An Interview with Mia Marlowe!

 Nicola here! Today I am very happy to welcome as our Word Wench guest historical author Mia Marlowe. Mia tells me that she learned much of what she knows about storytelling from singing. A classically trained soprano, she devised back stories for her characters as part of her preparation for operatic roles. Since she’s worn a real corset, and had to sing high C’s in one (and kudos for that - I used to be able to do one or the other but not both together!), she empathizes with the trials of her fictional heroines. But in Mia’s stories, they don’t die in a Parisian garret. They get to live and keep the hero! For more on Mia and her books visit www.miamarlowe.com.

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Here, Mia shares with us some of the research that has gone into her latest release, Touch of a Thief:

 “First, thank you for having me here today, Word Wenches. Since I adore history, I love your blog’s attention to historical detail. I'm a frequent lurker, so when Nicola invited me to guest blog I was thrilled.

Not all my research ends up in my novels. All the little tidbits are delicious, but what really fascinates me is learning how people thought about themselves and their place in the world and how these things change over time. Now, for example, adoption is lauded as a way to form families where none existed before. It was not always so. Adoption was unknown in England until the mid 20th century. Fostering, yes. Adoption, no. This is apparently a little known fact because I’ve read several highly acclaimed authors whose characters are supposedly adopted in the 19th century and go on to inherit titles and lands. Hereditary titles were all about bloodlines, so this could never have actually happened. The family to which a person was born, who his progenitors were, determined his place in the world. “Blood will out,” meaning a person’s lineage will show in their subsequent behavior, was taken quite seriously.

Because the idea of adoption was foreign to the Brits, it’s not surprising that they set aside the Indian custom of adopting a male heir when one was not born to a ruling potentate. According to British India's Doctrine of Lapse, any principality in which the ruling line failed to produce a male heir would be considered "lapsed." The kingdoms were stripped from their hereditary rulers and claimed by the British Crown. I used this inflammatory policy to set up a conflict in Touch of a Thief. My hero's best friend is Prince Sanjay, whose fictional Indian kingdom was lost to him because he was an adopted heir. In real life, Lord Dalhousie added in excess of three million pounds sterling to the Crown’s coffers with this policy. Per annum. The kingdom of Amjerat in Touch of a Thief is my own invention, but plenty of real cases of usurpation occurred. In one princely state, when the Rana died without a son to succeed him, his queen Lakshmi Bai adopted an heir in defiance of the British. Not to be set aside lightly, Lakshmi Bai donned warrior’s gear and led her people in armed rebellion. The uprising was put down, but she died fighting at the head of her force and has become an icon of feminine courage in India.

Though the action in Touch of a Thief takes place in London, Paris and Hanover, what happens in Delhi has a big impact on the main characters. My hero is trying to recover The Blood of the Tiger, a red diamond that was stolen from an Indian temple and is now en route to the Queen’s collection. He hopes returning the gem will help cool the tempers of the natives and diffuse a powder keg of unrest. Unfortunately, the Doctrine of Lapse has already upset the populace of India. When the new Enfield rifle is introduced to the Indian army and rumors fly that the cartridges are greased with pig or cow fat (anathema to both Hindus and Muslims), it’s the tipping point that leads to the disastrous Sepoy Mutiny. But that’s a subject for another blog…

Starred Review from Publishers Weekly for Touch of a Thief : “Marlowe weaves a gentle paranormal element into this delightful 19th-century romance. When a cursed red diamond is stolen from a temple in Amjerat, India, Capt. Greydon Quinn travels to London to recover it, accompanied by incognito crown prince Sanjay. They set a tempting trap of gems to catch the Mayfair Jewel Thief and force him to help them–but the thief turns out to be penniless Lady Viola Preston. Traveling to Paris uneasily posed as newlyweds, Viola and Greydon indulge their powerful lusts until they discover that Viola's supernatural gift for hearing jewels speak their histories lets her in on Greydon's secrets. The likable and quick-thinking protagonists sail through the challenges of both court and crime, swapping witty, sharp dialogue. Marlowe perfectly integrates Viola's paranormal sensitivity, with real problems balancing its obvious benefits. Both historical and paranormal readers will love this crossover tale.”

Touch of a Thief will be released on April 26, but I'm pleased to offer an advance copy to a randomly selected commenter. I love to talk with readers so if you leave a question, I will be by to answer. Thanks again for having me today!

Thank you to Mia for such a fascinating glimpse into the background to Touch of a Thief! Her question for you is: One of the themes in Touch of a Thief is injustice. What inequity makes your blood boil?

360 thoughts on “An Interview with Mia Marlowe!”

  1. Nicola thanks for inviting Mia along today.
    Mia what a great post and so interesting I do love the sound of this book and the research is fasinating.
    As for inequity for me it is that everyone is not treated equally and with respect
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  2. Nicola thanks for inviting Mia along today.
    Mia what a great post and so interesting I do love the sound of this book and the research is fasinating.
    As for inequity for me it is that everyone is not treated equally and with respect
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  3. Nicola thanks for inviting Mia along today.
    Mia what a great post and so interesting I do love the sound of this book and the research is fasinating.
    As for inequity for me it is that everyone is not treated equally and with respect
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  4. Nicola thanks for inviting Mia along today.
    Mia what a great post and so interesting I do love the sound of this book and the research is fasinating.
    As for inequity for me it is that everyone is not treated equally and with respect
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  5. Nicola thanks for inviting Mia along today.
    Mia what a great post and so interesting I do love the sound of this book and the research is fasinating.
    As for inequity for me it is that everyone is not treated equally and with respect
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  6. Welcome to Word Wenches, Mia, and thank you for such a fascinating post. As far as inequity is concerned, as a Brit I still find it hard to accept a monarchy that gives precedence to a male heir. Especially as we have had such a fabulous example from the current Queen!

    Reply
  7. Welcome to Word Wenches, Mia, and thank you for such a fascinating post. As far as inequity is concerned, as a Brit I still find it hard to accept a monarchy that gives precedence to a male heir. Especially as we have had such a fabulous example from the current Queen!

    Reply
  8. Welcome to Word Wenches, Mia, and thank you for such a fascinating post. As far as inequity is concerned, as a Brit I still find it hard to accept a monarchy that gives precedence to a male heir. Especially as we have had such a fabulous example from the current Queen!

    Reply
  9. Welcome to Word Wenches, Mia, and thank you for such a fascinating post. As far as inequity is concerned, as a Brit I still find it hard to accept a monarchy that gives precedence to a male heir. Especially as we have had such a fabulous example from the current Queen!

    Reply
  10. Welcome to Word Wenches, Mia, and thank you for such a fascinating post. As far as inequity is concerned, as a Brit I still find it hard to accept a monarchy that gives precedence to a male heir. Especially as we have had such a fabulous example from the current Queen!

    Reply
  11. I so agree, Nicola. The reason my heroine turned to thievery in the first place is that her father died without a male heir and his title reverted to another branch of the family. Her weasle of a cousin didn’t offer a bit of support to the former earl’s family and the acceptable ways for a woman to earn a living were limited.
    So Viola turned to an unacceptable way.

    Reply
  12. I so agree, Nicola. The reason my heroine turned to thievery in the first place is that her father died without a male heir and his title reverted to another branch of the family. Her weasle of a cousin didn’t offer a bit of support to the former earl’s family and the acceptable ways for a woman to earn a living were limited.
    So Viola turned to an unacceptable way.

    Reply
  13. I so agree, Nicola. The reason my heroine turned to thievery in the first place is that her father died without a male heir and his title reverted to another branch of the family. Her weasle of a cousin didn’t offer a bit of support to the former earl’s family and the acceptable ways for a woman to earn a living were limited.
    So Viola turned to an unacceptable way.

    Reply
  14. I so agree, Nicola. The reason my heroine turned to thievery in the first place is that her father died without a male heir and his title reverted to another branch of the family. Her weasle of a cousin didn’t offer a bit of support to the former earl’s family and the acceptable ways for a woman to earn a living were limited.
    So Viola turned to an unacceptable way.

    Reply
  15. I so agree, Nicola. The reason my heroine turned to thievery in the first place is that her father died without a male heir and his title reverted to another branch of the family. Her weasle of a cousin didn’t offer a bit of support to the former earl’s family and the acceptable ways for a woman to earn a living were limited.
    So Viola turned to an unacceptable way.

    Reply
  16. Anita–It’s not just any red diamond. It’s the Blood of the Tiger, a gem with an almost sentient malevolence. Lots of famous jewels are rumored to be cursed–think The Hope Diamond!–and my fictional red diamond is no exception.

    Reply
  17. Anita–It’s not just any red diamond. It’s the Blood of the Tiger, a gem with an almost sentient malevolence. Lots of famous jewels are rumored to be cursed–think The Hope Diamond!–and my fictional red diamond is no exception.

    Reply
  18. Anita–It’s not just any red diamond. It’s the Blood of the Tiger, a gem with an almost sentient malevolence. Lots of famous jewels are rumored to be cursed–think The Hope Diamond!–and my fictional red diamond is no exception.

    Reply
  19. Anita–It’s not just any red diamond. It’s the Blood of the Tiger, a gem with an almost sentient malevolence. Lots of famous jewels are rumored to be cursed–think The Hope Diamond!–and my fictional red diamond is no exception.

    Reply
  20. Anita–It’s not just any red diamond. It’s the Blood of the Tiger, a gem with an almost sentient malevolence. Lots of famous jewels are rumored to be cursed–think The Hope Diamond!–and my fictional red diamond is no exception.

    Reply
  21. Nunung–I enjoy a dollop of magic in my stories, but I haven’t figured out how to write vampires or werewolves. (I prefer my guys to have a pulse and not have fleas! Until I get over that, I can’t write them.) So adding a psychic gift to my characters seemed like a good way to add a sparkle of something otherworldly. I’m not saying I’ll never write vamps or shifters, but just not now.

