AM Stuart—Evil in Emerald

Anne here, and today I'm talking to Alison Stuart, who, as AM Stuart, writes historical crime set in 1910 Singapore, and as Alison Stuart writes Australian historical romance set in colonial Australia, and a variety of other historicals set in different time periods. You can find them listed on her website.

EvilInEmerald

I interviewed Alison when her first historical crime novel, Singapore Sapphire, was published in the USA, and you can read that interview here.  

Her latest book, third in the series, is Evil in EmeraldBut if you haven't read any of her books, you might want to start at the first in the series, Singapore Sapphire. 

Anne: Welcome back to the Word Wenches, Alison, and congratulations on the publication of the third Harriet Gordon and Inspector Curran story. The first title contained sapphires, the second rubies, and now we're onto emeralds. What's the significance?

AM Stuart: Thank you so much for having me back, Anne. I love spending time with the Word Wenches J

The gem theme came about accidently… I had titled the first book Singapore Sapphire and the second The Colonel’s Lady is Dead but my editor jumped on the idea of the gems because she wanted a red cover (the first being blue). Unfortunately I hadn’t written any rubies into the second book so I had to do a quick re-edit! The Emerald (green cover) suggested itself naturally as the crime takes place on Emerald Hill which is a real locale in Singapore. It works beautifully and the books look so pretty together!

Anne: You've moved into a slightly different area this time — the world of amateur theater. What drew you to it? Do you have experience in it yourself?

AM Stuart: There is probably more of myself in Harriet’s books then there has been in anything else I’ve written. I drew on my long years in the military for the second book (REVENGE IN RUBIES) and in EVIL IN EMERALD I have gone back to a brief and inglorious career in the chorus of a Gilbert and Sullivan theatre group.

Pirates 1 copyI rose to the grand role of Isabel in Pirates of Penzance which gave me ‘principal billing’ and a place in the principal’s dressing room. (That's Alison in orange on the left.) When I found a production of Pirates had been performed in the Victoria Hall around the time the story is set, it seemed a good fit and there is quite a bit of my own experience of the amateur theatrical world in the Singapore Amateur Dramatic and Music Society. Sadly Harriet never got to tread the stage in Victoria Hall. I think she might be off amateur theatre for a while!

Anne: The relationship between Harriet and Curran has been developing through the series. Can readers expect an eventual happy-ever-after for them?

AM Stuart:  I can neither confirm nor deny – I have to see where the next book takes them. Interestingly the readers seem to be divided on the issue. Let’s just say I am a sentimental romance writer at heart and I do like a HEA.

Anne: Could you share a snippet from Evil in Emeralds, please?

AM Stuart:  I have included a scene which, I hope, demonstrates something of the relationship between Harriet and Curran.

A fine motor vehicle stood drawn up at the gates, with a uniformed chauffeur in attendance. The man hurried forward with an umbrella, and Alicia turned to glance back at the cemetery.

“I hope you find his killer soon, Inspector. It is awful to think there is someone out there who could be so cruel. Mrs. Gordon, may I offer you a ride back to your home?”

Harriet looked to be on the verge of accepting, but Curran remembered the letters he had retrieved from Dowling’s bedroom.

“Actually, Mrs. Gordon, if you can spare an hour, I’ve got some work for you at South Bridge Road.”

Harriet cast a longing look at the Rolls Royce and sighed as she glanced at her watch. “Of course, Inspector.”

Fortunately, they did not have to wait long in the rain as an empty gharry trundled past. Curran hailed it and they clambered in. The roof leaked and Curran could have sworn the driver deliberately targeted every pothole in the road.

“What is it you want me to do?” she asked.

“I have some letters retrieved from Tony Dowling’s room. I thought a woman’s eye might read more into them than me.”

Harriet laughed. “Billet-doux?”

“I think so.”

“And I’m such an expert on love letters? I don’t think I’ve ever received one in my life. Have you?”

“Hardly.” Curran smiled in response. “Oh, I think I once received a Valentine from a friend of my cousin Ellie’s but it was anonymous, so I never knew who sent it.”

“And she’s probably nursing a broken heart to this day. Have you had any news from your cousin?”

Curran’s favorite cousin, Lady Eloise Warby, known to her family as Ellie, had met Harriet during Harriet’s time as a suffragette in London, and in August the news had not been good. Ellie had been involved in a hunger strike in Holloway and had been released close to death.

“Depends on who I believe,” Curran said. “According to Ellie, she’s back to her old self, campaigning for the WSPU and getting into scrapes but her husband writes her health has been badly affected.” He paused and looked at Harriet. “You would know.”

Harriet nodded. “It took me months to recover.” She touched her throat. “If I get overtired, the cough comes back. The force-feeding causes irreparable damage.”

“I can imagine,” Curran said. The more he read on the treatment of the suffragettes, the more his sympathy became aligned to their cause.

“Simon tells me that women have the vote in Australia. I don’t understand why Britain is so determined—” She broke off. “Sorry, Curran, not a subject to interest you.”

“But it does,” he said. “I told you when I first met you, I was sympathetic to the philosophy of the cause. What concerns me are the radical actions they are now resorting to.”

“‘Deeds not words’ is Mrs. Pankhurst’s new creed.” Her mouth tightened and just for a fleeting moment he thought he saw the pain of her own experience in her eyes. She took a breath and turned to him. “Why do you want me to look at these letters?”

“You’re better at reading handwriting than me.”

“I see.” She paused and gave him a cheeky smile. “You just don’t want to read all the silly sentimental drivel, do you?”

And that, he had to admit, was true.

Anne: Thanks for that. You've enjoyed writing books in a variety of time and place settings. Do you have a favorite? (And why do you enjoy it so much?) Could you tell us a little about your other books, please?

GatherTheBones

AM Stuart:  My stories span the centuries from the English Civil War (mid 17thcentury) to the 1920s, with a bit of Regency and, more recently Australian historicals set in the 1870s. Which is my favourite is like being asked to pick my favourite child! My passion will always be the English Civil War but I have loved writing the Australian historicals and of course Harriet’ stories are closest to me but if I have to pick an absolute favourite it is the crazy ‘history, mystery, romance and ghosts’ book – GATHER THE BONES spanning Regency, WW1 and the 1920s – Downton Abbey on speed dial!

Anne:  I know a number of Wenchly readers have enjoyed your Australian historicals. Thanks so much for joining us here, Alison. 
Alison will be giving away a paperback of Evil in Emerald to some reader who responds to this question.

I would love to know what period of history is your favourite setting for historicals (mysteries or romances)? And if your answer is Regency, what other period of history would appeal to your reading tastes?

190 thoughts on “AM Stuart—Evil in Emerald”

  1. I really enjoy medieval mysteries, and although I don’t tend to read historical romance, often in the books of my favourite authors the relationships between husband and wife are included.
    Yet Georgette Heyer introduced me to Regency romance.
    I absolutely enjoyed the first two books in the series, and so look forward to this third one.

    Reply
  2. I really enjoy medieval mysteries, and although I don’t tend to read historical romance, often in the books of my favourite authors the relationships between husband and wife are included.
    Yet Georgette Heyer introduced me to Regency romance.
    I absolutely enjoyed the first two books in the series, and so look forward to this third one.

