An Interview with Katherine Kellgren!

Katy Kellgren Nicola here! I am thrilled to have as my Word Wench guest today Katherine Kellgren! Katherine has recorded over 125 audiobooks, including winners of the Audie Award, the American Library Association’s Odyssey Honor, the Earphones Award, the Publishers Weekly Listen Up Award, and ForeWord Magazine’s Audiobook of the Year. She was named one of AudioFile Magazine’s Best Voices of the Year for 2008, 2009, & 2010 and last year she was added to AudioFile's list of Golden Voices. Amongst her titles are Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and now my very own audiobook, Notorious!

Katherine and I first got chatting when she contacted me to discuss some aspects of the characterisation in Notorious in the advance of the recording. The process of narrating and recording a book intrigued me and so I thought it would be interesting to invite Katherine to talk about her work.

Katherine, welcome to the Word Wenches! How did you come to work as a professional narrator? What is it about the job that appeals to you?

As a child and teenager, I spent hours in my room listening to audiobooks and spoken word recordings. My particular heroes were John Gielgud, Ralph Richardson and Edith Evans, and I spent countless hours listening to recordings of them performing in the plays of Shakespeare, Wilde, Sheridan & etc. and reading poetry. I had wanted to be an actress since a very young age, but part of what drew me into me into that desire was listening. After I graduated drama school (I did a three-year training at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art), my father (who was in New York) began to suffer from the effects of Parkinson's disease, one of which was that he could not focus to read properly. He had always been a great reader, so I went to the library and took out a book by his favorite out-of-print detective author, bought myself a hand-held recorder, and made him an audiobook of the title. When I moved back to the States I spent a lot of time reading to him, and somewhere along the line I began to realize that since listening to recordings and being read to had always been such an important part of my life, I should try to pursue audio narration.

What was the first book that you narrated?

The first audiobook I narrated professionally was WICKED WIDOW by Amanda Quick, which I recorded Wicked Widow for Random House Audio.

What qualities do you think you need to be a good narrator?

The patience and ability to work hard and really apply yourself to each title you record in terms of preparation and research. Concentration and stamina when you are in the studio are also very important, for when you spend all day recording you can't let your attention or focus waver for a second or it will show in the finished product. Also the traits that every actor needs to have – the intelligence to best interpret the will of the author, ability to embody characterizations & etc. Added to this, the ability (once you are armed with all the preparation possible) to let yourself go when you are recording and ride the arc of the story. You don't get to rehearse like you do in the theatre, and it can be a bit of a roller-coaster ride recording a book.

Take us through the preparation that you do for each book. How do you develop the characterisation, emotional interpretation and voices/dialects?

I first read the book through at home, making note in the margins as I go of any descriptions of tone the author has provided (i.e. "he said sullenly" "she said, shocked"), as well as any specific physical descriptions of characters provided. I make note of all the accents and dialects needed (and see a dialect coach if I need to brush up on or study them), and look up words which I'm not sure how to pronounce. Then I go back through and mark each character's dialogue in a different color of highlighter pen. This takes time, but really helps me attack each voice with more confidence when I'm in the studio.

I read that you also did some singing in some of the books, which sounds great! Are you a singer as well as a professional narrator?

 My first job when I left drama school was in a musical, but since I'm now entirely focused on audiobooks the only chance I get to sing is when a song pops up in the text. I always find it quite fun when that happens!

How does an audiobook get made? What happens in the recording studio?

Well, the process is different for different books, but for example, when I recorded your lovely title Notorious_350 NOTORIOUS it took me just under four days recording from 10AM to 4PM. I worked in the studio with a wonderful director/engineer called Nikki Banks who provided guidance, and kept me on the straight and narrow when I fluffed or accidentally said the wrong word (a big sin!) and also took care of the rough audio editing as we went. 

A newspaper recently said that: “The right voice can send an audiobook up the charts.” Do you think this is true?

I absolutely agree. I am a big listener to audiobooks, and I often buy them because I love the work of a particular narrator.

How many books do you record a year?

 It varies by year, but somewhere between 25 – 30.

Do you have to take special care of your voice?

I drink an awful lot of tea in the studio, and if I start to get a touch husky, I find hot water with honey remarkable soothing.

What sort of books do you enjoy reading – or listening to?

 P_-g_-wodehouse-thank-you-jeeves-cd-unabridged-audio-book-1477-p I used to be a big fan of 18th century English literature (and still am), but find that because I read a lot for work I do a lot less pleasure reading. When I do snatch the chance to read for pleasure nowadays it's often something like P.G. Wodehouse that does not require tremendously deep thought or analysis – not that I'm dissing P.G. Wodehouse – I worship him! As far as audiobooks go, I'm always listening to something. I often revisit the old spoken word recordings I loved when I was growing up, and I listen to a lot of new titles too. I'm a big fan of the work of Jim Dale, who is an unbelievably gifted narrator of children's audio. 

Katherine thank you so much for joining us here today and giving us such a fascinating insight into the world of audiobooks! I can’t wait to hear your reading of Notorious!

Now it’s over to you for any comments or questions for Katherine! To kick off the discussion I wonder how many audiobook listeners we have here? If you enjoy audiobooks, what is it that you like about them? Do you have any favourites? And what makes a good listening experience for you? I'm offering a gift voucher for the audiobook of your choice from Audible to one commenter between now and Sunday!

140 thoughts on “An Interview with Katherine Kellgren!”

  1. I listen to audiobooks. Not a lot, but I own several and I have definite favourites. I have a much-listened to tape with a reading of Pride and Prejudice by Susannah York which I love, even if it’s abridged, just because of her voice. The unabridged Lord of the Rings is one I actually enjoyed more in the audio version than on paper. The reader, Rob Inglis, has a wonderful voice, just the kind one would imagine coming from an old storyteller telling tales by the fire, which is exactly what suits that particular story. I think it is important for a narrator to have not only a good voice but a good storytelling style, and it’s important for me that they are able to create voices for the characters that are distinct and instantly recognisable and fit the character. I once returned an audiobook to the library after listening to only half a CD of it because the male reader couldn’t do convincing women – he made the heroine sound shrill, which was an instant turn-off.
    I have a question: Katherine, you mention that you listen to audiobooks yourself. Who are your favourite narrators and favourite readings?

    Reply
  2. I listen to audiobooks. Not a lot, but I own several and I have definite favourites. I have a much-listened to tape with a reading of Pride and Prejudice by Susannah York which I love, even if it’s abridged, just because of her voice. The unabridged Lord of the Rings is one I actually enjoyed more in the audio version than on paper. The reader, Rob Inglis, has a wonderful voice, just the kind one would imagine coming from an old storyteller telling tales by the fire, which is exactly what suits that particular story. I think it is important for a narrator to have not only a good voice but a good storytelling style, and it’s important for me that they are able to create voices for the characters that are distinct and instantly recognisable and fit the character. I once returned an audiobook to the library after listening to only half a CD of it because the male reader couldn’t do convincing women – he made the heroine sound shrill, which was an instant turn-off.
    I have a question: Katherine, you mention that you listen to audiobooks yourself. Who are your favourite narrators and favourite readings?

    Reply
  3. I listen to audiobooks. Not a lot, but I own several and I have definite favourites. I have a much-listened to tape with a reading of Pride and Prejudice by Susannah York which I love, even if it’s abridged, just because of her voice. The unabridged Lord of the Rings is one I actually enjoyed more in the audio version than on paper. The reader, Rob Inglis, has a wonderful voice, just the kind one would imagine coming from an old storyteller telling tales by the fire, which is exactly what suits that particular story. I think it is important for a narrator to have not only a good voice but a good storytelling style, and it’s important for me that they are able to create voices for the characters that are distinct and instantly recognisable and fit the character. I once returned an audiobook to the library after listening to only half a CD of it because the male reader couldn’t do convincing women – he made the heroine sound shrill, which was an instant turn-off.
    I have a question: Katherine, you mention that you listen to audiobooks yourself. Who are your favourite narrators and favourite readings?

