An Interview with Sarah Mallory!


HMB_Sarah_Mallory-3Nicola here. Today it's my very great pleasure to welcome Sarah Mallory to the Word Wench blog. Sarah is a multi-published, multi-award-winning UK author of historical romantic adventure and a long time friend and fellow member of the Romantic Novelists' Association. One reviewer commented of Sarah's writing: "Sarah Mallory's Regency world is
captivating, beautifully rendered and immensely atmospheric and I for one cannot
wait for her next novel, to return to this wonderful world!" Fortunately for all of Sarah's fans, her latest book, Bought for Revenge, is available now!

NC: Sarah, welcome ot the Word Wenches! Please
tell us a bit about yourself and how you came to be a writer.

I am a West Country girl, born and bred in Bristol but I moved
to Yorkshire in 1989, were I now live on the edge of the Pennines – fantastic
views and wonderful walks on the moors, so inspirational! I was always a
storyteller and then I began to write them down, so I wouldn't forget
them!  My first novel was published in
1980 under the pen name Melinda Hammond – it would now be called a
"sweet" Regency Romance. I had about a dozen books published before I
was signed up by Harlequin, where I write as Sarah Mallory – they are still historical
romantic adventures but the heat content is a bit higher now!

NC: I have several of your Melinda Hammond books on my keeper shelf, including Dance for a Diamond and The Belles Dames Club. I love them. I
was intrigued to read that it was a street sign that first inspired your
new book, Bought for
Bal Revenge. Please tell us more!
 

There is a little lane near my home called "Burnt Acres
Lane." Every time I see this sign I wonder why it was given that name.  I have not been able to find out any
information about it, so I made up my own story, about a burned-out shell of a
house, a tragic history and a man who returns to his old home, looking for
justice.  I have to admit it is one of
my favourite books: I love Lucas, the tortured hero and Annabelle, the long-suffering
heroine. Their trials and tribulations make the happy ending all the sweeter, I
think!



BFR_cover_smallWhat
is your favourite scene in the book?

When Lucas is at the very darkest point. He is alone in his
house, it is the early hours of the morning and he is in despair. He has
discovered the very worst news about how his parents died, he knows now that he
has punished an innocent man and he has lost the love of his life. Then
Annabelle appears… I won't say anymore, but I think Annabelle is truly angelic.
She has tremendous strength of character and is a real match for Lucas.

It sounds wonderful and I am looking forward to reading it very much (It's on my reading pile for my holiday)! What’s
your favourite part of writing a book, apart from seeing it on the
bookshelves?

I love starting a new book – everything is possible and it's
like having a huge box of toys where I can pick out anything I want. I love creating
the characters, the way they look, how they behave and where they live. For me
this is the most creative stage of the whole process.

What
do you consider to be the qualities that make a good historical novel?

First of all, the history! 
I love a good yarn, but I do like the historical background to be correct.  I try to recreate the time period accurately
and make sure that the stories I write could have happened.  The other qualities are the same for any
novel – great characters and a riveting plot that grips the reader to the very
last page.

What
do you keep beside your computer when you’re writing?

I have a pinboard that I set up at the beginning of every
new book with little details about my new story
Wills_1 – pictures of actors, actresses
etc who are lookalikes for my characters and a few costume pictures, too, for
period detail. For Bought for Revenge
there was also a local map, because I set the whole story in the area where I
live – although I changed the place names to protect the innocent! The pinboard
also has a basic synopsis, printed in small chunks so that I can make changes
as I go along.

 It's like an
aide-memoire to keep me on track with my book. Then there is my beautiful dog,
Willow. He is a whippet that needed a home and I adopted him about a year ago.
He is a perfect writer's dog – we go out for a walk three times a day and the
rest of the time he just lies around, sleeping.

Oh, and I always seem to have a cup of tea beside me, too!

Another writer who mainlines tea as she writes! A lot of us seem to do that. And Willow is the most beautiful dog. I'm hoping that one day soon my puppy Angus will lie sleeping next to my desk when I'm trying to work rather than busying around stealing stuff to chew!

If
you weren’t a writer, what would you be?

 An archaeologist!  I
was very tempted to go to university and study archaeology, but in those days
it was a pretty unfashionable subject. 
There were a small group of us at school who wanted to do the relevant
exams – including Ancient Greek, Latin and Ancient History – but in the end I
decided against it.  It is a slight
(very slight) regret, which I shall probably get over one day by writing a
romance about an archaeologist.



Me_&_Will_2What have you had to celebrate in the
last year?

It's actually been
quite a year for celebrations.  In March
it was our Ruby Wedding Anniversary – and I discovered that rubies can be
quite, er, pink, which is perfect for a romantic novelist!  Then this summer I celebrated my 60th
birthday and the family bought me a flight in a Tiger Moth, to fly over the
route used by the Dambusters when they were training for their famous
raid.  I grew up reading Biggles books
and always wanted to fly in a World War I plane, and I guess this was the
closest they could find.  It was such a
great experience, the team running the show were so enthusiastic and
welcoming.  I've actually put lots of
pictures in my blog, http://onebellesstrategem.blogspot.co.uk/

NC: Congratulations! You are very intrepid! And of course you have been very modest and not mentioned that this year you were also awarded the UK Romantic Novelists' Association prestigious RoNA Rose Award – for the second year in a row – for your historical romance Beneath the Major's Scars. Many congratulations on that too.

What’s
the best writing advice you’ve ever been given and what advice would you
give to other aspiring authors?

 "Don't get it write, get it written."  Once the basic story is out of my head I can
polish it up.  My advice to aspiring
authors?  Write what you are passionate
about and write the best book you can.

