An Interview with Andrea Pickens

Cat_243_dover_2  We’re being blessed with a lovely run of guest writers.  Today, I welcome Andrea Pickens. 

Like several of us Wenchly types, Andrea got her start in traditional Regency, writing ten Signet Regencies before moving into historical romance.  She’s been a Rita finalist and has won numerous awards, including the Romantic Times Career Achievement Award for Regency Romance, the 2008 Daphne Du Maurier Award, and a Holt Medallion Award of Excellence for The Spy Wore Silk.  (http://andreapickensonline.com )

The Scarlet Spy, third in her Merlin’s Maidens series, is just out from Grand Central.  Welcome, Andrea!  Let the interrogation begin. <G>  Tell us about Merlin’s Maidens in general and The Scarlet Spy in particular. 

AP: The series revolves around the idea of a secret school for female spies. (Mrs. Merlin’s Academy for Select Young Ladies is a Hogwarts for Hellions, so to speak.) The students are orphans from the rough slums of London, who have studied the art The_scarlet_spy of swordplay and seduction. Now they are highly trained lethal ladies, who have mastered their lessons to become England’s ultimate secret weapons—bold, beautiful, and oh-so dangerous. They are tough, courageous, and smart (not to mention sexy!) Yet they also have an inner vulnerability.

Within the convention of kick-ass heroine, I’ve tried to make each of the three very different individuals, and place them in very different settings. (The books can all be read as “stand alone” stories, but I hope readers will enjoy all The_spy_wore_silk three!) Siena, the heroine of The Spy Wore Silk, is a brooding, introspective agent whose assignment involves attending an art auction at ducal manor house in the wilds of Dartmoor.

Shannon, whose explosive temper tends to get her in trouble, is the star of Seduced By A Spy. She sees action in Ireland and the Highlands of Scotland, where she must team with a rakish Russian spy to defeat a French assassin.

Sofia, who is featured in The Scarlet Spy, is the most ladylike of the three. She is sent to London where her job is to expose a ring of corruption operating within the highest circles of government. Her superiors arrange for her to assume the role of an Italian contessa, and enlist the aid of  ‘Lord Sunshine’—the charming and popular Deverill Osborne—to introduce her into the ton. Osborne thinks she is a wealthy widow. Sofia thinks he is . . . a frivolous ass.

Her dance of deception takes on a number of dangerous twists as she spins from the ballrooms of Mayfair to the slums of St. Giles, all the while trying to keep Osborne from getting too close to her secret . . .

But enough said! For those who are interested, a sample chapter is posted on my website. ( http://andreadarif.com/the_scarlet_spy.html )

MJP:  Why spy stories?

Andrea AP: Well, I’ve always been a bit of a tomboy—as a kid, I always wanted to be the knight who got to fight the dragons instead the princess who needed to be rescued. I guess this never quite rubbed off (I’m still more comfortable in jeans and a sweatshirt than a slinky little black dress) for I’ve always liked creating strong, intelligent heroines, who challenge convention and aren’t afraid of breaking the rules.

In thinking of the Regency era, and how I might do something a little unexpected, I got wondering . . . what would be the least likely endeavor for a female to be involved in?  A “secret agent” came to mind, and as a big fan of all the old James Bond movies, I thought it could be a fun idea to pursue. So, I decided to turn tradition on its ear and create a trio of leading ladies capable of beating the men at their own game.

MJP:   How did you start writing?  Where you making up stories in kindergarten with a pencil clutched in one chubby fist, or did you come to the trade later?  How did you become interested in writing historical novels?

AP: Oh yes, I always had stories bubbling around in my brain. My mother kept very detailed family scrapbooks and in one there is my first manuscript—a cowboy story with full color pencil drawings of horses and gunslingers. (I was a huge Hopalong Cassidy fan, a fact my older brother will attest to, as I called him “Hoppy” for years.) Hopalong

My other childhood memory of storytelling was a fifth grade English class. I had a wonderful teacher who gave us really interesting projects. One day he walked in with a sheaf of pictures he had cut out of magazines, and handed one to each of us. The assignment was to spend the next half hour writing a short story based on the picture.

ThenChinesedragonblack  we all had to get up, show our picture and read our stories aloud. After class, as we were filing out to math, or some other odious subject, he took me aside and said that he had been sitting in the back of the room, half listening to everyone as he corrected papers, but that when I started to read, he had to put his pen down. “You have a real talent for this,” he said with a pat to my shoulder.

So, the long answer is yes, I’ve always had a vivid imagination . . . so much so that I think at times it worried my parents that I was so happy in my own little world, drawing pictures, playing with toy soldiers, reading books. My teachers will also tell you that I was the class history geek, even in grade school. I don’t really know why, but I was fascinated with the past and devoured books on everything from the Middle Ages to World War II.

However, in high school, my interest in art sort of took over and steered me away from writing. I remained a voracious reader, and as a history minor in college, I wrote reams of non-fiction essays (well, on occasion there might have been some fiction mixed in!) But storytelling got put on the back burner.

Venetia Until one day, about twelve years ago. I was walking down the street in New York City when I saw a little old man on the street corner selling used paperbacks at 50 cents a book. (I am embarrassed to admit they were “stripped” but at the time I had no idea what that meant)

Cheap books? Naturally I stopped, and on a whim bought a Georgette Heyer novel. I’d never heard of her, but well, I was captivated from the first chapter. History and romance? I had discovered a whole new, amazing world. After reading all her books —checked out of the library, not contraband copies—I discovered Signet Regencies (And Onyx and Topaz). Oh, now I was in heaven. Mary Jo Putney, Edith Layton, Loretta Chase, Patricia Rice . . . I had goddesses to worship (I am totally serious, you all were an incredible inspiration , showing that romance could be smart, savvy and sophisticated.)

All that reading seemed to reawaken an inner muse. I suddenly felt compelled to sit down and try writing my own Regency romance. I had never written a full length book, I had no idea whether I could do it, or if it would stink. But I put my fanny in a chair, determined that I would at least give it a try. Four months later I had a finished manuscript.

The_defiant_governess Through a serendipitous twist of fate, I met an agent, and as we were talking about other things, I bashfully mentioned that I had written a Regency romance. He  laughed, said one of his pals was an editor at Signet and offered to show it to her. Three days later he called me back to say he’d sold my book!

That’s probably WAY more than anyone wants to know about me, but I’ve been writing ever since.

MJP:  You’re a graduate of Yale and you have a Master’s degree in graphic design.  I’m a graphic designer myself (my degree was industrial design, but I ended up doing mostly graphics because that’s where the jobs were.)   Do you think your art and graphic background influences your writing, or are they fairly separate expressions of creativity?  (For the record, I find your writing very visual.)

AP:That’s such a great question, Mary Jo! I’ve actually thought about this, though Vintagegolfer you’ve phrased it far coherently than I ever have. For me there is a definite connection, though it’s not quite a linear one. As you well know, graphic design is all about communication, as opposed to the fine arts like painting and sculpture, where the artist is expressing his or her own creativity. In other words, a designer is usually a “middleman”, using visual elements, like images and type, to convey a client’s specific message to a specific audience—think of things like book jackets, annual reports, record covers, logos and advertisements.

To be a good designer, you have think clearly, concisely and logically. Yet you also think outside the box in order to come up with something creative, whimsical and different. You have to be disciplined, yet free-wheeling, practical yet zany. So in many ways, that dichotomy has been wonderful training for writing. 

I take it as a huge compliment that you find my writing ‘visual.” The one “formal” class I ever took on creative writing was a seminar on children’s books taught by the Where_the_wild_things_are legendary Maurice Sendak. Again it was a very intense course of study on integrating images and words to tell a story, and I learned some great lessons from a very amazing man. So, because of my background, I can’t help but picture things very vividly, and description is important to me because that’s how I visualize a scene. I guess that I want a reader to feel the smoke in the air, the texture of the silks and satins  . . . but without overwhelming the other elements of the story. As you know, it’s always a delicate balance, and that’s part of the challenge of writing—to somehow make it all work.

MJP: You and your husband publish golf magazines, so you’re simultaneously on two sides of publishing.  Do you find that fiction and publishing complicate or aid each other?   Have any of your books featured golf, that fine Scottish sport?  And have you cloned yourself to have time to do both jobs?  <G>

AP: First of all, publishing a magazine has been a great help to my writing career in that I’ve learned a lot about marketing, distribution and the business side of things. It really helps to understand those concerns because it gives a realistic understanding of how “corporate decisions” are made. Not that I always agree with them! But at least I feel I have a pretty good grasp of the business, which is helpful in forming Seduced20by20a20spy expectations of what a publisher will—and will not do—for an author.

I write some of our travel and lifestyle articles, which I find lots of fun. And I think it helps my fiction writing. Like any discipline, switching a routine keeps you fresh and helps keep your skills sharp and focused. As for cloning myself . . .I’m not sure I could put up with two of me  . . . LOL. But one of the good things about being your own boss is that I can set a flexible schedule, I work in the office three days a week, and then take Thursday and Friday to write. Sometimes a fire will flare up that needs to be put out, but for the most part it seems to work out.

