sent him that said, “Yes, this is a hint!” We spoke a lot on the phone so he didn’t understand my need for a letter. I said, “Because I can’t take out a phone call and re-read it at 3am when I’m missing you!” It was a short letter in cramped handwriting-a single sheet of note paper with a large part being x’s and 0’s at the bottom but is still precious after 33 years.

    Reply
  48. Shortly after our first Christmas together hubby moved up North. It would take me 3 months before I could join him. I wrote him a stack of letters. He wrote me one amd sent it in the self-addressed-stamped-envelope I sent him that said, “Yes, this is a hint!” We spoke a lot on the phone so he didn’t understand my need for a letter. I said, “Because I can’t take out a phone call and re-read it at 3am when I’m missing you!” It was a short letter in cramped handwriting-a single sheet of note paper with a large part being x’s and 0’s at the bottom but is still precious after 33 years.

    Reply
  49. Shortly after our first Christmas together hubby moved up North. It would take me 3 months before I could join him. I wrote him a stack of letters. He wrote me one amd sent it in the self-addressed-stamped-envelope I sent him that said, “Yes, this is a hint!” We spoke a lot on the phone so he didn’t understand my need for a letter. I said, “Because I can’t take out a phone call and re-read it at 3am when I’m missing you!” It was a short letter in cramped handwriting-a single sheet of note paper with a large part being x’s and 0’s at the bottom but is still precious after 33 years.

    Reply
  50. Shortly after our first Christmas together hubby moved up North. It would take me 3 months before I could join him. I wrote him a stack of letters. He wrote me one amd sent it in the self-addressed-stamped-envelope I sent him that said, “Yes, this is a hint!” We spoke a lot on the phone so he didn’t understand my need for a letter. I said, “Because I can’t take out a phone call and re-read it at 3am when I’m missing you!” It was a short letter in cramped handwriting-a single sheet of note paper with a large part being x’s and 0’s at the bottom but is still precious after 33 years.

    Reply
  51. Shortly after our first Christmas together hubby moved up North. It would take me 3 months before I could join him. I wrote him a stack of letters. He wrote me one and sent it in the self-addressed-stamped-envelope I sent him that said, “Yes, this is a hint!” We spoke a lot on the phone so he didn’t understand my need for a letter. I said, “Because I can’t take out a phone call and re-read it at 3am when I’m missing you!” It was a short letter in cramped handwriting-a single sheet of note paper with a large part being x’s and 0’s at the bottom but is still precious after 33 years.

    Reply
  52. Shortly after our first Christmas together hubby moved up North. It would take me 3 months before I could join him. I wrote him a stack of letters. He wrote me one and sent it in the self-addressed-stamped-envelope I sent him that said, “Yes, this is a hint!” We spoke a lot on the phone so he didn’t understand my need for a letter. I said, “Because I can’t take out a phone call and re-read it at 3am when I’m missing you!” It was a short letter in cramped handwriting-a single sheet of note paper with a large part being x’s and 0’s at the bottom but is still precious after 33 years.

    Reply
  53. Shortly after our first Christmas together hubby moved up North. It would take me 3 months before I could join him. I wrote him a stack of letters. He wrote me one and sent it in the self-addressed-stamped-envelope I sent him that said, “Yes, this is a hint!” We spoke a lot on the phone so he didn’t understand my need for a letter. I said, “Because I can’t take out a phone call and re-read it at 3am when I’m missing you!” It was a short letter in cramped handwriting-a single sheet of note paper with a large part being x’s and 0’s at the bottom but is still precious after 33 years.

    Reply
  54. Shortly after our first Christmas together hubby moved up North. It would take me 3 months before I could join him. I wrote him a stack of letters. He wrote me one and sent it in the self-addressed-stamped-envelope I sent him that said, “Yes, this is a hint!” We spoke a lot on the phone so he didn’t understand my need for a letter. I said, “Because I can’t take out a phone call and re-read it at 3am when I’m missing you!” It was a short letter in cramped handwriting-a single sheet of note paper with a large part being x’s and 0’s at the bottom but is still precious after 33 years.

    Reply
  55. Shortly after our first Christmas together hubby moved up North. It would take me 3 months before I could join him. I wrote him a stack of letters. He wrote me one and sent it in the self-addressed-stamped-envelope I sent him that said, “Yes, this is a hint!” We spoke a lot on the phone so he didn’t understand my need for a letter. I said, “Because I can’t take out a phone call and re-read it at 3am when I’m missing you!” It was a short letter in cramped handwriting-a single sheet of note paper with a large part being x’s and 0’s at the bottom but is still precious after 33 years.

    Reply
  56. What an awful thing (stalker experience) to have to go through at such a vulnerable age. I think you are probably right in your supposition that it was meant as a prank. Kids can be so cruel sometimes.

    Reply
  57. What an awful thing (stalker experience) to have to go through at such a vulnerable age. I think you are probably right in your supposition that it was meant as a prank. Kids can be so cruel sometimes.

    Reply
  58. What an awful thing (stalker experience) to have to go through at such a vulnerable age. I think you are probably right in your supposition that it was meant as a prank. Kids can be so cruel sometimes.