 NC: Thank you so much for joining us today, Sarah!

Over to you now to ask Sarah any questions you like about her books or her writing. To start the discussion, here's a question from Sarah:  BFR_cover_small

"I mentioned earlier that I love the part in Bought for
Revenge where Lucas is at his lowest ebb emotionally, but I'd really like to
know which part of a book readers like the best.  Is it the beginning, the
excitement of setting off into a new story, or perhaps the point where the hero
and heroine discover that they are in love?" 

Sarah is giving a way a copy of Bought for Revenge to one commenter today!

170 thoughts on “An Interview with Sarah Mallory!”

  1. In a romance it is usually no surprise that the hero and heroine discover that they are in love or at least in lust. Usually the interesting part of the story is the resolution of the conflict between them– or of them against the world.
    Bought for Revenge sounds interesting , but also as though it will take effort on the part of Lucas to be worthy to be called a hero.

    Reply
  2. In a romance it is usually no surprise that the hero and heroine discover that they are in love or at least in lust. Usually the interesting part of the story is the resolution of the conflict between them– or of them against the world.
    Bought for Revenge sounds interesting , but also as though it will take effort on the part of Lucas to be worthy to be called a hero.

    Reply
  3. In a romance it is usually no surprise that the hero and heroine discover that they are in love or at least in lust. Usually the interesting part of the story is the resolution of the conflict between them– or of them against the world.
    Bought for Revenge sounds interesting , but also as though it will take effort on the part of Lucas to be worthy to be called a hero.

    Reply
  4. In a romance it is usually no surprise that the hero and heroine discover that they are in love or at least in lust. Usually the interesting part of the story is the resolution of the conflict between them– or of them against the world.
    Bought for Revenge sounds interesting , but also as though it will take effort on the part of Lucas to be worthy to be called a hero.

    Reply
  5. In a romance it is usually no surprise that the hero and heroine discover that they are in love or at least in lust. Usually the interesting part of the story is the resolution of the conflict between them– or of them against the world.
    Bought for Revenge sounds interesting , but also as though it will take effort on the part of Lucas to be worthy to be called a hero.

    Reply
  6. You are so right, Nancy. Lucas really has to suffer to be worthy of his lady. He has to learn a lot about himself. I can assure you, though, deep down he is genuinely a good guy and deserves his happy ending.

    Reply
  7. You are so right, Nancy. Lucas really has to suffer to be worthy of his lady. He has to learn a lot about himself. I can assure you, though, deep down he is genuinely a good guy and deserves his happy ending.

    Reply
  8. You are so right, Nancy. Lucas really has to suffer to be worthy of his lady. He has to learn a lot about himself. I can assure you, though, deep down he is genuinely a good guy and deserves his happy ending.

    Reply
  9. You are so right, Nancy. Lucas really has to suffer to be worthy of his lady. He has to learn a lot about himself. I can assure you, though, deep down he is genuinely a good guy and deserves his happy ending.

    Reply
  10. You are so right, Nancy. Lucas really has to suffer to be worthy of his lady. He has to learn a lot about himself. I can assure you, though, deep down he is genuinely a good guy and deserves his happy ending.

    Reply
  11. I really enjoyed this interview, Nicola and Sarah, and now am looking forward to reading Sarah’s novels. I’m sorry to say that I haven’t read them yet, but I’ve only been with this genre a few years (yes, I was one of those stereotypical Resistant to Romance Readers).
    Nicola, I will probably be in the minority here, but my favorite part of an historical novel is the actual history, and how the H and h, as well as the secondary characters, live their lives with and against the tumultuous backdrop of that history.

    Reply
  12. I really enjoyed this interview, Nicola and Sarah, and now am looking forward to reading Sarah’s novels. I’m sorry to say that I haven’t read them yet, but I’ve only been with this genre a few years (yes, I was one of those stereotypical Resistant to Romance Readers).
    Nicola, I will probably be in the minority here, but my favorite part of an historical novel is the actual history, and how the H and h, as well as the secondary characters, live their lives with and against the tumultuous backdrop of that history.

    Reply
  13. I really enjoyed this interview, Nicola and Sarah, and now am looking forward to reading Sarah’s novels. I’m sorry to say that I haven’t read them yet, but I’ve only been with this genre a few years (yes, I was one of those stereotypical Resistant to Romance Readers).
    Nicola, I will probably be in the minority here, but my favorite part of an historical novel is the actual history, and how the H and h, as well as the secondary characters, live their lives with and against the tumultuous backdrop of that history.

    Reply
  14. I really enjoyed this interview, Nicola and Sarah, and now am looking forward to reading Sarah’s novels. I’m sorry to say that I haven’t read them yet, but I’ve only been with this genre a few years (yes, I was one of those stereotypical Resistant to Romance Readers).
    Nicola, I will probably be in the minority here, but my favorite part of an historical novel is the actual history, and how the H and h, as well as the secondary characters, live their lives with and against the tumultuous backdrop of that history.

    Reply
  15. I really enjoyed this interview, Nicola and Sarah, and now am looking forward to reading Sarah’s novels. I’m sorry to say that I haven’t read them yet, but I’ve only been with this genre a few years (yes, I was one of those stereotypical Resistant to Romance Readers).
    Nicola, I will probably be in the minority here, but my favorite part of an historical novel is the actual history, and how the H and h, as well as the secondary characters, live their lives with and against the tumultuous backdrop of that history.