And, funny thing you should ask about golf and romance! As it happens, one of my favorite books that I did for Signet Regencies was A Diamond in the Rough, a golf A_diamond_in_the_rough story, where I had the hero forced to learn the game in order to win back the ancestral estate that his father had gambled away. The heroine is the best golfer in St. Andrews but of course she must play disguised as a man. A friend asks her to teach the hero the game, so acting as his caddie, she takes on the assignment. At first blush, sport and Regency romance don’t seem an ideal match. Which is probably what made me think, “Oh, this could be fun.”

MJP:  What was your first book, and how well do you think it characterizes your latest work?  What themes do you keep coming back to?

AP: When I look back at my first book, The Defiant Governess, I cringe! It was a The_defiant_governess_2 none-too-subtle homage to Jane Eyre—ye gods, I even named the heroine and hero Jane and Edward. (Please picture me rolling my eyes.) But even though there is MUCH I would do differently these days, I do see that even back then I was interested in creating an unconventional heroine and exploring how she dares to defy the rules and be different. In subsequent Signet books, I tried to push various boundaries. As I mentioned, there was the golf book, and then I set The Storybook Hero mainly in Russia, which was a little offbeat for a Regency romance.

The_storybook_hero Maybe the best way to answer your question about themes is to explain why I love writing Regency-set historicals. I find the parallels between the Regency and today very intriguing in that both societies confront elemental challenges to the traditional way of thinking. The upheavals in literature, music, science, technology and social structure are so similar, and so individuals—especially women—ask the same sort of questions about their basic sense of self. I try to play with modern sensibilities within the Regency conventions, hoping that the blend will strike a chord with today’s readers. I want historical romance to be alive and relevant, not some stuffy, stiff story from a world they can’t relate to.
 
MJP:  What was the biggest mistake you made when you first began writing?

AP: It took me a long time to discover there were such great organizations, like RWA and NINC, out there for authors. The camaraderie formed at conferences is invaluable especially when starting out. The friendships I’ve made over the years have really enriched my life. Some of my fellow writers are now my best friends.

MJP:  What do you consider key elements of a great story?

AP:  Hmmm . . . another good question! I enjoy many different genres, for many different reasons. Sometimes I just want to laugh and not think too deeply. Sometimes, I crave a good mystery or a thriller, which may be totally plot driven. And sometimes I need an intensely emotional story that tugs at the heartstrings.

A_stroke_of_luck That said, there are certain basic things that appeal to me—textured characters, compelling conflicts and clever command of language. (If a book is really well-written, I will forgive other flaws.) A great story should make me curse any interruption—even from loved ones  . . . well, with a few exceptions. If an author can take me on a journey into that wonderful world of imagination for a few hours, then I return to the squeaky dishwasher and unvacuumed floors a happy soul!

MJP: Are there any trends you hope to see in romance in the next few years?

AP: I’m probably sounding hopelessly old-fashioned, but I’d like to see people stick with reading printed books. (I’m not suggesting quills and parchment, just a happy medium between copperplate script and cyber blips.) To me, there’s something very special about the feel of paper and the look of real ink on a printed page.

With that in mind, I’ve seen that Signet has recently announced that it will be re-issuing some of its traditional Regencies. I hope that proves to be a very successful venture. It would be wonderful if they would eventually consider reviving the line.

MJP: What is the best part about being a writer?  The most frustrating?

AP: Hey, I get to wear my synchilla sweatpants and Ugg boots to work on Thursday and Friday!

Quill_pen As for what’s frustrating, the toughest thing is that these days, publishers expect you to be very pro-active in promoting your books. This meaning trying to drum up internet “buzz”, which is fun in some ways, but takes up a huge amount of time. To be honest, the introvert in me would much rather be cloistered in my little room, writing my stories. However, life is all about being flexible and going with the flow . . . and look—it’s landed me here, which I consider a huge honor.

Thank you, Mary Jo, and all the Wenches, for having me!

The_scarlet_spy_2
MJP: Thanks for being here, Andrea!  Andrea is giving away a copy of The Scarlet Spy to someone who comments between now and Tuesday midnight.  Free book, yes!!! 

195 thoughts on “An Interview with Andrea Pickens”

  1. I’m fascinated and charmed with the idea of a historical romance writer taking classes from Maurice Sendak! How I love his work, and how I admire someone who can concoct a bridge from ‘In the Night Kitchen’ to regency spies!

    Reply
  2. I’m fascinated and charmed with the idea of a historical romance writer taking classes from Maurice Sendak! How I love his work, and how I admire someone who can concoct a bridge from ‘In the Night Kitchen’ to regency spies!

    Reply
  3. I’m fascinated and charmed with the idea of a historical romance writer taking classes from Maurice Sendak! How I love his work, and how I admire someone who can concoct a bridge from ‘In the Night Kitchen’ to regency spies!

    Reply
  4. I’m fascinated and charmed with the idea of a historical romance writer taking classes from Maurice Sendak! How I love his work, and how I admire someone who can concoct a bridge from ‘In the Night Kitchen’ to regency spies!

    Reply
  5. I’m fascinated and charmed with the idea of a historical romance writer taking classes from Maurice Sendak! How I love his work, and how I admire someone who can concoct a bridge from ‘In the Night Kitchen’ to regency spies!

    Reply
  6. Andrea and MaryJo, I just wanted to say that I really enjoyed your interview–lots of cool stuff about you and your writing I definitely didn’t know before! And I’m intrigued by this golfing story (not that I golf myself, but I love these stories where the women are the experts at something :))
    And call me old-fashioned, too, but I still love traditional books, and really prefer to read with a book in hand rather than electronically! I haven’t tried an e-book reader, but I don’t think it’ll be quite the same as turning pages in a brand new book!

    Reply
  7. Andrea and MaryJo, I just wanted to say that I really enjoyed your interview–lots of cool stuff about you and your writing I definitely didn’t know before! And I’m intrigued by this golfing story (not that I golf myself, but I love these stories where the women are the experts at something :))
    And call me old-fashioned, too, but I still love traditional books, and really prefer to read with a book in hand rather than electronically! I haven’t tried an e-book reader, but I don’t think it’ll be quite the same as turning pages in a brand new book!

    Reply
  8. Andrea and MaryJo, I just wanted to say that I really enjoyed your interview–lots of cool stuff about you and your writing I definitely didn’t know before! And I’m intrigued by this golfing story (not that I golf myself, but I love these stories where the women are the experts at something :))
    And call me old-fashioned, too, but I still love traditional books, and really prefer to read with a book in hand rather than electronically! I haven’t tried an e-book reader, but I don’t think it’ll be quite the same as turning pages in a brand new book!

    Reply
  9. Andrea and MaryJo, I just wanted to say that I really enjoyed your interview–lots of cool stuff about you and your writing I definitely didn’t know before! And I’m intrigued by this golfing story (not that I golf myself, but I love these stories where the women are the experts at something :))
    And call me old-fashioned, too, but I still love traditional books, and really prefer to read with a book in hand rather than electronically! I haven’t tried an e-book reader, but I don’t think it’ll be quite the same as turning pages in a brand new book!

    Reply
  10. Andrea and MaryJo, I just wanted to say that I really enjoyed your interview–lots of cool stuff about you and your writing I definitely didn’t know before! And I’m intrigued by this golfing story (not that I golf myself, but I love these stories where the women are the experts at something :))
    And call me old-fashioned, too, but I still love traditional books, and really prefer to read with a book in hand rather than electronically! I haven’t tried an e-book reader, but I don’t think it’ll be quite the same as turning pages in a brand new book!

    Reply
  11. I agree with Fedora. The idea of curling up in bed with a plastic device producing grayly glowing electrons makes me feel positively THX 1138’d. I will read on my laptop, but only if I have to, and I suppose it will stay that way. Then too, if I should leave behind a $350 Kindle by mistake, I’d be devastated, whereas losing a $7 paperback would irritate me but wouldn’t feel nearly so disastrous. I do think it’s great, however, that many authors are re-publishing their older books by ebook, making it possible for a generation less left-thumbed technologically than I am to discover their writing.

    Reply
  12. I agree with Fedora. The idea of curling up in bed with a plastic device producing grayly glowing electrons makes me feel positively THX 1138’d. I will read on my laptop, but only if I have to, and I suppose it will stay that way. Then too, if I should leave behind a $350 Kindle by mistake, I’d be devastated, whereas losing a $7 paperback would irritate me but wouldn’t feel nearly so disastrous. I do think it’s great, however, that many authors are re-publishing their older books by ebook, making it possible for a generation less left-thumbed technologically than I am to discover their writing.

    Reply
  13. I agree with Fedora. The idea of curling up in bed with a plastic device producing grayly glowing electrons makes me feel positively THX 1138’d. I will read on my laptop, but only if I have to, and I suppose it will stay that way. Then too, if I should leave behind a $350 Kindle by mistake, I’d be devastated, whereas losing a $7 paperback would irritate me but wouldn’t feel nearly so disastrous. I do think it’s great, however, that many authors are re-publishing their older books by ebook, making it possible for a generation less left-thumbed technologically than I am to discover their writing.

