An Interview with Sarah Gabriel: Part I

By Susan Holloway Scott

I'm delighted to interview one of the original Wenches, wearing her Sarah Gabriel hat. Sarah’s newest book, THE HIGHLAND GROOM (Avon), has just this week arrived in stores, and it’s already earning well-deserved praise:  
 
Highland Groom Reduced JPG "A whimsical engaging historical romance with a wee bit of the paranormal," says Harriet Klausner of Genre Go Round Reviews, who gives the book 5 stars. 
 
"A wonderfully romantic and magical book and one you don’t want to miss,” reports Char at RomanceJunkies.com.

THE HIGHLAND GROOM is a Top Pick for RomanceReaderAtHeart.com:  “A finely crafted tale…Gabriel is infinitely adept at creating beautifully passionate moments between the fiery Fiona and her lusty Laird.”

But enough from the reviewers –– let’s hear what Sarah herself has to say. Here's Part I of our conversation:

Susan Scott: Please tell us a little about THE HIGHLAND GROOM, Sarah.
 
TWAHBscan (3) Sarah Gabriel: Fiona MacCarran, whose twin brother was the hero of TO WED A HIGHLAND BRIDE (Avon), arrives in the Highlands to teach English to Gaelic children at a glen school. Her grandmother’s will requires Fiona and her three brothers to meet some odd conditions involving fairies and fairy lore, which was their late grandmother’s hobby–or they will lose their inheritance to a nasty cousin. Mostly, the MacCarran siblings think the requirements are a lot of hogwash, but they have no choice. 

A codicil requires Fiona to sketch some fairies from life and marry a wealthy Highlander with fairy blood. Certain she can never accomplish either of those, she goes to the Highlands intending to teach. Her younger brother, a revenue officer, warns her about the devilish smugglers in the region, but Fiona, who collects fossils and loves the rugged beauty of the Highlands, is content to explore.

Dougal MacGregor, Laird of Glen Kinloch, has a smuggling enterprise and a precious cache of fairy whiskey—made to a secret family recipe—to protect, and he doesn’t need a schoolteacher wandering the hills, especially one related to an excise man. His wacky uncles want to scare the girl away, but she sticks around, finding fossils (but no fairies) and teaching English, and manners, to their children.

Highland Groom Detail Fiona and Dougal knock heads over smuggling and other matters, and encounter danger more than once. Yet they begin to understand, respect and care deeply for one another—despite differences in character and intentions that make a future together unlikely. If Fiona chooses a poor Highland laird, her family will lose a fortune—and the laird doesn’t need the complications of a society lady. After some risky adventures and wild, tender moments together, Fiona and Dougal soon realize that they need each other in order to protect the glen—and to fulfill what is in their hearts.
 
SS: Smuggling plays an important part in the plot of The Highland Groom.  While many readers will already be aware of smuggling along the English coast, it’s fascinating to learn more about the whiskey smuggling trade in the Highlands. What inspired you to write about these uniquely Scottish outlaws?  
 
April Moon Cover SG: I wrote a Highland smuggling story, “White Fire,” a few years ago for APRIL MOON, an anthology shared with the wonderful Merline Lovelace and Miranda Jarrett, and I always wanted to return to the subject. Highland smuggling lends itself to sexy heroes, fun bad guys, danger, adventure and romance. The smuggling trade in Scotland flourished along the southwestern coast (the focus of “White Fire”), but it also occurred inland. Highland whiskey was produced in the hills and transported (often blatantly in typical Scottish in-yer-face style), down to the rivers and lochs, where it was taken by sea to Ireland or Europe, or into England.

Whisky Malt-based Highland whiskey was made in small batches of much higher quality than the cheaper grain whiskies produced in the Lowlands and England. What Highlanders smuggled is similar to the finest stuff available today. The English taste for excellent, affordable malt whiskey bolstered the illicit Highland whiskey trade even as their government tried to quell it. Add revenue officers often outsmarted and outdared by tough, clever Highland free-traders, and it’s a great recipe for fiction.

SS:The hero of HG, Dougal MacGregor, Laird of Kinloch, is one sexy free-trader, and a complicated character, too. What makes Dougal so irresistible?

