An Inside Peek at the Pantry!

ChocolateAndrea here, musing on an essential staple of the current sheltering-in-place life that most of us are living . . . or so all the food bloggers are telling us! A number of recent online articles have been waxing poetic on that humble kitchen element—the pantry!

I have a very spiffy one built into my kitchen. It is quite tall and features lovely roll-out shelves . . . which I confess are crammed to overflowing with . . .um, stuff. I actually do use the ‘stuff” in those shelves, as I like to cook. But inspired by a guide to stocking a pantry in the New York Times, I decided to take a closer look at mine.

It wasn’t pretty . . .

PantryOkay, I got fairly good marks for pasta, canned beans and various varieties of canned tomatoes. (I was actually quite proud of my rice and grain varieties, including such things as black rice, oat groats, quinoa, farro and bulgar. Um, never mind the less than perfect storage containers. (Note to self—go purchase some lovely glass cannisters.)

Honey, maple syrup and molasses? Check! (though the half-full honey has crystallized to the hardness of petrified amber. I take heart in the fact that honey is known for its longevity. Ancient Greek containers have yielded contents Maple syrupthat are still edible.) But I figure I should get extra credit for having three different types of maple syrup. (I have a wonderful recipe for maple-soy-ginger glaze for salmon and poultry.) I did pretty well on dried fruits, too. Raisins, cranberries, cherries were all in excellent shape. Alas, how did those lovely figs and dates turn into rocks?

Peanut butter and nuts also scored high marks (though I should stock up on tahini) But I flunked fish. No anchovies, tuna or sardines . . .which reminded me that the last time I had sardines (I don’t remember quite when that was) I liked them. However, I rebounded with oils—I have several olive oils, canola oil and toasted sesame oil. And dried herbs and spices also earned an “A”. I love perking up food with such condiments, as well as fresh herbs.
Spices
As for chocolate . . . needless to say, I take pride in being fully stocked for any culinary longing. Chocolate chips, cocoa powder, baking chocolate (I discovered I was hoarding one last box of single estate unsweetened baking chocolate from Trader Joe’s. I still haven’t forgiven them from discontinuing the that line!) And of course there is eating chocolate, both milk and dark. However, I did decide that I need to toss the plastic container of left-over jelly beans from three Easters ago.

OnionsCrackers . . . okay, I’m guilty of more half-open boxes than I realized, resulting soggy, inedible fare. Out with them! Root vegetables on the bottom shelf were also a mixed bag. (Hmm, did I really not notice the dessicated garlic cloves and the potatoes growing those very frightening appendages? More fodder for the garbage can.)

The New York Times has also been running a series of tips and recipes based on simple ingredients from the pantry. There are some fun ones for “snacking cake” as well as hearty soups and stews. You can check them out here, along with a number of other helpful stories about cooking in the time of COVID 19.

Hoosier CabineNow, before I push all the drawers back in place and shut the door, here are just a few interesting highlights on the history of the pantry. The word derives for the French word paneterie, which has its roots in pain, the French word for bread. In the Middle Ages, households had a specific space for bread, as well as a specific space for meats and other essentials (larder, buttery, etc)

The butler’s pantry developed as a room in which to store the silver. Given the value of the items, the butler often slept there.

Women-pantry
In the 1930s, the ‘Hoosier cabinet’ became popular, which in effect moved the pantry into the kitchen. It’s really the forerunner of what many of us use today, whether it’s built into the kitchen cabinets or a freestanding piece of furniture.

So do you have a pantry and is it well-stocked? Have you been using its contents during the last few weeks? What's been your go-to pantry item?

 

130 thoughts on “An Inside Peek at the Pantry!”

  1. I’ve been cleaning out kitchen cupboards since lock down started and I can tell you Andrea, I’ve come across some horrors!!My daughter took over baking when she was ill and had cupboards full of stuff. I thought most of it was decorating stuff or long lasting stuff. I found flours and sugars and things that had changed completely so I didn’t know what they were anymore, dated back to 2014!!!
    My next clear out is the ‘junk press’! Anything no one knows what to do with goes in there. The Lord alone knows what I’ll find!!

    Reply
  2. I’ve been cleaning out kitchen cupboards since lock down started and I can tell you Andrea, I’ve come across some horrors!!My daughter took over baking when she was ill and had cupboards full of stuff. I thought most of it was decorating stuff or long lasting stuff. I found flours and sugars and things that had changed completely so I didn’t know what they were anymore, dated back to 2014!!!
    My next clear out is the ‘junk press’! Anything no one knows what to do with goes in there. The Lord alone knows what I’ll find!!

    Reply
  3. I’ve been cleaning out kitchen cupboards since lock down started and I can tell you Andrea, I’ve come across some horrors!!My daughter took over baking when she was ill and had cupboards full of stuff. I thought most of it was decorating stuff or long lasting stuff. I found flours and sugars and things that had changed completely so I didn’t know what they were anymore, dated back to 2014!!!
    My next clear out is the ‘junk press’! Anything no one knows what to do with goes in there. The Lord alone knows what I’ll find!!

    Reply
  4. I’ve been cleaning out kitchen cupboards since lock down started and I can tell you Andrea, I’ve come across some horrors!!My daughter took over baking when she was ill and had cupboards full of stuff. I thought most of it was decorating stuff or long lasting stuff. I found flours and sugars and things that had changed completely so I didn’t know what they were anymore, dated back to 2014!!!
    My next clear out is the ‘junk press’! Anything no one knows what to do with goes in there. The Lord alone knows what I’ll find!!

    Reply
  5. I’ve been cleaning out kitchen cupboards since lock down started and I can tell you Andrea, I’ve come across some horrors!!My daughter took over baking when she was ill and had cupboards full of stuff. I thought most of it was decorating stuff or long lasting stuff. I found flours and sugars and things that had changed completely so I didn’t know what they were anymore, dated back to 2014!!!
    My next clear out is the ‘junk press’! Anything no one knows what to do with goes in there. The Lord alone knows what I’ll find!!

    Reply
  6. My pantry is a closet with shelves in the kitchen. I wouldn’t want to take a picture. I know it’s a mess. I have been pleasantly surprised these last few weeks that my pantry is better stocked than I expected. Probably because I am in the habit of buying 1 or 2 restock items every time I grocery shop. At least, I was doing that before the virus. I definitely have enough chocolate to last quite a while.

