Alphabet Soup

Wood-cube-491720_640I occasionally write about dyslexia because it affects a number of my friends and family members, and it interests me. Despite scientists having known about this affliction since the 1870s, it was rarely acknowledged even in the 20th century.

 

The official definition adapted by the International Dyslexia Association in 2002: “Dyslexia is a specific learning disability that is neurobiological in origin. It is characterized by difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities. These difficulties typically result from a deficit in the phonological component of language that is often unexpected in relation to other cognitive abilities and the provision of effective By http://www.scientificanimations.com - http://www.scientificanimations.com/wiki-images/, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=80900357classroom instruction. Secondary consequences may include problems in reading comprehension and reduced reading experience that can impede growth of vocabulary and background knowledge.”  https://dyslexiaida.org/definition-of-dyslexia/

 Dyslexia simulators like this one are entertaining but as far as I’m aware, dyslexics do not see words jumping about like grasshoppers. But if you can visualize these words standing still, you can sort of understand the confusion of letters.

15235809112_3490dc9418_w

"Dyslexia" by pegazuz66 is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

The term was first coined about 1880 by a German ophthalmologist who could find nothing wrong with the eyes of patients suffering from an inability to recognize words. It referred to adults he thought might be brain damaged. He based his diagnosis on earlier writings about “wordblindness.” Obviously my hero in THE LIBRARIAN’S SPELL in 1871 has utterly no awareness of this affliction. He’s just horribly embarrassed that he can’t read.Rice_TheLibrarian'sSpell_600x900

 As awareness of this condition grew, case studies multiplied, and doctors began making the diagnosis with children—thus eliminating the brain damage assumption. The case studies reported extremely intelligent children who are in every other way normal except that they can’t read. The world wars ended research in the UK but the US picked it up. Researchers gradually concluded dyslexia was caused by cognitive development and recommended phonics instruction as a means of overcoming it.

Despite a century or more of research and study, schools refused to recognize dyslexia as a diagnosis, and teachers weren’t provided training in dealing with it. Given that we actually understand science in this day and age (or most of us do), and still barely accept the diagnosis, can you imagine what it must have been like for dyslexics in the 19th century struggling to read? Everyone would have called them stupid—as they occasionally do today, unfortunately.

 But reading isn’t the only means of learning, and someone determined enough to learn will find other ways. My Max chose to learn by listening and working with his hands. Engineering in the 1870s wasn’t the complex mathematical and physics-oriented discipline that it is today, so if he could listen to other engineers, learn the math, and put in hands-on work, it’s quite possible he could excel despite his disability.

By Saffron Blaze - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=18925912  Except, of course, my heroine gives him a library tower full of books to fix. I do love a little irony.

Have you, or someone you know, had to deal with a learning disability? Was it recognized and treated?

(Obligatory promo note–THE LIBRARIAN'S SPELL releases this week!)

135 thoughts on “Alphabet Soup”

  1. A powerful topic, Pat! Varying degrees of dyslexia and its close kin, dysgraphyia, are pretty common in my experience. True word blindness, an absolute inability to read, is probably rare, but I’ve seen a number of people who have the problems with spelling, for example. A friend of mine said that he was told by the nuns that since he was so bright in most areas but his spelling was a joke, he must be deliberately messing up. Another friend of mine was in the local art college and herself taught at a famous local school for dyslexics. She said that that 90% of the student at her art college (including herself) were more or less dyslexic.
    I know dyslexic writers; they have the stories in their heads and need to learn serious coping mechanisms to tell the stories. Personally, I think there’s a wide range of glitches possible in our mental programming, most of which are relatively minor and wwe learn to deal with them. But the serious serious versions, like your Max’s, require a lot of work and empathy.

    Reply
  2. A powerful topic, Pat! Varying degrees of dyslexia and its close kin, dysgraphyia, are pretty common in my experience. True word blindness, an absolute inability to read, is probably rare, but I’ve seen a number of people who have the problems with spelling, for example. A friend of mine said that he was told by the nuns that since he was so bright in most areas but his spelling was a joke, he must be deliberately messing up. Another friend of mine was in the local art college and herself taught at a famous local school for dyslexics. She said that that 90% of the student at her art college (including herself) were more or less dyslexic.
    I know dyslexic writers; they have the stories in their heads and need to learn serious coping mechanisms to tell the stories. Personally, I think there’s a wide range of glitches possible in our mental programming, most of which are relatively minor and wwe learn to deal with them. But the serious serious versions, like your Max’s, require a lot of work and empathy.

    Reply
  3. A powerful topic, Pat! Varying degrees of dyslexia and its close kin, dysgraphyia, are pretty common in my experience. True word blindness, an absolute inability to read, is probably rare, but I’ve seen a number of people who have the problems with spelling, for example. A friend of mine said that he was told by the nuns that since he was so bright in most areas but his spelling was a joke, he must be deliberately messing up. Another friend of mine was in the local art college and herself taught at a famous local school for dyslexics. She said that that 90% of the student at her art college (including herself) were more or less dyslexic.
    I know dyslexic writers; they have the stories in their heads and need to learn serious coping mechanisms to tell the stories. Personally, I think there’s a wide range of glitches possible in our mental programming, most of which are relatively minor and wwe learn to deal with them. But the serious serious versions, like your Max’s, require a lot of work and empathy.

    Reply
  4. A powerful topic, Pat! Varying degrees of dyslexia and its close kin, dysgraphyia, are pretty common in my experience. True word blindness, an absolute inability to read, is probably rare, but I’ve seen a number of people who have the problems with spelling, for example. A friend of mine said that he was told by the nuns that since he was so bright in most areas but his spelling was a joke, he must be deliberately messing up. Another friend of mine was in the local art college and herself taught at a famous local school for dyslexics. She said that that 90% of the student at her art college (including herself) were more or less dyslexic.
    I know dyslexic writers; they have the stories in their heads and need to learn serious coping mechanisms to tell the stories. Personally, I think there’s a wide range of glitches possible in our mental programming, most of which are relatively minor and wwe learn to deal with them. But the serious serious versions, like your Max’s, require a lot of work and empathy.