SG: Dougal is one of my favorite heroes — a tough guy with a reserved and caring soul, who feels deeply yet says little about it. A proud loner with a hurtful past, he copes, and he’s strong enough to carry on alone if need be. He shoulders the responsibility of his people in trying times, and he is self-educated. Dougal loves his kin—his misfit uncles and a sassy wee niece—and he is able to love Fiona without expecting anything in return. I wanted this guy to find happiness! Emotional self-sufficiency in a quiet, intense, outdoorsy man can be very sexy—especially wrapped in taut muscle, dark hair and green eyes, and all kilted up in tartan.  
 
SS: Your heroine, Fiona MacCarran, is part of Edinburgh society and a charity schoolteacher. At first she seems hardly the sort to fall in love with an illicit smuggler.  Why did you decide to make her a teacher?  

SG:  I read some fascinating info about the educational system in the 19th century Scottish Highlands, and thought it would provide a great historical framework for a story. The Scots have always favored equal education for girls and boys (long before John Knox tried to derail that train with his essay on "the monstrous regiment of women”), and education was offered the poorer classes when possible. During the Clearances, when tragedy befell areas of the Highlands and Gaels were treated so badly, charitable societies tried to bring relief and education to Highlanders.

Highland croft Highland schools differed from equivalent English country schools. Aside from the dual language factor and the dearth of translated texts, there were unique issues of distance and weather. When schools and teachers were available (often provided for by the laird), boys and girls were educated together in schoolhouses for practicality’s sake, and teachers sometimes traveled through large glens conducting lessons in households. Education was seen as so essential in Scotland that many lairds funded schools in their glens when circumstances permitted.

I created a society—"The Edinburgh Ladies’ Society for the Education and Betterment of the Gaels"—to send Fiona McCarran north to help them. Because she spoke Gaelic as a child, she teaches English to Highlanders, both children and adults. It is a calling of hers, along with her hobby as a fossilologist. 

SS: How did you develop Fiona’s character to make her such a perfect match for Dougal?

SG: Fiona is independent, stubborn and caring, and hides her true feelings in much the same way that Dougal does, so on some level they understand each other. Others assume that she is cool, calm and capable, but she longs for wild adventure in contrast to her rather dull life in the city. The laird of Kinloch offers irresistible challenge and adventure — and Fiona wants a little taste of that before she returns to her safe life in Edinburgh. Of course, she gets more than she bargained for…she and Dougal are opposites in some ways, but when it counts, they are in perfect accord….

These are great questions and it's fun to talk about the book – and it's always exciting when a new book appears in bookstores. I love the chance to talk about the story and characters and the research, as it allows me to revisit characters I've come to love and had to leave when the manuscript was complete. I'll save the rest of my interview answers for Part II . . .  
 
* * * * * * * *  

Thank you, Sarah!

What do you all think is the lasting appeal of Scottish historical romances? Is it a rugged, kilted hero every time, mysterious legends or interesting history? Is it the way the reader can be transported to faraway romantic Scotland when the story is just right? Do you wish could visit Scotland — or have you done so already, and long to go back? 

Look for Part II of the "Highland Groom" interview soon, and learn more about legends, fairies, and the manly game of The Ba', and how they all influenced Sarah. And please be sure to leave a comment below — Sarah will be giving away a signed copy of THE HIGHLAND GROOM to one lucky poster! 

115 thoughts on “An Interview with Sarah Gabriel: Part I”