    Reply
  14. I agree with Fedora. The idea of curling up in bed with a plastic device producing grayly glowing electrons makes me feel positively THX 1138’d. I will read on my laptop, but only if I have to, and I suppose it will stay that way. Then too, if I should leave behind a $350 Kindle by mistake, I’d be devastated, whereas losing a $7 paperback would irritate me but wouldn’t feel nearly so disastrous. I do think it’s great, however, that many authors are re-publishing their older books by ebook, making it possible for a generation less left-thumbed technologically than I am to discover their writing.

    Reply
  15. I agree with Fedora. The idea of curling up in bed with a plastic device producing grayly glowing electrons makes me feel positively THX 1138’d. I will read on my laptop, but only if I have to, and I suppose it will stay that way. Then too, if I should leave behind a $350 Kindle by mistake, I’d be devastated, whereas losing a $7 paperback would irritate me but wouldn’t feel nearly so disastrous. I do think it’s great, however, that many authors are re-publishing their older books by ebook, making it possible for a generation less left-thumbed technologically than I am to discover their writing.

    Reply
  16. Hi Maya,
    It was an truly incredible experience to work with Maurice Sendak. His imagination is extraordinary . . . a truly gifted man. One thing I never forgot was hearing him give a talk about writing (just after his book Higgglety Pigglety Pop! came out) and he said in his typical self-effacing style, “Well I always wanted to write the great American novel, but somehow my stories come out as a dog talking to a pig.” When I started writing, I used that as a mantra, in the sense that it encouraged me to find my own voice. When anyone raises an eyebrow about me writing romance, I think of this words.

    Reply
  17. Hi Maya,
    It was an truly incredible experience to work with Maurice Sendak. His imagination is extraordinary . . . a truly gifted man. One thing I never forgot was hearing him give a talk about writing (just after his book Higgglety Pigglety Pop! came out) and he said in his typical self-effacing style, “Well I always wanted to write the great American novel, but somehow my stories come out as a dog talking to a pig.” When I started writing, I used that as a mantra, in the sense that it encouraged me to find my own voice. When anyone raises an eyebrow about me writing romance, I think of this words.

    Reply
  18. Hi Maya,
    It was an truly incredible experience to work with Maurice Sendak. His imagination is extraordinary . . . a truly gifted man. One thing I never forgot was hearing him give a talk about writing (just after his book Higgglety Pigglety Pop! came out) and he said in his typical self-effacing style, “Well I always wanted to write the great American novel, but somehow my stories come out as a dog talking to a pig.” When I started writing, I used that as a mantra, in the sense that it encouraged me to find my own voice. When anyone raises an eyebrow about me writing romance, I think of this words.

    Reply
  19. Hi Maya,
    It was an truly incredible experience to work with Maurice Sendak. His imagination is extraordinary . . . a truly gifted man. One thing I never forgot was hearing him give a talk about writing (just after his book Higgglety Pigglety Pop! came out) and he said in his typical self-effacing style, “Well I always wanted to write the great American novel, but somehow my stories come out as a dog talking to a pig.” When I started writing, I used that as a mantra, in the sense that it encouraged me to find my own voice. When anyone raises an eyebrow about me writing romance, I think of this words.

    Reply
  20. Hi Maya,
    It was an truly incredible experience to work with Maurice Sendak. His imagination is extraordinary . . . a truly gifted man. One thing I never forgot was hearing him give a talk about writing (just after his book Higgglety Pigglety Pop! came out) and he said in his typical self-effacing style, “Well I always wanted to write the great American novel, but somehow my stories come out as a dog talking to a pig.” When I started writing, I used that as a mantra, in the sense that it encouraged me to find my own voice. When anyone raises an eyebrow about me writing romance, I think of this words.

    Reply
  21. Hi Fedora and Janice,
    Thanks for the lovely comments. I am so glad you, too, like printed books. You make a good point that e-books help a new geberation discover some wonderful older books that are out of print. But let’s hope ink and paper stays around.
    And Fedora, glad you like strong heroines. You are certainly surrounded by “expert” women here—the Wenches rule!

    Reply
  22. Hi Fedora and Janice,
    Thanks for the lovely comments. I am so glad you, too, like printed books. You make a good point that e-books help a new geberation discover some wonderful older books that are out of print. But let’s hope ink and paper stays around.
    And Fedora, glad you like strong heroines. You are certainly surrounded by “expert” women here—the Wenches rule!

    Reply
  23. Hi Fedora and Janice,
    Thanks for the lovely comments. I am so glad you, too, like printed books. You make a good point that e-books help a new geberation discover some wonderful older books that are out of print. But let’s hope ink and paper stays around.
    And Fedora, glad you like strong heroines. You are certainly surrounded by “expert” women here—the Wenches rule!

    Reply
  24. Hi Fedora and Janice,
    Thanks for the lovely comments. I am so glad you, too, like printed books. You make a good point that e-books help a new geberation discover some wonderful older books that are out of print. But let’s hope ink and paper stays around.
    And Fedora, glad you like strong heroines. You are certainly surrounded by “expert” women here—the Wenches rule!

    Reply
  25. Hi Fedora and Janice,
    Thanks for the lovely comments. I am so glad you, too, like printed books. You make a good point that e-books help a new geberation discover some wonderful older books that are out of print. But let’s hope ink and paper stays around.
    And Fedora, glad you like strong heroines. You are certainly surrounded by “expert” women here—the Wenches rule!

    Reply
  26. Hi Crystal,
    Glad you like the covers! I have to admit, I’m especially fond of The Scarlet Spy. Even my picky art director brain can find nothing to change. Which for me is saying a lot!

    Reply
  27. Hi Crystal,
    Glad you like the covers! I have to admit, I’m especially fond of The Scarlet Spy. Even my picky art director brain can find nothing to change. Which for me is saying a lot!

    Reply
  28. Hi Crystal,
    Glad you like the covers! I have to admit, I’m especially fond of The Scarlet Spy. Even my picky art director brain can find nothing to change. Which for me is saying a lot!

    Reply
  29. Hi Crystal,
    Glad you like the covers! I have to admit, I’m especially fond of The Scarlet Spy. Even my picky art director brain can find nothing to change. Which for me is saying a lot!

    Reply
  30. Hi Crystal,
    Glad you like the covers! I have to admit, I’m especially fond of The Scarlet Spy. Even my picky art director brain can find nothing to change. Which for me is saying a lot!

    Reply
  31. Ohh, new authors…hooray! I love books with spies, especially female spies, so I can’t wait to track down copies of these books. I just finished Laura Lee Guhrke’s The Charade, as a matter of fact.
    Janice nailed the print vs. ebook debate for me – I want books to stay in print form, but I’m not opposed to some evolution towards ebooks. I don’t think ebooks are for me, for the most part, but it’s a good option for other readers.

    Reply
  32. Ohh, new authors…hooray! I love books with spies, especially female spies, so I can’t wait to track down copies of these books. I just finished Laura Lee Guhrke’s The Charade, as a matter of fact.
    Janice nailed the print vs. ebook debate for me – I want books to stay in print form, but I’m not opposed to some evolution towards ebooks. I don’t think ebooks are for me, for the most part, but it’s a good option for other readers.

    Reply
  33. Ohh, new authors…hooray! I love books with spies, especially female spies, so I can’t wait to track down copies of these books. I just finished Laura Lee Guhrke’s The Charade, as a matter of fact.
    Janice nailed the print vs. ebook debate for me – I want books to stay in print form, but I’m not opposed to some evolution towards ebooks. I don’t think ebooks are for me, for the most part, but it’s a good option for other readers.

    Reply
  34. Ohh, new authors…hooray! I love books with spies, especially female spies, so I can’t wait to track down copies of these books. I just finished Laura Lee Guhrke’s The Charade, as a matter of fact.
    Janice nailed the print vs. ebook debate for me – I want books to stay in print form, but I’m not opposed to some evolution towards ebooks. I don’t think ebooks are for me, for the most part, but it’s a good option for other readers.

    Reply
  35. Ohh, new authors…hooray! I love books with spies, especially female spies, so I can’t wait to track down copies of these books. I just finished Laura Lee Guhrke’s The Charade, as a matter of fact.
    Janice nailed the print vs. ebook debate for me – I want books to stay in print form, but I’m not opposed to some evolution towards ebooks. I don’t think ebooks are for me, for the most part, but it’s a good option for other readers.

    Reply
  36. Hi Lindsay,
    Well said about the print vs digital! Why not take advantage of technology . . . let’s just not dispose of traditional forms as well.
    And thanks for your interest in the “Merlins!” Hope you enjoy!

    Reply
  37. Hi Lindsay,
    Well said about the print vs digital! Why not take advantage of technology . . . let’s just not dispose of traditional forms as well.
    And thanks for your interest in the “Merlins!” Hope you enjoy!

    Reply
  38. Hi Lindsay,
    Well said about the print vs digital! Why not take advantage of technology . . . let’s just not dispose of traditional forms as well.
    And thanks for your interest in the “Merlins!” Hope you enjoy!

    Reply
  39. Hi Lindsay,
    Well said about the print vs digital! Why not take advantage of technology . . . let’s just not dispose of traditional forms as well.
    And thanks for your interest in the “Merlins!” Hope you enjoy!

    Reply
  40. Hi Lindsay,
    Well said about the print vs digital! Why not take advantage of technology . . . let’s just not dispose of traditional forms as well.
    And thanks for your interest in the “Merlins!” Hope you enjoy!