    Reply
  4. I listen to audiobooks. Not a lot, but I own several and I have definite favourites. I have a much-listened to tape with a reading of Pride and Prejudice by Susannah York which I love, even if it’s abridged, just because of her voice. The unabridged Lord of the Rings is one I actually enjoyed more in the audio version than on paper. The reader, Rob Inglis, has a wonderful voice, just the kind one would imagine coming from an old storyteller telling tales by the fire, which is exactly what suits that particular story. I think it is important for a narrator to have not only a good voice but a good storytelling style, and it’s important for me that they are able to create voices for the characters that are distinct and instantly recognisable and fit the character. I once returned an audiobook to the library after listening to only half a CD of it because the male reader couldn’t do convincing women – he made the heroine sound shrill, which was an instant turn-off.
    I have a question: Katherine, you mention that you listen to audiobooks yourself. Who are your favourite narrators and favourite readings?

    Reply
  5. I listen to audiobooks. Not a lot, but I own several and I have definite favourites. I have a much-listened to tape with a reading of Pride and Prejudice by Susannah York which I love, even if it’s abridged, just because of her voice. The unabridged Lord of the Rings is one I actually enjoyed more in the audio version than on paper. The reader, Rob Inglis, has a wonderful voice, just the kind one would imagine coming from an old storyteller telling tales by the fire, which is exactly what suits that particular story. I think it is important for a narrator to have not only a good voice but a good storytelling style, and it’s important for me that they are able to create voices for the characters that are distinct and instantly recognisable and fit the character. I once returned an audiobook to the library after listening to only half a CD of it because the male reader couldn’t do convincing women – he made the heroine sound shrill, which was an instant turn-off.
    I have a question: Katherine, you mention that you listen to audiobooks yourself. Who are your favourite narrators and favourite readings?

    Reply
  6. I always have an audiobook going in the car. (fortunately for me, my local library has a decent collection) I recently listened to a book that is not at all the type of book that I enjoy primarily because the narrator was appealing. I found that I enjoyed Lauren Willig’s Pink Carnation books much more in audio. Judy Kaye is, to me, the voice of Kinsey Milhone in Sue Grafton’s long running series. I loved Barbara Rosenblatt’s reading of Elizabeth Peters Amelia Peabody books–and found that I couldn’t stand listening to books in the series narrated by someone else. Similarly, C.J. Critt is the voice of the Stephanie Plum books.

    Reply
  7. I always have an audiobook going in the car. (fortunately for me, my local library has a decent collection) I recently listened to a book that is not at all the type of book that I enjoy primarily because the narrator was appealing. I found that I enjoyed Lauren Willig’s Pink Carnation books much more in audio. Judy Kaye is, to me, the voice of Kinsey Milhone in Sue Grafton’s long running series. I loved Barbara Rosenblatt’s reading of Elizabeth Peters Amelia Peabody books–and found that I couldn’t stand listening to books in the series narrated by someone else. Similarly, C.J. Critt is the voice of the Stephanie Plum books.

    Reply
  8. I always have an audiobook going in the car. (fortunately for me, my local library has a decent collection) I recently listened to a book that is not at all the type of book that I enjoy primarily because the narrator was appealing. I found that I enjoyed Lauren Willig’s Pink Carnation books much more in audio. Judy Kaye is, to me, the voice of Kinsey Milhone in Sue Grafton’s long running series. I loved Barbara Rosenblatt’s reading of Elizabeth Peters Amelia Peabody books–and found that I couldn’t stand listening to books in the series narrated by someone else. Similarly, C.J. Critt is the voice of the Stephanie Plum books.

    Reply
  9. I always have an audiobook going in the car. (fortunately for me, my local library has a decent collection) I recently listened to a book that is not at all the type of book that I enjoy primarily because the narrator was appealing. I found that I enjoyed Lauren Willig’s Pink Carnation books much more in audio. Judy Kaye is, to me, the voice of Kinsey Milhone in Sue Grafton’s long running series. I loved Barbara Rosenblatt’s reading of Elizabeth Peters Amelia Peabody books–and found that I couldn’t stand listening to books in the series narrated by someone else. Similarly, C.J. Critt is the voice of the Stephanie Plum books.

    Reply
  10. I always have an audiobook going in the car. (fortunately for me, my local library has a decent collection) I recently listened to a book that is not at all the type of book that I enjoy primarily because the narrator was appealing. I found that I enjoyed Lauren Willig’s Pink Carnation books much more in audio. Judy Kaye is, to me, the voice of Kinsey Milhone in Sue Grafton’s long running series. I loved Barbara Rosenblatt’s reading of Elizabeth Peters Amelia Peabody books–and found that I couldn’t stand listening to books in the series narrated by someone else. Similarly, C.J. Critt is the voice of the Stephanie Plum books.

    Reply
  11. I started listening to audiobooks when I had to drive long distances for work. They are also invaluable for train journeys (both to drown out other passengers and to positively pass the time). They are fantastic for people in hospital – sound of choice (avoid the constant TV noise), mind engaged, enjoying “reading” without the physical problems of handing a book.
    For me, the narrator is all important. As an English listener, I cannot listen to an American reading an English book. (This excludes me from virtually all the Librivox output!) However, if the author is American then I prefer an American narrator.
    What I will not tolerate in any circumstances is an abbreviated book. This does make audiobooks expensive for me to buy, and my library has a very limited catalogue.

    Reply
  12. I started listening to audiobooks when I had to drive long distances for work. They are also invaluable for train journeys (both to drown out other passengers and to positively pass the time). They are fantastic for people in hospital – sound of choice (avoid the constant TV noise), mind engaged, enjoying “reading” without the physical problems of handing a book.
    For me, the narrator is all important. As an English listener, I cannot listen to an American reading an English book. (This excludes me from virtually all the Librivox output!) However, if the author is American then I prefer an American narrator.
    What I will not tolerate in any circumstances is an abbreviated book. This does make audiobooks expensive for me to buy, and my library has a very limited catalogue.

    Reply
  13. I started listening to audiobooks when I had to drive long distances for work. They are also invaluable for train journeys (both to drown out other passengers and to positively pass the time). They are fantastic for people in hospital – sound of choice (avoid the constant TV noise), mind engaged, enjoying “reading” without the physical problems of handing a book.
    For me, the narrator is all important. As an English listener, I cannot listen to an American reading an English book. (This excludes me from virtually all the Librivox output!) However, if the author is American then I prefer an American narrator.
    What I will not tolerate in any circumstances is an abbreviated book. This does make audiobooks expensive for me to buy, and my library has a very limited catalogue.

    Reply
  14. I started listening to audiobooks when I had to drive long distances for work. They are also invaluable for train journeys (both to drown out other passengers and to positively pass the time). They are fantastic for people in hospital – sound of choice (avoid the constant TV noise), mind engaged, enjoying “reading” without the physical problems of handing a book.
    For me, the narrator is all important. As an English listener, I cannot listen to an American reading an English book. (This excludes me from virtually all the Librivox output!) However, if the author is American then I prefer an American narrator.
    What I will not tolerate in any circumstances is an abbreviated book. This does make audiobooks expensive for me to buy, and my library has a very limited catalogue.

    Reply
  15. I started listening to audiobooks when I had to drive long distances for work. They are also invaluable for train journeys (both to drown out other passengers and to positively pass the time). They are fantastic for people in hospital – sound of choice (avoid the constant TV noise), mind engaged, enjoying “reading” without the physical problems of handing a book.
    For me, the narrator is all important. As an English listener, I cannot listen to an American reading an English book. (This excludes me from virtually all the Librivox output!) However, if the author is American then I prefer an American narrator.
    What I will not tolerate in any circumstances is an abbreviated book. This does make audiobooks expensive for me to buy, and my library has a very limited catalogue.

    Reply
  16. Hi Katherine! I had the pleasure of rooming with you when we studied at The British American Drama Academy lo those many years ago. Like you, I grew up listening to spoken word recordings, particularly of Shakespeare. I found it helped to listen to the play, rather than just reading it. One of my favorites was the recording of Richard Burton’s Hamlet. When I was acting, I often listened to recordings of the play I was performing. However, when it comes to reading a book, I’m afraid that I prefer to read it rather listen. I find it hard to focus, plus I love the feel of a book in my hand. However, I may have to give it another try now that I have an I-Pod.