  1. I love the way you weave the real Scottish history into your stories, Susan/Sarah! There is a straight line connection between the Scottish passion for education and the huge contributions Scots have made to science, engineering, and other areas of life.
    I suppose the Highland hero appeals for similar reasons as the Western hero–the strong man who can survive and flourish in a harsh land.
    The kilts are a definite plus. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  2. I love the way you weave the real Scottish history into your stories, Susan/Sarah! There is a straight line connection between the Scottish passion for education and the huge contributions Scots have made to science, engineering, and other areas of life.
    I suppose the Highland hero appeals for similar reasons as the Western hero–the strong man who can survive and flourish in a harsh land.
    The kilts are a definite plus. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  3. I love the way you weave the real Scottish history into your stories, Susan/Sarah! There is a straight line connection between the Scottish passion for education and the huge contributions Scots have made to science, engineering, and other areas of life.
    I suppose the Highland hero appeals for similar reasons as the Western hero–the strong man who can survive and flourish in a harsh land.
    The kilts are a definite plus. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  4. I love the way you weave the real Scottish history into your stories, Susan/Sarah! There is a straight line connection between the Scottish passion for education and the huge contributions Scots have made to science, engineering, and other areas of life.
    I suppose the Highland hero appeals for similar reasons as the Western hero–the strong man who can survive and flourish in a harsh land.
    The kilts are a definite plus. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  5. I love the way you weave the real Scottish history into your stories, Susan/Sarah! There is a straight line connection between the Scottish passion for education and the huge contributions Scots have made to science, engineering, and other areas of life.
    I suppose the Highland hero appeals for similar reasons as the Western hero–the strong man who can survive and flourish in a harsh land.
    The kilts are a definite plus. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  6. Linda, all I can tell you about my fits over kilts is, when I was young and would see my uncles in full regalia, it took my breath away. They were handsome men, my uncles, with very broad shoulders, tall, strong, there was an air about them when they dressed that way that made them ‘larger than life’.
    That’s never changed for me. I still say you can put the scrawniest old man in full regalia and something just…happens. He becomes more than himself somehow.
    But, that’s me!

    Reply
  7. Linda, all I can tell you about my fits over kilts is, when I was young and would see my uncles in full regalia, it took my breath away. They were handsome men, my uncles, with very broad shoulders, tall, strong, there was an air about them when they dressed that way that made them ‘larger than life’.
    That’s never changed for me. I still say you can put the scrawniest old man in full regalia and something just…happens. He becomes more than himself somehow.
    But, that’s me!

    Reply
  8. Linda, all I can tell you about my fits over kilts is, when I was young and would see my uncles in full regalia, it took my breath away. They were handsome men, my uncles, with very broad shoulders, tall, strong, there was an air about them when they dressed that way that made them ‘larger than life’.
    That’s never changed for me. I still say you can put the scrawniest old man in full regalia and something just…happens. He becomes more than himself somehow.
    But, that’s me!

    Reply
  9. Linda, all I can tell you about my fits over kilts is, when I was young and would see my uncles in full regalia, it took my breath away. They were handsome men, my uncles, with very broad shoulders, tall, strong, there was an air about them when they dressed that way that made them ‘larger than life’.
    That’s never changed for me. I still say you can put the scrawniest old man in full regalia and something just…happens. He becomes more than himself somehow.
    But, that’s me!

    Reply
  10. Linda, all I can tell you about my fits over kilts is, when I was young and would see my uncles in full regalia, it took my breath away. They were handsome men, my uncles, with very broad shoulders, tall, strong, there was an air about them when they dressed that way that made them ‘larger than life’.
    That’s never changed for me. I still say you can put the scrawniest old man in full regalia and something just…happens. He becomes more than himself somehow.
    But, that’s me!

    Reply
  11. I loved your description of Dougal in this interview. He sounds like my favorite type of hero. I really must go find a copy of this book now.
    As for the lasting of appeal of Scottish historical romances, I think it is because Scottish men seem to epitomize masculinity. They are usually strong, tough, and passionate men.

    Reply
  12. I loved your description of Dougal in this interview. He sounds like my favorite type of hero. I really must go find a copy of this book now.
    As for the lasting of appeal of Scottish historical romances, I think it is because Scottish men seem to epitomize masculinity. They are usually strong, tough, and passionate men.

    Reply
  13. I loved your description of Dougal in this interview. He sounds like my favorite type of hero. I really must go find a copy of this book now.
    As for the lasting of appeal of Scottish historical romances, I think it is because Scottish men seem to epitomize masculinity. They are usually strong, tough, and passionate men.

    Reply
  14. I loved your description of Dougal in this interview. He sounds like my favorite type of hero. I really must go find a copy of this book now.
    As for the lasting of appeal of Scottish historical romances, I think it is because Scottish men seem to epitomize masculinity. They are usually strong, tough, and passionate men.

    Reply
  15. I loved your description of Dougal in this interview. He sounds like my favorite type of hero. I really must go find a copy of this book now.
    As for the lasting of appeal of Scottish historical romances, I think it is because Scottish men seem to epitomize masculinity. They are usually strong, tough, and passionate men.