    Reply
  22. Nunung–I enjoy a dollop of magic in my stories, but I haven’t figured out how to write vampires or werewolves. (I prefer my guys to have a pulse and not have fleas! Until I get over that, I can’t write them.) So adding a psychic gift to my characters seemed like a good way to add a sparkle of something otherworldly. I’m not saying I’ll never write vamps or shifters, but just not now.

    Reply
  23. Nunung–I enjoy a dollop of magic in my stories, but I haven’t figured out how to write vampires or werewolves. (I prefer my guys to have a pulse and not have fleas! Until I get over that, I can’t write them.) So adding a psychic gift to my characters seemed like a good way to add a sparkle of something otherworldly. I’m not saying I’ll never write vamps or shifters, but just not now.

    Reply
  24. Nunung–I enjoy a dollop of magic in my stories, but I haven’t figured out how to write vampires or werewolves. (I prefer my guys to have a pulse and not have fleas! Until I get over that, I can’t write them.) So adding a psychic gift to my characters seemed like a good way to add a sparkle of something otherworldly. I’m not saying I’ll never write vamps or shifters, but just not now.

    Reply
  25. Nunung–I enjoy a dollop of magic in my stories, but I haven’t figured out how to write vampires or werewolves. (I prefer my guys to have a pulse and not have fleas! Until I get over that, I can’t write them.) So adding a psychic gift to my characters seemed like a good way to add a sparkle of something otherworldly. I’m not saying I’ll never write vamps or shifters, but just not now.

    Reply
  26. Fascinating research, Mia. I like the mix of paranormal and historical, as well. Sounds like a great book. I can’t wait to pick it up!
    Alyssa

    Reply
  27. Fascinating research, Mia. I like the mix of paranormal and historical, as well. Sounds like a great book. I can’t wait to pick it up!
    Alyssa

    Reply
  28. Fascinating research, Mia. I like the mix of paranormal and historical, as well. Sounds like a great book. I can’t wait to pick it up!
    Alyssa

    Reply
  29. Fascinating research, Mia. I like the mix of paranormal and historical, as well. Sounds like a great book. I can’t wait to pick it up!
    Alyssa

    Reply
  30. Fascinating research, Mia. I like the mix of paranormal and historical, as well. Sounds like a great book. I can’t wait to pick it up!
    Alyssa

    Reply
  31. I love stories set in India and stories dealing with adoption (adoptee myself) so two more points in this book’s favor. Adoption as we know it is an extremely different concept from how someone from only a hundred years ago would view the same practice, so it’s a rich mine of conflict and character development in a historical. Can’t wait for this one.

    Reply
  32. I love stories set in India and stories dealing with adoption (adoptee myself) so two more points in this book’s favor. Adoption as we know it is an extremely different concept from how someone from only a hundred years ago would view the same practice, so it’s a rich mine of conflict and character development in a historical. Can’t wait for this one.

    Reply
  33. I love stories set in India and stories dealing with adoption (adoptee myself) so two more points in this book’s favor. Adoption as we know it is an extremely different concept from how someone from only a hundred years ago would view the same practice, so it’s a rich mine of conflict and character development in a historical. Can’t wait for this one.

    Reply
  34. I love stories set in India and stories dealing with adoption (adoptee myself) so two more points in this book’s favor. Adoption as we know it is an extremely different concept from how someone from only a hundred years ago would view the same practice, so it’s a rich mine of conflict and character development in a historical. Can’t wait for this one.

    Reply
  35. I love stories set in India and stories dealing with adoption (adoptee myself) so two more points in this book’s favor. Adoption as we know it is an extremely different concept from how someone from only a hundred years ago would view the same practice, so it’s a rich mine of conflict and character development in a historical. Can’t wait for this one.

    Reply
  36. Alyssa–There’s a risk when a historical author adds paranormal elements. She may offend historical purists and there may not be enough paranormal activity to satisfy paranormal readers. However, this heroine so needed something beyond a guilty conscience to make thievery difficult for her. Hence the unwelcome visions when she touches gemstones. I’m hoping since the pinch of the fantastic is intrinsic to my character, both factions of readers will be satisfied that there was no other way to tell the story of Touch of a Thief.

    Reply
  37. Alyssa–There’s a risk when a historical author adds paranormal elements. She may offend historical purists and there may not be enough paranormal activity to satisfy paranormal readers. However, this heroine so needed something beyond a guilty conscience to make thievery difficult for her. Hence the unwelcome visions when she touches gemstones. I’m hoping since the pinch of the fantastic is intrinsic to my character, both factions of readers will be satisfied that there was no other way to tell the story of Touch of a Thief.

    Reply
  38. Alyssa–There’s a risk when a historical author adds paranormal elements. She may offend historical purists and there may not be enough paranormal activity to satisfy paranormal readers. However, this heroine so needed something beyond a guilty conscience to make thievery difficult for her. Hence the unwelcome visions when she touches gemstones. I’m hoping since the pinch of the fantastic is intrinsic to my character, both factions of readers will be satisfied that there was no other way to tell the story of Touch of a Thief.

    Reply
  39. Alyssa–There’s a risk when a historical author adds paranormal elements. She may offend historical purists and there may not be enough paranormal activity to satisfy paranormal readers. However, this heroine so needed something beyond a guilty conscience to make thievery difficult for her. Hence the unwelcome visions when she touches gemstones. I’m hoping since the pinch of the fantastic is intrinsic to my character, both factions of readers will be satisfied that there was no other way to tell the story of Touch of a Thief.

    Reply
  40. Alyssa–There’s a risk when a historical author adds paranormal elements. She may offend historical purists and there may not be enough paranormal activity to satisfy paranormal readers. However, this heroine so needed something beyond a guilty conscience to make thievery difficult for her. Hence the unwelcome visions when she touches gemstones. I’m hoping since the pinch of the fantastic is intrinsic to my character, both factions of readers will be satisfied that there was no other way to tell the story of Touch of a Thief.

    Reply
  41. Anna–I’ve been fascinated by India since I discovered the work of MM Kaye years ago. She really captured the dichotomy of British India (“hideous as a rotting corpse and beautiful beyond belief”). For die-hard historians, I recommend my go-to source Raj, The Making and Unmaking of British India by Lawrence James.
    However, let me be clear. Touch of a Thief is not set in India (except for a brief scene in Chapter One), but the events that take place there impact my characters half a world away.

    Reply
  42. Anna–I’ve been fascinated by India since I discovered the work of MM Kaye years ago. She really captured the dichotomy of British India (“hideous as a rotting corpse and beautiful beyond belief”). For die-hard historians, I recommend my go-to source Raj, The Making and Unmaking of British India by Lawrence James.
    However, let me be clear. Touch of a Thief is not set in India (except for a brief scene in Chapter One), but the events that take place there impact my characters half a world away.

    Reply
  43. Anna–I’ve been fascinated by India since I discovered the work of MM Kaye years ago. She really captured the dichotomy of British India (“hideous as a rotting corpse and beautiful beyond belief”). For die-hard historians, I recommend my go-to source Raj, The Making and Unmaking of British India by Lawrence James.
    However, let me be clear. Touch of a Thief is not set in India (except for a brief scene in Chapter One), but the events that take place there impact my characters half a world away.

    Reply
  44. Anna–I’ve been fascinated by India since I discovered the work of MM Kaye years ago. She really captured the dichotomy of British India (“hideous as a rotting corpse and beautiful beyond belief”). For die-hard historians, I recommend my go-to source Raj, The Making and Unmaking of British India by Lawrence James.
    However, let me be clear. Touch of a Thief is not set in India (except for a brief scene in Chapter One), but the events that take place there impact my characters half a world away.

    Reply
  45. Anna–I’ve been fascinated by India since I discovered the work of MM Kaye years ago. She really captured the dichotomy of British India (“hideous as a rotting corpse and beautiful beyond belief”). For die-hard historians, I recommend my go-to source Raj, The Making and Unmaking of British India by Lawrence James.
    However, let me be clear. Touch of a Thief is not set in India (except for a brief scene in Chapter One), but the events that take place there impact my characters half a world away.

    Reply
  46. Being a scientist at heart, I enjoy reading about the research that went into a story. This one has been on my TBB list for awhile, Mia. I’m looking forward to the release!

    Reply
  47. Being a scientist at heart, I enjoy reading about the research that went into a story. This one has been on my TBB list for awhile, Mia. I’m looking forward to the release!

    Reply
  48. Being a scientist at heart, I enjoy reading about the research that went into a story. This one has been on my TBB list for awhile, Mia. I’m looking forward to the release!

    Reply
  49. Being a scientist at heart, I enjoy reading about the research that went into a story. This one has been on my TBB list for awhile, Mia. I’m looking forward to the release!

    Reply
  50. Being a scientist at heart, I enjoy reading about the research that went into a story. This one has been on my TBB list for awhile, Mia. I’m looking forward to the release!

    Reply
  51. Thanks, Barbara. I love the paranormal elements in your stories too. A sparkle of magic has always intrigued me. I still remember reading Mary Stewart’s This Rough Magic where her heroine had a psychic connection with the hero but though he practically lived in her head, she didn’t know who he was in real life. This was long before there was a “paranormal” subgenre. It was simply a story that required magic in order to be told correctly.

    Reply
  52. Thanks, Barbara. I love the paranormal elements in your stories too. A sparkle of magic has always intrigued me. I still remember reading Mary Stewart’s This Rough Magic where her heroine had a psychic connection with the hero but though he practically lived in her head, she didn’t know who he was in real life. This was long before there was a “paranormal” subgenre. It was simply a story that required magic in order to be told correctly.