    Reply
  3. I really enjoy medieval mysteries, and although I don’t tend to read historical romance, often in the books of my favourite authors the relationships between husband and wife are included.
    Yet Georgette Heyer introduced me to Regency romance.
    I absolutely enjoyed the first two books in the series, and so look forward to this third one.

    Reply
  4. I really enjoy medieval mysteries, and although I don’t tend to read historical romance, often in the books of my favourite authors the relationships between husband and wife are included.
    Yet Georgette Heyer introduced me to Regency romance.
    I absolutely enjoyed the first two books in the series, and so look forward to this third one.

    Reply
  5. I really enjoy medieval mysteries, and although I don’t tend to read historical romance, often in the books of my favourite authors the relationships between husband and wife are included.
    Yet Georgette Heyer introduced me to Regency romance.
    I absolutely enjoyed the first two books in the series, and so look forward to this third one.

    Reply
  6. I’ve loved all the Harriet Gordon mysteries, this last instalment was just as good as the first two. I was sorry to see Li Anne exit stage left but 5hat leaves Curran open to a romance with Harriet and how delicious would that be?

    Reply
  7. I’ve loved all the Harriet Gordon mysteries, this last instalment was just as good as the first two. I was sorry to see Li Anne exit stage left but 5hat leaves Curran open to a romance with Harriet and how delicious would that be?

    Reply
  8. I’ve loved all the Harriet Gordon mysteries, this last instalment was just as good as the first two. I was sorry to see Li Anne exit stage left but 5hat leaves Curran open to a romance with Harriet and how delicious would that be?

    Reply
  9. I’ve loved all the Harriet Gordon mysteries, this last instalment was just as good as the first two. I was sorry to see Li Anne exit stage left but 5hat leaves Curran open to a romance with Harriet and how delicious would that be?

    Reply
  10. I’ve loved all the Harriet Gordon mysteries, this last instalment was just as good as the first two. I was sorry to see Li Anne exit stage left but 5hat leaves Curran open to a romance with Harriet and how delicious would that be?

    Reply
  11. I love a good mystery with a dose of romance thrown in. I used to think my favorite time period was 1850’s & up in England. But last year I
    starting seeing WWII historical books popping up.
    They have become my favorites.
    I really like Harriet Gordon mysteries. Singapore is a
    character itself in these books. Never knew anything about Singapore until
    I started reading them. Hoping for the beginnings of a romance between
    Harriet and Curran.

    Reply
  12. I love a good mystery with a dose of romance thrown in. I used to think my favorite time period was 1850’s & up in England. But last year I
    starting seeing WWII historical books popping up.
    They have become my favorites.
    I really like Harriet Gordon mysteries. Singapore is a
    character itself in these books. Never knew anything about Singapore until
    I started reading them. Hoping for the beginnings of a romance between
    Harriet and Curran.

    Reply
  13. I love a good mystery with a dose of romance thrown in. I used to think my favorite time period was 1850’s & up in England. But last year I
    starting seeing WWII historical books popping up.
    They have become my favorites.
    I really like Harriet Gordon mysteries. Singapore is a
    character itself in these books. Never knew anything about Singapore until
    I started reading them. Hoping for the beginnings of a romance between
    Harriet and Curran.

    Reply
  14. I love a good mystery with a dose of romance thrown in. I used to think my favorite time period was 1850’s & up in England. But last year I
    starting seeing WWII historical books popping up.
    They have become my favorites.
    I really like Harriet Gordon mysteries. Singapore is a
    character itself in these books. Never knew anything about Singapore until
    I started reading them. Hoping for the beginnings of a romance between
    Harriet and Curran.

    Reply
  15. I love a good mystery with a dose of romance thrown in. I used to think my favorite time period was 1850’s & up in England. But last year I
    starting seeing WWII historical books popping up.
    They have become my favorites.
    I really like Harriet Gordon mysteries. Singapore is a
    character itself in these books. Never knew anything about Singapore until
    I started reading them. Hoping for the beginnings of a romance between
    Harriet and Curran.

    Reply
  16. My public library has Ms. Stuart’s first two books in the series but they don’t have this one yet. I would love to be able to read it and then share with my friends and sisters who have all enjoyed the books with me

    Reply
  17. My public library has Ms. Stuart’s first two books in the series but they don’t have this one yet. I would love to be able to read it and then share with my friends and sisters who have all enjoyed the books with me

    Reply
  18. My public library has Ms. Stuart’s first two books in the series but they don’t have this one yet. I would love to be able to read it and then share with my friends and sisters who have all enjoyed the books with me

    Reply
  19. My public library has Ms. Stuart’s first two books in the series but they don’t have this one yet. I would love to be able to read it and then share with my friends and sisters who have all enjoyed the books with me

    Reply
  20. My public library has Ms. Stuart’s first two books in the series but they don’t have this one yet. I would love to be able to read it and then share with my friends and sisters who have all enjoyed the books with me

    Reply
  21. I have read a couple of Ms. Stuart’s Australian Historicals and loved them. Especially interesting to me because I know so little of Australian history. I don’t mind at all when I have to stop and look something up. Love to learn things.
    As for favorite eras – I don’t know. My favorite genre is Historical Romance and most of them are set in the Regency era. The most interesting time in history to me is between 1800 and pre-WW1.
    However, for mysteries I do prefer the 1920s and 30s. Can’t say why – just do.

    Reply
  22. I have read a couple of Ms. Stuart’s Australian Historicals and loved them. Especially interesting to me because I know so little of Australian history. I don’t mind at all when I have to stop and look something up. Love to learn things.
    As for favorite eras – I don’t know. My favorite genre is Historical Romance and most of them are set in the Regency era. The most interesting time in history to me is between 1800 and pre-WW1.
    However, for mysteries I do prefer the 1920s and 30s. Can’t say why – just do.

    Reply
  23. I have read a couple of Ms. Stuart’s Australian Historicals and loved them. Especially interesting to me because I know so little of Australian history. I don’t mind at all when I have to stop and look something up. Love to learn things.
    As for favorite eras – I don’t know. My favorite genre is Historical Romance and most of them are set in the Regency era. The most interesting time in history to me is between 1800 and pre-WW1.
    However, for mysteries I do prefer the 1920s and 30s. Can’t say why – just do.

    Reply
  24. I have read a couple of Ms. Stuart’s Australian Historicals and loved them. Especially interesting to me because I know so little of Australian history. I don’t mind at all when I have to stop and look something up. Love to learn things.
    As for favorite eras – I don’t know. My favorite genre is Historical Romance and most of them are set in the Regency era. The most interesting time in history to me is between 1800 and pre-WW1.
    However, for mysteries I do prefer the 1920s and 30s. Can’t say why – just do.

    Reply
  25. I have read a couple of Ms. Stuart’s Australian Historicals and loved them. Especially interesting to me because I know so little of Australian history. I don’t mind at all when I have to stop and look something up. Love to learn things.
    As for favorite eras – I don’t know. My favorite genre is Historical Romance and most of them are set in the Regency era. The most interesting time in history to me is between 1800 and pre-WW1.
    However, for mysteries I do prefer the 1920s and 30s. Can’t say why – just do.

    Reply
  26. I like everything Regency the best, but I think the 20’s will come in a close second. Our modern day is getting a bit too technical to appeal to me at age 89.

    Reply
  27. I like everything Regency the best, but I think the 20’s will come in a close second. Our modern day is getting a bit too technical to appeal to me at age 89.