    Reply
  17. Hi Katherine! I had the pleasure of rooming with you when we studied at The British American Drama Academy lo those many years ago. Like you, I grew up listening to spoken word recordings, particularly of Shakespeare. I found it helped to listen to the play, rather than just reading it. One of my favorites was the recording of Richard Burton’s Hamlet. When I was acting, I often listened to recordings of the play I was performing. However, when it comes to reading a book, I’m afraid that I prefer to read it rather listen. I find it hard to focus, plus I love the feel of a book in my hand. However, I may have to give it another try now that I have an I-Pod.

    Reply
  18. Hi Katherine! I had the pleasure of rooming with you when we studied at The British American Drama Academy lo those many years ago. Like you, I grew up listening to spoken word recordings, particularly of Shakespeare. I found it helped to listen to the play, rather than just reading it. One of my favorites was the recording of Richard Burton’s Hamlet. When I was acting, I often listened to recordings of the play I was performing. However, when it comes to reading a book, I’m afraid that I prefer to read it rather listen. I find it hard to focus, plus I love the feel of a book in my hand. However, I may have to give it another try now that I have an I-Pod.

    Reply
  19. Hi Katherine! I had the pleasure of rooming with you when we studied at The British American Drama Academy lo those many years ago. Like you, I grew up listening to spoken word recordings, particularly of Shakespeare. I found it helped to listen to the play, rather than just reading it. One of my favorites was the recording of Richard Burton’s Hamlet. When I was acting, I often listened to recordings of the play I was performing. However, when it comes to reading a book, I’m afraid that I prefer to read it rather listen. I find it hard to focus, plus I love the feel of a book in my hand. However, I may have to give it another try now that I have an I-Pod.

    Reply
  20. Hi Katherine! I had the pleasure of rooming with you when we studied at The British American Drama Academy lo those many years ago. Like you, I grew up listening to spoken word recordings, particularly of Shakespeare. I found it helped to listen to the play, rather than just reading it. One of my favorites was the recording of Richard Burton’s Hamlet. When I was acting, I often listened to recordings of the play I was performing. However, when it comes to reading a book, I’m afraid that I prefer to read it rather listen. I find it hard to focus, plus I love the feel of a book in my hand. However, I may have to give it another try now that I have an I-Pod.

    Reply
  21. I do love audiobooks. 🙂 For one, there’s no commercials and they’re good for long trips. Secondly, I love Harry Potter and when I couldn’t read it, I wanted to listen to it–so I discovered nuances while listening that I hadn’t gotten from the book. The reader does really bring immeasurable stuff to the book!
    I remember once I was listening to Lisa Kleypas’ Sugar Daddy book in the car and I didn’t want to go in the house. I had it on CD in the car and I just sat in the car port for a while because I had to listen to the end of the scene. RIVETING.

    Reply
  22. I do love audiobooks. 🙂 For one, there’s no commercials and they’re good for long trips. Secondly, I love Harry Potter and when I couldn’t read it, I wanted to listen to it–so I discovered nuances while listening that I hadn’t gotten from the book. The reader does really bring immeasurable stuff to the book!
    I remember once I was listening to Lisa Kleypas’ Sugar Daddy book in the car and I didn’t want to go in the house. I had it on CD in the car and I just sat in the car port for a while because I had to listen to the end of the scene. RIVETING.

    Reply
  23. I do love audiobooks. 🙂 For one, there’s no commercials and they’re good for long trips. Secondly, I love Harry Potter and when I couldn’t read it, I wanted to listen to it–so I discovered nuances while listening that I hadn’t gotten from the book. The reader does really bring immeasurable stuff to the book!
    I remember once I was listening to Lisa Kleypas’ Sugar Daddy book in the car and I didn’t want to go in the house. I had it on CD in the car and I just sat in the car port for a while because I had to listen to the end of the scene. RIVETING.

    Reply
  24. I do love audiobooks. 🙂 For one, there’s no commercials and they’re good for long trips. Secondly, I love Harry Potter and when I couldn’t read it, I wanted to listen to it–so I discovered nuances while listening that I hadn’t gotten from the book. The reader does really bring immeasurable stuff to the book!
    I remember once I was listening to Lisa Kleypas’ Sugar Daddy book in the car and I didn’t want to go in the house. I had it on CD in the car and I just sat in the car port for a while because I had to listen to the end of the scene. RIVETING.

    Reply
  25. I do love audiobooks. 🙂 For one, there’s no commercials and they’re good for long trips. Secondly, I love Harry Potter and when I couldn’t read it, I wanted to listen to it–so I discovered nuances while listening that I hadn’t gotten from the book. The reader does really bring immeasurable stuff to the book!
    I remember once I was listening to Lisa Kleypas’ Sugar Daddy book in the car and I didn’t want to go in the house. I had it on CD in the car and I just sat in the car port for a while because I had to listen to the end of the scene. RIVETING.

    Reply
  26. Welcome to Word Wenches, Katherine. It’s a pleasure to have you with us today!
    Hellion, that’s a good point about there being no interruptions for commercials. There’s a lot to be said for that! Plus they can be so engrossing on a long trip. I agree with everyone who says that a good narrator is so important. I loved Dominic West’s reading of Pride and Prejudice and when I heard that Richard Armitage was recording a Georgette Heyer book I flattened everyone in my rush to buy.

    Reply
  27. Welcome to Word Wenches, Katherine. It’s a pleasure to have you with us today!
    Hellion, that’s a good point about there being no interruptions for commercials. There’s a lot to be said for that! Plus they can be so engrossing on a long trip. I agree with everyone who says that a good narrator is so important. I loved Dominic West’s reading of Pride and Prejudice and when I heard that Richard Armitage was recording a Georgette Heyer book I flattened everyone in my rush to buy.

    Reply
  28. Welcome to Word Wenches, Katherine. It’s a pleasure to have you with us today!
    Hellion, that’s a good point about there being no interruptions for commercials. There’s a lot to be said for that! Plus they can be so engrossing on a long trip. I agree with everyone who says that a good narrator is so important. I loved Dominic West’s reading of Pride and Prejudice and when I heard that Richard Armitage was recording a Georgette Heyer book I flattened everyone in my rush to buy.

    Reply
  29. Welcome to Word Wenches, Katherine. It’s a pleasure to have you with us today!
    Hellion, that’s a good point about there being no interruptions for commercials. There’s a lot to be said for that! Plus they can be so engrossing on a long trip. I agree with everyone who says that a good narrator is so important. I loved Dominic West’s reading of Pride and Prejudice and when I heard that Richard Armitage was recording a Georgette Heyer book I flattened everyone in my rush to buy.

    Reply
  30. Welcome to Word Wenches, Katherine. It’s a pleasure to have you with us today!
    Hellion, that’s a good point about there being no interruptions for commercials. There’s a lot to be said for that! Plus they can be so engrossing on a long trip. I agree with everyone who says that a good narrator is so important. I loved Dominic West’s reading of Pride and Prejudice and when I heard that Richard Armitage was recording a Georgette Heyer book I flattened everyone in my rush to buy.

    Reply
  31. What a lovely and fascinating interview! Thank you, Nicola and Katherine! I love discovering how audio books are done and the tremendous research you do to make them perfect, Katherine.
    I have to agree if the book’s author and especially if the characters are British I want a British narrator.
    I didn’t really listen to many audio books until the last few years, but I really do enjoy them when I am driving back and forth to work. Unfortunately the journey to and from is not a great distance and I can often be found sitting in my car listening to the end of a chapter before I turn it off and go inside!
    And like you, Nicola, the moment I discovered Richard Armitage had started recording the works of Heyer I set a speed record for ordering his recording of Sylvester. He reads me to sleep many a night!

    Reply
  32. What a lovely and fascinating interview! Thank you, Nicola and Katherine! I love discovering how audio books are done and the tremendous research you do to make them perfect, Katherine.
    I have to agree if the book’s author and especially if the characters are British I want a British narrator.
    I didn’t really listen to many audio books until the last few years, but I really do enjoy them when I am driving back and forth to work. Unfortunately the journey to and from is not a great distance and I can often be found sitting in my car listening to the end of a chapter before I turn it off and go inside!
    And like you, Nicola, the moment I discovered Richard Armitage had started recording the works of Heyer I set a speed record for ordering his recording of Sylvester. He reads me to sleep many a night!