    Reply
  59. What an awful thing (stalker experience) to have to go through at such a vulnerable age. I think you are probably right in your supposition that it was meant as a prank. Kids can be so cruel sometimes.

    Reply
  60. What an awful thing (stalker experience) to have to go through at such a vulnerable age. I think you are probably right in your supposition that it was meant as a prank. Kids can be so cruel sometimes.

    Reply
  61. Love the quotes about love – I never wrote/or received a love letter – just cards with sentiments of love. Love letters from the past are wonderful to read. Seems love and romance was a bit harder in past times because of duty, wealth etc but when it was felt, it was really love

    Reply
  62. Love the quotes about love – I never wrote/or received a love letter – just cards with sentiments of love. Love letters from the past are wonderful to read. Seems love and romance was a bit harder in past times because of duty, wealth etc but when it was felt, it was really love

    Reply
  63. Love the quotes about love – I never wrote/or received a love letter – just cards with sentiments of love. Love letters from the past are wonderful to read. Seems love and romance was a bit harder in past times because of duty, wealth etc but when it was felt, it was really love

    Reply
  64. Love the quotes about love – I never wrote/or received a love letter – just cards with sentiments of love. Love letters from the past are wonderful to read. Seems love and romance was a bit harder in past times because of duty, wealth etc but when it was felt, it was really love

    Reply
  65. Love the quotes about love – I never wrote/or received a love letter – just cards with sentiments of love. Love letters from the past are wonderful to read. Seems love and romance was a bit harder in past times because of duty, wealth etc but when it was felt, it was really love

    Reply
  66. Diane, Cards count IMO!
    Love definitely had more obstacles in the past, and perhaps those barriers fanned the passion—or perhaps passion was needed to burn down the barriers. Sadly, I think a great many love stories had unhappy ending because there was too much to overcome.

    Reply
  67. Diane, Cards count IMO!
    Love definitely had more obstacles in the past, and perhaps those barriers fanned the passion—or perhaps passion was needed to burn down the barriers. Sadly, I think a great many love stories had unhappy ending because there was too much to overcome.

    Reply
  68. Diane, Cards count IMO!
    Love definitely had more obstacles in the past, and perhaps those barriers fanned the passion—or perhaps passion was needed to burn down the barriers. Sadly, I think a great many love stories had unhappy ending because there was too much to overcome.

    Reply
  69. Diane, Cards count IMO!
    Love definitely had more obstacles in the past, and perhaps those barriers fanned the passion—or perhaps passion was needed to burn down the barriers. Sadly, I think a great many love stories had unhappy ending because there was too much to overcome.

    Reply
  70. Diane, Cards count IMO!
    Love definitely had more obstacles in the past, and perhaps those barriers fanned the passion—or perhaps passion was needed to burn down the barriers. Sadly, I think a great many love stories had unhappy ending because there was too much to overcome.

    Reply
  71. My husband often travels for work, and usually he leaves the house for a trip after I’ve gone to work in the morning. He leaves me post-it notes in various places around the house telling me he loves me, and they are always such a comfort while he is gone. They don’t have the word count of Keats or Byron or Napoleon, but they bring just as much delight!

    Reply
  72. My husband often travels for work, and usually he leaves the house for a trip after I’ve gone to work in the morning. He leaves me post-it notes in various places around the house telling me he loves me, and they are always such a comfort while he is gone. They don’t have the word count of Keats or Byron or Napoleon, but they bring just as much delight!

    Reply
  73. My husband often travels for work, and usually he leaves the house for a trip after I’ve gone to work in the morning. He leaves me post-it notes in various places around the house telling me he loves me, and they are always such a comfort while he is gone. They don’t have the word count of Keats or Byron or Napoleon, but they bring just as much delight!

    Reply
  74. My husband often travels for work, and usually he leaves the house for a trip after I’ve gone to work in the morning. He leaves me post-it notes in various places around the house telling me he loves me, and they are always such a comfort while he is gone. They don’t have the word count of Keats or Byron or Napoleon, but they bring just as much delight!

    Reply
  75. My husband often travels for work, and usually he leaves the house for a trip after I’ve gone to work in the morning. He leaves me post-it notes in various places around the house telling me he loves me, and they are always such a comfort while he is gone. They don’t have the word count of Keats or Byron or Napoleon, but they bring just as much delight!

    Reply
  76. I never received a love letter, but I received love notes from a boyfriend in high school and love cards from my hubby when we started dating. I still saved my favorites from 36 years ago. What a nice post this was!

    Reply
  77. I never received a love letter, but I received love notes from a boyfriend in high school and love cards from my hubby when we started dating. I still saved my favorites from 36 years ago. What a nice post this was!

    Reply
  78. I never received a love letter, but I received love notes from a boyfriend in high school and love cards from my hubby when we started dating. I still saved my favorites from 36 years ago. What a nice post this was!

    Reply
  79. I never received a love letter, but I received love notes from a boyfriend in high school and love cards from my hubby when we started dating. I still saved my favorites from 36 years ago. What a nice post this was!

    Reply
  80. I never received a love letter, but I received love notes from a boyfriend in high school and love cards from my hubby when we started dating. I still saved my favorites from 36 years ago. What a nice post this was!

    Reply

Leave a Comment