    Reply
  28. I like everything Regency the best, but I think the 20’s will come in a close second. Our modern day is getting a bit too technical to appeal to me at age 89.

    Reply
  29. I like everything Regency the best, but I think the 20’s will come in a close second. Our modern day is getting a bit too technical to appeal to me at age 89.

    Reply
  30. I like everything Regency the best, but I think the 20’s will come in a close second. Our modern day is getting a bit too technical to appeal to me at age 89.

    Reply
  31. I don’t have a favourite period but do have favourite authors and audio narrators. Some authors just hit the spot through character development and plot construction. The historical background sets patterns of behaviour but for me romance and mystery can be timeless in essence. Delighted to see that the three books are available in audio. I listened to the sample for ‘Evil in Emerald’ with Saskia Maarleveld narrating and liked it so would like to start there. I noticed that the narrator changes with each book. This can be a little disconcerting when one gets used to a particular voice for the main characters in a series … but if they are all good one rapidly adjusts! I am a huge fan of Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple mysteries and in a way you seem to have added a romantic thread and a different setting to the basic idea …. great idea!
    Thanks for introducing the Harriet Gordon books 😊

    Reply
  32. I don’t have a favourite period but do have favourite authors and audio narrators. Some authors just hit the spot through character development and plot construction. The historical background sets patterns of behaviour but for me romance and mystery can be timeless in essence. Delighted to see that the three books are available in audio. I listened to the sample for ‘Evil in Emerald’ with Saskia Maarleveld narrating and liked it so would like to start there. I noticed that the narrator changes with each book. This can be a little disconcerting when one gets used to a particular voice for the main characters in a series … but if they are all good one rapidly adjusts! I am a huge fan of Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple mysteries and in a way you seem to have added a romantic thread and a different setting to the basic idea …. great idea!
    Thanks for introducing the Harriet Gordon books 😊

    Reply
  33. I don’t have a favourite period but do have favourite authors and audio narrators. Some authors just hit the spot through character development and plot construction. The historical background sets patterns of behaviour but for me romance and mystery can be timeless in essence. Delighted to see that the three books are available in audio. I listened to the sample for ‘Evil in Emerald’ with Saskia Maarleveld narrating and liked it so would like to start there. I noticed that the narrator changes with each book. This can be a little disconcerting when one gets used to a particular voice for the main characters in a series … but if they are all good one rapidly adjusts! I am a huge fan of Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple mysteries and in a way you seem to have added a romantic thread and a different setting to the basic idea …. great idea!
    Thanks for introducing the Harriet Gordon books 😊

    Reply
  34. I don’t have a favourite period but do have favourite authors and audio narrators. Some authors just hit the spot through character development and plot construction. The historical background sets patterns of behaviour but for me romance and mystery can be timeless in essence. Delighted to see that the three books are available in audio. I listened to the sample for ‘Evil in Emerald’ with Saskia Maarleveld narrating and liked it so would like to start there. I noticed that the narrator changes with each book. This can be a little disconcerting when one gets used to a particular voice for the main characters in a series … but if they are all good one rapidly adjusts! I am a huge fan of Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple mysteries and in a way you seem to have added a romantic thread and a different setting to the basic idea …. great idea!
    Thanks for introducing the Harriet Gordon books 😊

    Reply
  35. I don’t have a favourite period but do have favourite authors and audio narrators. Some authors just hit the spot through character development and plot construction. The historical background sets patterns of behaviour but for me romance and mystery can be timeless in essence. Delighted to see that the three books are available in audio. I listened to the sample for ‘Evil in Emerald’ with Saskia Maarleveld narrating and liked it so would like to start there. I noticed that the narrator changes with each book. This can be a little disconcerting when one gets used to a particular voice for the main characters in a series … but if they are all good one rapidly adjusts! I am a huge fan of Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple mysteries and in a way you seem to have added a romantic thread and a different setting to the basic idea …. great idea!
    Thanks for introducing the Harriet Gordon books 😊

    Reply
  36. Anne and Alison, thank you for this wonderful interview.
    I’ll admit to liking novels set in all historical eras. I just reread Transcendence by Shay Savage which had a prehistoric setting; I also recently read Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus which was set in the 1950s.
    I look forward to reading one of your books, Alison.

    Reply
  37. Anne and Alison, thank you for this wonderful interview.
    I’ll admit to liking novels set in all historical eras. I just reread Transcendence by Shay Savage which had a prehistoric setting; I also recently read Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus which was set in the 1950s.
    I look forward to reading one of your books, Alison.

    Reply
  38. Anne and Alison, thank you for this wonderful interview.
    I’ll admit to liking novels set in all historical eras. I just reread Transcendence by Shay Savage which had a prehistoric setting; I also recently read Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus which was set in the 1950s.
    I look forward to reading one of your books, Alison.

    Reply
  39. Anne and Alison, thank you for this wonderful interview.
    I’ll admit to liking novels set in all historical eras. I just reread Transcendence by Shay Savage which had a prehistoric setting; I also recently read Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus which was set in the 1950s.
    I look forward to reading one of your books, Alison.

    Reply
  40. Anne and Alison, thank you for this wonderful interview.
    I’ll admit to liking novels set in all historical eras. I just reread Transcendence by Shay Savage which had a prehistoric setting; I also recently read Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus which was set in the 1950s.
    I look forward to reading one of your books, Alison.

    Reply
  41. I will just have to see where the characters take me in the next book! You know they have minds of their own 🙂 (and Li An is sure to make a reappearance – there is still unfinished business there!)

    Reply
  42. I will just have to see where the characters take me in the next book! You know they have minds of their own 🙂 (and Li An is sure to make a reappearance – there is still unfinished business there!)

    Reply
  43. I will just have to see where the characters take me in the next book! You know they have minds of their own 🙂 (and Li An is sure to make a reappearance – there is still unfinished business there!)

    Reply
  44. I will just have to see where the characters take me in the next book! You know they have minds of their own 🙂 (and Li An is sure to make a reappearance – there is still unfinished business there!)

    Reply
  45. I will just have to see where the characters take me in the next book! You know they have minds of their own 🙂 (and Li An is sure to make a reappearance – there is still unfinished business there!)

    Reply
  46. Be sure to ask your library to get book 3 in, Tricia! I have some hard core librarians/readers who tell me they frequently recommend the series, so I hope you get a chance to read it!

    Reply
  47. Be sure to ask your library to get book 3 in, Tricia! I have some hard core librarians/readers who tell me they frequently recommend the series, so I hope you get a chance to read it!

    Reply
  48. Be sure to ask your library to get book 3 in, Tricia! I have some hard core librarians/readers who tell me they frequently recommend the series, so I hope you get a chance to read it!

    Reply
  49. Be sure to ask your library to get book 3 in, Tricia! I have some hard core librarians/readers who tell me they frequently recommend the series, so I hope you get a chance to read it!

    Reply
  50. Be sure to ask your library to get book 3 in, Tricia! I have some hard core librarians/readers who tell me they frequently recommend the series, so I hope you get a chance to read it!

    Reply
  51. Thank you, Mary. So glad you enjoy my Maiden’s Creek books. I think more research went in to those books than any other I have written.
    Gather the Bones is set in the 1920s and it was such a fun period to write about because, I suppose, it is within living memory and I drew a lot on my grandmother’s stories.