    Reply
  33. What a lovely and fascinating interview! Thank you, Nicola and Katherine! I love discovering how audio books are done and the tremendous research you do to make them perfect, Katherine.
    I have to agree if the book’s author and especially if the characters are British I want a British narrator.
    I didn’t really listen to many audio books until the last few years, but I really do enjoy them when I am driving back and forth to work. Unfortunately the journey to and from is not a great distance and I can often be found sitting in my car listening to the end of a chapter before I turn it off and go inside!
    And like you, Nicola, the moment I discovered Richard Armitage had started recording the works of Heyer I set a speed record for ordering his recording of Sylvester. He reads me to sleep many a night!

    Reply
  34. What a lovely and fascinating interview! Thank you, Nicola and Katherine! I love discovering how audio books are done and the tremendous research you do to make them perfect, Katherine.
    I have to agree if the book’s author and especially if the characters are British I want a British narrator.
    I didn’t really listen to many audio books until the last few years, but I really do enjoy them when I am driving back and forth to work. Unfortunately the journey to and from is not a great distance and I can often be found sitting in my car listening to the end of a chapter before I turn it off and go inside!
    And like you, Nicola, the moment I discovered Richard Armitage had started recording the works of Heyer I set a speed record for ordering his recording of Sylvester. He reads me to sleep many a night!

    Reply
  35. What a lovely and fascinating interview! Thank you, Nicola and Katherine! I love discovering how audio books are done and the tremendous research you do to make them perfect, Katherine.
    I have to agree if the book’s author and especially if the characters are British I want a British narrator.
    I didn’t really listen to many audio books until the last few years, but I really do enjoy them when I am driving back and forth to work. Unfortunately the journey to and from is not a great distance and I can often be found sitting in my car listening to the end of a chapter before I turn it off and go inside!
    And like you, Nicola, the moment I discovered Richard Armitage had started recording the works of Heyer I set a speed record for ordering his recording of Sylvester. He reads me to sleep many a night!

    Reply
  36. Thank you for visiting the Wenches, Katherine. That’s all very interesting. I agree that a good reader is essential, and that includes one able to interpret correctly. I remember listening to one book where a character was clearly supposed to be a serious-minded teenager, and the reader turned her into a ditz. It made it funny, actually, but I couldn’t take much of it.
    I really admire the work you do,
    Jo

    Reply
  37. Thank you for visiting the Wenches, Katherine. That’s all very interesting. I agree that a good reader is essential, and that includes one able to interpret correctly. I remember listening to one book where a character was clearly supposed to be a serious-minded teenager, and the reader turned her into a ditz. It made it funny, actually, but I couldn’t take much of it.
    I really admire the work you do,
    Jo

    Reply
  38. Thank you for visiting the Wenches, Katherine. That’s all very interesting. I agree that a good reader is essential, and that includes one able to interpret correctly. I remember listening to one book where a character was clearly supposed to be a serious-minded teenager, and the reader turned her into a ditz. It made it funny, actually, but I couldn’t take much of it.
    I really admire the work you do,
    Jo

    Reply
  39. Thank you for visiting the Wenches, Katherine. That’s all very interesting. I agree that a good reader is essential, and that includes one able to interpret correctly. I remember listening to one book where a character was clearly supposed to be a serious-minded teenager, and the reader turned her into a ditz. It made it funny, actually, but I couldn’t take much of it.
    I really admire the work you do,
    Jo

    Reply
  40. Thank you for visiting the Wenches, Katherine. That’s all very interesting. I agree that a good reader is essential, and that includes one able to interpret correctly. I remember listening to one book where a character was clearly supposed to be a serious-minded teenager, and the reader turned her into a ditz. It made it funny, actually, but I couldn’t take much of it.
    I really admire the work you do,
    Jo

    Reply
  41. I became familiar with audiobooks when I began finding them for my mother who has macular degeneration. From there I began to listen while I am quilting, an activity that is soothing but a bit monotonous. Audiobooks give me a different take on a book I have already read or am thinking about reading. What I have learned since is that the skill of the narrator can make or break a story, and I deeply appreciate the talent it takes to use only a voice to convey a range of emotions.

    Reply
  42. I became familiar with audiobooks when I began finding them for my mother who has macular degeneration. From there I began to listen while I am quilting, an activity that is soothing but a bit monotonous. Audiobooks give me a different take on a book I have already read or am thinking about reading. What I have learned since is that the skill of the narrator can make or break a story, and I deeply appreciate the talent it takes to use only a voice to convey a range of emotions.

    Reply
  43. I became familiar with audiobooks when I began finding them for my mother who has macular degeneration. From there I began to listen while I am quilting, an activity that is soothing but a bit monotonous. Audiobooks give me a different take on a book I have already read or am thinking about reading. What I have learned since is that the skill of the narrator can make or break a story, and I deeply appreciate the talent it takes to use only a voice to convey a range of emotions.

    Reply
  44. I became familiar with audiobooks when I began finding them for my mother who has macular degeneration. From there I began to listen while I am quilting, an activity that is soothing but a bit monotonous. Audiobooks give me a different take on a book I have already read or am thinking about reading. What I have learned since is that the skill of the narrator can make or break a story, and I deeply appreciate the talent it takes to use only a voice to convey a range of emotions.

    Reply
  45. I became familiar with audiobooks when I began finding them for my mother who has macular degeneration. From there I began to listen while I am quilting, an activity that is soothing but a bit monotonous. Audiobooks give me a different take on a book I have already read or am thinking about reading. What I have learned since is that the skill of the narrator can make or break a story, and I deeply appreciate the talent it takes to use only a voice to convey a range of emotions.

    Reply
  46. Katherine, thanks so much for visiting the Word Wenches! You have a great “origin story”–clearly you were born to be an audiobook reader. Since I work at home, I don’t spend enough time in the car to be able to take on major listening projects, though I do listen to the audio versions of my own books. THe narrators have all been good, but I notice my writing errors. *G*
    I shall have to look for your work now!

    Reply
  47. Katherine, thanks so much for visiting the Word Wenches! You have a great “origin story”–clearly you were born to be an audiobook reader. Since I work at home, I don’t spend enough time in the car to be able to take on major listening projects, though I do listen to the audio versions of my own books. THe narrators have all been good, but I notice my writing errors. *G*
    I shall have to look for your work now!

    Reply
  48. Katherine, thanks so much for visiting the Word Wenches! You have a great “origin story”–clearly you were born to be an audiobook reader. Since I work at home, I don’t spend enough time in the car to be able to take on major listening projects, though I do listen to the audio versions of my own books. THe narrators have all been good, but I notice my writing errors. *G*
    I shall have to look for your work now!

    Reply
  49. Katherine, thanks so much for visiting the Word Wenches! You have a great “origin story”–clearly you were born to be an audiobook reader. Since I work at home, I don’t spend enough time in the car to be able to take on major listening projects, though I do listen to the audio versions of my own books. THe narrators have all been good, but I notice my writing errors. *G*
    I shall have to look for your work now!

    Reply
  50. Katherine, thanks so much for visiting the Word Wenches! You have a great “origin story”–clearly you were born to be an audiobook reader. Since I work at home, I don’t spend enough time in the car to be able to take on major listening projects, though I do listen to the audio versions of my own books. THe narrators have all been good, but I notice my writing errors. *G*
    I shall have to look for your work now!