    Reply
  41. Andrea,
    I love your Merlins Maidens series! I was a tomboy too – always enjoyed the Hardy Boys more than Nancy Drew – and the whole concept piqued my curiosity; they are fabulous! You keep writing and I’ll keep reading ~
    Best regards,
    LynneW

    Reply
  42. Andrea,
    I love your Merlins Maidens series! I was a tomboy too – always enjoyed the Hardy Boys more than Nancy Drew – and the whole concept piqued my curiosity; they are fabulous! You keep writing and I’ll keep reading ~
    Best regards,
    LynneW

    Reply
  43. Andrea,
    I love your Merlins Maidens series! I was a tomboy too – always enjoyed the Hardy Boys more than Nancy Drew – and the whole concept piqued my curiosity; they are fabulous! You keep writing and I’ll keep reading ~
    Best regards,
    LynneW

    Reply
  44. Andrea,
    I love your Merlins Maidens series! I was a tomboy too – always enjoyed the Hardy Boys more than Nancy Drew – and the whole concept piqued my curiosity; they are fabulous! You keep writing and I’ll keep reading ~
    Best regards,
    LynneW

    Reply
  45. Andrea,
    I love your Merlins Maidens series! I was a tomboy too – always enjoyed the Hardy Boys more than Nancy Drew – and the whole concept piqued my curiosity; they are fabulous! You keep writing and I’ll keep reading ~
    Best regards,
    LynneW

    Reply
  46. Andrea, thank you for sharing your experience and passion with us. Your books sound intriguing and I hope I win one! 🙂 Either way, I’ll be checking them out at the library (no contraband copies for me! LOL!).
    Mary Jo, great interview! 🙂

    Reply
  47. Andrea, thank you for sharing your experience and passion with us. Your books sound intriguing and I hope I win one! 🙂 Either way, I’ll be checking them out at the library (no contraband copies for me! LOL!).
    Mary Jo, great interview! 🙂

    Reply
  48. Andrea, thank you for sharing your experience and passion with us. Your books sound intriguing and I hope I win one! 🙂 Either way, I’ll be checking them out at the library (no contraband copies for me! LOL!).
    Mary Jo, great interview! 🙂

    Reply
  49. Andrea, thank you for sharing your experience and passion with us. Your books sound intriguing and I hope I win one! 🙂 Either way, I’ll be checking them out at the library (no contraband copies for me! LOL!).
    Mary Jo, great interview! 🙂

    Reply
  50. Andrea, thank you for sharing your experience and passion with us. Your books sound intriguing and I hope I win one! 🙂 Either way, I’ll be checking them out at the library (no contraband copies for me! LOL!).
    Mary Jo, great interview! 🙂

    Reply
  51. Great interview!
    I prefer books that are made out of paper, too. I have to stare at a computer screen quite enough, such as it is. I do like audio books, though.

    Reply
  52. Great interview!
    I prefer books that are made out of paper, too. I have to stare at a computer screen quite enough, such as it is. I do like audio books, though.

    Reply
  53. Great interview!
    I prefer books that are made out of paper, too. I have to stare at a computer screen quite enough, such as it is. I do like audio books, though.

    Reply
  54. Great interview!
    I prefer books that are made out of paper, too. I have to stare at a computer screen quite enough, such as it is. I do like audio books, though.

    Reply
  55. Great interview!
    I prefer books that are made out of paper, too. I have to stare at a computer screen quite enough, such as it is. I do like audio books, though.

    Reply
  56. I like unconventional heroines, and I like Merlin’s Maidens. I’ve already read books 1 and 2, and next on my TBR list is book 3.
    As for e-book vs. print–well, print is a hard sell, not that I’ve tried yet. I got an e-publisher to accept one story and they’re considering a second, so I see it as a start.

    Reply
  57. I like unconventional heroines, and I like Merlin’s Maidens. I’ve already read books 1 and 2, and next on my TBR list is book 3.
    As for e-book vs. print–well, print is a hard sell, not that I’ve tried yet. I got an e-publisher to accept one story and they’re considering a second, so I see it as a start.

    Reply
  58. I like unconventional heroines, and I like Merlin’s Maidens. I’ve already read books 1 and 2, and next on my TBR list is book 3.
    As for e-book vs. print–well, print is a hard sell, not that I’ve tried yet. I got an e-publisher to accept one story and they’re considering a second, so I see it as a start.

    Reply
  59. I like unconventional heroines, and I like Merlin’s Maidens. I’ve already read books 1 and 2, and next on my TBR list is book 3.
    As for e-book vs. print–well, print is a hard sell, not that I’ve tried yet. I got an e-publisher to accept one story and they’re considering a second, so I see it as a start.

    Reply
  60. I like unconventional heroines, and I like Merlin’s Maidens. I’ve already read books 1 and 2, and next on my TBR list is book 3.
    As for e-book vs. print–well, print is a hard sell, not that I’ve tried yet. I got an e-publisher to accept one story and they’re considering a second, so I see it as a start.

    Reply
  61. Big congrats on the e-book, Linda. That’s great. And I’m glad you are having fun flying with the Merlins.
    This is an interesting discussion we’ve started about books. Minna, I agree with you that audio books are wonderful for many people. I am such a visual person that I have trouble “listening” to a story. Wish I could, but for some reason, I need to see the words.
    However, for me, all forms of books are to be welcomed. The more ways stories can be shared with people, the better.

    Reply
  62. Big congrats on the e-book, Linda. That’s great. And I’m glad you are having fun flying with the Merlins.
    This is an interesting discussion we’ve started about books. Minna, I agree with you that audio books are wonderful for many people. I am such a visual person that I have trouble “listening” to a story. Wish I could, but for some reason, I need to see the words.
    However, for me, all forms of books are to be welcomed. The more ways stories can be shared with people, the better.

    Reply
  63. Big congrats on the e-book, Linda. That’s great. And I’m glad you are having fun flying with the Merlins.
    This is an interesting discussion we’ve started about books. Minna, I agree with you that audio books are wonderful for many people. I am such a visual person that I have trouble “listening” to a story. Wish I could, but for some reason, I need to see the words.
    However, for me, all forms of books are to be welcomed. The more ways stories can be shared with people, the better.

    Reply
  64. Big congrats on the e-book, Linda. That’s great. And I’m glad you are having fun flying with the Merlins.
    This is an interesting discussion we’ve started about books. Minna, I agree with you that audio books are wonderful for many people. I am such a visual person that I have trouble “listening” to a story. Wish I could, but for some reason, I need to see the words.
    However, for me, all forms of books are to be welcomed. The more ways stories can be shared with people, the better.

    Reply
  65. Big congrats on the e-book, Linda. That’s great. And I’m glad you are having fun flying with the Merlins.
    This is an interesting discussion we’ve started about books. Minna, I agree with you that audio books are wonderful for many people. I am such a visual person that I have trouble “listening” to a story. Wish I could, but for some reason, I need to see the words.
    However, for me, all forms of books are to be welcomed. The more ways stories can be shared with people, the better.

    Reply
  66. I’m so glad I found this interview today. I have read the first two books in the Merlin’s Maidens series, but I didn’t know the third was out yet. Now I’ve got to track down The Scarlet Spy. I loved the first two books because of the bold, spunky heroines.
    To add to the discussion here, I also prefer print books. I guess I’m just resistant to change and feel like there is nothing wrong with print books. In fact, holding a paper and ink book comforts me.

    Reply
  67. I’m so glad I found this interview today. I have read the first two books in the Merlin’s Maidens series, but I didn’t know the third was out yet. Now I’ve got to track down The Scarlet Spy. I loved the first two books because of the bold, spunky heroines.
    To add to the discussion here, I also prefer print books. I guess I’m just resistant to change and feel like there is nothing wrong with print books. In fact, holding a paper and ink book comforts me.

    Reply
  68. I’m so glad I found this interview today. I have read the first two books in the Merlin’s Maidens series, but I didn’t know the third was out yet. Now I’ve got to track down The Scarlet Spy. I loved the first two books because of the bold, spunky heroines.
    To add to the discussion here, I also prefer print books. I guess I’m just resistant to change and feel like there is nothing wrong with print books. In fact, holding a paper and ink book comforts me.

    Reply
  69. I’m so glad I found this interview today. I have read the first two books in the Merlin’s Maidens series, but I didn’t know the third was out yet. Now I’ve got to track down The Scarlet Spy. I loved the first two books because of the bold, spunky heroines.
    To add to the discussion here, I also prefer print books. I guess I’m just resistant to change and feel like there is nothing wrong with print books. In fact, holding a paper and ink book comforts me.

    Reply
  70. I’m so glad I found this interview today. I have read the first two books in the Merlin’s Maidens series, but I didn’t know the third was out yet. Now I’ve got to track down The Scarlet Spy. I loved the first two books because of the bold, spunky heroines.
    To add to the discussion here, I also prefer print books. I guess I’m just resistant to change and feel like there is nothing wrong with print books. In fact, holding a paper and ink book comforts me.

    Reply
  71. Good to see William Boyd’s picture as Hop-a-long Cassidy. Loved those movies based on Mulford’s books.
    Ms. Andre…Now I have to find your books to read.

    Reply
  72. Good to see William Boyd’s picture as Hop-a-long Cassidy. Loved those movies based on Mulford’s books.
    Ms. Andre…Now I have to find your books to read.