    Reply
  53. Thanks, Barbara. I love the paranormal elements in your stories too. A sparkle of magic has always intrigued me. I still remember reading Mary Stewart’s This Rough Magic where her heroine had a psychic connection with the hero but though he practically lived in her head, she didn’t know who he was in real life. This was long before there was a “paranormal” subgenre. It was simply a story that required magic in order to be told correctly.

    Reply
  54. Thanks, Barbara. I love the paranormal elements in your stories too. A sparkle of magic has always intrigued me. I still remember reading Mary Stewart’s This Rough Magic where her heroine had a psychic connection with the hero but though he practically lived in her head, she didn’t know who he was in real life. This was long before there was a “paranormal” subgenre. It was simply a story that required magic in order to be told correctly.

    Reply
  55. Thanks, Barbara. I love the paranormal elements in your stories too. A sparkle of magic has always intrigued me. I still remember reading Mary Stewart’s This Rough Magic where her heroine had a psychic connection with the hero but though he practically lived in her head, she didn’t know who he was in real life. This was long before there was a “paranormal” subgenre. It was simply a story that required magic in order to be told correctly.

    Reply
  56. Mia, you know I love your stories under any name.
    How did you come up with the idea of crossing an historical with a paranormal?
    The thing that makes my blood boil is bullying.

    Reply
  57. Mia, you know I love your stories under any name.
    How did you come up with the idea of crossing an historical with a paranormal?
    The thing that makes my blood boil is bullying.

    Reply
  58. Mia, you know I love your stories under any name.
    How did you come up with the idea of crossing an historical with a paranormal?
    The thing that makes my blood boil is bullying.

    Reply
  59. Mia, you know I love your stories under any name.
    How did you come up with the idea of crossing an historical with a paranormal?
    The thing that makes my blood boil is bullying.

    Reply
  60. Mia, you know I love your stories under any name.
    How did you come up with the idea of crossing an historical with a paranormal?
    The thing that makes my blood boil is bullying.

    Reply
  61. Mia, as as classically trained soprano, I was particularly fascinated by your post. I’ve researched India myself and can truly appreciate all the work you did to set up your story. I look forward to reading your book. Best wishes for a great success!
    Grace Kone, w.a. Blair Bancroft

    Reply
  62. Mia, as as classically trained soprano, I was particularly fascinated by your post. I’ve researched India myself and can truly appreciate all the work you did to set up your story. I look forward to reading your book. Best wishes for a great success!
    Grace Kone, w.a. Blair Bancroft

    Reply
  63. Mia, as as classically trained soprano, I was particularly fascinated by your post. I’ve researched India myself and can truly appreciate all the work you did to set up your story. I look forward to reading your book. Best wishes for a great success!
    Grace Kone, w.a. Blair Bancroft

    Reply
  64. Mia, as as classically trained soprano, I was particularly fascinated by your post. I’ve researched India myself and can truly appreciate all the work you did to set up your story. I look forward to reading your book. Best wishes for a great success!
    Grace Kone, w.a. Blair Bancroft

    Reply
  65. Mia, as as classically trained soprano, I was particularly fascinated by your post. I’ve researched India myself and can truly appreciate all the work you did to set up your story. I look forward to reading your book. Best wishes for a great success!
    Grace Kone, w.a. Blair Bancroft

    Reply
  66. Thank you, Sandy. I’m hardly the first to add a bit of the paranormal to their historicals. Jennifer Ashley’s Nvengarian series featured shape-shifters and a mythical kingdom in a Regency setting. Elizabeth Boyle’s His Mistress by Morning had a magical ring that granted wishes. When the heroine wishes the hero would love her, she expects to wake as his wife. Instead, she’s his light-o-love!

    Reply
  67. Thank you, Sandy. I’m hardly the first to add a bit of the paranormal to their historicals. Jennifer Ashley’s Nvengarian series featured shape-shifters and a mythical kingdom in a Regency setting. Elizabeth Boyle’s His Mistress by Morning had a magical ring that granted wishes. When the heroine wishes the hero would love her, she expects to wake as his wife. Instead, she’s his light-o-love!

    Reply
  68. Thank you, Sandy. I’m hardly the first to add a bit of the paranormal to their historicals. Jennifer Ashley’s Nvengarian series featured shape-shifters and a mythical kingdom in a Regency setting. Elizabeth Boyle’s His Mistress by Morning had a magical ring that granted wishes. When the heroine wishes the hero would love her, she expects to wake as his wife. Instead, she’s his light-o-love!

    Reply
  69. Thank you, Sandy. I’m hardly the first to add a bit of the paranormal to their historicals. Jennifer Ashley’s Nvengarian series featured shape-shifters and a mythical kingdom in a Regency setting. Elizabeth Boyle’s His Mistress by Morning had a magical ring that granted wishes. When the heroine wishes the hero would love her, she expects to wake as his wife. Instead, she’s his light-o-love!

    Reply
  70. Thank you, Sandy. I’m hardly the first to add a bit of the paranormal to their historicals. Jennifer Ashley’s Nvengarian series featured shape-shifters and a mythical kingdom in a Regency setting. Elizabeth Boyle’s His Mistress by Morning had a magical ring that granted wishes. When the heroine wishes the hero would love her, she expects to wake as his wife. Instead, she’s his light-o-love!

    Reply
  71. Hi Erin! I’m so glad we got to meet at RT. As you know, I’m a huge fan of your Shadowland stories. Anyone who can develop such a richly imagined reason for the creative spark in the human psyche is my kind of writer.

    Reply
  72. Hi Erin! I’m so glad we got to meet at RT. As you know, I’m a huge fan of your Shadowland stories. Anyone who can develop such a richly imagined reason for the creative spark in the human psyche is my kind of writer.

    Reply
  73. Hi Erin! I’m so glad we got to meet at RT. As you know, I’m a huge fan of your Shadowland stories. Anyone who can develop such a richly imagined reason for the creative spark in the human psyche is my kind of writer.

    Reply
  74. Hi Erin! I’m so glad we got to meet at RT. As you know, I’m a huge fan of your Shadowland stories. Anyone who can develop such a richly imagined reason for the creative spark in the human psyche is my kind of writer.

    Reply
  75. Hi Erin! I’m so glad we got to meet at RT. As you know, I’m a huge fan of your Shadowland stories. Anyone who can develop such a richly imagined reason for the creative spark in the human psyche is my kind of writer.

    Reply
  76. I can’t wait to read this book. It looks so good. I’ve actually had it on my wishlist for sometime now. I can’t wait to get my copy.

    Reply
  77. I can’t wait to read this book. It looks so good. I’ve actually had it on my wishlist for sometime now. I can’t wait to get my copy.

    Reply
  78. I can’t wait to read this book. It looks so good. I’ve actually had it on my wishlist for sometime now. I can’t wait to get my copy.

    Reply
  79. I can’t wait to read this book. It looks so good. I’ve actually had it on my wishlist for sometime now. I can’t wait to get my copy.

    Reply
  80. I can’t wait to read this book. It looks so good. I’ve actually had it on my wishlist for sometime now. I can’t wait to get my copy.

    Reply
  81. Thanks for being here today, Mia! AND, thank you, Nicola for having Mia today. Mia, I enjoyed your blog posting today… I’ve already got your book on my TBR list… I’d love to win a signed copy! Whoopee! Thanks for the opportunity.
    Linda T.

    Reply
  82. Thanks for being here today, Mia! AND, thank you, Nicola for having Mia today. Mia, I enjoyed your blog posting today… I’ve already got your book on my TBR list… I’d love to win a signed copy! Whoopee! Thanks for the opportunity.
    Linda T.

    Reply
  83. Thanks for being here today, Mia! AND, thank you, Nicola for having Mia today. Mia, I enjoyed your blog posting today… I’ve already got your book on my TBR list… I’d love to win a signed copy! Whoopee! Thanks for the opportunity.
    Linda T.

    Reply
  84. Thanks for being here today, Mia! AND, thank you, Nicola for having Mia today. Mia, I enjoyed your blog posting today… I’ve already got your book on my TBR list… I’d love to win a signed copy! Whoopee! Thanks for the opportunity.
    Linda T.

    Reply
  85. Thanks for being here today, Mia! AND, thank you, Nicola for having Mia today. Mia, I enjoyed your blog posting today… I’ve already got your book on my TBR list… I’d love to win a signed copy! Whoopee! Thanks for the opportunity.
    Linda T.

    Reply
  86. Clancy–The whole idea of an aristocracy that was superior by virtue of their birth has always fascinated me. I remember reading one of Jo Beverley’s fabulous books and being aghast at her hero demanding (and getting!) another man’s shoes when he needed them simply because a man of his station ought not go barefoot. Though it offends our sensibilities, Jo Beverley was absolutely true to the thought of the times.

    Reply
  87. Clancy–The whole idea of an aristocracy that was superior by virtue of their birth has always fascinated me. I remember reading one of Jo Beverley’s fabulous books and being aghast at her hero demanding (and getting!) another man’s shoes when he needed them simply because a man of his station ought not go barefoot. Though it offends our sensibilities, Jo Beverley was absolutely true to the thought of the times.

    Reply
  88. Clancy–The whole idea of an aristocracy that was superior by virtue of their birth has always fascinated me. I remember reading one of Jo Beverley’s fabulous books and being aghast at her hero demanding (and getting!) another man’s shoes when he needed them simply because a man of his station ought not go barefoot. Though it offends our sensibilities, Jo Beverley was absolutely true to the thought of the times.

    Reply
  89. Clancy–The whole idea of an aristocracy that was superior by virtue of their birth has always fascinated me. I remember reading one of Jo Beverley’s fabulous books and being aghast at her hero demanding (and getting!) another man’s shoes when he needed them simply because a man of his station ought not go barefoot. Though it offends our sensibilities, Jo Beverley was absolutely true to the thought of the times.