    Reply
  51. From Sherrie:
    Be afraid. Be very afraid. This is going to be a loonnggg post from an AVID (rabid, even!) fan of audiobooks!
    Nicola, how I laughed at your comment about flattening people to get an Armitage audiobook! I soooo understand what you mean, and totally “get” Louisa Cornell’s quip about setting speed records. I am a huge audiobook fan! I have something like 200+ unabridged audiobooks (absolutely will NOT buy abridged!), and if they weren’t so expensive, I would have trice that number.
    Some of my favorite narrators have been recipients of the audiobook industry’s highest awards: Jim Dale, the delightfully entertaining narrator of the Harry Potter series; Jenny Sterlin, whose narration of Laurie R. King’s Sherlock Holmes/Mary Russell series makes the characters come alive; the late Patrick Tull, whose gritty narration of Patrick O’Brian’s Aubrey/Maturin series is a sheer delight—you can almost hear the crash of waves and smell the salt spray in his voice; Davina Porter, whose mastery of English and Scottish accents in Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series is nothing short of astounding—her voice is so mellifluous I could listen to it all day (and have!); Phyllida Nash, whose hilarious narration of Heyer’s The Talisman Ring makes me laugh out loud, even though I’ve listened to that audiobook 2-3 times a year for over a decade.
    Katherine, I was flabbergasted at all the research and prep you do before narrating a book. I think narrating a book must be as hard (or harder!) than acting. With acting, you can use facial expressions and body language to portray a character. But in narration, all you have is the voice.
    I listen to audiobooks almost every day while doing housework, washing dishes or doing laundry, gardening or mucking out horse stalls, etc. They are my constant companions. And I’m a little embarrassed to admit that I sometimes listen to audiobooks to ward off the occasional bout of loneliness. It’s like having a family member in the house. *g*
    I can’t wait to hear Katherine’s narration of Notorious, Nicola! That will be a nice addition to my audiobook library.

    Reply
  52. From Sherrie:
    Be afraid. Be very afraid. This is going to be a loonnggg post from an AVID (rabid, even!) fan of audiobooks!
    Nicola, how I laughed at your comment about flattening people to get an Armitage audiobook! I soooo understand what you mean, and totally “get” Louisa Cornell’s quip about setting speed records. I am a huge audiobook fan! I have something like 200+ unabridged audiobooks (absolutely will NOT buy abridged!), and if they weren’t so expensive, I would have trice that number.
    Some of my favorite narrators have been recipients of the audiobook industry’s highest awards: Jim Dale, the delightfully entertaining narrator of the Harry Potter series; Jenny Sterlin, whose narration of Laurie R. King’s Sherlock Holmes/Mary Russell series makes the characters come alive; the late Patrick Tull, whose gritty narration of Patrick O’Brian’s Aubrey/Maturin series is a sheer delight—you can almost hear the crash of waves and smell the salt spray in his voice; Davina Porter, whose mastery of English and Scottish accents in Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series is nothing short of astounding—her voice is so mellifluous I could listen to it all day (and have!); Phyllida Nash, whose hilarious narration of Heyer’s The Talisman Ring makes me laugh out loud, even though I’ve listened to that audiobook 2-3 times a year for over a decade.
    Katherine, I was flabbergasted at all the research and prep you do before narrating a book. I think narrating a book must be as hard (or harder!) than acting. With acting, you can use facial expressions and body language to portray a character. But in narration, all you have is the voice.
    I listen to audiobooks almost every day while doing housework, washing dishes or doing laundry, gardening or mucking out horse stalls, etc. They are my constant companions. And I’m a little embarrassed to admit that I sometimes listen to audiobooks to ward off the occasional bout of loneliness. It’s like having a family member in the house. *g*
    I can’t wait to hear Katherine’s narration of Notorious, Nicola! That will be a nice addition to my audiobook library.

    Reply
  53. From Sherrie:
    Be afraid. Be very afraid. This is going to be a loonnggg post from an AVID (rabid, even!) fan of audiobooks!
    Nicola, how I laughed at your comment about flattening people to get an Armitage audiobook! I soooo understand what you mean, and totally “get” Louisa Cornell’s quip about setting speed records. I am a huge audiobook fan! I have something like 200+ unabridged audiobooks (absolutely will NOT buy abridged!), and if they weren’t so expensive, I would have trice that number.
    Some of my favorite narrators have been recipients of the audiobook industry’s highest awards: Jim Dale, the delightfully entertaining narrator of the Harry Potter series; Jenny Sterlin, whose narration of Laurie R. King’s Sherlock Holmes/Mary Russell series makes the characters come alive; the late Patrick Tull, whose gritty narration of Patrick O’Brian’s Aubrey/Maturin series is a sheer delight—you can almost hear the crash of waves and smell the salt spray in his voice; Davina Porter, whose mastery of English and Scottish accents in Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series is nothing short of astounding—her voice is so mellifluous I could listen to it all day (and have!); Phyllida Nash, whose hilarious narration of Heyer’s The Talisman Ring makes me laugh out loud, even though I’ve listened to that audiobook 2-3 times a year for over a decade.
    Katherine, I was flabbergasted at all the research and prep you do before narrating a book. I think narrating a book must be as hard (or harder!) than acting. With acting, you can use facial expressions and body language to portray a character. But in narration, all you have is the voice.
    I listen to audiobooks almost every day while doing housework, washing dishes or doing laundry, gardening or mucking out horse stalls, etc. They are my constant companions. And I’m a little embarrassed to admit that I sometimes listen to audiobooks to ward off the occasional bout of loneliness. It’s like having a family member in the house. *g*
    I can’t wait to hear Katherine’s narration of Notorious, Nicola! That will be a nice addition to my audiobook library.

    Reply
  54. From Sherrie:
    Be afraid. Be very afraid. This is going to be a loonnggg post from an AVID (rabid, even!) fan of audiobooks!
    Nicola, how I laughed at your comment about flattening people to get an Armitage audiobook! I soooo understand what you mean, and totally “get” Louisa Cornell’s quip about setting speed records. I am a huge audiobook fan! I have something like 200+ unabridged audiobooks (absolutely will NOT buy abridged!), and if they weren’t so expensive, I would have trice that number.
    Some of my favorite narrators have been recipients of the audiobook industry’s highest awards: Jim Dale, the delightfully entertaining narrator of the Harry Potter series; Jenny Sterlin, whose narration of Laurie R. King’s Sherlock Holmes/Mary Russell series makes the characters come alive; the late Patrick Tull, whose gritty narration of Patrick O’Brian’s Aubrey/Maturin series is a sheer delight—you can almost hear the crash of waves and smell the salt spray in his voice; Davina Porter, whose mastery of English and Scottish accents in Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series is nothing short of astounding—her voice is so mellifluous I could listen to it all day (and have!); Phyllida Nash, whose hilarious narration of Heyer’s The Talisman Ring makes me laugh out loud, even though I’ve listened to that audiobook 2-3 times a year for over a decade.
    Katherine, I was flabbergasted at all the research and prep you do before narrating a book. I think narrating a book must be as hard (or harder!) than acting. With acting, you can use facial expressions and body language to portray a character. But in narration, all you have is the voice.
    I listen to audiobooks almost every day while doing housework, washing dishes or doing laundry, gardening or mucking out horse stalls, etc. They are my constant companions. And I’m a little embarrassed to admit that I sometimes listen to audiobooks to ward off the occasional bout of loneliness. It’s like having a family member in the house. *g*
    I can’t wait to hear Katherine’s narration of Notorious, Nicola! That will be a nice addition to my audiobook library.

    Reply
  55. From Sherrie:
    Be afraid. Be very afraid. This is going to be a loonnggg post from an AVID (rabid, even!) fan of audiobooks!
    Nicola, how I laughed at your comment about flattening people to get an Armitage audiobook! I soooo understand what you mean, and totally “get” Louisa Cornell’s quip about setting speed records. I am a huge audiobook fan! I have something like 200+ unabridged audiobooks (absolutely will NOT buy abridged!), and if they weren’t so expensive, I would have trice that number.
    Some of my favorite narrators have been recipients of the audiobook industry’s highest awards: Jim Dale, the delightfully entertaining narrator of the Harry Potter series; Jenny Sterlin, whose narration of Laurie R. King’s Sherlock Holmes/Mary Russell series makes the characters come alive; the late Patrick Tull, whose gritty narration of Patrick O’Brian’s Aubrey/Maturin series is a sheer delight—you can almost hear the crash of waves and smell the salt spray in his voice; Davina Porter, whose mastery of English and Scottish accents in Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series is nothing short of astounding—her voice is so mellifluous I could listen to it all day (and have!); Phyllida Nash, whose hilarious narration of Heyer’s The Talisman Ring makes me laugh out loud, even though I’ve listened to that audiobook 2-3 times a year for over a decade.
    Katherine, I was flabbergasted at all the research and prep you do before narrating a book. I think narrating a book must be as hard (or harder!) than acting. With acting, you can use facial expressions and body language to portray a character. But in narration, all you have is the voice.
    I listen to audiobooks almost every day while doing housework, washing dishes or doing laundry, gardening or mucking out horse stalls, etc. They are my constant companions. And I’m a little embarrassed to admit that I sometimes listen to audiobooks to ward off the occasional bout of loneliness. It’s like having a family member in the house. *g*
    I can’t wait to hear Katherine’s narration of Notorious, Nicola! That will be a nice addition to my audiobook library.