    Reply
  73. Good to see William Boyd’s picture as Hop-a-long Cassidy. Loved those movies based on Mulford’s books.
    Ms. Andre…Now I have to find your books to read.

    Reply
  74. Good to see William Boyd’s picture as Hop-a-long Cassidy. Loved those movies based on Mulford’s books.
    Ms. Andre…Now I have to find your books to read.

    Reply
  75. Good to see William Boyd’s picture as Hop-a-long Cassidy. Loved those movies based on Mulford’s books.
    Ms. Andre…Now I have to find your books to read.

    Reply
  76. Hi Andrea,
    Congrats on the release of “The Scarlet Spy.” “Where the Wild Things Are” is one of my favorite books from childhood. I can’t imagine what a thrill it would be in a class taught by Maurice Sendak.

    Reply
  77. Hi Andrea,
    Congrats on the release of “The Scarlet Spy.” “Where the Wild Things Are” is one of my favorite books from childhood. I can’t imagine what a thrill it would be in a class taught by Maurice Sendak.

    Reply
  78. Hi Andrea,
    Congrats on the release of “The Scarlet Spy.” “Where the Wild Things Are” is one of my favorite books from childhood. I can’t imagine what a thrill it would be in a class taught by Maurice Sendak.

    Reply
  79. Hi Andrea,
    Congrats on the release of “The Scarlet Spy.” “Where the Wild Things Are” is one of my favorite books from childhood. I can’t imagine what a thrill it would be in a class taught by Maurice Sendak.

    Reply
  80. Hi Andrea,
    Congrats on the release of “The Scarlet Spy.” “Where the Wild Things Are” is one of my favorite books from childhood. I can’t imagine what a thrill it would be in a class taught by Maurice Sendak.

    Reply
  81. Thank you Andrea and Mary Jo for the interview. I’m glad they’re reissuing some Regencies. I’ll have to look for that. Your heroines sound unusual Andrea. Are your heroes more typical?

    Reply
  82. Thank you Andrea and Mary Jo for the interview. I’m glad they’re reissuing some Regencies. I’ll have to look for that. Your heroines sound unusual Andrea. Are your heroes more typical?

    Reply
  83. Thank you Andrea and Mary Jo for the interview. I’m glad they’re reissuing some Regencies. I’ll have to look for that. Your heroines sound unusual Andrea. Are your heroes more typical?

    Reply
  84. Thank you Andrea and Mary Jo for the interview. I’m glad they’re reissuing some Regencies. I’ll have to look for that. Your heroines sound unusual Andrea. Are your heroes more typical?

    Reply
  85. Thank you Andrea and Mary Jo for the interview. I’m glad they’re reissuing some Regencies. I’ll have to look for that. Your heroines sound unusual Andrea. Are your heroes more typical?

    Reply
  86. Maureen,
    In answer to your question, I like to think that my heroes are not quite typical . . . Seduced By A spy stars a rakish Russian noble who is also a secret agent. The hero of Scarlet Spy is outwardly a darling of the English aristocracy, but he also has some hidden steel.

    Reply
  87. Maureen,
    In answer to your question, I like to think that my heroes are not quite typical . . . Seduced By A spy stars a rakish Russian noble who is also a secret agent. The hero of Scarlet Spy is outwardly a darling of the English aristocracy, but he also has some hidden steel.

    Reply
  88. Maureen,
    In answer to your question, I like to think that my heroes are not quite typical . . . Seduced By A spy stars a rakish Russian noble who is also a secret agent. The hero of Scarlet Spy is outwardly a darling of the English aristocracy, but he also has some hidden steel.

    Reply
  89. Maureen,
    In answer to your question, I like to think that my heroes are not quite typical . . . Seduced By A spy stars a rakish Russian noble who is also a secret agent. The hero of Scarlet Spy is outwardly a darling of the English aristocracy, but he also has some hidden steel.

    Reply
  90. Maureen,
    In answer to your question, I like to think that my heroes are not quite typical . . . Seduced By A spy stars a rakish Russian noble who is also a secret agent. The hero of Scarlet Spy is outwardly a darling of the English aristocracy, but he also has some hidden steel.

    Reply
  91. Hey again, Andrea, good to “see” you here!
    I’m with you–I’ll read in any format words come to me, from cereal boxes to e-readers. Everyone should have as many options as possible. I can’t “listen” to books, but that option should be available for those who can.
    Of course, I’m one of these idiots who love change, just to see what’s over the horizon.

    Reply
  92. Hey again, Andrea, good to “see” you here!
    I’m with you–I’ll read in any format words come to me, from cereal boxes to e-readers. Everyone should have as many options as possible. I can’t “listen” to books, but that option should be available for those who can.
    Of course, I’m one of these idiots who love change, just to see what’s over the horizon.

    Reply
  93. Hey again, Andrea, good to “see” you here!
    I’m with you–I’ll read in any format words come to me, from cereal boxes to e-readers. Everyone should have as many options as possible. I can’t “listen” to books, but that option should be available for those who can.
    Of course, I’m one of these idiots who love change, just to see what’s over the horizon.

    Reply
  94. Hey again, Andrea, good to “see” you here!
    I’m with you–I’ll read in any format words come to me, from cereal boxes to e-readers. Everyone should have as many options as possible. I can’t “listen” to books, but that option should be available for those who can.
    Of course, I’m one of these idiots who love change, just to see what’s over the horizon.

    Reply
  95. Hey again, Andrea, good to “see” you here!
    I’m with you–I’ll read in any format words come to me, from cereal boxes to e-readers. Everyone should have as many options as possible. I can’t “listen” to books, but that option should be available for those who can.
    Of course, I’m one of these idiots who love change, just to see what’s over the horizon.

    Reply
  96. Hi, Andrea. (waving madly) Great to see you here. Great interview. Count me among those envious of your Sendak experience. Where the Wild Things Are is one of the “classics” in my home library.

    Reply
  97. Hi, Andrea. (waving madly) Great to see you here. Great interview. Count me among those envious of your Sendak experience. Where the Wild Things Are is one of the “classics” in my home library.

    Reply
  98. Hi, Andrea. (waving madly) Great to see you here. Great interview. Count me among those envious of your Sendak experience. Where the Wild Things Are is one of the “classics” in my home library.

    Reply
  99. Hi, Andrea. (waving madly) Great to see you here. Great interview. Count me among those envious of your Sendak experience. Where the Wild Things Are is one of the “classics” in my home library.

    Reply
  100. Hi, Andrea. (waving madly) Great to see you here. Great interview. Count me among those envious of your Sendak experience. Where the Wild Things Are is one of the “classics” in my home library.

    Reply
  101. Hi Pat!
    Thanks for having me here! I love “hanging” with the Wenches. You are right, we shouldn’t ever be afraid of change. It’s what keep thing percolating and fresh. Curiosity and creativity—it’s what you guys here are all about

    Reply
  102. Hi Pat!
    Thanks for having me here! I love “hanging” with the Wenches. You are right, we shouldn’t ever be afraid of change. It’s what keep thing percolating and fresh. Curiosity and creativity—it’s what you guys here are all about

    Reply
  103. Hi Pat!
    Thanks for having me here! I love “hanging” with the Wenches. You are right, we shouldn’t ever be afraid of change. It’s what keep thing percolating and fresh. Curiosity and creativity—it’s what you guys here are all about

    Reply
  104. Hi Pat!
    Thanks for having me here! I love “hanging” with the Wenches. You are right, we shouldn’t ever be afraid of change. It’s what keep thing percolating and fresh. Curiosity and creativity—it’s what you guys here are all about

    Reply
  105. Hi Pat!
    Thanks for having me here! I love “hanging” with the Wenches. You are right, we shouldn’t ever be afraid of change. It’s what keep thing percolating and fresh. Curiosity and creativity—it’s what you guys here are all about

    Reply
  106. Hi Loretta (waving back)!
    The Sendak experience is something that profoundly influenced me. It was my first real exposure to “creative genius” and he was such a NICE man—very shy and humble. There were just 12 of us, half artists, half writers, and he really worked closely with us as we created our own picture books. I still get a kick out of remembering that I was able to tell my roommates, who were bemoaning some heavy reading assignments in organic chemistry that MY reading was Caldecott’s “Froggy Goes A Courting”!

    Reply
  107. Hi Loretta (waving back)!
    The Sendak experience is something that profoundly influenced me. It was my first real exposure to “creative genius” and he was such a NICE man—very shy and humble. There were just 12 of us, half artists, half writers, and he really worked closely with us as we created our own picture books. I still get a kick out of remembering that I was able to tell my roommates, who were bemoaning some heavy reading assignments in organic chemistry that MY reading was Caldecott’s “Froggy Goes A Courting”!

    Reply
  108. Hi Loretta (waving back)!
    The Sendak experience is something that profoundly influenced me. It was my first real exposure to “creative genius” and he was such a NICE man—very shy and humble. There were just 12 of us, half artists, half writers, and he really worked closely with us as we created our own picture books. I still get a kick out of remembering that I was able to tell my roommates, who were bemoaning some heavy reading assignments in organic chemistry that MY reading was Caldecott’s “Froggy Goes A Courting”!