    Reply
  52. Thank you, Mary. So glad you enjoy my Maiden’s Creek books. I think more research went in to those books than any other I have written.
    Gather the Bones is set in the 1920s and it was such a fun period to write about because, I suppose, it is within living memory and I drew a lot on my grandmother’s stories.

    Reply
  53. Thank you, Mary. So glad you enjoy my Maiden’s Creek books. I think more research went in to those books than any other I have written.
    Gather the Bones is set in the 1920s and it was such a fun period to write about because, I suppose, it is within living memory and I drew a lot on my grandmother’s stories.

    Reply
  54. Thank you, Mary. So glad you enjoy my Maiden’s Creek books. I think more research went in to those books than any other I have written.
    Gather the Bones is set in the 1920s and it was such a fun period to write about because, I suppose, it is within living memory and I drew a lot on my grandmother’s stories.

    Reply
  55. Thank you, Mary. So glad you enjoy my Maiden’s Creek books. I think more research went in to those books than any other I have written.
    Gather the Bones is set in the 1920s and it was such a fun period to write about because, I suppose, it is within living memory and I drew a lot on my grandmother’s stories.

    Reply
  56. Our modern world is so complex, Beverly. Even when I wrote a book set in contemporary times I had to post date it to 1995 to avoid computers, internet and mobile phones – not to mention the draconian security laws which came in after 9/11. Yikes! Glad I write historicals 🙂

    Reply
  57. Our modern world is so complex, Beverly. Even when I wrote a book set in contemporary times I had to post date it to 1995 to avoid computers, internet and mobile phones – not to mention the draconian security laws which came in after 9/11. Yikes! Glad I write historicals 🙂

    Reply
  58. Our modern world is so complex, Beverly. Even when I wrote a book set in contemporary times I had to post date it to 1995 to avoid computers, internet and mobile phones – not to mention the draconian security laws which came in after 9/11. Yikes! Glad I write historicals 🙂

    Reply
  59. Our modern world is so complex, Beverly. Even when I wrote a book set in contemporary times I had to post date it to 1995 to avoid computers, internet and mobile phones – not to mention the draconian security laws which came in after 9/11. Yikes! Glad I write historicals 🙂

    Reply
  60. Our modern world is so complex, Beverly. Even when I wrote a book set in contemporary times I had to post date it to 1995 to avoid computers, internet and mobile phones – not to mention the draconian security laws which came in after 9/11. Yikes! Glad I write historicals 🙂

    Reply
  61. I am a HUGE fan of audio books… I used to do all my reading on the long commute to and from work. I sort of miss that time now and struggle to fit in listening time.
    I so agree about the change of narrator jerking you out of the stories. This has been a real bug bear with this series, but unfortunately the wonderful Saskia (who narrated Singapore Sapphire) was not available for the subsequent books (apparently voice actors have lives!) and we have struggled to find someone of her quality. I am happy with the narrator of book 3 (which I am only just listening to myself!) so I hope we can continue with her.
    And, yes, Agatha Christie was a huge influence on me growing up so it is inevitable it has come through.

    Reply
  62. I am a HUGE fan of audio books… I used to do all my reading on the long commute to and from work. I sort of miss that time now and struggle to fit in listening time.
    I so agree about the change of narrator jerking you out of the stories. This has been a real bug bear with this series, but unfortunately the wonderful Saskia (who narrated Singapore Sapphire) was not available for the subsequent books (apparently voice actors have lives!) and we have struggled to find someone of her quality. I am happy with the narrator of book 3 (which I am only just listening to myself!) so I hope we can continue with her.
    And, yes, Agatha Christie was a huge influence on me growing up so it is inevitable it has come through.

    Reply
  63. I am a HUGE fan of audio books… I used to do all my reading on the long commute to and from work. I sort of miss that time now and struggle to fit in listening time.
    I so agree about the change of narrator jerking you out of the stories. This has been a real bug bear with this series, but unfortunately the wonderful Saskia (who narrated Singapore Sapphire) was not available for the subsequent books (apparently voice actors have lives!) and we have struggled to find someone of her quality. I am happy with the narrator of book 3 (which I am only just listening to myself!) so I hope we can continue with her.
    And, yes, Agatha Christie was a huge influence on me growing up so it is inevitable it has come through.

    Reply
  64. I am a HUGE fan of audio books… I used to do all my reading on the long commute to and from work. I sort of miss that time now and struggle to fit in listening time.
    I so agree about the change of narrator jerking you out of the stories. This has been a real bug bear with this series, but unfortunately the wonderful Saskia (who narrated Singapore Sapphire) was not available for the subsequent books (apparently voice actors have lives!) and we have struggled to find someone of her quality. I am happy with the narrator of book 3 (which I am only just listening to myself!) so I hope we can continue with her.
    And, yes, Agatha Christie was a huge influence on me growing up so it is inevitable it has come through.

    Reply
  65. I am a HUGE fan of audio books… I used to do all my reading on the long commute to and from work. I sort of miss that time now and struggle to fit in listening time.
    I so agree about the change of narrator jerking you out of the stories. This has been a real bug bear with this series, but unfortunately the wonderful Saskia (who narrated Singapore Sapphire) was not available for the subsequent books (apparently voice actors have lives!) and we have struggled to find someone of her quality. I am happy with the narrator of book 3 (which I am only just listening to myself!) so I hope we can continue with her.
    And, yes, Agatha Christie was a huge influence on me growing up so it is inevitable it has come through.

    Reply
  66. Interesting book recommendations, Kareni. A book set in prehistory would not immediately draw me I am afraid but I will have a look. I did enjoy Bernard Cornwell’s book about Stonehenge (title escapes me for the moment) which is as far back as I have gone.

    Reply
  67. Interesting book recommendations, Kareni. A book set in prehistory would not immediately draw me I am afraid but I will have a look. I did enjoy Bernard Cornwell’s book about Stonehenge (title escapes me for the moment) which is as far back as I have gone.

    Reply
  68. Interesting book recommendations, Kareni. A book set in prehistory would not immediately draw me I am afraid but I will have a look. I did enjoy Bernard Cornwell’s book about Stonehenge (title escapes me for the moment) which is as far back as I have gone.

    Reply
  69. Interesting book recommendations, Kareni. A book set in prehistory would not immediately draw me I am afraid but I will have a look. I did enjoy Bernard Cornwell’s book about Stonehenge (title escapes me for the moment) which is as far back as I have gone.

    Reply
  70. Interesting book recommendations, Kareni. A book set in prehistory would not immediately draw me I am afraid but I will have a look. I did enjoy Bernard Cornwell’s book about Stonehenge (title escapes me for the moment) which is as far back as I have gone.

    Reply
  71. Hi Judy. Thank you for your kind words.
    I loved living in Singapore and I loved bringing old Singapore to life. Most historical stories set in Singapore are set around WWII.
    As for romance… we shall have to wait and see 😉 I think someone has some more bridges to cross before he is ready to let another woman in to his heart!

    Reply
  72. Hi Judy. Thank you for your kind words.
    I loved living in Singapore and I loved bringing old Singapore to life. Most historical stories set in Singapore are set around WWII.
    As for romance… we shall have to wait and see 😉 I think someone has some more bridges to cross before he is ready to let another woman in to his heart!

    Reply
  73. Hi Judy. Thank you for your kind words.
    I loved living in Singapore and I loved bringing old Singapore to life. Most historical stories set in Singapore are set around WWII.
    As for romance… we shall have to wait and see 😉 I think someone has some more bridges to cross before he is ready to let another woman in to his heart!