    Reply
  90. Clancy–The whole idea of an aristocracy that was superior by virtue of their birth has always fascinated me. I remember reading one of Jo Beverley’s fabulous books and being aghast at her hero demanding (and getting!) another man’s shoes when he needed them simply because a man of his station ought not go barefoot. Though it offends our sensibilities, Jo Beverley was absolutely true to the thought of the times.

    Reply
  91. Interesting post. I smiled at your choice of a male’s name. I once worked with a very personable Sanjay; you sparked a memory. Thank you. I enspecially like your paranormal touch. Quite intriging. Best of luck to you.

    Reply
  92. Interesting post. I smiled at your choice of a male’s name. I once worked with a very personable Sanjay; you sparked a memory. Thank you. I enspecially like your paranormal touch. Quite intriging. Best of luck to you.

    Reply
  93. Interesting post. I smiled at your choice of a male’s name. I once worked with a very personable Sanjay; you sparked a memory. Thank you. I enspecially like your paranormal touch. Quite intriging. Best of luck to you.

    Reply
  94. Interesting post. I smiled at your choice of a male’s name. I once worked with a very personable Sanjay; you sparked a memory. Thank you. I enspecially like your paranormal touch. Quite intriging. Best of luck to you.

    Reply
  95. Interesting post. I smiled at your choice of a male’s name. I once worked with a very personable Sanjay; you sparked a memory. Thank you. I enspecially like your paranormal touch. Quite intriging. Best of luck to you.

    Reply
  96. I really have a hard time with stereotyping – arresting someone because they fit the type, even though there’s no evidence they had anything to do with the crime. Most of the time, just an arrest is enough to turn a person’s world upside down. losing employment, friends, savings, etc., whether they actually committed a crime or not. And those who have been convicted and then found innocent years later, that really gets me – they’ve lost everything, including years of their lives, for something they didn’t do.
    I’m really looking forward to reading Touch of a Thief, it sounds wonderful.

    Reply
  97. I really have a hard time with stereotyping – arresting someone because they fit the type, even though there’s no evidence they had anything to do with the crime. Most of the time, just an arrest is enough to turn a person’s world upside down. losing employment, friends, savings, etc., whether they actually committed a crime or not. And those who have been convicted and then found innocent years later, that really gets me – they’ve lost everything, including years of their lives, for something they didn’t do.
    I’m really looking forward to reading Touch of a Thief, it sounds wonderful.

    Reply
  98. I really have a hard time with stereotyping – arresting someone because they fit the type, even though there’s no evidence they had anything to do with the crime. Most of the time, just an arrest is enough to turn a person’s world upside down. losing employment, friends, savings, etc., whether they actually committed a crime or not. And those who have been convicted and then found innocent years later, that really gets me – they’ve lost everything, including years of their lives, for something they didn’t do.
    I’m really looking forward to reading Touch of a Thief, it sounds wonderful.

    Reply
  99. I really have a hard time with stereotyping – arresting someone because they fit the type, even though there’s no evidence they had anything to do with the crime. Most of the time, just an arrest is enough to turn a person’s world upside down. losing employment, friends, savings, etc., whether they actually committed a crime or not. And those who have been convicted and then found innocent years later, that really gets me – they’ve lost everything, including years of their lives, for something they didn’t do.
    I’m really looking forward to reading Touch of a Thief, it sounds wonderful.

    Reply
  100. I really have a hard time with stereotyping – arresting someone because they fit the type, even though there’s no evidence they had anything to do with the crime. Most of the time, just an arrest is enough to turn a person’s world upside down. losing employment, friends, savings, etc., whether they actually committed a crime or not. And those who have been convicted and then found innocent years later, that really gets me – they’ve lost everything, including years of their lives, for something they didn’t do.
    I’m really looking forward to reading Touch of a Thief, it sounds wonderful.

    Reply
  101. Barbara–The research is never finished. Even while I’m writing, if something twitches my historical radar, I have to do a few quick searches to make sure what my characters are up to works for their time. That said, it’s time for you to start writing! You can still research as needed.

    Reply
  102. Barbara–The research is never finished. Even while I’m writing, if something twitches my historical radar, I have to do a few quick searches to make sure what my characters are up to works for their time. That said, it’s time for you to start writing! You can still research as needed.

    Reply
  103. Barbara–The research is never finished. Even while I’m writing, if something twitches my historical radar, I have to do a few quick searches to make sure what my characters are up to works for their time. That said, it’s time for you to start writing! You can still research as needed.

    Reply
  104. Barbara–The research is never finished. Even while I’m writing, if something twitches my historical radar, I have to do a few quick searches to make sure what my characters are up to works for their time. That said, it’s time for you to start writing! You can still research as needed.

    Reply
  105. Barbara–The research is never finished. Even while I’m writing, if something twitches my historical radar, I have to do a few quick searches to make sure what my characters are up to works for their time. That said, it’s time for you to start writing! You can still research as needed.

    Reply
  106. Barbara E–I agree. Someone falsely accused has a terrible time getting their reputation back. That’s a real injustice. My hero Quinn would want to do something about it.

    Reply
  107. Barbara E–I agree. Someone falsely accused has a terrible time getting their reputation back. That’s a real injustice. My hero Quinn would want to do something about it.

    Reply
  108. Barbara E–I agree. Someone falsely accused has a terrible time getting their reputation back. That’s a real injustice. My hero Quinn would want to do something about it.

    Reply
  109. Barbara E–I agree. Someone falsely accused has a terrible time getting their reputation back. That’s a real injustice. My hero Quinn would want to do something about it.

    Reply
  110. Barbara E–I agree. Someone falsely accused has a terrible time getting their reputation back. That’s a real injustice. My hero Quinn would want to do something about it.

    Reply
  111. Your book sounds very interesting! Congrats on the PW review.
    However, I had a question re: adoption. It was my impression that adoption did exist in England before the 20th century. Childless families did adopt. I believe Jane Austen’s own brother was adopted by family relatives and this ensured that he inherited a large estate (no title). Perhaps that was an informal adoption and he became heir through a will instead of a legalized adoption?

    Reply
  112. Your book sounds very interesting! Congrats on the PW review.
    However, I had a question re: adoption. It was my impression that adoption did exist in England before the 20th century. Childless families did adopt. I believe Jane Austen’s own brother was adopted by family relatives and this ensured that he inherited a large estate (no title). Perhaps that was an informal adoption and he became heir through a will instead of a legalized adoption?

    Reply
  113. Your book sounds very interesting! Congrats on the PW review.
    However, I had a question re: adoption. It was my impression that adoption did exist in England before the 20th century. Childless families did adopt. I believe Jane Austen’s own brother was adopted by family relatives and this ensured that he inherited a large estate (no title). Perhaps that was an informal adoption and he became heir through a will instead of a legalized adoption?

    Reply
  114. Your book sounds very interesting! Congrats on the PW review.
    However, I had a question re: adoption. It was my impression that adoption did exist in England before the 20th century. Childless families did adopt. I believe Jane Austen’s own brother was adopted by family relatives and this ensured that he inherited a large estate (no title). Perhaps that was an informal adoption and he became heir through a will instead of a legalized adoption?

    Reply
  115. Your book sounds very interesting! Congrats on the PW review.
    However, I had a question re: adoption. It was my impression that adoption did exist in England before the 20th century. Childless families did adopt. I believe Jane Austen’s own brother was adopted by family relatives and this ensured that he inherited a large estate (no title). Perhaps that was an informal adoption and he became heir through a will instead of a legalized adoption?

    Reply
  116. Hello, Mia! What a fascinating post. England’s interaction with India is fraught with inequities and dichotomies. It truly is a fascinating subject. I look forward to reading this book! Anything with India’s history and mystery interwoven with Regency England and a touch of the paranormal is an easy sell for me!
    I am curious as to whether the premise of this book was a hard sell for either your agent or your publisher?
    How did you decide how to maneuver the fine line between Regency historical romance and historical paranormal romance? How did you decide how much of the paranormal to include?

    Reply
  117. Hello, Mia! What a fascinating post. England’s interaction with India is fraught with inequities and dichotomies. It truly is a fascinating subject. I look forward to reading this book! Anything with India’s history and mystery interwoven with Regency England and a touch of the paranormal is an easy sell for me!
    I am curious as to whether the premise of this book was a hard sell for either your agent or your publisher?
    How did you decide how to maneuver the fine line between Regency historical romance and historical paranormal romance? How did you decide how much of the paranormal to include?

    Reply
  118. Hello, Mia! What a fascinating post. England’s interaction with India is fraught with inequities and dichotomies. It truly is a fascinating subject. I look forward to reading this book! Anything with India’s history and mystery interwoven with Regency England and a touch of the paranormal is an easy sell for me!
    I am curious as to whether the premise of this book was a hard sell for either your agent or your publisher?
    How did you decide how to maneuver the fine line between Regency historical romance and historical paranormal romance? How did you decide how much of the paranormal to include?

    Reply
  119. Hello, Mia! What a fascinating post. England’s interaction with India is fraught with inequities and dichotomies. It truly is a fascinating subject. I look forward to reading this book! Anything with India’s history and mystery interwoven with Regency England and a touch of the paranormal is an easy sell for me!
    I am curious as to whether the premise of this book was a hard sell for either your agent or your publisher?
    How did you decide how to maneuver the fine line between Regency historical romance and historical paranormal romance? How did you decide how much of the paranormal to include?