    Reply
  109. Hi Loretta (waving back)!
    The Sendak experience is something that profoundly influenced me. It was my first real exposure to “creative genius” and he was such a NICE man—very shy and humble. There were just 12 of us, half artists, half writers, and he really worked closely with us as we created our own picture books. I still get a kick out of remembering that I was able to tell my roommates, who were bemoaning some heavy reading assignments in organic chemistry that MY reading was Caldecott’s “Froggy Goes A Courting”!

    Reply
  110. Hi Loretta (waving back)!
    The Sendak experience is something that profoundly influenced me. It was my first real exposure to “creative genius” and he was such a NICE man—very shy and humble. There were just 12 of us, half artists, half writers, and he really worked closely with us as we created our own picture books. I still get a kick out of remembering that I was able to tell my roommates, who were bemoaning some heavy reading assignments in organic chemistry that MY reading was Caldecott’s “Froggy Goes A Courting”!

    Reply
  111. Welcome to Word Wenches, Andrea. And great interview, Mary Jo.
    Andrea, your spy series sounds awesome! I love kick-… heroines. Definitely putting your books on my Christmas List.
    Nina, who prefers to slip between the covers with a warm book to a cold bit of plastic

    Reply
  112. Welcome to Word Wenches, Andrea. And great interview, Mary Jo.
    Andrea, your spy series sounds awesome! I love kick-… heroines. Definitely putting your books on my Christmas List.
    Nina, who prefers to slip between the covers with a warm book to a cold bit of plastic

    Reply
  113. Welcome to Word Wenches, Andrea. And great interview, Mary Jo.
    Andrea, your spy series sounds awesome! I love kick-… heroines. Definitely putting your books on my Christmas List.
    Nina, who prefers to slip between the covers with a warm book to a cold bit of plastic

    Reply
  114. Welcome to Word Wenches, Andrea. And great interview, Mary Jo.
    Andrea, your spy series sounds awesome! I love kick-… heroines. Definitely putting your books on my Christmas List.
    Nina, who prefers to slip between the covers with a warm book to a cold bit of plastic

    Reply
  115. Welcome to Word Wenches, Andrea. And great interview, Mary Jo.
    Andrea, your spy series sounds awesome! I love kick-… heroines. Definitely putting your books on my Christmas List.
    Nina, who prefers to slip between the covers with a warm book to a cold bit of plastic

    Reply
  116. True, Andrea and Janice and others, it isn’t that I’m opposed to e-books–I do think that they’re certainly paper/space savers, and they can make books readily available to an audience who might not otherwise have access, but I do like holding a book in hand and turning pages 🙂
    And ditto what others have said–how neat to have learned from Maurice Sendak! We have Where the Wild Things Are on our keeper shelf 🙂

    Reply
  117. True, Andrea and Janice and others, it isn’t that I’m opposed to e-books–I do think that they’re certainly paper/space savers, and they can make books readily available to an audience who might not otherwise have access, but I do like holding a book in hand and turning pages 🙂
    And ditto what others have said–how neat to have learned from Maurice Sendak! We have Where the Wild Things Are on our keeper shelf 🙂

    Reply
  118. True, Andrea and Janice and others, it isn’t that I’m opposed to e-books–I do think that they’re certainly paper/space savers, and they can make books readily available to an audience who might not otherwise have access, but I do like holding a book in hand and turning pages 🙂
    And ditto what others have said–how neat to have learned from Maurice Sendak! We have Where the Wild Things Are on our keeper shelf 🙂

    Reply
  119. True, Andrea and Janice and others, it isn’t that I’m opposed to e-books–I do think that they’re certainly paper/space savers, and they can make books readily available to an audience who might not otherwise have access, but I do like holding a book in hand and turning pages 🙂
    And ditto what others have said–how neat to have learned from Maurice Sendak! We have Where the Wild Things Are on our keeper shelf 🙂

    Reply
  120. True, Andrea and Janice and others, it isn’t that I’m opposed to e-books–I do think that they’re certainly paper/space savers, and they can make books readily available to an audience who might not otherwise have access, but I do like holding a book in hand and turning pages 🙂
    And ditto what others have said–how neat to have learned from Maurice Sendak! We have Where the Wild Things Are on our keeper shelf 🙂

    Reply
  121. Nina, you are right—it’s definitely nicer to curl up under the comforter with a book rather than an electronic device.

    Reply
  122. Nina, you are right—it’s definitely nicer to curl up under the comforter with a book rather than an electronic device.

    Reply
  123. Nina, you are right—it’s definitely nicer to curl up under the comforter with a book rather than an electronic device.

    Reply
  124. Nina, you are right—it’s definitely nicer to curl up under the comforter with a book rather than an electronic device.

    Reply
  125. Nina, you are right—it’s definitely nicer to curl up under the comforter with a book rather than an electronic device.

    Reply
  126. Andrea, I really miss the traditional Regencies (and I loved yours). I liked the comedy-of-manners aspect that seems to have gotten lost in the “historical romance” with its emphasis on action and hot spicy scenes. Do you think that Heyer could get a book like, for example, COTILLION published today?
    I have plans to start the Genteel Book Club, for lovers of old-fashioned books with old-fashioned plots. D.E. Stevenson, anyone? Elizabeth Cadell?
    I too grew up on Hopalong Cassidy. At one point we lived next door to some people who got suddenly rich when the man of the house invented “wetter water”; I think they were the first people in town to have a TV. It had a tiny oval screen that cut off the characters at the neck in most scenes.
    I wouldn’t have been too happy seeing Hoppy anyway, because I was raised on the actual books by Clarence E. Mulford, in which he was a lot scruffier than the color-coordinated TV version. I think my grandfather had a complete set, along most or all of the G.A. Henty books and a set of Kipling. I loved visiting my grandfather in the summer!
    I don’t care at all for contemporary spy stories, but I’m still in love with The Scarlet Pimpernel! And I love Andre Norton and Rosemary Edgehill’s Carolus Rex, set in an alternate Regency with magic.

    Reply
  127. Andrea, I really miss the traditional Regencies (and I loved yours). I liked the comedy-of-manners aspect that seems to have gotten lost in the “historical romance” with its emphasis on action and hot spicy scenes. Do you think that Heyer could get a book like, for example, COTILLION published today?
    I have plans to start the Genteel Book Club, for lovers of old-fashioned books with old-fashioned plots. D.E. Stevenson, anyone? Elizabeth Cadell?
    I too grew up on Hopalong Cassidy. At one point we lived next door to some people who got suddenly rich when the man of the house invented “wetter water”; I think they were the first people in town to have a TV. It had a tiny oval screen that cut off the characters at the neck in most scenes.
    I wouldn’t have been too happy seeing Hoppy anyway, because I was raised on the actual books by Clarence E. Mulford, in which he was a lot scruffier than the color-coordinated TV version. I think my grandfather had a complete set, along most or all of the G.A. Henty books and a set of Kipling. I loved visiting my grandfather in the summer!
    I don’t care at all for contemporary spy stories, but I’m still in love with The Scarlet Pimpernel! And I love Andre Norton and Rosemary Edgehill’s Carolus Rex, set in an alternate Regency with magic.

    Reply
  128. Andrea, I really miss the traditional Regencies (and I loved yours). I liked the comedy-of-manners aspect that seems to have gotten lost in the “historical romance” with its emphasis on action and hot spicy scenes. Do you think that Heyer could get a book like, for example, COTILLION published today?
    I have plans to start the Genteel Book Club, for lovers of old-fashioned books with old-fashioned plots. D.E. Stevenson, anyone? Elizabeth Cadell?
    I too grew up on Hopalong Cassidy. At one point we lived next door to some people who got suddenly rich when the man of the house invented “wetter water”; I think they were the first people in town to have a TV. It had a tiny oval screen that cut off the characters at the neck in most scenes.
    I wouldn’t have been too happy seeing Hoppy anyway, because I was raised on the actual books by Clarence E. Mulford, in which he was a lot scruffier than the color-coordinated TV version. I think my grandfather had a complete set, along most or all of the G.A. Henty books and a set of Kipling. I loved visiting my grandfather in the summer!
    I don’t care at all for contemporary spy stories, but I’m still in love with The Scarlet Pimpernel! And I love Andre Norton and Rosemary Edgehill’s Carolus Rex, set in an alternate Regency with magic.

    Reply
  129. Andrea, I really miss the traditional Regencies (and I loved yours). I liked the comedy-of-manners aspect that seems to have gotten lost in the “historical romance” with its emphasis on action and hot spicy scenes. Do you think that Heyer could get a book like, for example, COTILLION published today?
    I have plans to start the Genteel Book Club, for lovers of old-fashioned books with old-fashioned plots. D.E. Stevenson, anyone? Elizabeth Cadell?
    I too grew up on Hopalong Cassidy. At one point we lived next door to some people who got suddenly rich when the man of the house invented “wetter water”; I think they were the first people in town to have a TV. It had a tiny oval screen that cut off the characters at the neck in most scenes.
    I wouldn’t have been too happy seeing Hoppy anyway, because I was raised on the actual books by Clarence E. Mulford, in which he was a lot scruffier than the color-coordinated TV version. I think my grandfather had a complete set, along most or all of the G.A. Henty books and a set of Kipling. I loved visiting my grandfather in the summer!
    I don’t care at all for contemporary spy stories, but I’m still in love with The Scarlet Pimpernel! And I love Andre Norton and Rosemary Edgehill’s Carolus Rex, set in an alternate Regency with magic.