    Reply
  74. Hi Judy. Thank you for your kind words.
    I loved living in Singapore and I loved bringing old Singapore to life. Most historical stories set in Singapore are set around WWII.
    As for romance… we shall have to wait and see 😉 I think someone has some more bridges to cross before he is ready to let another woman in to his heart!

    Reply
  75. Hi Judy. Thank you for your kind words.
    I loved living in Singapore and I loved bringing old Singapore to life. Most historical stories set in Singapore are set around WWII.
    As for romance… we shall have to wait and see 😉 I think someone has some more bridges to cross before he is ready to let another woman in to his heart!

    Reply
  76. Thank you, Sharon. I am partial to a bit of Medieval myself… Sharon Penman has been a long time favourite but I don’t think it is a period I can write about (despite several barely started stories in my sock drawer!)

    Reply
  77. Thank you, Sharon. I am partial to a bit of Medieval myself… Sharon Penman has been a long time favourite but I don’t think it is a period I can write about (despite several barely started stories in my sock drawer!)

    Reply
  78. Thank you, Sharon. I am partial to a bit of Medieval myself… Sharon Penman has been a long time favourite but I don’t think it is a period I can write about (despite several barely started stories in my sock drawer!)

    Reply
  79. Thank you, Sharon. I am partial to a bit of Medieval myself… Sharon Penman has been a long time favourite but I don’t think it is a period I can write about (despite several barely started stories in my sock drawer!)

    Reply
  80. Thank you, Sharon. I am partial to a bit of Medieval myself… Sharon Penman has been a long time favourite but I don’t think it is a period I can write about (despite several barely started stories in my sock drawer!)

    Reply
  81. Thanks so much for this terrific post. You have introduced me to a new to me author.
    For romance, I like Regency, but also earlier and later in both England and the US. In fact, in romance, I like romance.
    For mystery, I am a huge fan of the period between the two world wars. Women were becoming more recognized for their skills —-yes—-I know there were huge battles, but still things were better than they had been. Art Deco is a style I love and the designs were seen in everything from tea pots to entire homes.
    Also, people were seeing an entire new world. There were more job opportunities. In fact, that period was a huge era of change. And to be honest, I think the clothes were terrific. Who would not love peals that reached to your knees?
    Hope everyone is happy.

    Reply
  82. Thanks so much for this terrific post. You have introduced me to a new to me author.
    For romance, I like Regency, but also earlier and later in both England and the US. In fact, in romance, I like romance.
    For mystery, I am a huge fan of the period between the two world wars. Women were becoming more recognized for their skills —-yes—-I know there were huge battles, but still things were better than they had been. Art Deco is a style I love and the designs were seen in everything from tea pots to entire homes.
    Also, people were seeing an entire new world. There were more job opportunities. In fact, that period was a huge era of change. And to be honest, I think the clothes were terrific. Who would not love peals that reached to your knees?
    Hope everyone is happy.

    Reply
  83. Thanks so much for this terrific post. You have introduced me to a new to me author.
    For romance, I like Regency, but also earlier and later in both England and the US. In fact, in romance, I like romance.
    For mystery, I am a huge fan of the period between the two world wars. Women were becoming more recognized for their skills —-yes—-I know there were huge battles, but still things were better than they had been. Art Deco is a style I love and the designs were seen in everything from tea pots to entire homes.
    Also, people were seeing an entire new world. There were more job opportunities. In fact, that period was a huge era of change. And to be honest, I think the clothes were terrific. Who would not love peals that reached to your knees?
    Hope everyone is happy.

    Reply
  84. Thanks so much for this terrific post. You have introduced me to a new to me author.
    For romance, I like Regency, but also earlier and later in both England and the US. In fact, in romance, I like romance.
    For mystery, I am a huge fan of the period between the two world wars. Women were becoming more recognized for their skills —-yes—-I know there were huge battles, but still things were better than they had been. Art Deco is a style I love and the designs were seen in everything from tea pots to entire homes.
    Also, people were seeing an entire new world. There were more job opportunities. In fact, that period was a huge era of change. And to be honest, I think the clothes were terrific. Who would not love peals that reached to your knees?
    Hope everyone is happy.

    Reply
  85. Thanks so much for this terrific post. You have introduced me to a new to me author.
    For romance, I like Regency, but also earlier and later in both England and the US. In fact, in romance, I like romance.
    For mystery, I am a huge fan of the period between the two world wars. Women were becoming more recognized for their skills —-yes—-I know there were huge battles, but still things were better than they had been. Art Deco is a style I love and the designs were seen in everything from tea pots to entire homes.
    Also, people were seeing an entire new world. There were more job opportunities. In fact, that period was a huge era of change. And to be honest, I think the clothes were terrific. Who would not love peals that reached to your knees?
    Hope everyone is happy.

    Reply
  86. I’ve very much enjoyed the 1st two books in the series and was about to request Evil in Emeralds through interlibrary loan. I’d love to get #3 Evil in Emerald as a personal copy!
    As to what my favorite Historical time period is…it depends on my mood! But generally Regency to WWII. I didn’t used to do much past Edwardian but have now expanded into the WWII era since that has now become more historical instead of “just 30 years ago”.
    I also like historical romances (and some mysteries) set in the 1800’s in the western part of the US as well as Australia.
    Occasionally I’ll dip into medieval or Georgian historicals.
    I also like contemporary romances in all those places plus Scotland, Wales, Cornwall, England and any part of the US….
    In other words..I’ll try any time period!

    Reply
  87. I’ve very much enjoyed the 1st two books in the series and was about to request Evil in Emeralds through interlibrary loan. I’d love to get #3 Evil in Emerald as a personal copy!
    As to what my favorite Historical time period is…it depends on my mood! But generally Regency to WWII. I didn’t used to do much past Edwardian but have now expanded into the WWII era since that has now become more historical instead of “just 30 years ago”.
    I also like historical romances (and some mysteries) set in the 1800’s in the western part of the US as well as Australia.
    Occasionally I’ll dip into medieval or Georgian historicals.
    I also like contemporary romances in all those places plus Scotland, Wales, Cornwall, England and any part of the US….
    In other words..I’ll try any time period!

    Reply
  88. I’ve very much enjoyed the 1st two books in the series and was about to request Evil in Emeralds through interlibrary loan. I’d love to get #3 Evil in Emerald as a personal copy!
    As to what my favorite Historical time period is…it depends on my mood! But generally Regency to WWII. I didn’t used to do much past Edwardian but have now expanded into the WWII era since that has now become more historical instead of “just 30 years ago”.
    I also like historical romances (and some mysteries) set in the 1800’s in the western part of the US as well as Australia.
    Occasionally I’ll dip into medieval or Georgian historicals.
    I also like contemporary romances in all those places plus Scotland, Wales, Cornwall, England and any part of the US….
    In other words..I’ll try any time period!

    Reply
  89. I’ve very much enjoyed the 1st two books in the series and was about to request Evil in Emeralds through interlibrary loan. I’d love to get #3 Evil in Emerald as a personal copy!
    As to what my favorite Historical time period is…it depends on my mood! But generally Regency to WWII. I didn’t used to do much past Edwardian but have now expanded into the WWII era since that has now become more historical instead of “just 30 years ago”.
    I also like historical romances (and some mysteries) set in the 1800’s in the western part of the US as well as Australia.
    Occasionally I’ll dip into medieval or Georgian historicals.
    I also like contemporary romances in all those places plus Scotland, Wales, Cornwall, England and any part of the US….
    In other words..I’ll try any time period!