    Reply
  16. Congrats on the new release. Dougal sounds like a great hero. I like that even though he’s reserved and has a hurtful past, he’s able to love Fiona.

    Reply
  17. Congrats on the new release. Dougal sounds like a great hero. I like that even though he’s reserved and has a hurtful past, he’s able to love Fiona.

    Reply
  18. Congrats on the new release. Dougal sounds like a great hero. I like that even though he’s reserved and has a hurtful past, he’s able to love Fiona.

    Reply
  19. Congrats on the new release. Dougal sounds like a great hero. I like that even though he’s reserved and has a hurtful past, he’s able to love Fiona.

    Reply
  20. Congrats on the new release. Dougal sounds like a great hero. I like that even though he’s reserved and has a hurtful past, he’s able to love Fiona.

    Reply
  21. I so love an historical set in Scotland I just love the rugged kilted Scotsman Hero and the Socttish Highlands is one place I have always yearned to visit.
    I ordered the book and it should arrive today I will be ordering To Wed A highland Bride this week so as I have both looking forward to reading them and the next part of the interview.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  22. I so love an historical set in Scotland I just love the rugged kilted Scotsman Hero and the Socttish Highlands is one place I have always yearned to visit.
    I ordered the book and it should arrive today I will be ordering To Wed A highland Bride this week so as I have both looking forward to reading them and the next part of the interview.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  23. I so love an historical set in Scotland I just love the rugged kilted Scotsman Hero and the Socttish Highlands is one place I have always yearned to visit.
    I ordered the book and it should arrive today I will be ordering To Wed A highland Bride this week so as I have both looking forward to reading them and the next part of the interview.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  24. I so love an historical set in Scotland I just love the rugged kilted Scotsman Hero and the Socttish Highlands is one place I have always yearned to visit.
    I ordered the book and it should arrive today I will be ordering To Wed A highland Bride this week so as I have both looking forward to reading them and the next part of the interview.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  25. I so love an historical set in Scotland I just love the rugged kilted Scotsman Hero and the Socttish Highlands is one place I have always yearned to visit.
    I ordered the book and it should arrive today I will be ordering To Wed A highland Bride this week so as I have both looking forward to reading them and the next part of the interview.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  26. Congratulations on the new book. I think the appeal is that these are men who have to be tough to survive but family is important and I enjoy seeing them bluster their way to falling in love.

    Reply
  27. Congratulations on the new book. I think the appeal is that these are men who have to be tough to survive but family is important and I enjoy seeing them bluster their way to falling in love.

    Reply
  28. Congratulations on the new book. I think the appeal is that these are men who have to be tough to survive but family is important and I enjoy seeing them bluster their way to falling in love.

    Reply
  29. Congratulations on the new book. I think the appeal is that these are men who have to be tough to survive but family is important and I enjoy seeing them bluster their way to falling in love.

    Reply
  30. Congratulations on the new book. I think the appeal is that these are men who have to be tough to survive but family is important and I enjoy seeing them bluster their way to falling in love.