    Reply
  7. My pantry is a closet with shelves in the kitchen. I wouldn’t want to take a picture. I know it’s a mess. I have been pleasantly surprised these last few weeks that my pantry is better stocked than I expected. Probably because I am in the habit of buying 1 or 2 restock items every time I grocery shop. At least, I was doing that before the virus. I definitely have enough chocolate to last quite a while.

    Reply
  8. My pantry is a closet with shelves in the kitchen. I wouldn’t want to take a picture. I know it’s a mess. I have been pleasantly surprised these last few weeks that my pantry is better stocked than I expected. Probably because I am in the habit of buying 1 or 2 restock items every time I grocery shop. At least, I was doing that before the virus. I definitely have enough chocolate to last quite a while.

    Reply
  9. My pantry is a closet with shelves in the kitchen. I wouldn’t want to take a picture. I know it’s a mess. I have been pleasantly surprised these last few weeks that my pantry is better stocked than I expected. Probably because I am in the habit of buying 1 or 2 restock items every time I grocery shop. At least, I was doing that before the virus. I definitely have enough chocolate to last quite a while.

    Reply
  10. My pantry is a closet with shelves in the kitchen. I wouldn’t want to take a picture. I know it’s a mess. I have been pleasantly surprised these last few weeks that my pantry is better stocked than I expected. Probably because I am in the habit of buying 1 or 2 restock items every time I grocery shop. At least, I was doing that before the virus. I definitely have enough chocolate to last quite a while.

    Reply
  11. Andrea, thanks for the fun trip through sometimes terrifying territory! I’d say you rate at least an A- even by New York Times standards. *G* I’m more likely a B-, though like Misti, I’m big on restocking items I’m about to run out of. Honey is easy–just put the bottle in hot water and the crystal magically melt into soft sweetness. I think I consider the freezer in the basement part of my pantry–lots of interesting things in there!

    Reply
  12. Andrea, thanks for the fun trip through sometimes terrifying territory! I’d say you rate at least an A- even by New York Times standards. *G* I’m more likely a B-, though like Misti, I’m big on restocking items I’m about to run out of. Honey is easy–just put the bottle in hot water and the crystal magically melt into soft sweetness. I think I consider the freezer in the basement part of my pantry–lots of interesting things in there!

    Reply
  13. Andrea, thanks for the fun trip through sometimes terrifying territory! I’d say you rate at least an A- even by New York Times standards. *G* I’m more likely a B-, though like Misti, I’m big on restocking items I’m about to run out of. Honey is easy–just put the bottle in hot water and the crystal magically melt into soft sweetness. I think I consider the freezer in the basement part of my pantry–lots of interesting things in there!

    Reply
  14. Andrea, thanks for the fun trip through sometimes terrifying territory! I’d say you rate at least an A- even by New York Times standards. *G* I’m more likely a B-, though like Misti, I’m big on restocking items I’m about to run out of. Honey is easy–just put the bottle in hot water and the crystal magically melt into soft sweetness. I think I consider the freezer in the basement part of my pantry–lots of interesting things in there!

    Reply
  15. Andrea, thanks for the fun trip through sometimes terrifying territory! I’d say you rate at least an A- even by New York Times standards. *G* I’m more likely a B-, though like Misti, I’m big on restocking items I’m about to run out of. Honey is easy–just put the bottle in hot water and the crystal magically melt into soft sweetness. I think I consider the freezer in the basement part of my pantry–lots of interesting things in there!

    Reply
  16. Our pantry is a lazy-Susan tucked into the corner cabinet of our kitchen. Thanks to my Mom who loved that style from the house in which I grew up. When she remodeled the kitchen in the late 1990s, that was on the top of her list. As for how well-stocked it is, is thanks to my husband who is an essential worker in a grocery store. We do our monthly stock up as per usual. A couple times a week, my husband calls me from work to see if there is anything that we need, he’ll bring it home after work. As a result we are fortunate that we aren’t experiencing shortages other than prefered cleaning supplies, but we have found acceptable alternatives. Most of the meals my husband and I make have a starch component, so our go-to items are pasta, rice and potatoes.

    Reply
  17. Our pantry is a lazy-Susan tucked into the corner cabinet of our kitchen. Thanks to my Mom who loved that style from the house in which I grew up. When she remodeled the kitchen in the late 1990s, that was on the top of her list. As for how well-stocked it is, is thanks to my husband who is an essential worker in a grocery store. We do our monthly stock up as per usual. A couple times a week, my husband calls me from work to see if there is anything that we need, he’ll bring it home after work. As a result we are fortunate that we aren’t experiencing shortages other than prefered cleaning supplies, but we have found acceptable alternatives. Most of the meals my husband and I make have a starch component, so our go-to items are pasta, rice and potatoes.

    Reply
  18. Our pantry is a lazy-Susan tucked into the corner cabinet of our kitchen. Thanks to my Mom who loved that style from the house in which I grew up. When she remodeled the kitchen in the late 1990s, that was on the top of her list. As for how well-stocked it is, is thanks to my husband who is an essential worker in a grocery store. We do our monthly stock up as per usual. A couple times a week, my husband calls me from work to see if there is anything that we need, he’ll bring it home after work. As a result we are fortunate that we aren’t experiencing shortages other than prefered cleaning supplies, but we have found acceptable alternatives. Most of the meals my husband and I make have a starch component, so our go-to items are pasta, rice and potatoes.

    Reply
  19. Our pantry is a lazy-Susan tucked into the corner cabinet of our kitchen. Thanks to my Mom who loved that style from the house in which I grew up. When she remodeled the kitchen in the late 1990s, that was on the top of her list. As for how well-stocked it is, is thanks to my husband who is an essential worker in a grocery store. We do our monthly stock up as per usual. A couple times a week, my husband calls me from work to see if there is anything that we need, he’ll bring it home after work. As a result we are fortunate that we aren’t experiencing shortages other than prefered cleaning supplies, but we have found acceptable alternatives. Most of the meals my husband and I make have a starch component, so our go-to items are pasta, rice and potatoes.

    Reply
  20. Our pantry is a lazy-Susan tucked into the corner cabinet of our kitchen. Thanks to my Mom who loved that style from the house in which I grew up. When she remodeled the kitchen in the late 1990s, that was on the top of her list. As for how well-stocked it is, is thanks to my husband who is an essential worker in a grocery store. We do our monthly stock up as per usual. A couple times a week, my husband calls me from work to see if there is anything that we need, he’ll bring it home after work. As a result we are fortunate that we aren’t experiencing shortages other than prefered cleaning supplies, but we have found acceptable alternatives. Most of the meals my husband and I make have a starch component, so our go-to items are pasta, rice and potatoes.