    Reply
  16. Maria, if you love the first meeting of the hero and heroine then I think you will enjoy the first time Lucas and Annabelle meet in Bought for Revenge – it is certainly not love at first sight (or at least, they wouldn’t admit it).
    Donna – I love the history, too, which is why I like to get the background right and involve my characters in plots that might well have happened. Reading about the past always throws up more fascinating snippets and I find myself saying, “what if….”. Then I’m off on another story!

    Reply
  17. Maria, if you love the first meeting of the hero and heroine then I think you will enjoy the first time Lucas and Annabelle meet in Bought for Revenge – it is certainly not love at first sight (or at least, they wouldn’t admit it).
    Donna – I love the history, too, which is why I like to get the background right and involve my characters in plots that might well have happened. Reading about the past always throws up more fascinating snippets and I find myself saying, “what if….”. Then I’m off on another story!

    Reply
  18. Maria, if you love the first meeting of the hero and heroine then I think you will enjoy the first time Lucas and Annabelle meet in Bought for Revenge – it is certainly not love at first sight (or at least, they wouldn’t admit it).
    Donna – I love the history, too, which is why I like to get the background right and involve my characters in plots that might well have happened. Reading about the past always throws up more fascinating snippets and I find myself saying, “what if….”. Then I’m off on another story!

    Reply
  19. Maria, if you love the first meeting of the hero and heroine then I think you will enjoy the first time Lucas and Annabelle meet in Bought for Revenge – it is certainly not love at first sight (or at least, they wouldn’t admit it).
    Donna – I love the history, too, which is why I like to get the background right and involve my characters in plots that might well have happened. Reading about the past always throws up more fascinating snippets and I find myself saying, “what if….”. Then I’m off on another story!

    Reply
  20. Maria, if you love the first meeting of the hero and heroine then I think you will enjoy the first time Lucas and Annabelle meet in Bought for Revenge – it is certainly not love at first sight (or at least, they wouldn’t admit it).
    Donna – I love the history, too, which is why I like to get the background right and involve my characters in plots that might well have happened. Reading about the past always throws up more fascinating snippets and I find myself saying, “what if….”. Then I’m off on another story!

    Reply
  21. I love the parts where they overcome the obstacles and get their HEA. Love the airplane!! We you surprised by the cold when flying in an open cockpit?

    Reply
  22. I love the parts where they overcome the obstacles and get their HEA. Love the airplane!! We you surprised by the cold when flying in an open cockpit?

    Reply
  23. I love the parts where they overcome the obstacles and get their HEA. Love the airplane!! We you surprised by the cold when flying in an open cockpit?

    Reply
  24. I love the parts where they overcome the obstacles and get their HEA. Love the airplane!! We you surprised by the cold when flying in an open cockpit?

    Reply
  25. I love the parts where they overcome the obstacles and get their HEA. Love the airplane!! We you surprised by the cold when flying in an open cockpit?

    Reply
  26. Cate, I was lucky that we are having one of our best summers for years here in the UK. Will (the pilot) said it was perfect flying conditions, very calm. However, once we were in the air and flying at about 90 mph I was being buffeted about a great deal, although Will kept the plane steady enough. And the temperature dropped as we climbed higher. The wartime flying jacket I was wearing was lovely and warm – a bit big, of course, but it was like being hugged by a friendly bear! By the time we landed my hands were chilled, but not uncomfortably so. I believe when planes were scrambled during the war many pilots put their flying suits on over their pyjamas: I might try that if I fly in the winter!

    Reply
  27. Cate, I was lucky that we are having one of our best summers for years here in the UK. Will (the pilot) said it was perfect flying conditions, very calm. However, once we were in the air and flying at about 90 mph I was being buffeted about a great deal, although Will kept the plane steady enough. And the temperature dropped as we climbed higher. The wartime flying jacket I was wearing was lovely and warm – a bit big, of course, but it was like being hugged by a friendly bear! By the time we landed my hands were chilled, but not uncomfortably so. I believe when planes were scrambled during the war many pilots put their flying suits on over their pyjamas: I might try that if I fly in the winter!

    Reply
  28. Cate, I was lucky that we are having one of our best summers for years here in the UK. Will (the pilot) said it was perfect flying conditions, very calm. However, once we were in the air and flying at about 90 mph I was being buffeted about a great deal, although Will kept the plane steady enough. And the temperature dropped as we climbed higher. The wartime flying jacket I was wearing was lovely and warm – a bit big, of course, but it was like being hugged by a friendly bear! By the time we landed my hands were chilled, but not uncomfortably so. I believe when planes were scrambled during the war many pilots put their flying suits on over their pyjamas: I might try that if I fly in the winter!

    Reply
  29. Cate, I was lucky that we are having one of our best summers for years here in the UK. Will (the pilot) said it was perfect flying conditions, very calm. However, once we were in the air and flying at about 90 mph I was being buffeted about a great deal, although Will kept the plane steady enough. And the temperature dropped as we climbed higher. The wartime flying jacket I was wearing was lovely and warm – a bit big, of course, but it was like being hugged by a friendly bear! By the time we landed my hands were chilled, but not uncomfortably so. I believe when planes were scrambled during the war many pilots put their flying suits on over their pyjamas: I might try that if I fly in the winter!

    Reply
  30. Cate, I was lucky that we are having one of our best summers for years here in the UK. Will (the pilot) said it was perfect flying conditions, very calm. However, once we were in the air and flying at about 90 mph I was being buffeted about a great deal, although Will kept the plane steady enough. And the temperature dropped as we climbed higher. The wartime flying jacket I was wearing was lovely and warm – a bit big, of course, but it was like being hugged by a friendly bear! By the time we landed my hands were chilled, but not uncomfortably so. I believe when planes were scrambled during the war many pilots put their flying suits on over their pyjamas: I might try that if I fly in the winter!