    Reply
  56. Audiobooks have really improved my commute to work–and since I used to get all tense from listening to the news while commuting, audiobooks have improved the overall quality of my life as well. I usually choose them at random from things on sale, and have discovered great authors and great voices as a result. Loved the multi-voice recording of Elizabeth Kostova’s The Swan Thieves. And when I’m listening to Phil Gigante reading one of Karen Marie Moning’s books, I always feel like such an incredible voice can’t possibly be legal (the word “eargasm” has been used by some to describe it . . .).

    Reply
  57. Audiobooks have really improved my commute to work–and since I used to get all tense from listening to the news while commuting, audiobooks have improved the overall quality of my life as well. I usually choose them at random from things on sale, and have discovered great authors and great voices as a result. Loved the multi-voice recording of Elizabeth Kostova’s The Swan Thieves. And when I’m listening to Phil Gigante reading one of Karen Marie Moning’s books, I always feel like such an incredible voice can’t possibly be legal (the word “eargasm” has been used by some to describe it . . .).

    Reply
  58. Audiobooks have really improved my commute to work–and since I used to get all tense from listening to the news while commuting, audiobooks have improved the overall quality of my life as well. I usually choose them at random from things on sale, and have discovered great authors and great voices as a result. Loved the multi-voice recording of Elizabeth Kostova’s The Swan Thieves. And when I’m listening to Phil Gigante reading one of Karen Marie Moning’s books, I always feel like such an incredible voice can’t possibly be legal (the word “eargasm” has been used by some to describe it . . .).

    Reply
  59. Audiobooks have really improved my commute to work–and since I used to get all tense from listening to the news while commuting, audiobooks have improved the overall quality of my life as well. I usually choose them at random from things on sale, and have discovered great authors and great voices as a result. Loved the multi-voice recording of Elizabeth Kostova’s The Swan Thieves. And when I’m listening to Phil Gigante reading one of Karen Marie Moning’s books, I always feel like such an incredible voice can’t possibly be legal (the word “eargasm” has been used by some to describe it . . .).

    Reply
  60. Audiobooks have really improved my commute to work–and since I used to get all tense from listening to the news while commuting, audiobooks have improved the overall quality of my life as well. I usually choose them at random from things on sale, and have discovered great authors and great voices as a result. Loved the multi-voice recording of Elizabeth Kostova’s The Swan Thieves. And when I’m listening to Phil Gigante reading one of Karen Marie Moning’s books, I always feel like such an incredible voice can’t possibly be legal (the word “eargasm” has been used by some to describe it . . .).

    Reply
  61. Fascinating post! Thanks so much for visiting, Katherine. I confess, I don’t listen much to audiobooks because I just can’t seem to focus on the story well. I need to see the words in print. But I can totally understand that the narrator is so very important in creating the mood and tone of the book—perhpas even more so than actors, since they are reading the author’s words verbatim, and only voice, not actions, convey the nuances of meaning.
    I found the details of preparation so interesting—- and am in awe of the dedication and hard work it takes to do it right!

    Reply
  62. Fascinating post! Thanks so much for visiting, Katherine. I confess, I don’t listen much to audiobooks because I just can’t seem to focus on the story well. I need to see the words in print. But I can totally understand that the narrator is so very important in creating the mood and tone of the book—perhpas even more so than actors, since they are reading the author’s words verbatim, and only voice, not actions, convey the nuances of meaning.
    I found the details of preparation so interesting—- and am in awe of the dedication and hard work it takes to do it right!

    Reply
  63. Fascinating post! Thanks so much for visiting, Katherine. I confess, I don’t listen much to audiobooks because I just can’t seem to focus on the story well. I need to see the words in print. But I can totally understand that the narrator is so very important in creating the mood and tone of the book—perhpas even more so than actors, since they are reading the author’s words verbatim, and only voice, not actions, convey the nuances of meaning.
    I found the details of preparation so interesting—- and am in awe of the dedication and hard work it takes to do it right!

    Reply
  64. Fascinating post! Thanks so much for visiting, Katherine. I confess, I don’t listen much to audiobooks because I just can’t seem to focus on the story well. I need to see the words in print. But I can totally understand that the narrator is so very important in creating the mood and tone of the book—perhpas even more so than actors, since they are reading the author’s words verbatim, and only voice, not actions, convey the nuances of meaning.
    I found the details of preparation so interesting—- and am in awe of the dedication and hard work it takes to do it right!

    Reply
  65. Fascinating post! Thanks so much for visiting, Katherine. I confess, I don’t listen much to audiobooks because I just can’t seem to focus on the story well. I need to see the words in print. But I can totally understand that the narrator is so very important in creating the mood and tone of the book—perhpas even more so than actors, since they are reading the author’s words verbatim, and only voice, not actions, convey the nuances of meaning.
    I found the details of preparation so interesting—- and am in awe of the dedication and hard work it takes to do it right!

    Reply
  66. Hi Katherine and Nicola,
    I have only listened to self-improvement books on tape–never a novel for pure enjoyment. However, I am going to be taking a long journey later this year (way too many hours in a car!) and have been considering whether to purchase an e-reader that can read aloud to me or maybe an audio version.
    A book from Nicola would be extra special to enjoy on my trip! Please enter my name in your fabulous giveaway:
    Laura T
    heartoftexasbooks[at]yahoo[dot]com

    Reply
  67. Hi Katherine and Nicola,
    I have only listened to self-improvement books on tape–never a novel for pure enjoyment. However, I am going to be taking a long journey later this year (way too many hours in a car!) and have been considering whether to purchase an e-reader that can read aloud to me or maybe an audio version.
    A book from Nicola would be extra special to enjoy on my trip! Please enter my name in your fabulous giveaway:
    Laura T
    heartoftexasbooks[at]yahoo[dot]com

    Reply
  68. Hi Katherine and Nicola,
    I have only listened to self-improvement books on tape–never a novel for pure enjoyment. However, I am going to be taking a long journey later this year (way too many hours in a car!) and have been considering whether to purchase an e-reader that can read aloud to me or maybe an audio version.
    A book from Nicola would be extra special to enjoy on my trip! Please enter my name in your fabulous giveaway:
    Laura T
    heartoftexasbooks[at]yahoo[dot]com

    Reply
  69. Hi Katherine and Nicola,
    I have only listened to self-improvement books on tape–never a novel for pure enjoyment. However, I am going to be taking a long journey later this year (way too many hours in a car!) and have been considering whether to purchase an e-reader that can read aloud to me or maybe an audio version.
    A book from Nicola would be extra special to enjoy on my trip! Please enter my name in your fabulous giveaway:
    Laura T
    heartoftexasbooks[at]yahoo[dot]com

    Reply
  70. Hi Katherine and Nicola,
    I have only listened to self-improvement books on tape–never a novel for pure enjoyment. However, I am going to be taking a long journey later this year (way too many hours in a car!) and have been considering whether to purchase an e-reader that can read aloud to me or maybe an audio version.
    A book from Nicola would be extra special to enjoy on my trip! Please enter my name in your fabulous giveaway:
    Laura T
    heartoftexasbooks[at]yahoo[dot]com

    Reply
  71. Never listened to audios as such a short commute but, now that I’m retired, a whole new experience is available. Thanks and good luck.