    Reply
  21. it helps to have friends in the right places! My local stores have been pretty good about having a good selection of things. yes, some stuff does run out, but the staples are well stocked. Except for toiley paper. I’m still trying to understand why that is the one impossible item to find. (Except at Trader Joe’s, which has had a couple of deliveries, which they nicely ration one.) Go figure.

    Reply
  22. it helps to have friends in the right places! My local stores have been pretty good about having a good selection of things. yes, some stuff does run out, but the staples are well stocked. Except for toiley paper. I’m still trying to understand why that is the one impossible item to find. (Except at Trader Joe’s, which has had a couple of deliveries, which they nicely ration one.) Go figure.

    Reply
  23. it helps to have friends in the right places! My local stores have been pretty good about having a good selection of things. yes, some stuff does run out, but the staples are well stocked. Except for toiley paper. I’m still trying to understand why that is the one impossible item to find. (Except at Trader Joe’s, which has had a couple of deliveries, which they nicely ration one.) Go figure.

    Reply
  24. it helps to have friends in the right places! My local stores have been pretty good about having a good selection of things. yes, some stuff does run out, but the staples are well stocked. Except for toiley paper. I’m still trying to understand why that is the one impossible item to find. (Except at Trader Joe’s, which has had a couple of deliveries, which they nicely ration one.) Go figure.

    Reply
  25. it helps to have friends in the right places! My local stores have been pretty good about having a good selection of things. yes, some stuff does run out, but the staples are well stocked. Except for toiley paper. I’m still trying to understand why that is the one impossible item to find. (Except at Trader Joe’s, which has had a couple of deliveries, which they nicely ration one.) Go figure.

    Reply
  26. We repurposed a book shelf in our daughter’s room after she moved to Korea into a pantry for our low sodium items (broth, an assortment of canned beans, and marinara); other items reside in the kitchen cupboards. Our stock of supplies is pretty lean.
    My sister’s pantry, on the other hand, is a palatial walk in closet. My sister loves to support farm to table small businesses, and her pantry is filled with many wonders. She also (historically) has traveled A LOT, so her pantry has international flair. The irony is that she and her husband (pre-COVID-19) often ate out, so things in her pantry sit and age.
    I stayed at my sister’s house for several weeks once with my convalescing mother while my sister was out of the country. As a project, I tidied her pantry and fridge. The oldest item I found had expired eight years earlier. I also (and I’m not kidding) completely filled two large trash bins with expired goods. It was actually rather painful to consider the waste of food and money.

    Reply
  27. We repurposed a book shelf in our daughter’s room after she moved to Korea into a pantry for our low sodium items (broth, an assortment of canned beans, and marinara); other items reside in the kitchen cupboards. Our stock of supplies is pretty lean.
    My sister’s pantry, on the other hand, is a palatial walk in closet. My sister loves to support farm to table small businesses, and her pantry is filled with many wonders. She also (historically) has traveled A LOT, so her pantry has international flair. The irony is that she and her husband (pre-COVID-19) often ate out, so things in her pantry sit and age.
    I stayed at my sister’s house for several weeks once with my convalescing mother while my sister was out of the country. As a project, I tidied her pantry and fridge. The oldest item I found had expired eight years earlier. I also (and I’m not kidding) completely filled two large trash bins with expired goods. It was actually rather painful to consider the waste of food and money.

    Reply
  28. We repurposed a book shelf in our daughter’s room after she moved to Korea into a pantry for our low sodium items (broth, an assortment of canned beans, and marinara); other items reside in the kitchen cupboards. Our stock of supplies is pretty lean.
    My sister’s pantry, on the other hand, is a palatial walk in closet. My sister loves to support farm to table small businesses, and her pantry is filled with many wonders. She also (historically) has traveled A LOT, so her pantry has international flair. The irony is that she and her husband (pre-COVID-19) often ate out, so things in her pantry sit and age.
    I stayed at my sister’s house for several weeks once with my convalescing mother while my sister was out of the country. As a project, I tidied her pantry and fridge. The oldest item I found had expired eight years earlier. I also (and I’m not kidding) completely filled two large trash bins with expired goods. It was actually rather painful to consider the waste of food and money.

    Reply
  29. We repurposed a book shelf in our daughter’s room after she moved to Korea into a pantry for our low sodium items (broth, an assortment of canned beans, and marinara); other items reside in the kitchen cupboards. Our stock of supplies is pretty lean.
    My sister’s pantry, on the other hand, is a palatial walk in closet. My sister loves to support farm to table small businesses, and her pantry is filled with many wonders. She also (historically) has traveled A LOT, so her pantry has international flair. The irony is that she and her husband (pre-COVID-19) often ate out, so things in her pantry sit and age.
    I stayed at my sister’s house for several weeks once with my convalescing mother while my sister was out of the country. As a project, I tidied her pantry and fridge. The oldest item I found had expired eight years earlier. I also (and I’m not kidding) completely filled two large trash bins with expired goods. It was actually rather painful to consider the waste of food and money.

    Reply
  30. We repurposed a book shelf in our daughter’s room after she moved to Korea into a pantry for our low sodium items (broth, an assortment of canned beans, and marinara); other items reside in the kitchen cupboards. Our stock of supplies is pretty lean.
    My sister’s pantry, on the other hand, is a palatial walk in closet. My sister loves to support farm to table small businesses, and her pantry is filled with many wonders. She also (historically) has traveled A LOT, so her pantry has international flair. The irony is that she and her husband (pre-COVID-19) often ate out, so things in her pantry sit and age.
    I stayed at my sister’s house for several weeks once with my convalescing mother while my sister was out of the country. As a project, I tidied her pantry and fridge. The oldest item I found had expired eight years earlier. I also (and I’m not kidding) completely filled two large trash bins with expired goods. It was actually rather painful to consider the waste of food and money.

    Reply
  31. Kareni, your sister’s pantry sounds wonderful, but how sad that so much great stuff was wasted. I’ve been guilty on occasion of bringing some exotic food back from a trip, and then hoarding it, saying “I need to save it for a special occasion.” And then forget, and find it outdated and have to toss it. Not often, but I hate doing it, so I try to be aware of what’s tucked away in the shadows!