    Reply
  90. I’ve very much enjoyed the 1st two books in the series and was about to request Evil in Emeralds through interlibrary loan. I’d love to get #3 Evil in Emerald as a personal copy!
    As to what my favorite Historical time period is…it depends on my mood! But generally Regency to WWII. I didn’t used to do much past Edwardian but have now expanded into the WWII era since that has now become more historical instead of “just 30 years ago”.
    I also like historical romances (and some mysteries) set in the 1800’s in the western part of the US as well as Australia.
    Occasionally I’ll dip into medieval or Georgian historicals.
    I also like contemporary romances in all those places plus Scotland, Wales, Cornwall, England and any part of the US….
    In other words..I’ll try any time period!

    Reply
  91. I enjoy any historical era, but I do wish there were more books set during the Tudor era. I didn’t realize Alison had Australian historicals, I have really enjoyed the few I’ve found by other authors. I would love to read something set in Singapore.

    Reply
  92. I enjoy any historical era, but I do wish there were more books set during the Tudor era. I didn’t realize Alison had Australian historicals, I have really enjoyed the few I’ve found by other authors. I would love to read something set in Singapore.

    Reply
  93. I enjoy any historical era, but I do wish there were more books set during the Tudor era. I didn’t realize Alison had Australian historicals, I have really enjoyed the few I’ve found by other authors. I would love to read something set in Singapore.

    Reply
  94. I enjoy any historical era, but I do wish there were more books set during the Tudor era. I didn’t realize Alison had Australian historicals, I have really enjoyed the few I’ve found by other authors. I would love to read something set in Singapore.

    Reply
  95. I enjoy any historical era, but I do wish there were more books set during the Tudor era. I didn’t realize Alison had Australian historicals, I have really enjoyed the few I’ve found by other authors. I would love to read something set in Singapore.

    Reply
  96. I’ve just purchased Gather the Bones. I’d never heard of it and it sounds right up my alley! I love dual timelines and definitely ghosts. Looking forward to reading it.
    I like a wide variety of historical novels. I don’t read contemporary at all. I have enough of that in everyday life.
    Good luck with the new book.

    Reply
  97. I’ve just purchased Gather the Bones. I’d never heard of it and it sounds right up my alley! I love dual timelines and definitely ghosts. Looking forward to reading it.
    I like a wide variety of historical novels. I don’t read contemporary at all. I have enough of that in everyday life.
    Good luck with the new book.

    Reply
  98. I’ve just purchased Gather the Bones. I’d never heard of it and it sounds right up my alley! I love dual timelines and definitely ghosts. Looking forward to reading it.
    I like a wide variety of historical novels. I don’t read contemporary at all. I have enough of that in everyday life.
    Good luck with the new book.

    Reply
  99. I’ve just purchased Gather the Bones. I’d never heard of it and it sounds right up my alley! I love dual timelines and definitely ghosts. Looking forward to reading it.
    I like a wide variety of historical novels. I don’t read contemporary at all. I have enough of that in everyday life.
    Good luck with the new book.

    Reply
  100. I’ve just purchased Gather the Bones. I’d never heard of it and it sounds right up my alley! I love dual timelines and definitely ghosts. Looking forward to reading it.
    I like a wide variety of historical novels. I don’t read contemporary at all. I have enough of that in everyday life.
    Good luck with the new book.

    Reply
  101. I honestly can’t pick just one period of time in history or one place either. If the book is well-written, well-plotted, and keeps my interested it doesn’t matter when or where it is set. That said, I do lean toward English settings, anywhere from medieval to contemporary.

    Reply
  102. I honestly can’t pick just one period of time in history or one place either. If the book is well-written, well-plotted, and keeps my interested it doesn’t matter when or where it is set. That said, I do lean toward English settings, anywhere from medieval to contemporary.

    Reply
  103. I honestly can’t pick just one period of time in history or one place either. If the book is well-written, well-plotted, and keeps my interested it doesn’t matter when or where it is set. That said, I do lean toward English settings, anywhere from medieval to contemporary.

    Reply
  104. I honestly can’t pick just one period of time in history or one place either. If the book is well-written, well-plotted, and keeps my interested it doesn’t matter when or where it is set. That said, I do lean toward English settings, anywhere from medieval to contemporary.

    Reply
  105. I honestly can’t pick just one period of time in history or one place either. If the book is well-written, well-plotted, and keeps my interested it doesn’t matter when or where it is set. That said, I do lean toward English settings, anywhere from medieval to contemporary.

    Reply
  106. I really like Regency and Victorian time settings. Medieval is third on my list. I came across Singapore Sapphire several times before I finally got it and read it. I am so glad I did. Fantastic series!! I guess I now have expanded beyond Victorian time. What I like about the setting of Harriet Gordon series are horses as a mode transportation and British rule/influence.

    Reply
  107. I really like Regency and Victorian time settings. Medieval is third on my list. I came across Singapore Sapphire several times before I finally got it and read it. I am so glad I did. Fantastic series!! I guess I now have expanded beyond Victorian time. What I like about the setting of Harriet Gordon series are horses as a mode transportation and British rule/influence.

    Reply
  108. I really like Regency and Victorian time settings. Medieval is third on my list. I came across Singapore Sapphire several times before I finally got it and read it. I am so glad I did. Fantastic series!! I guess I now have expanded beyond Victorian time. What I like about the setting of Harriet Gordon series are horses as a mode transportation and British rule/influence.

    Reply
  109. I really like Regency and Victorian time settings. Medieval is third on my list. I came across Singapore Sapphire several times before I finally got it and read it. I am so glad I did. Fantastic series!! I guess I now have expanded beyond Victorian time. What I like about the setting of Harriet Gordon series are horses as a mode transportation and British rule/influence.

    Reply
  110. I really like Regency and Victorian time settings. Medieval is third on my list. I came across Singapore Sapphire several times before I finally got it and read it. I am so glad I did. Fantastic series!! I guess I now have expanded beyond Victorian time. What I like about the setting of Harriet Gordon series are horses as a mode transportation and British rule/influence.

    Reply
  111. I’ve written one book set in the 1920s and it was so much fun exploring that clash of the old world and the new. It is a very popular period for historical mystery writers, which is why I deliberately veered away from it and chose to set my Harriet books in that uncertain period pre WWI. I found it quite poignant writing Revenge in Rubies, knowing the young men of the staid Regiment that formed the kernel of the book, would be marching to war and most likely their deaths in a few years.

    Reply
  112. I’ve written one book set in the 1920s and it was so much fun exploring that clash of the old world and the new. It is a very popular period for historical mystery writers, which is why I deliberately veered away from it and chose to set my Harriet books in that uncertain period pre WWI. I found it quite poignant writing Revenge in Rubies, knowing the young men of the staid Regiment that formed the kernel of the book, would be marching to war and most likely their deaths in a few years.

    Reply
  113. I’ve written one book set in the 1920s and it was so much fun exploring that clash of the old world and the new. It is a very popular period for historical mystery writers, which is why I deliberately veered away from it and chose to set my Harriet books in that uncertain period pre WWI. I found it quite poignant writing Revenge in Rubies, knowing the young men of the staid Regiment that formed the kernel of the book, would be marching to war and most likely their deaths in a few years.