    Reply
  120. Hello, Mia! What a fascinating post. England’s interaction with India is fraught with inequities and dichotomies. It truly is a fascinating subject. I look forward to reading this book! Anything with India’s history and mystery interwoven with Regency England and a touch of the paranormal is an easy sell for me!
    I am curious as to whether the premise of this book was a hard sell for either your agent or your publisher?
    How did you decide how to maneuver the fine line between Regency historical romance and historical paranormal romance? How did you decide how much of the paranormal to include?

    Reply
  121. Oh, and the inequities that make my blood boil?
    The complete dismissal of animals as feeling, sentient beings simply because they are animals. The cruelty laws in this country are, for the most part, laughable and one wonders if the powers that fight stricter laws realize that most violent criminals and all serial killers start out as animal abusers.
    The other iniquity that sets my teeth on edge is the one that judges a person by the expense of their clothes, the prestige of their home or the job at which they make their living. People should be judged by the kindness they show others and the lengths they go to in order to make the world a better place. Everything else is just window-dressing.

    Reply
  122. Oh, and the inequities that make my blood boil?
    The complete dismissal of animals as feeling, sentient beings simply because they are animals. The cruelty laws in this country are, for the most part, laughable and one wonders if the powers that fight stricter laws realize that most violent criminals and all serial killers start out as animal abusers.
    The other iniquity that sets my teeth on edge is the one that judges a person by the expense of their clothes, the prestige of their home or the job at which they make their living. People should be judged by the kindness they show others and the lengths they go to in order to make the world a better place. Everything else is just window-dressing.

    Reply
  123. Oh, and the inequities that make my blood boil?
    The complete dismissal of animals as feeling, sentient beings simply because they are animals. The cruelty laws in this country are, for the most part, laughable and one wonders if the powers that fight stricter laws realize that most violent criminals and all serial killers start out as animal abusers.
    The other iniquity that sets my teeth on edge is the one that judges a person by the expense of their clothes, the prestige of their home or the job at which they make their living. People should be judged by the kindness they show others and the lengths they go to in order to make the world a better place. Everything else is just window-dressing.

    Reply
  124. Oh, and the inequities that make my blood boil?
    The complete dismissal of animals as feeling, sentient beings simply because they are animals. The cruelty laws in this country are, for the most part, laughable and one wonders if the powers that fight stricter laws realize that most violent criminals and all serial killers start out as animal abusers.
    The other iniquity that sets my teeth on edge is the one that judges a person by the expense of their clothes, the prestige of their home or the job at which they make their living. People should be judged by the kindness they show others and the lengths they go to in order to make the world a better place. Everything else is just window-dressing.

    Reply
  125. Oh, and the inequities that make my blood boil?
    The complete dismissal of animals as feeling, sentient beings simply because they are animals. The cruelty laws in this country are, for the most part, laughable and one wonders if the powers that fight stricter laws realize that most violent criminals and all serial killers start out as animal abusers.
    The other iniquity that sets my teeth on edge is the one that judges a person by the expense of their clothes, the prestige of their home or the job at which they make their living. People should be judged by the kindness they show others and the lengths they go to in order to make the world a better place. Everything else is just window-dressing.

    Reply
  126. Hi, Mia! Yea on your upcoming release! It sounds like it is going to be fabulous!
    For me it’s judging. And on the most silly things! People be crazy, I tell ya 😉

    Reply
  127. Hi, Mia! Yea on your upcoming release! It sounds like it is going to be fabulous!
    For me it’s judging. And on the most silly things! People be crazy, I tell ya 😉

    Reply
  128. Hi, Mia! Yea on your upcoming release! It sounds like it is going to be fabulous!
    For me it’s judging. And on the most silly things! People be crazy, I tell ya 😉

    Reply
  129. Hi, Mia! Yea on your upcoming release! It sounds like it is going to be fabulous!
    For me it’s judging. And on the most silly things! People be crazy, I tell ya 😉

    Reply
  130. Hi, Mia! Yea on your upcoming release! It sounds like it is going to be fabulous!
    For me it’s judging. And on the most silly things! People be crazy, I tell ya 😉

    Reply
  131. Thank you for your post, Mia. The history you discuss is fascinating. So is your technique of applying history to fiction.
    Capturing the mindset of a past era is challenging. Yet it makes reading and writing historical fiction a richer, more rewarding experience than reading or writing stories that take place in the past, but in which the characters think, talk, and act like contemporary types in costumes.
    Good luck with “Touch of a Thief”!

    Reply
  132. Thank you for your post, Mia. The history you discuss is fascinating. So is your technique of applying history to fiction.
    Capturing the mindset of a past era is challenging. Yet it makes reading and writing historical fiction a richer, more rewarding experience than reading or writing stories that take place in the past, but in which the characters think, talk, and act like contemporary types in costumes.
    Good luck with “Touch of a Thief”!

    Reply
  133. Thank you for your post, Mia. The history you discuss is fascinating. So is your technique of applying history to fiction.
    Capturing the mindset of a past era is challenging. Yet it makes reading and writing historical fiction a richer, more rewarding experience than reading or writing stories that take place in the past, but in which the characters think, talk, and act like contemporary types in costumes.
    Good luck with “Touch of a Thief”!

    Reply
  134. Thank you for your post, Mia. The history you discuss is fascinating. So is your technique of applying history to fiction.
    Capturing the mindset of a past era is challenging. Yet it makes reading and writing historical fiction a richer, more rewarding experience than reading or writing stories that take place in the past, but in which the characters think, talk, and act like contemporary types in costumes.
    Good luck with “Touch of a Thief”!

    Reply
  135. Thank you for your post, Mia. The history you discuss is fascinating. So is your technique of applying history to fiction.
    Capturing the mindset of a past era is challenging. Yet it makes reading and writing historical fiction a richer, more rewarding experience than reading or writing stories that take place in the past, but in which the characters think, talk, and act like contemporary types in costumes.
    Good luck with “Touch of a Thief”!

    Reply
  136. Fascinating research! And a subject that holds much interest for me. Though not in England, My grandmother was adopted, and we’ve only just started to suspect she may have traveled on one of those orphan trains.
    BTW, i’m trying to get used to your new name.
    Julie

    Reply
  137. Fascinating research! And a subject that holds much interest for me. Though not in England, My grandmother was adopted, and we’ve only just started to suspect she may have traveled on one of those orphan trains.
    BTW, i’m trying to get used to your new name.
    Julie

    Reply
  138. Fascinating research! And a subject that holds much interest for me. Though not in England, My grandmother was adopted, and we’ve only just started to suspect she may have traveled on one of those orphan trains.
    BTW, i’m trying to get used to your new name.
    Julie

    Reply
  139. Fascinating research! And a subject that holds much interest for me. Though not in England, My grandmother was adopted, and we’ve only just started to suspect she may have traveled on one of those orphan trains.
    BTW, i’m trying to get used to your new name.
    Julie

    Reply
  140. Fascinating research! And a subject that holds much interest for me. Though not in England, My grandmother was adopted, and we’ve only just started to suspect she may have traveled on one of those orphan trains.
    BTW, i’m trying to get used to your new name.
    Julie

    Reply
  141. Hi Mia,
    I love the sound of this new release. Of course I love ever one of your books no matter what name it’s written in. I am always impressed with your research. I love History and Paranormal and know I’ll enjoy this book. Wishing you many sales.
    Carol L
    Lucky4750@aol.com

    Reply
  142. Hi Mia,
    I love the sound of this new release. Of course I love ever one of your books no matter what name it’s written in. I am always impressed with your research. I love History and Paranormal and know I’ll enjoy this book. Wishing you many sales.
    Carol L
    Lucky4750@aol.com

    Reply
  143. Hi Mia,
    I love the sound of this new release. Of course I love ever one of your books no matter what name it’s written in. I am always impressed with your research. I love History and Paranormal and know I’ll enjoy this book. Wishing you many sales.
    Carol L
    Lucky4750@aol.com

    Reply
  144. Hi Mia,
    I love the sound of this new release. Of course I love ever one of your books no matter what name it’s written in. I am always impressed with your research. I love History and Paranormal and know I’ll enjoy this book. Wishing you many sales.
    Carol L
    Lucky4750@aol.com

    Reply
  145. Hi Mia,
    I love the sound of this new release. Of course I love ever one of your books no matter what name it’s written in. I am always impressed with your research. I love History and Paranormal and know I’ll enjoy this book. Wishing you many sales.
    Carol L
    Lucky4750@aol.com

    Reply
  146. Dee, the adoption issue interests me too. It’s certainly the case that James Austen was “adopted” by the Leigh family and inherited from them and the same thing happened in my own family at the end of the 19th century where childless relatives adopted a nephew.
    However, as I understand it, this all hinges on entail. In most British aristocratic families the title, estate and fortune are entailed and so can only be inherited by the next male in the hereditary line (although to confuse the issue there are a handful of titles that can be inherited by females). In contrast, an estate and a fortune that is not entailed can be inherited by anyone that the owner chooses to bestow it upon. So, as Mia says, a peer simply could not adopt a child and then leave him – or her – their lands and title etc because these are almost always governed by the complex rules of entail and tail male etc. As far as I know, the Leigh estate was not entailed which was why James Austen was able to inherit it.
    I studied this as part of my history degree and boy was it complicated! Plus it was a long time ago (!) so I may have forgotten the finer points but in essence I think this is correct.

    Reply
  147. Dee, the adoption issue interests me too. It’s certainly the case that James Austen was “adopted” by the Leigh family and inherited from them and the same thing happened in my own family at the end of the 19th century where childless relatives adopted a nephew.
    However, as I understand it, this all hinges on entail. In most British aristocratic families the title, estate and fortune are entailed and so can only be inherited by the next male in the hereditary line (although to confuse the issue there are a handful of titles that can be inherited by females). In contrast, an estate and a fortune that is not entailed can be inherited by anyone that the owner chooses to bestow it upon. So, as Mia says, a peer simply could not adopt a child and then leave him – or her – their lands and title etc because these are almost always governed by the complex rules of entail and tail male etc. As far as I know, the Leigh estate was not entailed which was why James Austen was able to inherit it.
    I studied this as part of my history degree and boy was it complicated! Plus it was a long time ago (!) so I may have forgotten the finer points but in essence I think this is correct.