    Reply
  31. Welcome to the Wenches, Sarah! With your love of history I knew you would be a good fit for the Wenches and our readers. I’m particularly looking forward to reading Bought for Revenge because of the setting as well as everything else. It sounds very atmospheric.

    Reply
  32. Welcome to the Wenches, Sarah! With your love of history I knew you would be a good fit for the Wenches and our readers. I’m particularly looking forward to reading Bought for Revenge because of the setting as well as everything else. It sounds very atmospheric.

    Reply
  33. Welcome to the Wenches, Sarah! With your love of history I knew you would be a good fit for the Wenches and our readers. I’m particularly looking forward to reading Bought for Revenge because of the setting as well as everything else. It sounds very atmospheric.

    Reply
  34. Welcome to the Wenches, Sarah! With your love of history I knew you would be a good fit for the Wenches and our readers. I’m particularly looking forward to reading Bought for Revenge because of the setting as well as everything else. It sounds very atmospheric.

    Reply
  35. Welcome to the Wenches, Sarah! With your love of history I knew you would be a good fit for the Wenches and our readers. I’m particularly looking forward to reading Bought for Revenge because of the setting as well as everything else. It sounds very atmospheric.

    Reply
  36. I like the part when the hero and/or heroine start getting attracted to each other (even more so when they try not to succumb but fail! LOL).
    Your dog is beautiful! Such lovely lines. He looks like he could run like the wind.

    Reply
  37. I like the part when the hero and/or heroine start getting attracted to each other (even more so when they try not to succumb but fail! LOL).
    Your dog is beautiful! Such lovely lines. He looks like he could run like the wind.

    Reply
  38. I like the part when the hero and/or heroine start getting attracted to each other (even more so when they try not to succumb but fail! LOL).
    Your dog is beautiful! Such lovely lines. He looks like he could run like the wind.

    Reply
  39. I like the part when the hero and/or heroine start getting attracted to each other (even more so when they try not to succumb but fail! LOL).
    Your dog is beautiful! Such lovely lines. He looks like he could run like the wind.

    Reply
  40. I like the part when the hero and/or heroine start getting attracted to each other (even more so when they try not to succumb but fail! LOL).
    Your dog is beautiful! Such lovely lines. He looks like he could run like the wind.

    Reply
  41. Thanks for the welcome, Nicola, it’s a real thrill to be here amongst such good company. Bought for Revenge is set in the north if England, which you know very well!
    Linda, my dog WIllow is very fast, but also very lazy, so after a good run he is happy to lie around for hours and I can get on with my writing – a perfect dog for me.
    I like to build up the attraction between the hero and the heroine quite slowly, so they know they shouldn’t, but can’t help themselves. Then they have to overcome all obstacles to reach their HEA. Lucas and Annabelle certainly have lots of obstacles to overcome 🙂

    Reply
  42. Thanks for the welcome, Nicola, it’s a real thrill to be here amongst such good company. Bought for Revenge is set in the north if England, which you know very well!
    Linda, my dog WIllow is very fast, but also very lazy, so after a good run he is happy to lie around for hours and I can get on with my writing – a perfect dog for me.
    I like to build up the attraction between the hero and the heroine quite slowly, so they know they shouldn’t, but can’t help themselves. Then they have to overcome all obstacles to reach their HEA. Lucas and Annabelle certainly have lots of obstacles to overcome 🙂

    Reply
  43. Thanks for the welcome, Nicola, it’s a real thrill to be here amongst such good company. Bought for Revenge is set in the north if England, which you know very well!
    Linda, my dog WIllow is very fast, but also very lazy, so after a good run he is happy to lie around for hours and I can get on with my writing – a perfect dog for me.
    I like to build up the attraction between the hero and the heroine quite slowly, so they know they shouldn’t, but can’t help themselves. Then they have to overcome all obstacles to reach their HEA. Lucas and Annabelle certainly have lots of obstacles to overcome 🙂

    Reply
  44. Thanks for the welcome, Nicola, it’s a real thrill to be here amongst such good company. Bought for Revenge is set in the north if England, which you know very well!
    Linda, my dog WIllow is very fast, but also very lazy, so after a good run he is happy to lie around for hours and I can get on with my writing – a perfect dog for me.
    I like to build up the attraction between the hero and the heroine quite slowly, so they know they shouldn’t, but can’t help themselves. Then they have to overcome all obstacles to reach their HEA. Lucas and Annabelle certainly have lots of obstacles to overcome 🙂

    Reply
  45. Thanks for the welcome, Nicola, it’s a real thrill to be here amongst such good company. Bought for Revenge is set in the north if England, which you know very well!
    Linda, my dog WIllow is very fast, but also very lazy, so after a good run he is happy to lie around for hours and I can get on with my writing – a perfect dog for me.
    I like to build up the attraction between the hero and the heroine quite slowly, so they know they shouldn’t, but can’t help themselves. Then they have to overcome all obstacles to reach their HEA. Lucas and Annabelle certainly have lots of obstacles to overcome 🙂

    Reply
  46. It’s hard to pick out what I like best. Certainly watching the hero and heroine interact is a huge part of what attracts me to romance novels. I’ve loved books where one is immediately gobsmacked by the other (e.g. Wench Anne Gracie’s “The Perfect Rake”), where the realization comes gradually, and where they begin as antagonists (e.g. Shakespeare’s “Much Ado”, which is a play, I know, but still quite romantic). It’s a bonus if we can see that relationship develop within the constraints of a realistic historical world, so I look forward to discovering Ms. Mallory’s books.