    Reply
  114. I’ve written one book set in the 1920s and it was so much fun exploring that clash of the old world and the new. It is a very popular period for historical mystery writers, which is why I deliberately veered away from it and chose to set my Harriet books in that uncertain period pre WWI. I found it quite poignant writing Revenge in Rubies, knowing the young men of the staid Regiment that formed the kernel of the book, would be marching to war and most likely their deaths in a few years.

    Reply
  115. I’ve written one book set in the 1920s and it was so much fun exploring that clash of the old world and the new. It is a very popular period for historical mystery writers, which is why I deliberately veered away from it and chose to set my Harriet books in that uncertain period pre WWI. I found it quite poignant writing Revenge in Rubies, knowing the young men of the staid Regiment that formed the kernel of the book, would be marching to war and most likely their deaths in a few years.

    Reply
  116. Thank you, Vicki. I hope you enjoy #3!
    That 150 years saw such huge social and technological change that it provides untapped resources for writers! For fun I tried moving a story I set in the Regency to the 1850s and the whole vibe changed. Suddenly there were trains, better communications, gas lights etc etc! I changed it back again.
    At the end of the day it shouldn’t matter when a story is set as long as its a good well written, well researched piece of story telling that grips you from beginning to end!

    Reply
  117. Thank you, Vicki. I hope you enjoy #3!
    That 150 years saw such huge social and technological change that it provides untapped resources for writers! For fun I tried moving a story I set in the Regency to the 1850s and the whole vibe changed. Suddenly there were trains, better communications, gas lights etc etc! I changed it back again.
    At the end of the day it shouldn’t matter when a story is set as long as its a good well written, well researched piece of story telling that grips you from beginning to end!

    Reply
  118. Thank you, Vicki. I hope you enjoy #3!
    That 150 years saw such huge social and technological change that it provides untapped resources for writers! For fun I tried moving a story I set in the Regency to the 1850s and the whole vibe changed. Suddenly there were trains, better communications, gas lights etc etc! I changed it back again.
    At the end of the day it shouldn’t matter when a story is set as long as its a good well written, well researched piece of story telling that grips you from beginning to end!

    Reply
  119. Thank you, Vicki. I hope you enjoy #3!
    That 150 years saw such huge social and technological change that it provides untapped resources for writers! For fun I tried moving a story I set in the Regency to the 1850s and the whole vibe changed. Suddenly there were trains, better communications, gas lights etc etc! I changed it back again.
    At the end of the day it shouldn’t matter when a story is set as long as its a good well written, well researched piece of story telling that grips you from beginning to end!

    Reply
  120. Thank you, Vicki. I hope you enjoy #3!
    That 150 years saw such huge social and technological change that it provides untapped resources for writers! For fun I tried moving a story I set in the Regency to the 1850s and the whole vibe changed. Suddenly there were trains, better communications, gas lights etc etc! I changed it back again.
    At the end of the day it shouldn’t matter when a story is set as long as its a good well written, well researched piece of story telling that grips you from beginning to end!

    Reply
  121. It is such an interesting period… socially and politically and very popular with historical mystery writers. I am a fan of Sulari Gentill’s Australian set mystery series set in the mid 30s. I have learned so much about Australian history (and the tension between the right wing and the communist factions)that I didn’t know! I love it when good writing entertains and educates!

    Reply
  122. It is such an interesting period… socially and politically and very popular with historical mystery writers. I am a fan of Sulari Gentill’s Australian set mystery series set in the mid 30s. I have learned so much about Australian history (and the tension between the right wing and the communist factions)that I didn’t know! I love it when good writing entertains and educates!

    Reply
  123. It is such an interesting period… socially and politically and very popular with historical mystery writers. I am a fan of Sulari Gentill’s Australian set mystery series set in the mid 30s. I have learned so much about Australian history (and the tension between the right wing and the communist factions)that I didn’t know! I love it when good writing entertains and educates!

    Reply
  124. It is such an interesting period… socially and politically and very popular with historical mystery writers. I am a fan of Sulari Gentill’s Australian set mystery series set in the mid 30s. I have learned so much about Australian history (and the tension between the right wing and the communist factions)that I didn’t know! I love it when good writing entertains and educates!

    Reply
  125. It is such an interesting period… socially and politically and very popular with historical mystery writers. I am a fan of Sulari Gentill’s Australian set mystery series set in the mid 30s. I have learned so much about Australian history (and the tension between the right wing and the communist factions)that I didn’t know! I love it when good writing entertains and educates!

    Reply
  126. Hi Karin The Tudor period enjoyed a huge burst of popularity a few years ago but seems to have faded away (I am still waiting for the Stuarts to become the new Regency!). Yes I do write Australian historicals a short series set in a small gold mining community – THE POSTMISTRESS and THE GOLD MINER’S SISTER. #3 THE HOMECOMING will be out next January. I love writing stories set in my own backyard but in an odd way I find them more challenging than the English Civil War for example!

    Reply
  127. Hi Karin The Tudor period enjoyed a huge burst of popularity a few years ago but seems to have faded away (I am still waiting for the Stuarts to become the new Regency!). Yes I do write Australian historicals a short series set in a small gold mining community – THE POSTMISTRESS and THE GOLD MINER’S SISTER. #3 THE HOMECOMING will be out next January. I love writing stories set in my own backyard but in an odd way I find them more challenging than the English Civil War for example!

    Reply
  128. Hi Karin The Tudor period enjoyed a huge burst of popularity a few years ago but seems to have faded away (I am still waiting for the Stuarts to become the new Regency!). Yes I do write Australian historicals a short series set in a small gold mining community – THE POSTMISTRESS and THE GOLD MINER’S SISTER. #3 THE HOMECOMING will be out next January. I love writing stories set in my own backyard but in an odd way I find them more challenging than the English Civil War for example!

    Reply
  129. Hi Karin The Tudor period enjoyed a huge burst of popularity a few years ago but seems to have faded away (I am still waiting for the Stuarts to become the new Regency!). Yes I do write Australian historicals a short series set in a small gold mining community – THE POSTMISTRESS and THE GOLD MINER’S SISTER. #3 THE HOMECOMING will be out next January. I love writing stories set in my own backyard but in an odd way I find them more challenging than the English Civil War for example!

    Reply
  130. Hi Karin The Tudor period enjoyed a huge burst of popularity a few years ago but seems to have faded away (I am still waiting for the Stuarts to become the new Regency!). Yes I do write Australian historicals a short series set in a small gold mining community – THE POSTMISTRESS and THE GOLD MINER’S SISTER. #3 THE HOMECOMING will be out next January. I love writing stories set in my own backyard but in an odd way I find them more challenging than the English Civil War for example!

    Reply
  131. I do hope you love GATHER THE BONES. It is the book of my heart but I don’t know what I was thinking when I threw all those elements together. It was also my first foray into Australian characters (even though it is set in England). There are also more G&S references!
    I agree about contemporaries and I actually find them quite difficult to write. I would rather tackle a smallpox epidemic in 1872 than the whole dilemma of covid19!