    Reply
  31. Thanks for the great comments on HIGHLAND GROOM! I sooooo agree that the appeal of a Scotsman has a LOT to do with that tough-but-tender factor that makes some heroes totally irresistible. There’s an undeniably fascinating contrast between a tough guy with a kind side. I think the kilt is a bit of a metaphor for that, too –the “skirt” on a guy, and an appearance that speaks of earlier centuries, sets up such contrast in a hero with tough, hard-edged masculine characteristics. There’s a sort of perfect yin-yang to a kilted Highland hero.
    And I think Theo’s analysis is fabulous, that the kilt can make a guy appear larger than life and more than ordinary. A handsome, manly guy in every day clothing is one thing, but put a kilt on him, and it seems to lift him out of the ordinary world, adds metaphor, myth, power and tradition to his aura, in a way. It places him on another level entirely.
    And I enjoyed Maureen’s comment, too, about loving to see these tough guys bluster their way into falling in love! Highlanders or not, that’s always a great aspect of a romance hero — that transformation. I don’t always go for Alpha heroes, and I’m not sure I’ve ever really written one, but that transformation, in one way or another, is elemental to a good romance story, I think — for both hero and heroine.
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  32. Thanks for the great comments on HIGHLAND GROOM! I sooooo agree that the appeal of a Scotsman has a LOT to do with that tough-but-tender factor that makes some heroes totally irresistible. There’s an undeniably fascinating contrast between a tough guy with a kind side. I think the kilt is a bit of a metaphor for that, too –the “skirt” on a guy, and an appearance that speaks of earlier centuries, sets up such contrast in a hero with tough, hard-edged masculine characteristics. There’s a sort of perfect yin-yang to a kilted Highland hero.
    And I think Theo’s analysis is fabulous, that the kilt can make a guy appear larger than life and more than ordinary. A handsome, manly guy in every day clothing is one thing, but put a kilt on him, and it seems to lift him out of the ordinary world, adds metaphor, myth, power and tradition to his aura, in a way. It places him on another level entirely.
    And I enjoyed Maureen’s comment, too, about loving to see these tough guys bluster their way into falling in love! Highlanders or not, that’s always a great aspect of a romance hero — that transformation. I don’t always go for Alpha heroes, and I’m not sure I’ve ever really written one, but that transformation, in one way or another, is elemental to a good romance story, I think — for both hero and heroine.
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  33. Thanks for the great comments on HIGHLAND GROOM! I sooooo agree that the appeal of a Scotsman has a LOT to do with that tough-but-tender factor that makes some heroes totally irresistible. There’s an undeniably fascinating contrast between a tough guy with a kind side. I think the kilt is a bit of a metaphor for that, too –the “skirt” on a guy, and an appearance that speaks of earlier centuries, sets up such contrast in a hero with tough, hard-edged masculine characteristics. There’s a sort of perfect yin-yang to a kilted Highland hero.
    And I think Theo’s analysis is fabulous, that the kilt can make a guy appear larger than life and more than ordinary. A handsome, manly guy in every day clothing is one thing, but put a kilt on him, and it seems to lift him out of the ordinary world, adds metaphor, myth, power and tradition to his aura, in a way. It places him on another level entirely.
    And I enjoyed Maureen’s comment, too, about loving to see these tough guys bluster their way into falling in love! Highlanders or not, that’s always a great aspect of a romance hero — that transformation. I don’t always go for Alpha heroes, and I’m not sure I’ve ever really written one, but that transformation, in one way or another, is elemental to a good romance story, I think — for both hero and heroine.
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  34. Thanks for the great comments on HIGHLAND GROOM! I sooooo agree that the appeal of a Scotsman has a LOT to do with that tough-but-tender factor that makes some heroes totally irresistible. There’s an undeniably fascinating contrast between a tough guy with a kind side. I think the kilt is a bit of a metaphor for that, too –the “skirt” on a guy, and an appearance that speaks of earlier centuries, sets up such contrast in a hero with tough, hard-edged masculine characteristics. There’s a sort of perfect yin-yang to a kilted Highland hero.
    And I think Theo’s analysis is fabulous, that the kilt can make a guy appear larger than life and more than ordinary. A handsome, manly guy in every day clothing is one thing, but put a kilt on him, and it seems to lift him out of the ordinary world, adds metaphor, myth, power and tradition to his aura, in a way. It places him on another level entirely.
    And I enjoyed Maureen’s comment, too, about loving to see these tough guys bluster their way into falling in love! Highlanders or not, that’s always a great aspect of a romance hero — that transformation. I don’t always go for Alpha heroes, and I’m not sure I’ve ever really written one, but that transformation, in one way or another, is elemental to a good romance story, I think — for both hero and heroine.
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  35. Thanks for the great comments on HIGHLAND GROOM! I sooooo agree that the appeal of a Scotsman has a LOT to do with that tough-but-tender factor that makes some heroes totally irresistible. There’s an undeniably fascinating contrast between a tough guy with a kind side. I think the kilt is a bit of a metaphor for that, too –the “skirt” on a guy, and an appearance that speaks of earlier centuries, sets up such contrast in a hero with tough, hard-edged masculine characteristics. There’s a sort of perfect yin-yang to a kilted Highland hero.
    And I think Theo’s analysis is fabulous, that the kilt can make a guy appear larger than life and more than ordinary. A handsome, manly guy in every day clothing is one thing, but put a kilt on him, and it seems to lift him out of the ordinary world, adds metaphor, myth, power and tradition to his aura, in a way. It places him on another level entirely.
    And I enjoyed Maureen’s comment, too, about loving to see these tough guys bluster their way into falling in love! Highlanders or not, that’s always a great aspect of a romance hero — that transformation. I don’t always go for Alpha heroes, and I’m not sure I’ve ever really written one, but that transformation, in one way or another, is elemental to a good romance story, I think — for both hero and heroine.
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  36. Hi, Sarah, thanks for the interview! I enjoy the Scottish historicals, too–Scottish heroes seem to have to be a particular kind of tough guy to face the elements and enemies, and as you said, that contrast to the “skirt” 😉 And though you can’t really hear it in a book, I’m a sucker for the accents 🙂 I haven’t had the pleasure of visiting Scotland, but would love to someday! It seems like such an incredibly beautiful land!