    Reply
  47. It’s hard to pick out what I like best. Certainly watching the hero and heroine interact is a huge part of what attracts me to romance novels. I’ve loved books where one is immediately gobsmacked by the other (e.g. Wench Anne Gracie’s “The Perfect Rake”), where the realization comes gradually, and where they begin as antagonists (e.g. Shakespeare’s “Much Ado”, which is a play, I know, but still quite romantic). It’s a bonus if we can see that relationship develop within the constraints of a realistic historical world, so I look forward to discovering Ms. Mallory’s books.

    Reply
  48. It’s hard to pick out what I like best. Certainly watching the hero and heroine interact is a huge part of what attracts me to romance novels. I’ve loved books where one is immediately gobsmacked by the other (e.g. Wench Anne Gracie’s “The Perfect Rake”), where the realization comes gradually, and where they begin as antagonists (e.g. Shakespeare’s “Much Ado”, which is a play, I know, but still quite romantic). It’s a bonus if we can see that relationship develop within the constraints of a realistic historical world, so I look forward to discovering Ms. Mallory’s books.

    Reply
  49. It’s hard to pick out what I like best. Certainly watching the hero and heroine interact is a huge part of what attracts me to romance novels. I’ve loved books where one is immediately gobsmacked by the other (e.g. Wench Anne Gracie’s “The Perfect Rake”), where the realization comes gradually, and where they begin as antagonists (e.g. Shakespeare’s “Much Ado”, which is a play, I know, but still quite romantic). It’s a bonus if we can see that relationship develop within the constraints of a realistic historical world, so I look forward to discovering Ms. Mallory’s books.

    Reply
  50. It’s hard to pick out what I like best. Certainly watching the hero and heroine interact is a huge part of what attracts me to romance novels. I’ve loved books where one is immediately gobsmacked by the other (e.g. Wench Anne Gracie’s “The Perfect Rake”), where the realization comes gradually, and where they begin as antagonists (e.g. Shakespeare’s “Much Ado”, which is a play, I know, but still quite romantic). It’s a bonus if we can see that relationship develop within the constraints of a realistic historical world, so I look forward to discovering Ms. Mallory’s books.

    Reply
  51. Thanks for dropping by, Susan, I hope you enjoy my brand of romance novel – like Nicola Cornick I enjoy adding a touch of adventure to the romance, and although within the genre we don’t go into too much detail about the harsh realities of life in 18th and 19th century England, they are never very far away.

    Reply
  52. Thanks for dropping by, Susan, I hope you enjoy my brand of romance novel – like Nicola Cornick I enjoy adding a touch of adventure to the romance, and although within the genre we don’t go into too much detail about the harsh realities of life in 18th and 19th century England, they are never very far away.

    Reply
  53. Thanks for dropping by, Susan, I hope you enjoy my brand of romance novel – like Nicola Cornick I enjoy adding a touch of adventure to the romance, and although within the genre we don’t go into too much detail about the harsh realities of life in 18th and 19th century England, they are never very far away.

    Reply
  54. Thanks for dropping by, Susan, I hope you enjoy my brand of romance novel – like Nicola Cornick I enjoy adding a touch of adventure to the romance, and although within the genre we don’t go into too much detail about the harsh realities of life in 18th and 19th century England, they are never very far away.

    Reply
  55. Thanks for dropping by, Susan, I hope you enjoy my brand of romance novel – like Nicola Cornick I enjoy adding a touch of adventure to the romance, and although within the genre we don’t go into too much detail about the harsh realities of life in 18th and 19th century England, they are never very far away.

    Reply
  56. Welcome, Sarah! Willow is positively gorgeous and deserves his own story. I can relate to the need to be an archeologist. I subscribe to several magazines and keep up with all the latest discoveries and wish I had a few more lifetimes. Wonder what it is that makes us so fascinated with history?

    Reply
  57. Welcome, Sarah! Willow is positively gorgeous and deserves his own story. I can relate to the need to be an archeologist. I subscribe to several magazines and keep up with all the latest discoveries and wish I had a few more lifetimes. Wonder what it is that makes us so fascinated with history?

    Reply
  58. Welcome, Sarah! Willow is positively gorgeous and deserves his own story. I can relate to the need to be an archeologist. I subscribe to several magazines and keep up with all the latest discoveries and wish I had a few more lifetimes. Wonder what it is that makes us so fascinated with history?

    Reply
  59. Welcome, Sarah! Willow is positively gorgeous and deserves his own story. I can relate to the need to be an archeologist. I subscribe to several magazines and keep up with all the latest discoveries and wish I had a few more lifetimes. Wonder what it is that makes us so fascinated with history?

    Reply
  60. Welcome, Sarah! Willow is positively gorgeous and deserves his own story. I can relate to the need to be an archeologist. I subscribe to several magazines and keep up with all the latest discoveries and wish I had a few more lifetimes. Wonder what it is that makes us so fascinated with history?

    Reply
  61. Hi Patricia. Glad you like Willow – he wins everyone’s heart! I have no idea why I love the past so much, but history books or tv programs have me hooked. I have the intention (one day) of writing a love story about an archeologist and an engineer – the past meets the future. I am sure it would make for some great conflicts!

    Reply
  62. Hi Patricia. Glad you like Willow – he wins everyone’s heart! I have no idea why I love the past so much, but history books or tv programs have me hooked. I have the intention (one day) of writing a love story about an archeologist and an engineer – the past meets the future. I am sure it would make for some great conflicts!