    Reply
  132. I do hope you love GATHER THE BONES. It is the book of my heart but I don’t know what I was thinking when I threw all those elements together. It was also my first foray into Australian characters (even though it is set in England). There are also more G&S references!
    I agree about contemporaries and I actually find them quite difficult to write. I would rather tackle a smallpox epidemic in 1872 than the whole dilemma of covid19!

    Reply
  133. I do hope you love GATHER THE BONES. It is the book of my heart but I don’t know what I was thinking when I threw all those elements together. It was also my first foray into Australian characters (even though it is set in England). There are also more G&S references!
    I agree about contemporaries and I actually find them quite difficult to write. I would rather tackle a smallpox epidemic in 1872 than the whole dilemma of covid19!

    Reply
  134. I do hope you love GATHER THE BONES. It is the book of my heart but I don’t know what I was thinking when I threw all those elements together. It was also my first foray into Australian characters (even though it is set in England). There are also more G&S references!
    I agree about contemporaries and I actually find them quite difficult to write. I would rather tackle a smallpox epidemic in 1872 than the whole dilemma of covid19!

    Reply
  135. I do hope you love GATHER THE BONES. It is the book of my heart but I don’t know what I was thinking when I threw all those elements together. It was also my first foray into Australian characters (even though it is set in England). There are also more G&S references!
    I agree about contemporaries and I actually find them quite difficult to write. I would rather tackle a smallpox epidemic in 1872 than the whole dilemma of covid19!

    Reply
  136. Fantastic… and you are spot on! It shouldn’t matter when a story is set if it is well written and engaging. I also believe it should be well researched too because readers do rely on fiction for historical knowledge and we, as writers, owe it to them to be as accurate as we can be!

    Reply
  137. Fantastic… and you are spot on! It shouldn’t matter when a story is set if it is well written and engaging. I also believe it should be well researched too because readers do rely on fiction for historical knowledge and we, as writers, owe it to them to be as accurate as we can be!

    Reply
  138. Fantastic… and you are spot on! It shouldn’t matter when a story is set if it is well written and engaging. I also believe it should be well researched too because readers do rely on fiction for historical knowledge and we, as writers, owe it to them to be as accurate as we can be!

    Reply
  139. Fantastic… and you are spot on! It shouldn’t matter when a story is set if it is well written and engaging. I also believe it should be well researched too because readers do rely on fiction for historical knowledge and we, as writers, owe it to them to be as accurate as we can be!

    Reply
  140. Fantastic… and you are spot on! It shouldn’t matter when a story is set if it is well written and engaging. I also believe it should be well researched too because readers do rely on fiction for historical knowledge and we, as writers, owe it to them to be as accurate as we can be!

    Reply
  141. I am so glad you found Harriet!
    1910 is an interesting time when motor vehicles were just coming in and horse drawn transport fading out, but I enjoyed making Curran a bit of a luddite and giving him the eccentricity of his own horse! However I have a feeling he might lean toward motor cycles at some point.
    I have tried to be even handed about the colonial influence. There are good and bad in every society and certainly in Emerald you will encounter some venal characters, but I try to balance their views with the more enlightened views of my own characters.

    Reply
  142. I am so glad you found Harriet!
    1910 is an interesting time when motor vehicles were just coming in and horse drawn transport fading out, but I enjoyed making Curran a bit of a luddite and giving him the eccentricity of his own horse! However I have a feeling he might lean toward motor cycles at some point.
    I have tried to be even handed about the colonial influence. There are good and bad in every society and certainly in Emerald you will encounter some venal characters, but I try to balance their views with the more enlightened views of my own characters.

    Reply
  143. I am so glad you found Harriet!
    1910 is an interesting time when motor vehicles were just coming in and horse drawn transport fading out, but I enjoyed making Curran a bit of a luddite and giving him the eccentricity of his own horse! However I have a feeling he might lean toward motor cycles at some point.
    I have tried to be even handed about the colonial influence. There are good and bad in every society and certainly in Emerald you will encounter some venal characters, but I try to balance their views with the more enlightened views of my own characters.

    Reply
  144. I am so glad you found Harriet!
    1910 is an interesting time when motor vehicles were just coming in and horse drawn transport fading out, but I enjoyed making Curran a bit of a luddite and giving him the eccentricity of his own horse! However I have a feeling he might lean toward motor cycles at some point.
    I have tried to be even handed about the colonial influence. There are good and bad in every society and certainly in Emerald you will encounter some venal characters, but I try to balance their views with the more enlightened views of my own characters.

    Reply
  145. I am so glad you found Harriet!
    1910 is an interesting time when motor vehicles were just coming in and horse drawn transport fading out, but I enjoyed making Curran a bit of a luddite and giving him the eccentricity of his own horse! However I have a feeling he might lean toward motor cycles at some point.
    I have tried to be even handed about the colonial influence. There are good and bad in every society and certainly in Emerald you will encounter some venal characters, but I try to balance their views with the more enlightened views of my own characters.

    Reply
  146. Yes, the depth of the politics in Sulari Gentill’s books is amazing! We don’t learn about Australia at all in the U.S. so it was all news to me.

    Reply
  147. Yes, the depth of the politics in Sulari Gentill’s books is amazing! We don’t learn about Australia at all in the U.S. so it was all news to me.

    Reply
  148. Yes, the depth of the politics in Sulari Gentill’s books is amazing! We don’t learn about Australia at all in the U.S. so it was all news to me.

    Reply
  149. Yes, the depth of the politics in Sulari Gentill’s books is amazing! We don’t learn about Australia at all in the U.S. so it was all news to me.

    Reply
  150. Yes, the depth of the politics in Sulari Gentill’s books is amazing! We don’t learn about Australia at all in the U.S. so it was all news to me.

    Reply
  151. Karin, there are things in Sulari’s books that I didn’t know about either — especially the political situation in Sydney around the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. I knew some, of course, but our high school history classes never covered that period.
    Have you seen the interviews I’ve done with Sulari? If not, you might enjoy them.
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2019/10/meet-sulari-gentill.html
    and
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2020/03/sulari-gentill.html

    Reply
  152. Karin, there are things in Sulari’s books that I didn’t know about either — especially the political situation in Sydney around the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. I knew some, of course, but our high school history classes never covered that period.
    Have you seen the interviews I’ve done with Sulari? If not, you might enjoy them.
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2019/10/meet-sulari-gentill.html
    and
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2020/03/sulari-gentill.html

    Reply
  153. Karin, there are things in Sulari’s books that I didn’t know about either — especially the political situation in Sydney around the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. I knew some, of course, but our high school history classes never covered that period.
    Have you seen the interviews I’ve done with Sulari? If not, you might enjoy them.
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2019/10/meet-sulari-gentill.html
    and
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2020/03/sulari-gentill.html

    Reply
  154. Karin, there are things in Sulari’s books that I didn’t know about either — especially the political situation in Sydney around the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. I knew some, of course, but our high school history classes never covered that period.
    Have you seen the interviews I’ve done with Sulari? If not, you might enjoy them.
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2019/10/meet-sulari-gentill.html
    and
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2020/03/sulari-gentill.html

    Reply
  155. Karin, there are things in Sulari’s books that I didn’t know about either — especially the political situation in Sydney around the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. I knew some, of course, but our high school history classes never covered that period.
    Have you seen the interviews I’ve done with Sulari? If not, you might enjoy them.
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2019/10/meet-sulari-gentill.html
    and
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2020/03/sulari-gentill.html

    Reply

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