    Reply
  32. Kareni, your sister’s pantry sounds wonderful, but how sad that so much great stuff was wasted. I’ve been guilty on occasion of bringing some exotic food back from a trip, and then hoarding it, saying “I need to save it for a special occasion.” And then forget, and find it outdated and have to toss it. Not often, but I hate doing it, so I try to be aware of what’s tucked away in the shadows!

    Reply
  33. Kareni, your sister’s pantry sounds wonderful, but how sad that so much great stuff was wasted. I’ve been guilty on occasion of bringing some exotic food back from a trip, and then hoarding it, saying “I need to save it for a special occasion.” And then forget, and find it outdated and have to toss it. Not often, but I hate doing it, so I try to be aware of what’s tucked away in the shadows!

    Reply
  34. Kareni, your sister’s pantry sounds wonderful, but how sad that so much great stuff was wasted. I’ve been guilty on occasion of bringing some exotic food back from a trip, and then hoarding it, saying “I need to save it for a special occasion.” And then forget, and find it outdated and have to toss it. Not often, but I hate doing it, so I try to be aware of what’s tucked away in the shadows!

    Reply
  35. Kareni, your sister’s pantry sounds wonderful, but how sad that so much great stuff was wasted. I’ve been guilty on occasion of bringing some exotic food back from a trip, and then hoarding it, saying “I need to save it for a special occasion.” And then forget, and find it outdated and have to toss it. Not often, but I hate doing it, so I try to be aware of what’s tucked away in the shadows!

    Reply
  36. Andrea, the reason for the TP debacle is that there are two supply chains: home and not-home. The flimsy stuff you’re faced with in offices, libraries, and other workplaces comes from an entirely different production and marketing system from Charmin. Generally, the two lines are in balance, but with everyone home, no-one’s using the thin stuff and the demand for the good stuff is basically doubled. This can’t be corrected in any quick and feasible way.
    This is also true of much of our food supply, which has parallel supply chains for home versus industrial use (restaurants, hospitals, work cafeterias, etc.). That’s why eggs and meat are allegedly getting scarce, too.
    As the supposed Chinese curse goes, we do live in interesting times. But there are blessings, too, including cleaner skies.

    Reply
  37. Andrea, the reason for the TP debacle is that there are two supply chains: home and not-home. The flimsy stuff you’re faced with in offices, libraries, and other workplaces comes from an entirely different production and marketing system from Charmin. Generally, the two lines are in balance, but with everyone home, no-one’s using the thin stuff and the demand for the good stuff is basically doubled. This can’t be corrected in any quick and feasible way.
    This is also true of much of our food supply, which has parallel supply chains for home versus industrial use (restaurants, hospitals, work cafeterias, etc.). That’s why eggs and meat are allegedly getting scarce, too.
    As the supposed Chinese curse goes, we do live in interesting times. But there are blessings, too, including cleaner skies.

    Reply
  38. Andrea, the reason for the TP debacle is that there are two supply chains: home and not-home. The flimsy stuff you’re faced with in offices, libraries, and other workplaces comes from an entirely different production and marketing system from Charmin. Generally, the two lines are in balance, but with everyone home, no-one’s using the thin stuff and the demand for the good stuff is basically doubled. This can’t be corrected in any quick and feasible way.
    This is also true of much of our food supply, which has parallel supply chains for home versus industrial use (restaurants, hospitals, work cafeterias, etc.). That’s why eggs and meat are allegedly getting scarce, too.
    As the supposed Chinese curse goes, we do live in interesting times. But there are blessings, too, including cleaner skies.

    Reply
  39. Andrea, the reason for the TP debacle is that there are two supply chains: home and not-home. The flimsy stuff you’re faced with in offices, libraries, and other workplaces comes from an entirely different production and marketing system from Charmin. Generally, the two lines are in balance, but with everyone home, no-one’s using the thin stuff and the demand for the good stuff is basically doubled. This can’t be corrected in any quick and feasible way.
    This is also true of much of our food supply, which has parallel supply chains for home versus industrial use (restaurants, hospitals, work cafeterias, etc.). That’s why eggs and meat are allegedly getting scarce, too.
    As the supposed Chinese curse goes, we do live in interesting times. But there are blessings, too, including cleaner skies.

    Reply
  40. Andrea, the reason for the TP debacle is that there are two supply chains: home and not-home. The flimsy stuff you’re faced with in offices, libraries, and other workplaces comes from an entirely different production and marketing system from Charmin. Generally, the two lines are in balance, but with everyone home, no-one’s using the thin stuff and the demand for the good stuff is basically doubled. This can’t be corrected in any quick and feasible way.
    This is also true of much of our food supply, which has parallel supply chains for home versus industrial use (restaurants, hospitals, work cafeterias, etc.). That’s why eggs and meat are allegedly getting scarce, too.
    As the supposed Chinese curse goes, we do live in interesting times. But there are blessings, too, including cleaner skies.

    Reply
  41. We don’t have a pantry. So the storage is all over the kitchen (and the freezer in the basement? as Mary Jo suggested). We’re farily well stocked, as I check frequently. Also, I have a rotation plan that pulls the oldest stuff in front. It works fairly well. And then a heavy pollen season hits! I’m out like a light for days, and I must start over.
    But all in all, it works fairly well.
    On the other hand … I’ve just discovered that out guest room has become a junk room, which I have started clearing out. These aren’t perishables, but the amount to be taken care of is staggering!

    Reply
  42. We don’t have a pantry. So the storage is all over the kitchen (and the freezer in the basement? as Mary Jo suggested). We’re farily well stocked, as I check frequently. Also, I have a rotation plan that pulls the oldest stuff in front. It works fairly well. And then a heavy pollen season hits! I’m out like a light for days, and I must start over.
    But all in all, it works fairly well.
    On the other hand … I’ve just discovered that out guest room has become a junk room, which I have started clearing out. These aren’t perishables, but the amount to be taken care of is staggering!

    Reply
  43. We don’t have a pantry. So the storage is all over the kitchen (and the freezer in the basement? as Mary Jo suggested). We’re farily well stocked, as I check frequently. Also, I have a rotation plan that pulls the oldest stuff in front. It works fairly well. And then a heavy pollen season hits! I’m out like a light for days, and I must start over.
    But all in all, it works fairly well.
    On the other hand … I’ve just discovered that out guest room has become a junk room, which I have started clearing out. These aren’t perishables, but the amount to be taken care of is staggering!