    Reply
  63. Hi Patricia. Glad you like Willow – he wins everyone’s heart! I have no idea why I love the past so much, but history books or tv programs have me hooked. I have the intention (one day) of writing a love story about an archeologist and an engineer – the past meets the future. I am sure it would make for some great conflicts!

    Reply
  64. Hi Patricia. Glad you like Willow – he wins everyone’s heart! I have no idea why I love the past so much, but history books or tv programs have me hooked. I have the intention (one day) of writing a love story about an archeologist and an engineer – the past meets the future. I am sure it would make for some great conflicts!

    Reply
  65. Hi Patricia. Glad you like Willow – he wins everyone’s heart! I have no idea why I love the past so much, but history books or tv programs have me hooked. I have the intention (one day) of writing a love story about an archeologist and an engineer – the past meets the future. I am sure it would make for some great conflicts!

    Reply
  66. Thanks to everyone for the warm welcome, and thank you for your feedback, it’s good to know what the readers enjoy. It’s a holiday weekend over here in the UK so I am off to prepare – but I will drop by again when I can.

    Reply
  67. Thanks to everyone for the warm welcome, and thank you for your feedback, it’s good to know what the readers enjoy. It’s a holiday weekend over here in the UK so I am off to prepare – but I will drop by again when I can.

    Reply
  68. Thanks to everyone for the warm welcome, and thank you for your feedback, it’s good to know what the readers enjoy. It’s a holiday weekend over here in the UK so I am off to prepare – but I will drop by again when I can.

    Reply
  69. Thanks to everyone for the warm welcome, and thank you for your feedback, it’s good to know what the readers enjoy. It’s a holiday weekend over here in the UK so I am off to prepare – but I will drop by again when I can.

    Reply
  70. Thanks to everyone for the warm welcome, and thank you for your feedback, it’s good to know what the readers enjoy. It’s a holiday weekend over here in the UK so I am off to prepare – but I will drop by again when I can.

    Reply
  71. Patricia’s comment about the archeologist and the engineer made me think of Aynak copper mine. The Afghans are excavating Buddahist ruins, preventing the Chinese from beginning excavation. The past vs the very real need for money…
    For me, the favorite point in the book is the moment when I really, really want the two people to overcome their internal and external hurdles and join together. It varies from book to book, but it’s often past the first attraction, and it’s before the plot starts to really move forward quickly. It’s usually at the precise moment when I really need to close the book and join real life or turn off the lights. Sometimes, I indulge in just a few more pages, a few more moments.

    Reply
  72. Patricia’s comment about the archeologist and the engineer made me think of Aynak copper mine. The Afghans are excavating Buddahist ruins, preventing the Chinese from beginning excavation. The past vs the very real need for money…
    For me, the favorite point in the book is the moment when I really, really want the two people to overcome their internal and external hurdles and join together. It varies from book to book, but it’s often past the first attraction, and it’s before the plot starts to really move forward quickly. It’s usually at the precise moment when I really need to close the book and join real life or turn off the lights. Sometimes, I indulge in just a few more pages, a few more moments.

    Reply
  73. Patricia’s comment about the archeologist and the engineer made me think of Aynak copper mine. The Afghans are excavating Buddahist ruins, preventing the Chinese from beginning excavation. The past vs the very real need for money…
    For me, the favorite point in the book is the moment when I really, really want the two people to overcome their internal and external hurdles and join together. It varies from book to book, but it’s often past the first attraction, and it’s before the plot starts to really move forward quickly. It’s usually at the precise moment when I really need to close the book and join real life or turn off the lights. Sometimes, I indulge in just a few more pages, a few more moments.

    Reply
  74. Patricia’s comment about the archeologist and the engineer made me think of Aynak copper mine. The Afghans are excavating Buddahist ruins, preventing the Chinese from beginning excavation. The past vs the very real need for money…
    For me, the favorite point in the book is the moment when I really, really want the two people to overcome their internal and external hurdles and join together. It varies from book to book, but it’s often past the first attraction, and it’s before the plot starts to really move forward quickly. It’s usually at the precise moment when I really need to close the book and join real life or turn off the lights. Sometimes, I indulge in just a few more pages, a few more moments.

    Reply
  75. Patricia’s comment about the archeologist and the engineer made me think of Aynak copper mine. The Afghans are excavating Buddahist ruins, preventing the Chinese from beginning excavation. The past vs the very real need for money…
    For me, the favorite point in the book is the moment when I really, really want the two people to overcome their internal and external hurdles and join together. It varies from book to book, but it’s often past the first attraction, and it’s before the plot starts to really move forward quickly. It’s usually at the precise moment when I really need to close the book and join real life or turn off the lights. Sometimes, I indulge in just a few more pages, a few more moments.

    Reply
  76. Hi Sarah, I am not familiar with your books, but I certainly plan on reading some now! These author interviews are causing my TBR pile to grow higher and higher.
    My catnip as a reader is the forced proximity story-whether it’s a marriage of convenience or some other device that causes the H & h to spend a lot of time together. As Susan/DC said, I also love to read a story where one of them is immediately gobsmacked. And I love those places in the plot when one of them runs into a conflict or crisis, and the other gets a chance to prove their loyalty and in some sense perform a rescue.

    Reply
  77. Hi Sarah, I am not familiar with your books, but I certainly plan on reading some now! These author interviews are causing my TBR pile to grow higher and higher.
    My catnip as a reader is the forced proximity story-whether it’s a marriage of convenience or some other device that causes the H & h to spend a lot of time together. As Susan/DC said, I also love to read a story where one of them is immediately gobsmacked. And I love those places in the plot when one of them runs into a conflict or crisis, and the other gets a chance to prove their loyalty and in some sense perform a rescue.