    Reply
  130. Andrea, I really miss the traditional Regencies (and I loved yours). I liked the comedy-of-manners aspect that seems to have gotten lost in the “historical romance” with its emphasis on action and hot spicy scenes. Do you think that Heyer could get a book like, for example, COTILLION published today?
    I have plans to start the Genteel Book Club, for lovers of old-fashioned books with old-fashioned plots. D.E. Stevenson, anyone? Elizabeth Cadell?
    I too grew up on Hopalong Cassidy. At one point we lived next door to some people who got suddenly rich when the man of the house invented “wetter water”; I think they were the first people in town to have a TV. It had a tiny oval screen that cut off the characters at the neck in most scenes.
    I wouldn’t have been too happy seeing Hoppy anyway, because I was raised on the actual books by Clarence E. Mulford, in which he was a lot scruffier than the color-coordinated TV version. I think my grandfather had a complete set, along most or all of the G.A. Henty books and a set of Kipling. I loved visiting my grandfather in the summer!
    I don’t care at all for contemporary spy stories, but I’m still in love with The Scarlet Pimpernel! And I love Andre Norton and Rosemary Edgehill’s Carolus Rex, set in an alternate Regency with magic.

    Reply
  131. Talpianna, I love the traditional Regencies too. Just like the way we read books in different ways these days, we ought to have a wide range of stories to suit everyone’s taste.
    But alas, you are right—it’s a tough sell for the trads these days. Editors want sex—and rather a lot of it—so we, as writers, have to adapt and try new things. Hopefully you will find modern authors that appeal to you.
    Love the cats under the covers. Sounds cozy!

    Reply
  132. Talpianna, I love the traditional Regencies too. Just like the way we read books in different ways these days, we ought to have a wide range of stories to suit everyone’s taste.
    But alas, you are right—it’s a tough sell for the trads these days. Editors want sex—and rather a lot of it—so we, as writers, have to adapt and try new things. Hopefully you will find modern authors that appeal to you.
    Love the cats under the covers. Sounds cozy!

    Reply
  133. Talpianna, I love the traditional Regencies too. Just like the way we read books in different ways these days, we ought to have a wide range of stories to suit everyone’s taste.
    But alas, you are right—it’s a tough sell for the trads these days. Editors want sex—and rather a lot of it—so we, as writers, have to adapt and try new things. Hopefully you will find modern authors that appeal to you.
    Love the cats under the covers. Sounds cozy!

    Reply
  134. Talpianna, I love the traditional Regencies too. Just like the way we read books in different ways these days, we ought to have a wide range of stories to suit everyone’s taste.
    But alas, you are right—it’s a tough sell for the trads these days. Editors want sex—and rather a lot of it—so we, as writers, have to adapt and try new things. Hopefully you will find modern authors that appeal to you.
    Love the cats under the covers. Sounds cozy!

    Reply
  135. Talpianna, I love the traditional Regencies too. Just like the way we read books in different ways these days, we ought to have a wide range of stories to suit everyone’s taste.
    But alas, you are right—it’s a tough sell for the trads these days. Editors want sex—and rather a lot of it—so we, as writers, have to adapt and try new things. Hopefully you will find modern authors that appeal to you.
    Love the cats under the covers. Sounds cozy!

    Reply
  136. Frpm Sherrie:
    Hello, Andrea, my fellow Twitter buddy! I’m writing this with my arm curled haphazardly around a cat that refuses to give up lap space to a keyboard, so forgive any typos. He keeps giving my hand affectionate head bumps, causing my fingers to skitter across the keyboard!
    One of the biggest drawbacks I see for reading books electronically is the issue of older readers with eyesight that isn’t what it used to be. (And let’s face it–older readers account for a large portion of book buyers!) After spending all day working on a computer, my eyes are tired and blurry. The last thing I want to do is read by the electronic glare of an e-reader. My eyes just cannot handle it. E-books are terrific for those who prefer them, but most of the older folks I know who have tried them ended up chucking their e-readers to the back of the closet.
    I adore audiobooks, though. Are any of your books in audiobook, Andrea? Lately, that seems to be the only way I can get any “reading” done. I would love to pick up your books in audiobook format if available! Barring that, I’ll go the old-fashioned route & get them at the grocery store!

    Reply
  137. Frpm Sherrie:
    Hello, Andrea, my fellow Twitter buddy! I’m writing this with my arm curled haphazardly around a cat that refuses to give up lap space to a keyboard, so forgive any typos. He keeps giving my hand affectionate head bumps, causing my fingers to skitter across the keyboard!
    One of the biggest drawbacks I see for reading books electronically is the issue of older readers with eyesight that isn’t what it used to be. (And let’s face it–older readers account for a large portion of book buyers!) After spending all day working on a computer, my eyes are tired and blurry. The last thing I want to do is read by the electronic glare of an e-reader. My eyes just cannot handle it. E-books are terrific for those who prefer them, but most of the older folks I know who have tried them ended up chucking their e-readers to the back of the closet.
    I adore audiobooks, though. Are any of your books in audiobook, Andrea? Lately, that seems to be the only way I can get any “reading” done. I would love to pick up your books in audiobook format if available! Barring that, I’ll go the old-fashioned route & get them at the grocery store!

    Reply
  138. Frpm Sherrie:
    Hello, Andrea, my fellow Twitter buddy! I’m writing this with my arm curled haphazardly around a cat that refuses to give up lap space to a keyboard, so forgive any typos. He keeps giving my hand affectionate head bumps, causing my fingers to skitter across the keyboard!
    One of the biggest drawbacks I see for reading books electronically is the issue of older readers with eyesight that isn’t what it used to be. (And let’s face it–older readers account for a large portion of book buyers!) After spending all day working on a computer, my eyes are tired and blurry. The last thing I want to do is read by the electronic glare of an e-reader. My eyes just cannot handle it. E-books are terrific for those who prefer them, but most of the older folks I know who have tried them ended up chucking their e-readers to the back of the closet.
    I adore audiobooks, though. Are any of your books in audiobook, Andrea? Lately, that seems to be the only way I can get any “reading” done. I would love to pick up your books in audiobook format if available! Barring that, I’ll go the old-fashioned route & get them at the grocery store!

    Reply
  139. Frpm Sherrie:
    Hello, Andrea, my fellow Twitter buddy! I’m writing this with my arm curled haphazardly around a cat that refuses to give up lap space to a keyboard, so forgive any typos. He keeps giving my hand affectionate head bumps, causing my fingers to skitter across the keyboard!
    One of the biggest drawbacks I see for reading books electronically is the issue of older readers with eyesight that isn’t what it used to be. (And let’s face it–older readers account for a large portion of book buyers!) After spending all day working on a computer, my eyes are tired and blurry. The last thing I want to do is read by the electronic glare of an e-reader. My eyes just cannot handle it. E-books are terrific for those who prefer them, but most of the older folks I know who have tried them ended up chucking their e-readers to the back of the closet.
    I adore audiobooks, though. Are any of your books in audiobook, Andrea? Lately, that seems to be the only way I can get any “reading” done. I would love to pick up your books in audiobook format if available! Barring that, I’ll go the old-fashioned route & get them at the grocery store!

    Reply
  140. Frpm Sherrie:
    Hello, Andrea, my fellow Twitter buddy! I’m writing this with my arm curled haphazardly around a cat that refuses to give up lap space to a keyboard, so forgive any typos. He keeps giving my hand affectionate head bumps, causing my fingers to skitter across the keyboard!
    One of the biggest drawbacks I see for reading books electronically is the issue of older readers with eyesight that isn’t what it used to be. (And let’s face it–older readers account for a large portion of book buyers!) After spending all day working on a computer, my eyes are tired and blurry. The last thing I want to do is read by the electronic glare of an e-reader. My eyes just cannot handle it. E-books are terrific for those who prefer them, but most of the older folks I know who have tried them ended up chucking their e-readers to the back of the closet.
    I adore audiobooks, though. Are any of your books in audiobook, Andrea? Lately, that seems to be the only way I can get any “reading” done. I would love to pick up your books in audiobook format if available! Barring that, I’ll go the old-fashioned route & get them at the grocery store!

    Reply
  141. Sherrie, I’ve been having fun following your “twitters”! However, you are making me feel very guilty about home orgaanization and cleaning! (Sort of)
    Actually I’m not quite sure whether my books are on audio . . . I think not yet. (Having not quite achieved Wenchly status in the publishing world.) So hope you will try the paper and ink version.
    That’s a very good point about “older” eyes. But I also think that so many people spend hours in front of a computer at work that even “tounger” eyeball may need a break from a screen. And someg how, an actual book feels like a reward to my, rather than just more “work”.

    Reply
  142. Sherrie, I’ve been having fun following your “twitters”! However, you are making me feel very guilty about home orgaanization and cleaning! (Sort of)
    Actually I’m not quite sure whether my books are on audio . . . I think not yet. (Having not quite achieved Wenchly status in the publishing world.) So hope you will try the paper and ink version.
    That’s a very good point about “older” eyes. But I also think that so many people spend hours in front of a computer at work that even “tounger” eyeball may need a break from a screen. And someg how, an actual book feels like a reward to my, rather than just more “work”.