    Reply
  44. We don’t have a pantry. So the storage is all over the kitchen (and the freezer in the basement? as Mary Jo suggested). We’re farily well stocked, as I check frequently. Also, I have a rotation plan that pulls the oldest stuff in front. It works fairly well. And then a heavy pollen season hits! I’m out like a light for days, and I must start over.
    But all in all, it works fairly well.
    On the other hand … I’ve just discovered that out guest room has become a junk room, which I have started clearing out. These aren’t perishables, but the amount to be taken care of is staggering!

    Reply
  45. We don’t have a pantry. So the storage is all over the kitchen (and the freezer in the basement? as Mary Jo suggested). We’re farily well stocked, as I check frequently. Also, I have a rotation plan that pulls the oldest stuff in front. It works fairly well. And then a heavy pollen season hits! I’m out like a light for days, and I must start over.
    But all in all, it works fairly well.
    On the other hand … I’ve just discovered that out guest room has become a junk room, which I have started clearing out. These aren’t perishables, but the amount to be taken care of is staggering!

    Reply
  46. I have an old-fashioned walk-in pantry and I love it. I can see everything at a glance, and probably score pretty well on the basics, as like others here, I restock as I go. And I do have plenty of canned fish – tuna, mackerel, sardines, anchovies. But I’m a fish lover, and eat lots of fresh fish as well.
    That doesn’t mean that there aren’t a few fossils lurking at the back of the pantry. Might be time for me to have a clean-out. I was going to make a suggestion about your solid honey, but I see Mary Jo beat me to it. I still have some of the last honey I harvested.
    But one thing my pantry has none of and that’s chocolate. Somehow, whenever I buy chocolate it disappears. No idea how. Cocoa, drinking chocolate and baking cacao is fine, but whenever I buy eating chocolate it just . . . goes. It’s a real mystery.

    Reply
  47. I have an old-fashioned walk-in pantry and I love it. I can see everything at a glance, and probably score pretty well on the basics, as like others here, I restock as I go. And I do have plenty of canned fish – tuna, mackerel, sardines, anchovies. But I’m a fish lover, and eat lots of fresh fish as well.
    That doesn’t mean that there aren’t a few fossils lurking at the back of the pantry. Might be time for me to have a clean-out. I was going to make a suggestion about your solid honey, but I see Mary Jo beat me to it. I still have some of the last honey I harvested.
    But one thing my pantry has none of and that’s chocolate. Somehow, whenever I buy chocolate it disappears. No idea how. Cocoa, drinking chocolate and baking cacao is fine, but whenever I buy eating chocolate it just . . . goes. It’s a real mystery.

    Reply
  48. I have an old-fashioned walk-in pantry and I love it. I can see everything at a glance, and probably score pretty well on the basics, as like others here, I restock as I go. And I do have plenty of canned fish – tuna, mackerel, sardines, anchovies. But I’m a fish lover, and eat lots of fresh fish as well.
    That doesn’t mean that there aren’t a few fossils lurking at the back of the pantry. Might be time for me to have a clean-out. I was going to make a suggestion about your solid honey, but I see Mary Jo beat me to it. I still have some of the last honey I harvested.
    But one thing my pantry has none of and that’s chocolate. Somehow, whenever I buy chocolate it disappears. No idea how. Cocoa, drinking chocolate and baking cacao is fine, but whenever I buy eating chocolate it just . . . goes. It’s a real mystery.

    Reply
  49. I have an old-fashioned walk-in pantry and I love it. I can see everything at a glance, and probably score pretty well on the basics, as like others here, I restock as I go. And I do have plenty of canned fish – tuna, mackerel, sardines, anchovies. But I’m a fish lover, and eat lots of fresh fish as well.
    That doesn’t mean that there aren’t a few fossils lurking at the back of the pantry. Might be time for me to have a clean-out. I was going to make a suggestion about your solid honey, but I see Mary Jo beat me to it. I still have some of the last honey I harvested.
    But one thing my pantry has none of and that’s chocolate. Somehow, whenever I buy chocolate it disappears. No idea how. Cocoa, drinking chocolate and baking cacao is fine, but whenever I buy eating chocolate it just . . . goes. It’s a real mystery.

    Reply
  50. I have an old-fashioned walk-in pantry and I love it. I can see everything at a glance, and probably score pretty well on the basics, as like others here, I restock as I go. And I do have plenty of canned fish – tuna, mackerel, sardines, anchovies. But I’m a fish lover, and eat lots of fresh fish as well.
    That doesn’t mean that there aren’t a few fossils lurking at the back of the pantry. Might be time for me to have a clean-out. I was going to make a suggestion about your solid honey, but I see Mary Jo beat me to it. I still have some of the last honey I harvested.
    But one thing my pantry has none of and that’s chocolate. Somehow, whenever I buy chocolate it disappears. No idea how. Cocoa, drinking chocolate and baking cacao is fine, but whenever I buy eating chocolate it just . . . goes. It’s a real mystery.

    Reply
  51. We moved last July into a Victorian with a little open pantry under an archway at one end of the kitchen. There are cupboards galore and drawers that need a smoothing of soap so I can wrestle them open. It’s big enough to store the “good” dishes and food and all the other strange things I’ve acquired after almost 50 years of marriage. It’s fairly well organized now, but only because I threw out an unconscionable amount of stuff when I packed up the old house. Sauce mixes from 2010, etc. I’m sure I could have poisoned half my old town. Right now there’s too much on the shelves–my husband has turned into a prepper and I’m not sure I’ll live long enough to eat 3 boxes of Raisin Bran. Maybe muffins are in my future.:)

    Reply
  52. We moved last July into a Victorian with a little open pantry under an archway at one end of the kitchen. There are cupboards galore and drawers that need a smoothing of soap so I can wrestle them open. It’s big enough to store the “good” dishes and food and all the other strange things I’ve acquired after almost 50 years of marriage. It’s fairly well organized now, but only because I threw out an unconscionable amount of stuff when I packed up the old house. Sauce mixes from 2010, etc. I’m sure I could have poisoned half my old town. Right now there’s too much on the shelves–my husband has turned into a prepper and I’m not sure I’ll live long enough to eat 3 boxes of Raisin Bran. Maybe muffins are in my future.:)

    Reply
  53. We moved last July into a Victorian with a little open pantry under an archway at one end of the kitchen. There are cupboards galore and drawers that need a smoothing of soap so I can wrestle them open. It’s big enough to store the “good” dishes and food and all the other strange things I’ve acquired after almost 50 years of marriage. It’s fairly well organized now, but only because I threw out an unconscionable amount of stuff when I packed up the old house. Sauce mixes from 2010, etc. I’m sure I could have poisoned half my old town. Right now there’s too much on the shelves–my husband has turned into a prepper and I’m not sure I’ll live long enough to eat 3 boxes of Raisin Bran. Maybe muffins are in my future.:)