    Reply
  78. Hi Sarah, I am not familiar with your books, but I certainly plan on reading some now! These author interviews are causing my TBR pile to grow higher and higher.
    My catnip as a reader is the forced proximity story-whether it’s a marriage of convenience or some other device that causes the H & h to spend a lot of time together. As Susan/DC said, I also love to read a story where one of them is immediately gobsmacked. And I love those places in the plot when one of them runs into a conflict or crisis, and the other gets a chance to prove their loyalty and in some sense perform a rescue.

    Reply
  79. Hi Sarah, I am not familiar with your books, but I certainly plan on reading some now! These author interviews are causing my TBR pile to grow higher and higher.
    My catnip as a reader is the forced proximity story-whether it’s a marriage of convenience or some other device that causes the H & h to spend a lot of time together. As Susan/DC said, I also love to read a story where one of them is immediately gobsmacked. And I love those places in the plot when one of them runs into a conflict or crisis, and the other gets a chance to prove their loyalty and in some sense perform a rescue.

    Reply
  80. Hi Sarah, I am not familiar with your books, but I certainly plan on reading some now! These author interviews are causing my TBR pile to grow higher and higher.
    My catnip as a reader is the forced proximity story-whether it’s a marriage of convenience or some other device that causes the H & h to spend a lot of time together. As Susan/DC said, I also love to read a story where one of them is immediately gobsmacked. And I love those places in the plot when one of them runs into a conflict or crisis, and the other gets a chance to prove their loyalty and in some sense perform a rescue.

    Reply
  81. Congratulations on your new book, and your rubies, Sarah. I love the first few chapters of starting a new story. The first page or two where I’m getting the set up, meeting the characters and their dilemmas is always great fun.

    Reply
  82. Congratulations on your new book, and your rubies, Sarah. I love the first few chapters of starting a new story. The first page or two where I’m getting the set up, meeting the characters and their dilemmas is always great fun.

    Reply
  83. Congratulations on your new book, and your rubies, Sarah. I love the first few chapters of starting a new story. The first page or two where I’m getting the set up, meeting the characters and their dilemmas is always great fun.

    Reply
  84. Congratulations on your new book, and your rubies, Sarah. I love the first few chapters of starting a new story. The first page or two where I’m getting the set up, meeting the characters and their dilemmas is always great fun.

    Reply
  85. Congratulations on your new book, and your rubies, Sarah. I love the first few chapters of starting a new story. The first page or two where I’m getting the set up, meeting the characters and their dilemmas is always great fun.

    Reply
  86. Sorry if I am repeating myself – I tried posting comments from my smart phone but they haven’t appeared, so phone not as smart as they make out 🙂
    Shannon, I too wonder about this fascination with the past. One day I’ll write a story about an engineer and an archeologist – past vs future…
    And thanks to Karin and Gemma for stopping by, too. It seems everyone likes different parts of the story, which is so interesting. I love it all!

    Reply
  87. Sorry if I am repeating myself – I tried posting comments from my smart phone but they haven’t appeared, so phone not as smart as they make out 🙂
    Shannon, I too wonder about this fascination with the past. One day I’ll write a story about an engineer and an archeologist – past vs future…
    And thanks to Karin and Gemma for stopping by, too. It seems everyone likes different parts of the story, which is so interesting. I love it all!

    Reply
  88. Sorry if I am repeating myself – I tried posting comments from my smart phone but they haven’t appeared, so phone not as smart as they make out 🙂
    Shannon, I too wonder about this fascination with the past. One day I’ll write a story about an engineer and an archeologist – past vs future…
    And thanks to Karin and Gemma for stopping by, too. It seems everyone likes different parts of the story, which is so interesting. I love it all!

    Reply
  89. Sorry if I am repeating myself – I tried posting comments from my smart phone but they haven’t appeared, so phone not as smart as they make out 🙂
    Shannon, I too wonder about this fascination with the past. One day I’ll write a story about an engineer and an archeologist – past vs future…
    And thanks to Karin and Gemma for stopping by, too. It seems everyone likes different parts of the story, which is so interesting. I love it all!

    Reply
  90. Sorry if I am repeating myself – I tried posting comments from my smart phone but they haven’t appeared, so phone not as smart as they make out 🙂
    Shannon, I too wonder about this fascination with the past. One day I’ll write a story about an engineer and an archeologist – past vs future…
    And thanks to Karin and Gemma for stopping by, too. It seems everyone likes different parts of the story, which is so interesting. I love it all!

    Reply
  91. I do like where the couple tell each that they love the other – from then on they work together to overcome whatever adversities they face.

    Reply
  92. I do like where the couple tell each that they love the other – from then on they work together to overcome whatever adversities they face.

    Reply
  93. I do like where the couple tell each that they love the other – from then on they work together to overcome whatever adversities they face.

    Reply
  94. I do like where the couple tell each that they love the other – from then on they work together to overcome whatever adversities they face.

    Reply
  95. I do like where the couple tell each that they love the other – from then on they work together to overcome whatever adversities they face.