    Reply
  72. Never listened to audios as such a short commute but, now that I’m retired, a whole new experience is available. Thanks and good luck.

    Reply
  73. Never listened to audios as such a short commute but, now that I’m retired, a whole new experience is available. Thanks and good luck.

    Reply
  74. Never listened to audios as such a short commute but, now that I’m retired, a whole new experience is available. Thanks and good luck.

    Reply
  75. Never listened to audios as such a short commute but, now that I’m retired, a whole new experience is available. Thanks and good luck.

    Reply
  76. I have to drive a bit to see family & find audiobooks invaluable and I learn “stuff”, too. Toll roads & highways can be nice, but they are also a bit boring.
    I recently returned to needlework, but I don’t watch television, so I do my needlework while listening to audiobooks! Keeps my mind busy while my hands are busy!

    Reply
  77. I have to drive a bit to see family & find audiobooks invaluable and I learn “stuff”, too. Toll roads & highways can be nice, but they are also a bit boring.
    I recently returned to needlework, but I don’t watch television, so I do my needlework while listening to audiobooks! Keeps my mind busy while my hands are busy!

    Reply
  78. I have to drive a bit to see family & find audiobooks invaluable and I learn “stuff”, too. Toll roads & highways can be nice, but they are also a bit boring.
    I recently returned to needlework, but I don’t watch television, so I do my needlework while listening to audiobooks! Keeps my mind busy while my hands are busy!

    Reply
  79. I have to drive a bit to see family & find audiobooks invaluable and I learn “stuff”, too. Toll roads & highways can be nice, but they are also a bit boring.
    I recently returned to needlework, but I don’t watch television, so I do my needlework while listening to audiobooks! Keeps my mind busy while my hands are busy!

    Reply
  80. I have to drive a bit to see family & find audiobooks invaluable and I learn “stuff”, too. Toll roads & highways can be nice, but they are also a bit boring.
    I recently returned to needlework, but I don’t watch television, so I do my needlework while listening to audiobooks! Keeps my mind busy while my hands are busy!

    Reply
  81. Great question! I don’t normally listen to audiobooks and want I do it is only after I have read it the book. I am a visual person and really “get” a story when I read it rather than listen. I do like listening when I have read a book which adds to the book experience. Maybe one day I’ll try to listen to an audiobook without prior reading. When I do listen it’s during at night when it’s quiet. In the car, or in a crowded place or while running errands is too distracting for me to enjoy it fully.

    Reply
  82. Great question! I don’t normally listen to audiobooks and want I do it is only after I have read it the book. I am a visual person and really “get” a story when I read it rather than listen. I do like listening when I have read a book which adds to the book experience. Maybe one day I’ll try to listen to an audiobook without prior reading. When I do listen it’s during at night when it’s quiet. In the car, or in a crowded place or while running errands is too distracting for me to enjoy it fully.

    Reply
  83. Great question! I don’t normally listen to audiobooks and want I do it is only after I have read it the book. I am a visual person and really “get” a story when I read it rather than listen. I do like listening when I have read a book which adds to the book experience. Maybe one day I’ll try to listen to an audiobook without prior reading. When I do listen it’s during at night when it’s quiet. In the car, or in a crowded place or while running errands is too distracting for me to enjoy it fully.

    Reply
  84. Great question! I don’t normally listen to audiobooks and want I do it is only after I have read it the book. I am a visual person and really “get” a story when I read it rather than listen. I do like listening when I have read a book which adds to the book experience. Maybe one day I’ll try to listen to an audiobook without prior reading. When I do listen it’s during at night when it’s quiet. In the car, or in a crowded place or while running errands is too distracting for me to enjoy it fully.

    Reply
  85. Great question! I don’t normally listen to audiobooks and want I do it is only after I have read it the book. I am a visual person and really “get” a story when I read it rather than listen. I do like listening when I have read a book which adds to the book experience. Maybe one day I’ll try to listen to an audiobook without prior reading. When I do listen it’s during at night when it’s quiet. In the car, or in a crowded place or while running errands is too distracting for me to enjoy it fully.

    Reply
  86. Sherrie, thank you for the reminder of the wonderful recording of The Talisman Ring! It has a special place in my heart because I chose to narrate a passage from it for my Certificate in Spoken English. I’m not sure I could match Phyllida Nash – or Katherine – in terms of great interpretation, but I did achieve a credit!
    Thank you so much, everyone, for all the comments on audiobook listening. It’s something that I have only come to lately and I am totally hooked!

    Reply
  87. Sherrie, thank you for the reminder of the wonderful recording of The Talisman Ring! It has a special place in my heart because I chose to narrate a passage from it for my Certificate in Spoken English. I’m not sure I could match Phyllida Nash – or Katherine – in terms of great interpretation, but I did achieve a credit!
    Thank you so much, everyone, for all the comments on audiobook listening. It’s something that I have only come to lately and I am totally hooked!

    Reply
  88. Sherrie, thank you for the reminder of the wonderful recording of The Talisman Ring! It has a special place in my heart because I chose to narrate a passage from it for my Certificate in Spoken English. I’m not sure I could match Phyllida Nash – or Katherine – in terms of great interpretation, but I did achieve a credit!
    Thank you so much, everyone, for all the comments on audiobook listening. It’s something that I have only come to lately and I am totally hooked!

    Reply
  89. Sherrie, thank you for the reminder of the wonderful recording of The Talisman Ring! It has a special place in my heart because I chose to narrate a passage from it for my Certificate in Spoken English. I’m not sure I could match Phyllida Nash – or Katherine – in terms of great interpretation, but I did achieve a credit!
    Thank you so much, everyone, for all the comments on audiobook listening. It’s something that I have only come to lately and I am totally hooked!

    Reply
  90. Sherrie, thank you for the reminder of the wonderful recording of The Talisman Ring! It has a special place in my heart because I chose to narrate a passage from it for my Certificate in Spoken English. I’m not sure I could match Phyllida Nash – or Katherine – in terms of great interpretation, but I did achieve a credit!
    Thank you so much, everyone, for all the comments on audiobook listening. It’s something that I have only come to lately and I am totally hooked!

    Reply
  91. I have never listened to an audio book shame on me I have heard they are so good I really need to try some I think
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  92. I have never listened to an audio book shame on me I have heard they are so good I really need to try some I think
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  93. I have never listened to an audio book shame on me I have heard they are so good I really need to try some I think
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  94. I have never listened to an audio book shame on me I have heard they are so good I really need to try some I think
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  95. I have never listened to an audio book shame on me I have heard they are so good I really need to try some I think
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  96. I haven’t listened to an audio book in some time but I do like them when I have a long trip to make since they are a wonderful way to spend the time.

    Reply
  97. I haven’t listened to an audio book in some time but I do like them when I have a long trip to make since they are a wonderful way to spend the time.

    Reply
  98. I haven’t listened to an audio book in some time but I do like them when I have a long trip to make since they are a wonderful way to spend the time.

    Reply
  99. I haven’t listened to an audio book in some time but I do like them when I have a long trip to make since they are a wonderful way to spend the time.

    Reply
  100. I haven’t listened to an audio book in some time but I do like them when I have a long trip to make since they are a wonderful way to spend the time.

    Reply
  101. I am a big fan of audiobooks, and I am always listening to one. I listen at all times, but I haven’t given up reading books also. I have listened to a couple of audiobooks that Katherine Kellgren has narrated. Blackout by Connie Willis was the most recent. Great job on the narration.

    Reply
  102. I am a big fan of audiobooks, and I am always listening to one. I listen at all times, but I haven’t given up reading books also. I have listened to a couple of audiobooks that Katherine Kellgren has narrated. Blackout by Connie Willis was the most recent. Great job on the narration.

    Reply
  103. I am a big fan of audiobooks, and I am always listening to one. I listen at all times, but I haven’t given up reading books also. I have listened to a couple of audiobooks that Katherine Kellgren has narrated. Blackout by Connie Willis was the most recent. Great job on the narration.

    Reply
  104. I am a big fan of audiobooks, and I am always listening to one. I listen at all times, but I haven’t given up reading books also. I have listened to a couple of audiobooks that Katherine Kellgren has narrated. Blackout by Connie Willis was the most recent. Great job on the narration.