    Reply
  54. We moved last July into a Victorian with a little open pantry under an archway at one end of the kitchen. There are cupboards galore and drawers that need a smoothing of soap so I can wrestle them open. It’s big enough to store the “good” dishes and food and all the other strange things I’ve acquired after almost 50 years of marriage. It’s fairly well organized now, but only because I threw out an unconscionable amount of stuff when I packed up the old house. Sauce mixes from 2010, etc. I’m sure I could have poisoned half my old town. Right now there’s too much on the shelves–my husband has turned into a prepper and I’m not sure I’ll live long enough to eat 3 boxes of Raisin Bran. Maybe muffins are in my future.:)

    Reply
  55. We moved last July into a Victorian with a little open pantry under an archway at one end of the kitchen. There are cupboards galore and drawers that need a smoothing of soap so I can wrestle them open. It’s big enough to store the “good” dishes and food and all the other strange things I’ve acquired after almost 50 years of marriage. It’s fairly well organized now, but only because I threw out an unconscionable amount of stuff when I packed up the old house. Sauce mixes from 2010, etc. I’m sure I could have poisoned half my old town. Right now there’s too much on the shelves–my husband has turned into a prepper and I’m not sure I’ll live long enough to eat 3 boxes of Raisin Bran. Maybe muffins are in my future.:)

    Reply
  56. Sue, I’m VERY impressed by your organization. I need think of your rotation system of moving things back to front so I don’t let the hidden stuff languish.
    The junk room . . .sigh. I feel your pain! I have the junk closets. I have very big and deep closets, plus two bedrooms with walk-in closets. I know I should think of tackling them . . .

    Reply
  57. Sue, I’m VERY impressed by your organization. I need think of your rotation system of moving things back to front so I don’t let the hidden stuff languish.
    The junk room . . .sigh. I feel your pain! I have the junk closets. I have very big and deep closets, plus two bedrooms with walk-in closets. I know I should think of tackling them . . .

    Reply
  58. Sue, I’m VERY impressed by your organization. I need think of your rotation system of moving things back to front so I don’t let the hidden stuff languish.
    The junk room . . .sigh. I feel your pain! I have the junk closets. I have very big and deep closets, plus two bedrooms with walk-in closets. I know I should think of tackling them . . .

    Reply
  59. Sue, I’m VERY impressed by your organization. I need think of your rotation system of moving things back to front so I don’t let the hidden stuff languish.
    The junk room . . .sigh. I feel your pain! I have the junk closets. I have very big and deep closets, plus two bedrooms with walk-in closets. I know I should think of tackling them . . .

    Reply
  60. Sue, I’m VERY impressed by your organization. I need think of your rotation system of moving things back to front so I don’t let the hidden stuff languish.
    The junk room . . .sigh. I feel your pain! I have the junk closets. I have very big and deep closets, plus two bedrooms with walk-in closets. I know I should think of tackling them . . .

    Reply
  61. My deepest sympathies on the disappearing chocolate, Anne. You must have some VERY malevolent mice!
    A walk-in pantry- sounds divine—much easier to see things. And I know you makes preserves and condiments, so it’s lovely to have all that room for glass jars. (I do know the trick of heating honey.)

    Reply
  62. My deepest sympathies on the disappearing chocolate, Anne. You must have some VERY malevolent mice!
    A walk-in pantry- sounds divine—much easier to see things. And I know you makes preserves and condiments, so it’s lovely to have all that room for glass jars. (I do know the trick of heating honey.)

    Reply
  63. My deepest sympathies on the disappearing chocolate, Anne. You must have some VERY malevolent mice!
    A walk-in pantry- sounds divine—much easier to see things. And I know you makes preserves and condiments, so it’s lovely to have all that room for glass jars. (I do know the trick of heating honey.)

    Reply
  64. My deepest sympathies on the disappearing chocolate, Anne. You must have some VERY malevolent mice!
    A walk-in pantry- sounds divine—much easier to see things. And I know you makes preserves and condiments, so it’s lovely to have all that room for glass jars. (I do know the trick of heating honey.)

    Reply
  65. My deepest sympathies on the disappearing chocolate, Anne. You must have some VERY malevolent mice!
    A walk-in pantry- sounds divine—much easier to see things. And I know you makes preserves and condiments, so it’s lovely to have all that room for glass jars. (I do know the trick of heating honey.)

    Reply
  66. Oh, ha-ha on the mountain of stuff that gets tossed when one moves! The dates can be REALLY frightening! (And deadly!) And one does tend to accumulate things that one never uses, so “cleaning house” is always a good thing. I always feel very virtuous when I do a weeding out of any space.
    Muffins sound like a good plan! Comfort cooking is very cathartic these days!

    Reply
  67. Oh, ha-ha on the mountain of stuff that gets tossed when one moves! The dates can be REALLY frightening! (And deadly!) And one does tend to accumulate things that one never uses, so “cleaning house” is always a good thing. I always feel very virtuous when I do a weeding out of any space.
    Muffins sound like a good plan! Comfort cooking is very cathartic these days!

    Reply
  68. Oh, ha-ha on the mountain of stuff that gets tossed when one moves! The dates can be REALLY frightening! (And deadly!) And one does tend to accumulate things that one never uses, so “cleaning house” is always a good thing. I always feel very virtuous when I do a weeding out of any space.
    Muffins sound like a good plan! Comfort cooking is very cathartic these days!

    Reply
  69. Oh, ha-ha on the mountain of stuff that gets tossed when one moves! The dates can be REALLY frightening! (And deadly!) And one does tend to accumulate things that one never uses, so “cleaning house” is always a good thing. I always feel very virtuous when I do a weeding out of any space.
    Muffins sound like a good plan! Comfort cooking is very cathartic these days!

    Reply
  70. Oh, ha-ha on the mountain of stuff that gets tossed when one moves! The dates can be REALLY frightening! (And deadly!) And one does tend to accumulate things that one never uses, so “cleaning house” is always a good thing. I always feel very virtuous when I do a weeding out of any space.
    Muffins sound like a good plan! Comfort cooking is very cathartic these days!