    Reply
  96. The part of romances I like most is when hero and heroine fight. I appreciate witty dialogues and sexual tension at this stage and only the best writers can convey all this.
    This is really exciting before…they come to understand and love each other 😉

    Reply
  97. The part of romances I like most is when hero and heroine fight. I appreciate witty dialogues and sexual tension at this stage and only the best writers can convey all this.
    This is really exciting before…they come to understand and love each other 😉

    Reply
  98. The part of romances I like most is when hero and heroine fight. I appreciate witty dialogues and sexual tension at this stage and only the best writers can convey all this.
    This is really exciting before…they come to understand and love each other 😉

    Reply
  99. The part of romances I like most is when hero and heroine fight. I appreciate witty dialogues and sexual tension at this stage and only the best writers can convey all this.
    This is really exciting before…they come to understand and love each other 😉

    Reply
  100. The part of romances I like most is when hero and heroine fight. I appreciate witty dialogues and sexual tension at this stage and only the best writers can convey all this.
    This is really exciting before…they come to understand and love each other 😉

    Reply
  101. Wow, thank you for all the comments – it is so interesting to see what readers like. I am about to polish up my latest work in progress, so I shall be on the alert to try and make sure I do my best to cover all the points you raise.

    Reply
  102. Wow, thank you for all the comments – it is so interesting to see what readers like. I am about to polish up my latest work in progress, so I shall be on the alert to try and make sure I do my best to cover all the points you raise.

    Reply
  103. Wow, thank you for all the comments – it is so interesting to see what readers like. I am about to polish up my latest work in progress, so I shall be on the alert to try and make sure I do my best to cover all the points you raise.

    Reply
  104. Wow, thank you for all the comments – it is so interesting to see what readers like. I am about to polish up my latest work in progress, so I shall be on the alert to try and make sure I do my best to cover all the points you raise.

    Reply
  105. Wow, thank you for all the comments – it is so interesting to see what readers like. I am about to polish up my latest work in progress, so I shall be on the alert to try and make sure I do my best to cover all the points you raise.

    Reply
  106. I love a historical romance. The setting can be very formal, yet underneath there is a different world that can be filled with scandal. The hero and heroine have to live a certain lifestyle and conform to rules, or reputations can be ruined. The part I love is where they begin to realise their attraction for each other, yet refuse to acknowledge it. It keeps me on the edge of my seat, and I love the tension and the build up to the point where they finally acknowledge, they can no longer deny their attraction to each other.
    Lovely interview. My great uncle had a whippet, his name was Fly. He was such a gentle dog, I loved him.
    Lorraine x

    Reply
  107. I love a historical romance. The setting can be very formal, yet underneath there is a different world that can be filled with scandal. The hero and heroine have to live a certain lifestyle and conform to rules, or reputations can be ruined. The part I love is where they begin to realise their attraction for each other, yet refuse to acknowledge it. It keeps me on the edge of my seat, and I love the tension and the build up to the point where they finally acknowledge, they can no longer deny their attraction to each other.
    Lovely interview. My great uncle had a whippet, his name was Fly. He was such a gentle dog, I loved him.
    Lorraine x

    Reply
  108. I love a historical romance. The setting can be very formal, yet underneath there is a different world that can be filled with scandal. The hero and heroine have to live a certain lifestyle and conform to rules, or reputations can be ruined. The part I love is where they begin to realise their attraction for each other, yet refuse to acknowledge it. It keeps me on the edge of my seat, and I love the tension and the build up to the point where they finally acknowledge, they can no longer deny their attraction to each other.
    Lovely interview. My great uncle had a whippet, his name was Fly. He was such a gentle dog, I loved him.
    Lorraine x

    Reply
  109. I love a historical romance. The setting can be very formal, yet underneath there is a different world that can be filled with scandal. The hero and heroine have to live a certain lifestyle and conform to rules, or reputations can be ruined. The part I love is where they begin to realise their attraction for each other, yet refuse to acknowledge it. It keeps me on the edge of my seat, and I love the tension and the build up to the point where they finally acknowledge, they can no longer deny their attraction to each other.
    Lovely interview. My great uncle had a whippet, his name was Fly. He was such a gentle dog, I loved him.
    Lorraine x

    Reply
  110. I love a historical romance. The setting can be very formal, yet underneath there is a different world that can be filled with scandal. The hero and heroine have to live a certain lifestyle and conform to rules, or reputations can be ruined. The part I love is where they begin to realise their attraction for each other, yet refuse to acknowledge it. It keeps me on the edge of my seat, and I love the tension and the build up to the point where they finally acknowledge, they can no longer deny their attraction to each other.
    Lovely interview. My great uncle had a whippet, his name was Fly. He was such a gentle dog, I loved him.
    Lorraine x

    Reply
  111. Thanks Lorraine – historical romance can be like a complicated dance, I think – there are set moves that the characters have to perform, conforming tot he rules of the time, but, being a romance, love conquers all.
    And Willow the whippet is a very gentle dog, too. A real sweetie (and he is curled up in a chair as I write this)
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  112. Thanks Lorraine – historical romance can be like a complicated dance, I think – there are set moves that the characters have to perform, conforming tot he rules of the time, but, being a romance, love conquers all.
    And Willow the whippet is a very gentle dog, too. A real sweetie (and he is curled up in a chair as I write this)
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  113. Thanks Lorraine – historical romance can be like a complicated dance, I think – there are set moves that the characters have to perform, conforming tot he rules of the time, but, being a romance, love conquers all.
    And Willow the whippet is a very gentle dog, too. A real sweetie (and he is curled up in a chair as I write this)
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  114. Thanks Lorraine – historical romance can be like a complicated dance, I think – there are set moves that the characters have to perform, conforming tot he rules of the time, but, being a romance, love conquers all.
    And Willow the whippet is a very gentle dog, too. A real sweetie (and he is curled up in a chair as I write this)
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  115. Thanks Lorraine – historical romance can be like a complicated dance, I think – there are set moves that the characters have to perform, conforming tot he rules of the time, but, being a romance, love conquers all.
    And Willow the whippet is a very gentle dog, too. A real sweetie (and he is curled up in a chair as I write this)
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply

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