    Reply
  143. Sherrie, I’ve been having fun following your “twitters”! However, you are making me feel very guilty about home orgaanization and cleaning! (Sort of)
    Actually I’m not quite sure whether my books are on audio . . . I think not yet. (Having not quite achieved Wenchly status in the publishing world.) So hope you will try the paper and ink version.
    That’s a very good point about “older” eyes. But I also think that so many people spend hours in front of a computer at work that even “tounger” eyeball may need a break from a screen. And someg how, an actual book feels like a reward to my, rather than just more “work”.

    Reply
  144. Sherrie, I’ve been having fun following your “twitters”! However, you are making me feel very guilty about home orgaanization and cleaning! (Sort of)
    Actually I’m not quite sure whether my books are on audio . . . I think not yet. (Having not quite achieved Wenchly status in the publishing world.) So hope you will try the paper and ink version.
    That’s a very good point about “older” eyes. But I also think that so many people spend hours in front of a computer at work that even “tounger” eyeball may need a break from a screen. And someg how, an actual book feels like a reward to my, rather than just more “work”.

    Reply
  145. Sherrie, I’ve been having fun following your “twitters”! However, you are making me feel very guilty about home orgaanization and cleaning! (Sort of)
    Actually I’m not quite sure whether my books are on audio . . . I think not yet. (Having not quite achieved Wenchly status in the publishing world.) So hope you will try the paper and ink version.
    That’s a very good point about “older” eyes. But I also think that so many people spend hours in front of a computer at work that even “tounger” eyeball may need a break from a screen. And someg how, an actual book feels like a reward to my, rather than just more “work”.

    Reply
  146. Hi Andrea,
    your two earlier Merlin’s Maiden are on my keeper shelf, and I’d love to read this one too. I prefer print books, I love to look at the gorgeous covers and reread them now and then in bed. Not the same with ebooks…

    Reply
  147. Hi Andrea,
    your two earlier Merlin’s Maiden are on my keeper shelf, and I’d love to read this one too. I prefer print books, I love to look at the gorgeous covers and reread them now and then in bed. Not the same with ebooks…

    Reply
  148. Hi Andrea,
    your two earlier Merlin’s Maiden are on my keeper shelf, and I’d love to read this one too. I prefer print books, I love to look at the gorgeous covers and reread them now and then in bed. Not the same with ebooks…

    Reply
  149. Hi Andrea,
    your two earlier Merlin’s Maiden are on my keeper shelf, and I’d love to read this one too. I prefer print books, I love to look at the gorgeous covers and reread them now and then in bed. Not the same with ebooks…

    Reply
  150. Hi Andrea,
    your two earlier Merlin’s Maiden are on my keeper shelf, and I’d love to read this one too. I prefer print books, I love to look at the gorgeous covers and reread them now and then in bed. Not the same with ebooks…

    Reply
  151. From MJP:
    Andrea–if it’s any comfort, my first encounter with Georgette Heyer was also stripped books–in the basement of the economy bookstore in downtown Syracuse. I was a poor college student, and wow, here were books for a nickel each!
    Like you, I didn’t understand book stripping. I have since paid for my sins by being any number of Heyer books new–sometimes more than once.
    Mary Jo, whose first Heyer was SYLVESTER. Which is still a fave…

    Reply
  152. From MJP:
    Andrea–if it’s any comfort, my first encounter with Georgette Heyer was also stripped books–in the basement of the economy bookstore in downtown Syracuse. I was a poor college student, and wow, here were books for a nickel each!
    Like you, I didn’t understand book stripping. I have since paid for my sins by being any number of Heyer books new–sometimes more than once.
    Mary Jo, whose first Heyer was SYLVESTER. Which is still a fave…

    Reply
  153. From MJP:
    Andrea–if it’s any comfort, my first encounter with Georgette Heyer was also stripped books–in the basement of the economy bookstore in downtown Syracuse. I was a poor college student, and wow, here were books for a nickel each!
    Like you, I didn’t understand book stripping. I have since paid for my sins by being any number of Heyer books new–sometimes more than once.
    Mary Jo, whose first Heyer was SYLVESTER. Which is still a fave…

    Reply
  154. From MJP:
    Andrea–if it’s any comfort, my first encounter with Georgette Heyer was also stripped books–in the basement of the economy bookstore in downtown Syracuse. I was a poor college student, and wow, here were books for a nickel each!
    Like you, I didn’t understand book stripping. I have since paid for my sins by being any number of Heyer books new–sometimes more than once.
    Mary Jo, whose first Heyer was SYLVESTER. Which is still a fave…

    Reply
  155. From MJP:
    Andrea–if it’s any comfort, my first encounter with Georgette Heyer was also stripped books–in the basement of the economy bookstore in downtown Syracuse. I was a poor college student, and wow, here were books for a nickel each!
    Like you, I didn’t understand book stripping. I have since paid for my sins by being any number of Heyer books new–sometimes more than once.
    Mary Jo, whose first Heyer was SYLVESTER. Which is still a fave…

    Reply
  156. Eva, I’m honored to have made the “keeper” shelf! Always a nice thing to hear.Hope you enjoy snuggling up with The Scarlet Spy!

    Reply
  157. Eva, I’m honored to have made the “keeper” shelf! Always a nice thing to hear.Hope you enjoy snuggling up with The Scarlet Spy!

    Reply
  158. Eva, I’m honored to have made the “keeper” shelf! Always a nice thing to hear.Hope you enjoy snuggling up with The Scarlet Spy!

    Reply
  159. Eva, I’m honored to have made the “keeper” shelf! Always a nice thing to hear.Hope you enjoy snuggling up with The Scarlet Spy!

    Reply
  160. Eva, I’m honored to have made the “keeper” shelf! Always a nice thing to hear.Hope you enjoy snuggling up with The Scarlet Spy!

    Reply
  161. Mary Jo, you make me feel a tad less guilty. I have also paid homage (literally) to GH by purchasing new copies for my collection. My first was The Talisman Ring . . . and I still smile when I re-read it.

    Reply
  162. Mary Jo, you make me feel a tad less guilty. I have also paid homage (literally) to GH by purchasing new copies for my collection. My first was The Talisman Ring . . . and I still smile when I re-read it.

    Reply
  163. Mary Jo, you make me feel a tad less guilty. I have also paid homage (literally) to GH by purchasing new copies for my collection. My first was The Talisman Ring . . . and I still smile when I re-read it.

    Reply
  164. Mary Jo, you make me feel a tad less guilty. I have also paid homage (literally) to GH by purchasing new copies for my collection. My first was The Talisman Ring . . . and I still smile when I re-read it.

    Reply
  165. Mary Jo, you make me feel a tad less guilty. I have also paid homage (literally) to GH by purchasing new copies for my collection. My first was The Talisman Ring . . . and I still smile when I re-read it.

    Reply
  166. One thing I like about audiobooks is I can be doing something else while listening to them — driving, puttering around, or as I am now, fooling around on the internet. I like best the ones that are read by their own authors (when they’re good at it) – such as Robert Evans’s The Kid Stays in the Picture, or Richard Hammond’s On the Edge (a terrific love story). But experience varies; some readers like Barbara Rosenthal add to the experience, others detract from it. And there’s no pictures. So if I love a book I often buy both print and audio.

    Reply
  167. One thing I like about audiobooks is I can be doing something else while listening to them — driving, puttering around, or as I am now, fooling around on the internet. I like best the ones that are read by their own authors (when they’re good at it) – such as Robert Evans’s The Kid Stays in the Picture, or Richard Hammond’s On the Edge (a terrific love story). But experience varies; some readers like Barbara Rosenthal add to the experience, others detract from it. And there’s no pictures. So if I love a book I often buy both print and audio.

    Reply
  168. One thing I like about audiobooks is I can be doing something else while listening to them — driving, puttering around, or as I am now, fooling around on the internet. I like best the ones that are read by their own authors (when they’re good at it) – such as Robert Evans’s The Kid Stays in the Picture, or Richard Hammond’s On the Edge (a terrific love story). But experience varies; some readers like Barbara Rosenthal add to the experience, others detract from it. And there’s no pictures. So if I love a book I often buy both print and audio.

    Reply
  169. One thing I like about audiobooks is I can be doing something else while listening to them — driving, puttering around, or as I am now, fooling around on the internet. I like best the ones that are read by their own authors (when they’re good at it) – such as Robert Evans’s The Kid Stays in the Picture, or Richard Hammond’s On the Edge (a terrific love story). But experience varies; some readers like Barbara Rosenthal add to the experience, others detract from it. And there’s no pictures. So if I love a book I often buy both print and audio.

    Reply
  170. One thing I like about audiobooks is I can be doing something else while listening to them — driving, puttering around, or as I am now, fooling around on the internet. I like best the ones that are read by their own authors (when they’re good at it) – such as Robert Evans’s The Kid Stays in the Picture, or Richard Hammond’s On the Edge (a terrific love story). But experience varies; some readers like Barbara Rosenthal add to the experience, others detract from it. And there’s no pictures. So if I love a book I often buy both print and audio.

    Reply

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