    Reply
  148. Dee, the adoption issue interests me too. It’s certainly the case that James Austen was “adopted” by the Leigh family and inherited from them and the same thing happened in my own family at the end of the 19th century where childless relatives adopted a nephew.
    However, as I understand it, this all hinges on entail. In most British aristocratic families the title, estate and fortune are entailed and so can only be inherited by the next male in the hereditary line (although to confuse the issue there are a handful of titles that can be inherited by females). In contrast, an estate and a fortune that is not entailed can be inherited by anyone that the owner chooses to bestow it upon. So, as Mia says, a peer simply could not adopt a child and then leave him – or her – their lands and title etc because these are almost always governed by the complex rules of entail and tail male etc. As far as I know, the Leigh estate was not entailed which was why James Austen was able to inherit it.
    I studied this as part of my history degree and boy was it complicated! Plus it was a long time ago (!) so I may have forgotten the finer points but in essence I think this is correct.

    Reply
  149. Dee, the adoption issue interests me too. It’s certainly the case that James Austen was “adopted” by the Leigh family and inherited from them and the same thing happened in my own family at the end of the 19th century where childless relatives adopted a nephew.
    However, as I understand it, this all hinges on entail. In most British aristocratic families the title, estate and fortune are entailed and so can only be inherited by the next male in the hereditary line (although to confuse the issue there are a handful of titles that can be inherited by females). In contrast, an estate and a fortune that is not entailed can be inherited by anyone that the owner chooses to bestow it upon. So, as Mia says, a peer simply could not adopt a child and then leave him – or her – their lands and title etc because these are almost always governed by the complex rules of entail and tail male etc. As far as I know, the Leigh estate was not entailed which was why James Austen was able to inherit it.
    I studied this as part of my history degree and boy was it complicated! Plus it was a long time ago (!) so I may have forgotten the finer points but in essence I think this is correct.

    Reply
  150. Dee, the adoption issue interests me too. It’s certainly the case that James Austen was “adopted” by the Leigh family and inherited from them and the same thing happened in my own family at the end of the 19th century where childless relatives adopted a nephew.
    However, as I understand it, this all hinges on entail. In most British aristocratic families the title, estate and fortune are entailed and so can only be inherited by the next male in the hereditary line (although to confuse the issue there are a handful of titles that can be inherited by females). In contrast, an estate and a fortune that is not entailed can be inherited by anyone that the owner chooses to bestow it upon. So, as Mia says, a peer simply could not adopt a child and then leave him – or her – their lands and title etc because these are almost always governed by the complex rules of entail and tail male etc. As far as I know, the Leigh estate was not entailed which was why James Austen was able to inherit it.
    I studied this as part of my history degree and boy was it complicated! Plus it was a long time ago (!) so I may have forgotten the finer points but in essence I think this is correct.

    Reply
  151. Mia, As both an attorney and a historical romance author, I give a big hats off to you on accuracy grounds–you’re correct that adoption could NOT solve the entail problem for peers, though the process existed legally in other contexts much as we understand it now. Th complications of the peerage legalities confound me–I’m trying to put together a plot around a title in abeyance now, and feel like no matter how thoroughly I research it, somebody is going to cite a competing authority and down will come my entire story.

    Reply
  152. Mia, As both an attorney and a historical romance author, I give a big hats off to you on accuracy grounds–you’re correct that adoption could NOT solve the entail problem for peers, though the process existed legally in other contexts much as we understand it now. Th complications of the peerage legalities confound me–I’m trying to put together a plot around a title in abeyance now, and feel like no matter how thoroughly I research it, somebody is going to cite a competing authority and down will come my entire story.

    Reply
  153. Mia, As both an attorney and a historical romance author, I give a big hats off to you on accuracy grounds–you’re correct that adoption could NOT solve the entail problem for peers, though the process existed legally in other contexts much as we understand it now. Th complications of the peerage legalities confound me–I’m trying to put together a plot around a title in abeyance now, and feel like no matter how thoroughly I research it, somebody is going to cite a competing authority and down will come my entire story.

    Reply
  154. Mia, As both an attorney and a historical romance author, I give a big hats off to you on accuracy grounds–you’re correct that adoption could NOT solve the entail problem for peers, though the process existed legally in other contexts much as we understand it now. Th complications of the peerage legalities confound me–I’m trying to put together a plot around a title in abeyance now, and feel like no matter how thoroughly I research it, somebody is going to cite a competing authority and down will come my entire story.

    Reply
  155. Mia, As both an attorney and a historical romance author, I give a big hats off to you on accuracy grounds–you’re correct that adoption could NOT solve the entail problem for peers, though the process existed legally in other contexts much as we understand it now. Th complications of the peerage legalities confound me–I’m trying to put together a plot around a title in abeyance now, and feel like no matter how thoroughly I research it, somebody is going to cite a competing authority and down will come my entire story.

    Reply
  156. Dee–There were no adoption laws in England until the 1920’s so any arrangement prior to that would have been informal and usual a matter of family members taking in a child of a relative.

    Reply
  157. Dee–There were no adoption laws in England until the 1920’s so any arrangement prior to that would have been informal and usual a matter of family members taking in a child of a relative.

    Reply
  158. Dee–There were no adoption laws in England until the 1920’s so any arrangement prior to that would have been informal and usual a matter of family members taking in a child of a relative.

    Reply
  159. Dee–There were no adoption laws in England until the 1920’s so any arrangement prior to that would have been informal and usual a matter of family members taking in a child of a relative.

    Reply
  160. Dee–There were no adoption laws in England until the 1920’s so any arrangement prior to that would have been informal and usual a matter of family members taking in a child of a relative.

    Reply
  161. Dee–The first actal laws on adoption in England weren’t enacted till the 1920’s so any arrangement prior to that must have been an informal one. It wasn’t uncommon for family members to take in an orphaned child of a relative, but an adopted heir could not inherit a title.

    Reply
  162. Dee–The first actal laws on adoption in England weren’t enacted till the 1920’s so any arrangement prior to that must have been an informal one. It wasn’t uncommon for family members to take in an orphaned child of a relative, but an adopted heir could not inherit a title.

    Reply
  163. Dee–The first actal laws on adoption in England weren’t enacted till the 1920’s so any arrangement prior to that must have been an informal one. It wasn’t uncommon for family members to take in an orphaned child of a relative, but an adopted heir could not inherit a title.

    Reply
  164. Dee–The first actal laws on adoption in England weren’t enacted till the 1920’s so any arrangement prior to that must have been an informal one. It wasn’t uncommon for family members to take in an orphaned child of a relative, but an adopted heir could not inherit a title.

    Reply
  165. Dee–The first actal laws on adoption in England weren’t enacted till the 1920’s so any arrangement prior to that must have been an informal one. It wasn’t uncommon for family members to take in an orphaned child of a relative, but an adopted heir could not inherit a title.

    Reply
  166. Louisa–Touch of a Thief is set in 1857, twenty years into Victoria’s reign so it’s not a Regency. My agent did a terrific job matching this story up with Alicia Condon, my Kensington editor, so I don’t think it was too hard a sell.
    As far as mixing historical and paranormal goes, I just follow the story. This one needed its spark of magic in order to be told correctly.
    Your comment about people being judged by their clothing reminded me of the old sumptuary laws that forbade people of certain classes to wear specific types of fabric or furs. This was so class distinctions would be easy to make with a glance. Since the earliest statutes date back to ancient Greece limiting embroidery on a robe, clothing has made the man for a long time.

    Reply
  167. Louisa–Touch of a Thief is set in 1857, twenty years into Victoria’s reign so it’s not a Regency. My agent did a terrific job matching this story up with Alicia Condon, my Kensington editor, so I don’t think it was too hard a sell.
    As far as mixing historical and paranormal goes, I just follow the story. This one needed its spark of magic in order to be told correctly.
    Your comment about people being judged by their clothing reminded me of the old sumptuary laws that forbade people of certain classes to wear specific types of fabric or furs. This was so class distinctions would be easy to make with a glance. Since the earliest statutes date back to ancient Greece limiting embroidery on a robe, clothing has made the man for a long time.

    Reply
  168. Louisa–Touch of a Thief is set in 1857, twenty years into Victoria’s reign so it’s not a Regency. My agent did a terrific job matching this story up with Alicia Condon, my Kensington editor, so I don’t think it was too hard a sell.
    As far as mixing historical and paranormal goes, I just follow the story. This one needed its spark of magic in order to be told correctly.
    Your comment about people being judged by their clothing reminded me of the old sumptuary laws that forbade people of certain classes to wear specific types of fabric or furs. This was so class distinctions would be easy to make with a glance. Since the earliest statutes date back to ancient Greece limiting embroidery on a robe, clothing has made the man for a long time.

    Reply
  169. Louisa–Touch of a Thief is set in 1857, twenty years into Victoria’s reign so it’s not a Regency. My agent did a terrific job matching this story up with Alicia Condon, my Kensington editor, so I don’t think it was too hard a sell.
    As far as mixing historical and paranormal goes, I just follow the story. This one needed its spark of magic in order to be told correctly.
    Your comment about people being judged by their clothing reminded me of the old sumptuary laws that forbade people of certain classes to wear specific types of fabric or furs. This was so class distinctions would be easy to make with a glance. Since the earliest statutes date back to ancient Greece limiting embroidery on a robe, clothing has made the man for a long time.