    Reply
  71. I have a closet which is my pantry. I have ups and downs with what is, was and is in there. I have a Hoosier cabinet. It has a bread box, a drawer for flour and built in cookie sheets…wonderful stuff. I keep china in it, my slow cooker, candles and many, many miscellaneous things. I love the cabinet, it has moved many times with me. But, since it has lived with me it has never held food.
    I try not to keep food items which are past their prime.
    I recently had a birthday and one of my beautiful grand-daughters sent me food for 2 days….I felt as though I was ready to be a float in the Macy’s parade. I am doing some cooking, but I really am attempting to use food more wisely during this time that I am one of the prisoners of Zenda.
    I have been making soups. It has been interesting to experiment. Some things should never be put together in the same large pot….that is me sharing my recently gathered wisdom

    Reply
  72. I have a closet which is my pantry. I have ups and downs with what is, was and is in there. I have a Hoosier cabinet. It has a bread box, a drawer for flour and built in cookie sheets…wonderful stuff. I keep china in it, my slow cooker, candles and many, many miscellaneous things. I love the cabinet, it has moved many times with me. But, since it has lived with me it has never held food.
    I try not to keep food items which are past their prime.
    I recently had a birthday and one of my beautiful grand-daughters sent me food for 2 days….I felt as though I was ready to be a float in the Macy’s parade. I am doing some cooking, but I really am attempting to use food more wisely during this time that I am one of the prisoners of Zenda.
    I have been making soups. It has been interesting to experiment. Some things should never be put together in the same large pot….that is me sharing my recently gathered wisdom

    Reply
  73. I have a closet which is my pantry. I have ups and downs with what is, was and is in there. I have a Hoosier cabinet. It has a bread box, a drawer for flour and built in cookie sheets…wonderful stuff. I keep china in it, my slow cooker, candles and many, many miscellaneous things. I love the cabinet, it has moved many times with me. But, since it has lived with me it has never held food.
    I try not to keep food items which are past their prime.
    I recently had a birthday and one of my beautiful grand-daughters sent me food for 2 days….I felt as though I was ready to be a float in the Macy’s parade. I am doing some cooking, but I really am attempting to use food more wisely during this time that I am one of the prisoners of Zenda.
    I have been making soups. It has been interesting to experiment. Some things should never be put together in the same large pot….that is me sharing my recently gathered wisdom

    Reply
  74. I have a closet which is my pantry. I have ups and downs with what is, was and is in there. I have a Hoosier cabinet. It has a bread box, a drawer for flour and built in cookie sheets…wonderful stuff. I keep china in it, my slow cooker, candles and many, many miscellaneous things. I love the cabinet, it has moved many times with me. But, since it has lived with me it has never held food.
    I try not to keep food items which are past their prime.
    I recently had a birthday and one of my beautiful grand-daughters sent me food for 2 days….I felt as though I was ready to be a float in the Macy’s parade. I am doing some cooking, but I really am attempting to use food more wisely during this time that I am one of the prisoners of Zenda.
    I have been making soups. It has been interesting to experiment. Some things should never be put together in the same large pot….that is me sharing my recently gathered wisdom

    Reply
  75. I have a closet which is my pantry. I have ups and downs with what is, was and is in there. I have a Hoosier cabinet. It has a bread box, a drawer for flour and built in cookie sheets…wonderful stuff. I keep china in it, my slow cooker, candles and many, many miscellaneous things. I love the cabinet, it has moved many times with me. But, since it has lived with me it has never held food.
    I try not to keep food items which are past their prime.
    I recently had a birthday and one of my beautiful grand-daughters sent me food for 2 days….I felt as though I was ready to be a float in the Macy’s parade. I am doing some cooking, but I really am attempting to use food more wisely during this time that I am one of the prisoners of Zenda.
    I have been making soups. It has been interesting to experiment. Some things should never be put together in the same large pot….that is me sharing my recently gathered wisdom

    Reply
  76. I’ve also got a Lazy Susan type cabinet for canned goods, but most of my pantry resides in the other kitchen cabinets, plus some shelves in the laundry room, plus a chest freezer. Yes, I am always stocked up, and not just because of this emergency. At any point in time, we could eat quite well for several months. I have impulse bought different flours, like potato flour, semolina, and teff in the past. Now I am getting a chance to experiment with using them. Teff breakfast pancakes are excellent! I always have a variety of dried lentils, beans and rice, plus lots of pasta which I buy when it’s on sale. My selection of teas is out of control; there’s probably 25 or 30 varieties, plain black teas, flavored black teas, green teas and herbal teas. And the freezer, besides meat and store-bought frozen vegetables, still has some stuff in it from last summer’s garden, including rhubarb, string beans, tomatoes, kale, chard, plus wild mushrooms and blueberries that I picked myself. The only place I am a bit deficient is in the chocolate department!

    Reply
  77. I’ve also got a Lazy Susan type cabinet for canned goods, but most of my pantry resides in the other kitchen cabinets, plus some shelves in the laundry room, plus a chest freezer. Yes, I am always stocked up, and not just because of this emergency. At any point in time, we could eat quite well for several months. I have impulse bought different flours, like potato flour, semolina, and teff in the past. Now I am getting a chance to experiment with using them. Teff breakfast pancakes are excellent! I always have a variety of dried lentils, beans and rice, plus lots of pasta which I buy when it’s on sale. My selection of teas is out of control; there’s probably 25 or 30 varieties, plain black teas, flavored black teas, green teas and herbal teas. And the freezer, besides meat and store-bought frozen vegetables, still has some stuff in it from last summer’s garden, including rhubarb, string beans, tomatoes, kale, chard, plus wild mushrooms and blueberries that I picked myself. The only place I am a bit deficient is in the chocolate department!

    Reply
  78. I’ve also got a Lazy Susan type cabinet for canned goods, but most of my pantry resides in the other kitchen cabinets, plus some shelves in the laundry room, plus a chest freezer. Yes, I am always stocked up, and not just because of this emergency. At any point in time, we could eat quite well for several months. I have impulse bought different flours, like potato flour, semolina, and teff in the past. Now I am getting a chance to experiment with using them. Teff breakfast pancakes are excellent! I always have a variety of dried lentils, beans and rice, plus lots of pasta which I buy when it’s on sale. My selection of teas is out of control; there’s probably 25 or 30 varieties, plain black teas, flavored black teas, green teas and herbal teas. And the freezer, besides meat and store-bought frozen vegetables, still has some stuff in it from last summer’s garden, including rhubarb, string beans, tomatoes, kale, chard, plus wild mushrooms and blueberries that I picked myself. The only place I am a bit deficient is in the chocolate department!