    Reply
  37. Hi, Sarah, thanks for the interview! I enjoy the Scottish historicals, too–Scottish heroes seem to have to be a particular kind of tough guy to face the elements and enemies, and as you said, that contrast to the “skirt” 😉 And though you can’t really hear it in a book, I’m a sucker for the accents 🙂 I haven’t had the pleasure of visiting Scotland, but would love to someday! It seems like such an incredibly beautiful land!

    Reply
  38. Hi, Sarah, thanks for the interview! I enjoy the Scottish historicals, too–Scottish heroes seem to have to be a particular kind of tough guy to face the elements and enemies, and as you said, that contrast to the “skirt” 😉 And though you can’t really hear it in a book, I’m a sucker for the accents 🙂 I haven’t had the pleasure of visiting Scotland, but would love to someday! It seems like such an incredibly beautiful land!

    Reply
  39. Hi, Sarah, thanks for the interview! I enjoy the Scottish historicals, too–Scottish heroes seem to have to be a particular kind of tough guy to face the elements and enemies, and as you said, that contrast to the “skirt” 😉 And though you can’t really hear it in a book, I’m a sucker for the accents 🙂 I haven’t had the pleasure of visiting Scotland, but would love to someday! It seems like such an incredibly beautiful land!

    Reply
  40. Hi, Sarah, thanks for the interview! I enjoy the Scottish historicals, too–Scottish heroes seem to have to be a particular kind of tough guy to face the elements and enemies, and as you said, that contrast to the “skirt” 😉 And though you can’t really hear it in a book, I’m a sucker for the accents 🙂 I haven’t had the pleasure of visiting Scotland, but would love to someday! It seems like such an incredibly beautiful land!

    Reply
  41. Scotland is one of the most beautiful places on earth, and I love reading Scottish-set historicals to remind me of past trips. I need to go again! My husband’s family is from Scotland via Nova Scotia, but I’ve not been able to get him in a kilt after all these years.
    The book sounds great—love that touch of magic!

    Reply
  42. Scotland is one of the most beautiful places on earth, and I love reading Scottish-set historicals to remind me of past trips. I need to go again! My husband’s family is from Scotland via Nova Scotia, but I’ve not been able to get him in a kilt after all these years.
    The book sounds great—love that touch of magic!

    Reply
  43. Scotland is one of the most beautiful places on earth, and I love reading Scottish-set historicals to remind me of past trips. I need to go again! My husband’s family is from Scotland via Nova Scotia, but I’ve not been able to get him in a kilt after all these years.
    The book sounds great—love that touch of magic!

    Reply
  44. Scotland is one of the most beautiful places on earth, and I love reading Scottish-set historicals to remind me of past trips. I need to go again! My husband’s family is from Scotland via Nova Scotia, but I’ve not been able to get him in a kilt after all these years.
    The book sounds great—love that touch of magic!

    Reply
  45. Scotland is one of the most beautiful places on earth, and I love reading Scottish-set historicals to remind me of past trips. I need to go again! My husband’s family is from Scotland via Nova Scotia, but I’ve not been able to get him in a kilt after all these years.
    The book sounds great—love that touch of magic!