    Reply
  170. Louisa–Touch of a Thief is set in 1857, twenty years into Victoria’s reign so it’s not a Regency. My agent did a terrific job matching this story up with Alicia Condon, my Kensington editor, so I don’t think it was too hard a sell.
    As far as mixing historical and paranormal goes, I just follow the story. This one needed its spark of magic in order to be told correctly.
    Your comment about people being judged by their clothing reminded me of the old sumptuary laws that forbade people of certain classes to wear specific types of fabric or furs. This was so class distinctions would be easy to make with a glance. Since the earliest statutes date back to ancient Greece limiting embroidery on a robe, clothing has made the man for a long time.

    Reply
  171. Thank you, Mary Ann. History is much more than the daily details of people’s lives, though those are important. How people thought, what they believed has always interested me more than what sort of lace they attached to their collars.

    Reply
  172. Thank you, Mary Ann. History is much more than the daily details of people’s lives, though those are important. How people thought, what they believed has always interested me more than what sort of lace they attached to their collars.

    Reply
  173. Thank you, Mary Ann. History is much more than the daily details of people’s lives, though those are important. How people thought, what they believed has always interested me more than what sort of lace they attached to their collars.

    Reply
  174. Thank you, Mary Ann. History is much more than the daily details of people’s lives, though those are important. How people thought, what they believed has always interested me more than what sort of lace they attached to their collars.

    Reply
  175. Thank you, Mary Ann. History is much more than the daily details of people’s lives, though those are important. How people thought, what they believed has always interested me more than what sort of lace they attached to their collars.

    Reply
  176. Julie–About the multiple pen names . . . I wouldn’t have done it if it hadn’t been a publishing requirement. Now that I’ve written under three of them (Diana Groe, Emily Bryan and now Mia Marlowe) I’m discovering that many authors have done so. They just may not have been as transparent about it.

    Reply
  177. Julie–About the multiple pen names . . . I wouldn’t have done it if it hadn’t been a publishing requirement. Now that I’ve written under three of them (Diana Groe, Emily Bryan and now Mia Marlowe) I’m discovering that many authors have done so. They just may not have been as transparent about it.

    Reply
  178. Julie–About the multiple pen names . . . I wouldn’t have done it if it hadn’t been a publishing requirement. Now that I’ve written under three of them (Diana Groe, Emily Bryan and now Mia Marlowe) I’m discovering that many authors have done so. They just may not have been as transparent about it.

    Reply
  179. Julie–About the multiple pen names . . . I wouldn’t have done it if it hadn’t been a publishing requirement. Now that I’ve written under three of them (Diana Groe, Emily Bryan and now Mia Marlowe) I’m discovering that many authors have done so. They just may not have been as transparent about it.

    Reply
  180. Julie–About the multiple pen names . . . I wouldn’t have done it if it hadn’t been a publishing requirement. Now that I’ve written under three of them (Diana Groe, Emily Bryan and now Mia Marlowe) I’m discovering that many authors have done so. They just may not have been as transparent about it.

    Reply
  181. Nicola–Thanks for having me here on the WordWenches. I love all the authors associated with this blog.
    And thanks for backing me on the adoption issue. It’s a source of frequent mistakes in historical romance and wasn’t that difficult for me to discover. We owe it to our readers to try to get the history right.

    Reply
  182. Nicola–Thanks for having me here on the WordWenches. I love all the authors associated with this blog.
    And thanks for backing me on the adoption issue. It’s a source of frequent mistakes in historical romance and wasn’t that difficult for me to discover. We owe it to our readers to try to get the history right.

    Reply
  183. Nicola–Thanks for having me here on the WordWenches. I love all the authors associated with this blog.
    And thanks for backing me on the adoption issue. It’s a source of frequent mistakes in historical romance and wasn’t that difficult for me to discover. We owe it to our readers to try to get the history right.

    Reply
  184. Nicola–Thanks for having me here on the WordWenches. I love all the authors associated with this blog.
    And thanks for backing me on the adoption issue. It’s a source of frequent mistakes in historical romance and wasn’t that difficult for me to discover. We owe it to our readers to try to get the history right.

    Reply
  185. Nicola–Thanks for having me here on the WordWenches. I love all the authors associated with this blog.
    And thanks for backing me on the adoption issue. It’s a source of frequent mistakes in historical romance and wasn’t that difficult for me to discover. We owe it to our readers to try to get the history right.

    Reply
  186. Grace–I’m always excited when I meet a reader who knows more than me about a subject. For my debut Diana Groe novel–a viking story–I used a few Old Norse phrases and wouldn’t you know it, a Dutch linguist contacted me to correct the spelling! We’ve kept in touch and when my DH and I visited Amsterdam last year, we had lunch with her. I count her a friend and a valuable resource if I ever return to medieval Scandinavia.

    Reply
  187. Grace–I’m always excited when I meet a reader who knows more than me about a subject. For my debut Diana Groe novel–a viking story–I used a few Old Norse phrases and wouldn’t you know it, a Dutch linguist contacted me to correct the spelling! We’ve kept in touch and when my DH and I visited Amsterdam last year, we had lunch with her. I count her a friend and a valuable resource if I ever return to medieval Scandinavia.

    Reply
  188. Grace–I’m always excited when I meet a reader who knows more than me about a subject. For my debut Diana Groe novel–a viking story–I used a few Old Norse phrases and wouldn’t you know it, a Dutch linguist contacted me to correct the spelling! We’ve kept in touch and when my DH and I visited Amsterdam last year, we had lunch with her. I count her a friend and a valuable resource if I ever return to medieval Scandinavia.

    Reply
  189. Grace–I’m always excited when I meet a reader who knows more than me about a subject. For my debut Diana Groe novel–a viking story–I used a few Old Norse phrases and wouldn’t you know it, a Dutch linguist contacted me to correct the spelling! We’ve kept in touch and when my DH and I visited Amsterdam last year, we had lunch with her. I count her a friend and a valuable resource if I ever return to medieval Scandinavia.

    Reply
  190. Grace–I’m always excited when I meet a reader who knows more than me about a subject. For my debut Diana Groe novel–a viking story–I used a few Old Norse phrases and wouldn’t you know it, a Dutch linguist contacted me to correct the spelling! We’ve kept in touch and when my DH and I visited Amsterdam last year, we had lunch with her. I count her a friend and a valuable resource if I ever return to medieval Scandinavia.

    Reply
  191. Welcome to Wenchdom, Mia! When Nicola suggested inviting you, I checked out your website and promptly downloaded one of your books. This one sounds terrific, too. Interestingly, several years ago I wrote a book set in India that involved the Doctrine of Lapse. (And I’m writing a book with a hero named Greydon now. *g*
    Good luck with the new book!

    Reply
  192. Welcome to Wenchdom, Mia! When Nicola suggested inviting you, I checked out your website and promptly downloaded one of your books. This one sounds terrific, too. Interestingly, several years ago I wrote a book set in India that involved the Doctrine of Lapse. (And I’m writing a book with a hero named Greydon now. *g*
    Good luck with the new book!

    Reply
  193. Welcome to Wenchdom, Mia! When Nicola suggested inviting you, I checked out your website and promptly downloaded one of your books. This one sounds terrific, too. Interestingly, several years ago I wrote a book set in India that involved the Doctrine of Lapse. (And I’m writing a book with a hero named Greydon now. *g*
    Good luck with the new book!

    Reply
  194. Welcome to Wenchdom, Mia! When Nicola suggested inviting you, I checked out your website and promptly downloaded one of your books. This one sounds terrific, too. Interestingly, several years ago I wrote a book set in India that involved the Doctrine of Lapse. (And I’m writing a book with a hero named Greydon now. *g*
    Good luck with the new book!

    Reply
  195. Welcome to Wenchdom, Mia! When Nicola suggested inviting you, I checked out your website and promptly downloaded one of your books. This one sounds terrific, too. Interestingly, several years ago I wrote a book set in India that involved the Doctrine of Lapse. (And I’m writing a book with a hero named Greydon now. *g*
    Good luck with the new book!

    Reply
  196. The book sounds fascinating; quite an unusual mix historical romance+paranormal? I have it on my wishlist but it’s a lot more expensive compared to most historical romances 🙁
    I think probably hypocrisy makes my blood boil most.

    Reply
  197. The book sounds fascinating; quite an unusual mix historical romance+paranormal? I have it on my wishlist but it’s a lot more expensive compared to most historical romances 🙁
    I think probably hypocrisy makes my blood boil most.

    Reply
  198. The book sounds fascinating; quite an unusual mix historical romance+paranormal? I have it on my wishlist but it’s a lot more expensive compared to most historical romances 🙁
    I think probably hypocrisy makes my blood boil most.

    Reply
  199. The book sounds fascinating; quite an unusual mix historical romance+paranormal? I have it on my wishlist but it’s a lot more expensive compared to most historical romances 🙁
    I think probably hypocrisy makes my blood boil most.

    Reply
  200. The book sounds fascinating; quite an unusual mix historical romance+paranormal? I have it on my wishlist but it’s a lot more expensive compared to most historical romances 🙁
    I think probably hypocrisy makes my blood boil most.

    Reply
  201. This sounds like a fascinating book. Personally, I like a paranormal that DOESN’T involve vampires or weres… ‘psychic is chic’! I love historicals and this one sounds fabulous.
    Inequity? The Great Money Divide – the chasm between the haves and have-nots.
    Thanks for the opportunity to win this book…looking forward to reading more.

    Reply
  202. This sounds like a fascinating book. Personally, I like a paranormal that DOESN’T involve vampires or weres… ‘psychic is chic’! I love historicals and this one sounds fabulous.
    Inequity? The Great Money Divide – the chasm between the haves and have-nots.
    Thanks for the opportunity to win this book…looking forward to reading more.