    Reply
  79. I’ve also got a Lazy Susan type cabinet for canned goods, but most of my pantry resides in the other kitchen cabinets, plus some shelves in the laundry room, plus a chest freezer. Yes, I am always stocked up, and not just because of this emergency. At any point in time, we could eat quite well for several months. I have impulse bought different flours, like potato flour, semolina, and teff in the past. Now I am getting a chance to experiment with using them. Teff breakfast pancakes are excellent! I always have a variety of dried lentils, beans and rice, plus lots of pasta which I buy when it’s on sale. My selection of teas is out of control; there’s probably 25 or 30 varieties, plain black teas, flavored black teas, green teas and herbal teas. And the freezer, besides meat and store-bought frozen vegetables, still has some stuff in it from last summer’s garden, including rhubarb, string beans, tomatoes, kale, chard, plus wild mushrooms and blueberries that I picked myself. The only place I am a bit deficient is in the chocolate department!

    Reply
  80. I’ve also got a Lazy Susan type cabinet for canned goods, but most of my pantry resides in the other kitchen cabinets, plus some shelves in the laundry room, plus a chest freezer. Yes, I am always stocked up, and not just because of this emergency. At any point in time, we could eat quite well for several months. I have impulse bought different flours, like potato flour, semolina, and teff in the past. Now I am getting a chance to experiment with using them. Teff breakfast pancakes are excellent! I always have a variety of dried lentils, beans and rice, plus lots of pasta which I buy when it’s on sale. My selection of teas is out of control; there’s probably 25 or 30 varieties, plain black teas, flavored black teas, green teas and herbal teas. And the freezer, besides meat and store-bought frozen vegetables, still has some stuff in it from last summer’s garden, including rhubarb, string beans, tomatoes, kale, chard, plus wild mushrooms and blueberries that I picked myself. The only place I am a bit deficient is in the chocolate department!

    Reply
  81. I have been well stocked so that I only have to shop every 4 weeks. By then I have run out of milk and fresh veggies. I have a closet which we use as a pantry, mostly for canned goods and boxed foods. I try to buy bulk and freeze individual meal portions. Or I make a batch of stew, soups or other and freeze I portions. Since the isolation and bare shelves in the grocery stores, I feel bad buying in bulk because many others are shopping after me and I do not want to take too much for us. We are all learning new ways to fix meals.
    My favorite Chinese take out had to close as their supply source is in Chicago and no longer would be open. That hurts.

    Reply
  82. I have been well stocked so that I only have to shop every 4 weeks. By then I have run out of milk and fresh veggies. I have a closet which we use as a pantry, mostly for canned goods and boxed foods. I try to buy bulk and freeze individual meal portions. Or I make a batch of stew, soups or other and freeze I portions. Since the isolation and bare shelves in the grocery stores, I feel bad buying in bulk because many others are shopping after me and I do not want to take too much for us. We are all learning new ways to fix meals.
    My favorite Chinese take out had to close as their supply source is in Chicago and no longer would be open. That hurts.

    Reply
  83. I have been well stocked so that I only have to shop every 4 weeks. By then I have run out of milk and fresh veggies. I have a closet which we use as a pantry, mostly for canned goods and boxed foods. I try to buy bulk and freeze individual meal portions. Or I make a batch of stew, soups or other and freeze I portions. Since the isolation and bare shelves in the grocery stores, I feel bad buying in bulk because many others are shopping after me and I do not want to take too much for us. We are all learning new ways to fix meals.
    My favorite Chinese take out had to close as their supply source is in Chicago and no longer would be open. That hurts.

    Reply
  84. I have been well stocked so that I only have to shop every 4 weeks. By then I have run out of milk and fresh veggies. I have a closet which we use as a pantry, mostly for canned goods and boxed foods. I try to buy bulk and freeze individual meal portions. Or I make a batch of stew, soups or other and freeze I portions. Since the isolation and bare shelves in the grocery stores, I feel bad buying in bulk because many others are shopping after me and I do not want to take too much for us. We are all learning new ways to fix meals.
    My favorite Chinese take out had to close as their supply source is in Chicago and no longer would be open. That hurts.

    Reply
  85. I have been well stocked so that I only have to shop every 4 weeks. By then I have run out of milk and fresh veggies. I have a closet which we use as a pantry, mostly for canned goods and boxed foods. I try to buy bulk and freeze individual meal portions. Or I make a batch of stew, soups or other and freeze I portions. Since the isolation and bare shelves in the grocery stores, I feel bad buying in bulk because many others are shopping after me and I do not want to take too much for us. We are all learning new ways to fix meals.
    My favorite Chinese take out had to close as their supply source is in Chicago and no longer would be open. That hurts.

    Reply
  86. I do have some packets of hot chocolate, and baking chocolate in case of emergency. I am a chocolate lover but I ration myself!

    Reply
  87. I do have some packets of hot chocolate, and baking chocolate in case of emergency. I am a chocolate lover but I ration myself!

    Reply
  88. I do have some packets of hot chocolate, and baking chocolate in case of emergency. I am a chocolate lover but I ration myself!

    Reply
  89. I do have some packets of hot chocolate, and baking chocolate in case of emergency. I am a chocolate lover but I ration myself!

    Reply
  90. I do have some packets of hot chocolate, and baking chocolate in case of emergency. I am a chocolate lover but I ration myself!

    Reply
  91. Hi Andrea! I hope you are doing fabulous! I am a huge fan of your books and recently reread The Defiant Governess for likely the 10th time. Wanted to ask if you might be working on another book or still writing? 🙂

    Reply
  92. Hi Andrea! I hope you are doing fabulous! I am a huge fan of your books and recently reread The Defiant Governess for likely the 10th time. Wanted to ask if you might be working on another book or still writing? 🙂

    Reply
  93. Hi Andrea! I hope you are doing fabulous! I am a huge fan of your books and recently reread The Defiant Governess for likely the 10th time. Wanted to ask if you might be working on another book or still writing? 🙂

    Reply
  94. Hi Andrea! I hope you are doing fabulous! I am a huge fan of your books and recently reread The Defiant Governess for likely the 10th time. Wanted to ask if you might be working on another book or still writing? 🙂

    Reply
  95. Hi Andrea! I hope you are doing fabulous! I am a huge fan of your books and recently reread The Defiant Governess for likely the 10th time. Wanted to ask if you might be working on another book or still writing? 🙂

    Reply

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