    Reply
  46. I have a tripped planned to Scotland in May! I was there once before, but I was only 12, so I am extreeeeemely excited to be going back.
    I have always been a bit obsessed with the Scottish romantic hero, whether from my own Scottish roots of long ago, or just a plain old romantic heart, I don’t know, but I am definitely looking forward to getting acquainted with the laird. 😉

    Reply
  47. I have a tripped planned to Scotland in May! I was there once before, but I was only 12, so I am extreeeeemely excited to be going back.
    I have always been a bit obsessed with the Scottish romantic hero, whether from my own Scottish roots of long ago, or just a plain old romantic heart, I don’t know, but I am definitely looking forward to getting acquainted with the laird. 😉

    Reply
  48. I have a tripped planned to Scotland in May! I was there once before, but I was only 12, so I am extreeeeemely excited to be going back.
    I have always been a bit obsessed with the Scottish romantic hero, whether from my own Scottish roots of long ago, or just a plain old romantic heart, I don’t know, but I am definitely looking forward to getting acquainted with the laird. 😉

    Reply
  49. I have a tripped planned to Scotland in May! I was there once before, but I was only 12, so I am extreeeeemely excited to be going back.
    I have always been a bit obsessed with the Scottish romantic hero, whether from my own Scottish roots of long ago, or just a plain old romantic heart, I don’t know, but I am definitely looking forward to getting acquainted with the laird. 😉

    Reply
  50. I have a tripped planned to Scotland in May! I was there once before, but I was only 12, so I am extreeeeemely excited to be going back.
    I have always been a bit obsessed with the Scottish romantic hero, whether from my own Scottish roots of long ago, or just a plain old romantic heart, I don’t know, but I am definitely looking forward to getting acquainted with the laird. 😉

    Reply
  51. My ancestors were from Scotland, but I have never had the opportunity to visit. Congratulations on your book. I really like a well written Scottish Historical.

    Reply
  52. My ancestors were from Scotland, but I have never had the opportunity to visit. Congratulations on your book. I really like a well written Scottish Historical.

    Reply
  53. My ancestors were from Scotland, but I have never had the opportunity to visit. Congratulations on your book. I really like a well written Scottish Historical.

    Reply
  54. My ancestors were from Scotland, but I have never had the opportunity to visit. Congratulations on your book. I really like a well written Scottish Historical.

    Reply
  55. My ancestors were from Scotland, but I have never had the opportunity to visit. Congratulations on your book. I really like a well written Scottish Historical.

    Reply
  56. I’m afraid you have the chronology of John Knox’s “Monstrous Regiment of Women” and the Scottish educational system’s development a little confused.
    “The First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous Regiment of Women” did not deal with the education of girls, but rather with the fact that Mary Tudor, Mary Queen of Scots, her mother Mary of Guise, and Catherine de Medici as regent of France were opposing the spread of Protestantism.

    Reply
  57. I’m afraid you have the chronology of John Knox’s “Monstrous Regiment of Women” and the Scottish educational system’s development a little confused.
    “The First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous Regiment of Women” did not deal with the education of girls, but rather with the fact that Mary Tudor, Mary Queen of Scots, her mother Mary of Guise, and Catherine de Medici as regent of France were opposing the spread of Protestantism.

    Reply
  58. I’m afraid you have the chronology of John Knox’s “Monstrous Regiment of Women” and the Scottish educational system’s development a little confused.
    “The First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous Regiment of Women” did not deal with the education of girls, but rather with the fact that Mary Tudor, Mary Queen of Scots, her mother Mary of Guise, and Catherine de Medici as regent of France were opposing the spread of Protestantism.

    Reply
  59. I’m afraid you have the chronology of John Knox’s “Monstrous Regiment of Women” and the Scottish educational system’s development a little confused.
    “The First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous Regiment of Women” did not deal with the education of girls, but rather with the fact that Mary Tudor, Mary Queen of Scots, her mother Mary of Guise, and Catherine de Medici as regent of France were opposing the spread of Protestantism.

    Reply
  60. I’m afraid you have the chronology of John Knox’s “Monstrous Regiment of Women” and the Scottish educational system’s development a little confused.
    “The First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous Regiment of Women” did not deal with the education of girls, but rather with the fact that Mary Tudor, Mary Queen of Scots, her mother Mary of Guise, and Catherine de Medici as regent of France were opposing the spread of Protestantism.