    Reply
  203. This sounds like a fascinating book. Personally, I like a paranormal that DOESN’T involve vampires or weres… ‘psychic is chic’! I love historicals and this one sounds fabulous.
    Inequity? The Great Money Divide – the chasm between the haves and have-nots.
    Thanks for the opportunity to win this book…looking forward to reading more.

    Reply
  204. This sounds like a fascinating book. Personally, I like a paranormal that DOESN’T involve vampires or weres… ‘psychic is chic’! I love historicals and this one sounds fabulous.
    Inequity? The Great Money Divide – the chasm between the haves and have-nots.
    Thanks for the opportunity to win this book…looking forward to reading more.

    Reply
  205. This sounds like a fascinating book. Personally, I like a paranormal that DOESN’T involve vampires or weres… ‘psychic is chic’! I love historicals and this one sounds fabulous.
    Inequity? The Great Money Divide – the chasm between the haves and have-nots.
    Thanks for the opportunity to win this book…looking forward to reading more.

    Reply
  206. Mary Jo–‘Scuse me while I have a gushing fan girl moment! I adore your work. One that has really stayed with me is one of your paranormal/historicals involving the abolition of slavery, A Distant Magic. Brilliant use of time travel. Your lyrical prose has always reminded me of Mary Stewart.
    Just picked up Loving a Lost Lord. I can’t wait to dive into it.

    Reply
  207. Mary Jo–‘Scuse me while I have a gushing fan girl moment! I adore your work. One that has really stayed with me is one of your paranormal/historicals involving the abolition of slavery, A Distant Magic. Brilliant use of time travel. Your lyrical prose has always reminded me of Mary Stewart.
    Just picked up Loving a Lost Lord. I can’t wait to dive into it.

    Reply
  208. Mary Jo–‘Scuse me while I have a gushing fan girl moment! I adore your work. One that has really stayed with me is one of your paranormal/historicals involving the abolition of slavery, A Distant Magic. Brilliant use of time travel. Your lyrical prose has always reminded me of Mary Stewart.
    Just picked up Loving a Lost Lord. I can’t wait to dive into it.

    Reply
  209. Mary Jo–‘Scuse me while I have a gushing fan girl moment! I adore your work. One that has really stayed with me is one of your paranormal/historicals involving the abolition of slavery, A Distant Magic. Brilliant use of time travel. Your lyrical prose has always reminded me of Mary Stewart.
    Just picked up Loving a Lost Lord. I can’t wait to dive into it.

    Reply
  210. Mary Jo–‘Scuse me while I have a gushing fan girl moment! I adore your work. One that has really stayed with me is one of your paranormal/historicals involving the abolition of slavery, A Distant Magic. Brilliant use of time travel. Your lyrical prose has always reminded me of Mary Stewart.
    Just picked up Loving a Lost Lord. I can’t wait to dive into it.

    Reply
  211. Robin–We are, unfortunately, very visual. And it doesn’t just apply to how we view people. I’m horrified by junebugs, but enchanted by a butterfly. Both are flying insects. When a squirrel scampers across my path while I walk Mack the Wonderdog, I smile and hold Mack firmly to heel. If a rat did the same thing I’d turn my terrier loose on him. “Pretty” influences us in many areas. Not right, but sadly, true.

    Reply
  212. Robin–We are, unfortunately, very visual. And it doesn’t just apply to how we view people. I’m horrified by junebugs, but enchanted by a butterfly. Both are flying insects. When a squirrel scampers across my path while I walk Mack the Wonderdog, I smile and hold Mack firmly to heel. If a rat did the same thing I’d turn my terrier loose on him. “Pretty” influences us in many areas. Not right, but sadly, true.

    Reply
  213. Robin–We are, unfortunately, very visual. And it doesn’t just apply to how we view people. I’m horrified by junebugs, but enchanted by a butterfly. Both are flying insects. When a squirrel scampers across my path while I walk Mack the Wonderdog, I smile and hold Mack firmly to heel. If a rat did the same thing I’d turn my terrier loose on him. “Pretty” influences us in many areas. Not right, but sadly, true.

    Reply
  214. Robin–We are, unfortunately, very visual. And it doesn’t just apply to how we view people. I’m horrified by junebugs, but enchanted by a butterfly. Both are flying insects. When a squirrel scampers across my path while I walk Mack the Wonderdog, I smile and hold Mack firmly to heel. If a rat did the same thing I’d turn my terrier loose on him. “Pretty” influences us in many areas. Not right, but sadly, true.

    Reply
  215. Robin–We are, unfortunately, very visual. And it doesn’t just apply to how we view people. I’m horrified by junebugs, but enchanted by a butterfly. Both are flying insects. When a squirrel scampers across my path while I walk Mack the Wonderdog, I smile and hold Mack firmly to heel. If a rat did the same thing I’d turn my terrier loose on him. “Pretty” influences us in many areas. Not right, but sadly, true.

    Reply
  216. Linda–I don’t set the prices on my books. Touch of a Thief is offered in beautiful trade paperback format. This is a much larger book that standard mass market with correspondingly larger print. Think of it as a hardcover without the “hard.”
    The ebook version is less expensive. I hope that helps. 😉

    Reply
  217. Linda–I don’t set the prices on my books. Touch of a Thief is offered in beautiful trade paperback format. This is a much larger book that standard mass market with correspondingly larger print. Think of it as a hardcover without the “hard.”
    The ebook version is less expensive. I hope that helps. 😉

    Reply
  218. Linda–I don’t set the prices on my books. Touch of a Thief is offered in beautiful trade paperback format. This is a much larger book that standard mass market with correspondingly larger print. Think of it as a hardcover without the “hard.”
    The ebook version is less expensive. I hope that helps. 😉

    Reply
  219. Linda–I don’t set the prices on my books. Touch of a Thief is offered in beautiful trade paperback format. This is a much larger book that standard mass market with correspondingly larger print. Think of it as a hardcover without the “hard.”
    The ebook version is less expensive. I hope that helps. 😉

    Reply
  220. Linda–I don’t set the prices on my books. Touch of a Thief is offered in beautiful trade paperback format. This is a much larger book that standard mass market with correspondingly larger print. Think of it as a hardcover without the “hard.”
    The ebook version is less expensive. I hope that helps. 😉

    Reply
  221. Galena–Even thought vampires and werewolves are popular, it’s not productive to “write to the market” because lack of passion always shows.
    But I never say never. There may come a time when a story pops into my head which requires a vamp or were-something. Until then, I’ll leave them to the authors who are passionate about them.

    Reply
  222. Galena–Even thought vampires and werewolves are popular, it’s not productive to “write to the market” because lack of passion always shows.
    But I never say never. There may come a time when a story pops into my head which requires a vamp or were-something. Until then, I’ll leave them to the authors who are passionate about them.

    Reply
  223. Galena–Even thought vampires and werewolves are popular, it’s not productive to “write to the market” because lack of passion always shows.
    But I never say never. There may come a time when a story pops into my head which requires a vamp or were-something. Until then, I’ll leave them to the authors who are passionate about them.

    Reply
  224. Galena–Even thought vampires and werewolves are popular, it’s not productive to “write to the market” because lack of passion always shows.
    But I never say never. There may come a time when a story pops into my head which requires a vamp or were-something. Until then, I’ll leave them to the authors who are passionate about them.

    Reply
  225. Galena–Even thought vampires and werewolves are popular, it’s not productive to “write to the market” because lack of passion always shows.
    But I never say never. There may come a time when a story pops into my head which requires a vamp or were-something. Until then, I’ll leave them to the authors who are passionate about them.

    Reply
  226. Mia, thank you so much for joining us here at the Wenches over the past few days. It has been a real pleasure to host you and we have all enjoyed the discussion. Very best wishes for Touch of a Thief!

    Reply
  227. Mia, thank you so much for joining us here at the Wenches over the past few days. It has been a real pleasure to host you and we have all enjoyed the discussion. Very best wishes for Touch of a Thief!

    Reply
  228. Mia, thank you so much for joining us here at the Wenches over the past few days. It has been a real pleasure to host you and we have all enjoyed the discussion. Very best wishes for Touch of a Thief!

    Reply
  229. Mia, thank you so much for joining us here at the Wenches over the past few days. It has been a real pleasure to host you and we have all enjoyed the discussion. Very best wishes for Touch of a Thief!

    Reply
  230. Mia, thank you so much for joining us here at the Wenches over the past few days. It has been a real pleasure to host you and we have all enjoyed the discussion. Very best wishes for Touch of a Thief!

    Reply
  231. Thanks for letting us get an even better look at Mia and her book. I’ve recently become even more interested in Indian history while reading Lauren Willig’s The Betrayal of the Blood Lily. I’ll be hunting for Touch of a Thief soon.

    Reply
  232. Thanks for letting us get an even better look at Mia and her book. I’ve recently become even more interested in Indian history while reading Lauren Willig’s The Betrayal of the Blood Lily. I’ll be hunting for Touch of a Thief soon.

    Reply
  233. Thanks for letting us get an even better look at Mia and her book. I’ve recently become even more interested in Indian history while reading Lauren Willig’s The Betrayal of the Blood Lily. I’ll be hunting for Touch of a Thief soon.

    Reply
  234. Thanks for letting us get an even better look at Mia and her book. I’ve recently become even more interested in Indian history while reading Lauren Willig’s The Betrayal of the Blood Lily. I’ll be hunting for Touch of a Thief soon.

    Reply
  235. Thanks for letting us get an even better look at Mia and her book. I’ve recently become even more interested in Indian history while reading Lauren Willig’s The Betrayal of the Blood Lily. I’ll be hunting for Touch of a Thief soon.

    Reply

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