    Reply
  105. I am a big fan of audiobooks, and I am always listening to one. I listen at all times, but I haven’t given up reading books also. I have listened to a couple of audiobooks that Katherine Kellgren has narrated. Blackout by Connie Willis was the most recent. Great job on the narration.

    Reply
  106. If a book is available in audio, i prefer to listen to it since i can listen while i work. my biggest problem is they don’t publish the audiobooks i want to listen to fast enough. I was very excited to see that notorious was available in audio. Will more of your books be available in audio?

    Reply
  107. If a book is available in audio, i prefer to listen to it since i can listen while i work. my biggest problem is they don’t publish the audiobooks i want to listen to fast enough. I was very excited to see that notorious was available in audio. Will more of your books be available in audio?

    Reply
  108. If a book is available in audio, i prefer to listen to it since i can listen while i work. my biggest problem is they don’t publish the audiobooks i want to listen to fast enough. I was very excited to see that notorious was available in audio. Will more of your books be available in audio?

    Reply
  109. If a book is available in audio, i prefer to listen to it since i can listen while i work. my biggest problem is they don’t publish the audiobooks i want to listen to fast enough. I was very excited to see that notorious was available in audio. Will more of your books be available in audio?

    Reply
  110. If a book is available in audio, i prefer to listen to it since i can listen while i work. my biggest problem is they don’t publish the audiobooks i want to listen to fast enough. I was very excited to see that notorious was available in audio. Will more of your books be available in audio?

    Reply
  111. Nice interview.
    I love audiobooks! They make my commute to work so much nicer. 🙂 I usually check them out of the library, but I do own a small collection I enjoy and listen to again and again.

    Reply
  112. Nice interview.
    I love audiobooks! They make my commute to work so much nicer. 🙂 I usually check them out of the library, but I do own a small collection I enjoy and listen to again and again.

    Reply
  113. Nice interview.
    I love audiobooks! They make my commute to work so much nicer. 🙂 I usually check them out of the library, but I do own a small collection I enjoy and listen to again and again.

    Reply
  114. Nice interview.
    I love audiobooks! They make my commute to work so much nicer. 🙂 I usually check them out of the library, but I do own a small collection I enjoy and listen to again and again.

    Reply
  115. Nice interview.
    I love audiobooks! They make my commute to work so much nicer. 🙂 I usually check them out of the library, but I do own a small collection I enjoy and listen to again and again.

    Reply
  116. Audiobooks have been wonderful for our family. My husband has little time to read. I check out books from our library and we both listen to them on our commutes to work (when I was working) or on trips. It is nice to be able to discuss books with him and this is really the only way. For example, he never would have read THE HELP, but we both loved it on audio.
    It is so true that a good reader can make all the difference for a book. There have been some books that I really didn’t enjoy as much as I could have because of the reader. Then again, I read Nora Roberts’ THE CIRCLE TRILOGY and enjoyed it. We got the audiobooks in at the library and I enjoyed them much more listening to them.
    The biggest advantage has been for our daughter and her son. The dyslexic, so reading is a struggle. Our grandson especially has benefited. He can enjoy the books rather than struggle with them. He is “reading” books he would otherwise miss out on.
    Best of luck with your career. I am going to check my collection of audiobooks and see which ones are read by you.

    Reply
  117. Audiobooks have been wonderful for our family. My husband has little time to read. I check out books from our library and we both listen to them on our commutes to work (when I was working) or on trips. It is nice to be able to discuss books with him and this is really the only way. For example, he never would have read THE HELP, but we both loved it on audio.
    It is so true that a good reader can make all the difference for a book. There have been some books that I really didn’t enjoy as much as I could have because of the reader. Then again, I read Nora Roberts’ THE CIRCLE TRILOGY and enjoyed it. We got the audiobooks in at the library and I enjoyed them much more listening to them.
    The biggest advantage has been for our daughter and her son. The dyslexic, so reading is a struggle. Our grandson especially has benefited. He can enjoy the books rather than struggle with them. He is “reading” books he would otherwise miss out on.
    Best of luck with your career. I am going to check my collection of audiobooks and see which ones are read by you.

    Reply
  118. Audiobooks have been wonderful for our family. My husband has little time to read. I check out books from our library and we both listen to them on our commutes to work (when I was working) or on trips. It is nice to be able to discuss books with him and this is really the only way. For example, he never would have read THE HELP, but we both loved it on audio.
    It is so true that a good reader can make all the difference for a book. There have been some books that I really didn’t enjoy as much as I could have because of the reader. Then again, I read Nora Roberts’ THE CIRCLE TRILOGY and enjoyed it. We got the audiobooks in at the library and I enjoyed them much more listening to them.
    The biggest advantage has been for our daughter and her son. The dyslexic, so reading is a struggle. Our grandson especially has benefited. He can enjoy the books rather than struggle with them. He is “reading” books he would otherwise miss out on.
    Best of luck with your career. I am going to check my collection of audiobooks and see which ones are read by you.

    Reply
  119. Audiobooks have been wonderful for our family. My husband has little time to read. I check out books from our library and we both listen to them on our commutes to work (when I was working) or on trips. It is nice to be able to discuss books with him and this is really the only way. For example, he never would have read THE HELP, but we both loved it on audio.
    It is so true that a good reader can make all the difference for a book. There have been some books that I really didn’t enjoy as much as I could have because of the reader. Then again, I read Nora Roberts’ THE CIRCLE TRILOGY and enjoyed it. We got the audiobooks in at the library and I enjoyed them much more listening to them.
    The biggest advantage has been for our daughter and her son. The dyslexic, so reading is a struggle. Our grandson especially has benefited. He can enjoy the books rather than struggle with them. He is “reading” books he would otherwise miss out on.
    Best of luck with your career. I am going to check my collection of audiobooks and see which ones are read by you.

    Reply
  120. Audiobooks have been wonderful for our family. My husband has little time to read. I check out books from our library and we both listen to them on our commutes to work (when I was working) or on trips. It is nice to be able to discuss books with him and this is really the only way. For example, he never would have read THE HELP, but we both loved it on audio.
    It is so true that a good reader can make all the difference for a book. There have been some books that I really didn’t enjoy as much as I could have because of the reader. Then again, I read Nora Roberts’ THE CIRCLE TRILOGY and enjoyed it. We got the audiobooks in at the library and I enjoyed them much more listening to them.
    The biggest advantage has been for our daughter and her son. The dyslexic, so reading is a struggle. Our grandson especially has benefited. He can enjoy the books rather than struggle with them. He is “reading” books he would otherwise miss out on.
    Best of luck with your career. I am going to check my collection of audiobooks and see which ones are read by you.

    Reply
  121. Coming in here very late to say I discovered audio books only in the last few years, but I love them, especially for long trips in the car, and also at home, when I’m doing grim jobs like cleaning out cupboards or preparing to paint a room. The time flies and my hands work busily on auto-pilot while my mind is far, far away.

    Reply
  122. Coming in here very late to say I discovered audio books only in the last few years, but I love them, especially for long trips in the car, and also at home, when I’m doing grim jobs like cleaning out cupboards or preparing to paint a room. The time flies and my hands work busily on auto-pilot while my mind is far, far away.

    Reply
  123. Coming in here very late to say I discovered audio books only in the last few years, but I love them, especially for long trips in the car, and also at home, when I’m doing grim jobs like cleaning out cupboards or preparing to paint a room. The time flies and my hands work busily on auto-pilot while my mind is far, far away.

    Reply
  124. Coming in here very late to say I discovered audio books only in the last few years, but I love them, especially for long trips in the car, and also at home, when I’m doing grim jobs like cleaning out cupboards or preparing to paint a room. The time flies and my hands work busily on auto-pilot while my mind is far, far away.

    Reply
  125. Coming in here very late to say I discovered audio books only in the last few years, but I love them, especially for long trips in the car, and also at home, when I’m doing grim jobs like cleaning out cupboards or preparing to paint a room. The time flies and my hands work busily on auto-pilot while my mind is far, far away.

    Reply

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