    Reply
  61. Thanks, Virginia, of course that’s the case. I mentioned Knox as an example of attitudes toward women, not as a chronological step in the evolution of education in Scotland.
    Susan

    Reply
  62. Thanks, Virginia, of course that’s the case. I mentioned Knox as an example of attitudes toward women, not as a chronological step in the evolution of education in Scotland.
    Susan

    Reply
  63. Thanks, Virginia, of course that’s the case. I mentioned Knox as an example of attitudes toward women, not as a chronological step in the evolution of education in Scotland.
    Susan

    Reply
  64. Thanks, Virginia, of course that’s the case. I mentioned Knox as an example of attitudes toward women, not as a chronological step in the evolution of education in Scotland.
    Susan

    Reply
  65. Thanks, Virginia, of course that’s the case. I mentioned Knox as an example of attitudes toward women, not as a chronological step in the evolution of education in Scotland.
    Susan

    Reply
  66. Unfortunately your interviewer obviously hasn’t read the book as she keeps talking about “Highland whiskey” – there is no such thing, it’s whisky in Scotland. Whiskey is Irish.
    I see it’s right in the novel itself though 🙂

    Reply
  67. Unfortunately your interviewer obviously hasn’t read the book as she keeps talking about “Highland whiskey” – there is no such thing, it’s whisky in Scotland. Whiskey is Irish.
    I see it’s right in the novel itself though 🙂

    Reply
  68. Unfortunately your interviewer obviously hasn’t read the book as she keeps talking about “Highland whiskey” – there is no such thing, it’s whisky in Scotland. Whiskey is Irish.
    I see it’s right in the novel itself though 🙂

    Reply
  69. Unfortunately your interviewer obviously hasn’t read the book as she keeps talking about “Highland whiskey” – there is no such thing, it’s whisky in Scotland. Whiskey is Irish.
    I see it’s right in the novel itself though 🙂

    Reply
  70. Unfortunately your interviewer obviously hasn’t read the book as she keeps talking about “Highland whiskey” – there is no such thing, it’s whisky in Scotland. Whiskey is Irish.
    I see it’s right in the novel itself though 🙂

    Reply
  71. Unfortunately your interviewer obviously hasn’t read the book as she keeps talking about “Highland whiskey” – there is no such thing, it’s whisky in Scotland. Whiskey is Irish.
    I see it’s right in the novel itself though 🙂

    Reply
  72. Unfortunately your interviewer obviously hasn’t read the book as she keeps talking about “Highland whiskey” – there is no such thing, it’s whisky in Scotland. Whiskey is Irish.
    I see it’s right in the novel itself though 🙂

    Reply
  73. Unfortunately your interviewer obviously hasn’t read the book as she keeps talking about “Highland whiskey” – there is no such thing, it’s whisky in Scotland. Whiskey is Irish.
    I see it’s right in the novel itself though 🙂

    Reply
  74. Unfortunately your interviewer obviously hasn’t read the book as she keeps talking about “Highland whiskey” – there is no such thing, it’s whisky in Scotland. Whiskey is Irish.
    I see it’s right in the novel itself though 🙂

    Reply
  75. Unfortunately your interviewer obviously hasn’t read the book as she keeps talking about “Highland whiskey” – there is no such thing, it’s whisky in Scotland. Whiskey is Irish.
    I see it’s right in the novel itself though 🙂

    Reply
  76. Jojo- not the interviewer’s fault, it’s just my spelling habit. Though I know the difference, I can’t always get my American fingers to type it correctly! 🙂
    It’s right in the novel, for sure.
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  77. Jojo- not the interviewer’s fault, it’s just my spelling habit. Though I know the difference, I can’t always get my American fingers to type it correctly! 🙂
    It’s right in the novel, for sure.
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  78. Jojo- not the interviewer’s fault, it’s just my spelling habit. Though I know the difference, I can’t always get my American fingers to type it correctly! 🙂
    It’s right in the novel, for sure.
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  79. Jojo- not the interviewer’s fault, it’s just my spelling habit. Though I know the difference, I can’t always get my American fingers to type it correctly! 🙂
    It’s right in the novel, for sure.
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  80. Jojo- not the interviewer’s fault, it’s just my spelling habit. Though I know the difference, I can’t always get my American fingers to type it correctly! 🙂
    It’s right in the novel, for sure.
    Susan Sarah

    Reply

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