    Reply
  5. A powerful topic, Pat! Varying degrees of dyslexia and its close kin, dysgraphyia, are pretty common in my experience. True word blindness, an absolute inability to read, is probably rare, but I’ve seen a number of people who have the problems with spelling, for example. A friend of mine said that he was told by the nuns that since he was so bright in most areas but his spelling was a joke, he must be deliberately messing up. Another friend of mine was in the local art college and herself taught at a famous local school for dyslexics. She said that that 90% of the student at her art college (including herself) were more or less dyslexic.
    I know dyslexic writers; they have the stories in their heads and need to learn serious coping mechanisms to tell the stories. Personally, I think there’s a wide range of glitches possible in our mental programming, most of which are relatively minor and wwe learn to deal with them. But the serious serious versions, like your Max’s, require a lot of work and empathy.

    Reply
  6. When I was first teaching many, many years ago, I had a student who was perfectly bright when speaking but used to hand in papers with bizarre mistakes in them, like “who” when she clearly meant “the”. I had no idea what the problem was, and when I went to the department chair and the headmistress, their best suggestion was to give her more spelling exercises. I couldn’t see how that could help, but my own best idea was for her to read her papers out loud to herself.
    It was a good ten years later that I first heard of dyslexia and realized what her problem had been. I still feel guilty about my failure to help her.

    Reply
  7. When I was first teaching many, many years ago, I had a student who was perfectly bright when speaking but used to hand in papers with bizarre mistakes in them, like “who” when she clearly meant “the”. I had no idea what the problem was, and when I went to the department chair and the headmistress, their best suggestion was to give her more spelling exercises. I couldn’t see how that could help, but my own best idea was for her to read her papers out loud to herself.
    It was a good ten years later that I first heard of dyslexia and realized what her problem had been. I still feel guilty about my failure to help her.

    Reply
  8. When I was first teaching many, many years ago, I had a student who was perfectly bright when speaking but used to hand in papers with bizarre mistakes in them, like “who” when she clearly meant “the”. I had no idea what the problem was, and when I went to the department chair and the headmistress, their best suggestion was to give her more spelling exercises. I couldn’t see how that could help, but my own best idea was for her to read her papers out loud to herself.
    It was a good ten years later that I first heard of dyslexia and realized what her problem had been. I still feel guilty about my failure to help her.

    Reply
  9. When I was first teaching many, many years ago, I had a student who was perfectly bright when speaking but used to hand in papers with bizarre mistakes in them, like “who” when she clearly meant “the”. I had no idea what the problem was, and when I went to the department chair and the headmistress, their best suggestion was to give her more spelling exercises. I couldn’t see how that could help, but my own best idea was for her to read her papers out loud to herself.
    It was a good ten years later that I first heard of dyslexia and realized what her problem had been. I still feel guilty about my failure to help her.

    Reply
  10. When I was first teaching many, many years ago, I had a student who was perfectly bright when speaking but used to hand in papers with bizarre mistakes in them, like “who” when she clearly meant “the”. I had no idea what the problem was, and when I went to the department chair and the headmistress, their best suggestion was to give her more spelling exercises. I couldn’t see how that could help, but my own best idea was for her to read her papers out loud to herself.
    It was a good ten years later that I first heard of dyslexia and realized what her problem had been. I still feel guilty about my failure to help her.

    Reply
  11. I am so glad that I live now when folk with difficulties like this can be helped. I have known a few librarians who were very good at their jobs in spite of being dyslexic. I can’t even imagine life without being able to read.

    Reply
  12. I am so glad that I live now when folk with difficulties like this can be helped. I have known a few librarians who were very good at their jobs in spite of being dyslexic. I can’t even imagine life without being able to read.

    Reply
  13. I am so glad that I live now when folk with difficulties like this can be helped. I have known a few librarians who were very good at their jobs in spite of being dyslexic. I can’t even imagine life without being able to read.

    Reply
  14. I am so glad that I live now when folk with difficulties like this can be helped. I have known a few librarians who were very good at their jobs in spite of being dyslexic. I can’t even imagine life without being able to read.

    Reply
  15. I am so glad that I live now when folk with difficulties like this can be helped. I have known a few librarians who were very good at their jobs in spite of being dyslexic. I can’t even imagine life without being able to read.

    Reply
  16. Both my husband and I are dyslexic. His presents in a more severe form than mine. He has a high school education, but could not adapt to the demands of college. He then joined the Navy and succeeded as a Aviation Hydraulics Mate, and in his civilian career. I also present as dysgraphic as there is a disconnect between what I see and what my hand writes. I graduated from college and have continued my formal education. He and I are both life-long learners. He has learned how to skim while reading and picking up the content. Me, I have to read every word to understand content. He doesn’t read for pleasure as I do. When I become too tired to read, the words shift on the page making it impossible to read further. He doesn’t write, but I do for pleasure. The word processing programs made correcting and editing a breeze where the typed our handwritten page would have to be rewritten multiple times, opening more opportunities to create mistakes. I still have to see my hands when I type, so no touch typing for me! It is interesting how the disability manifests itself differently from person to person.
    I was fortunate to have a 1st grade teacher early 1970s who had taken a workshop about dyslexia and contacted my parents. My mother was a former teacher before she had children so she learned everything she could to help me improve my writing and reading skills. I’m fortunate to have been diagnosed at such a young age and have teachers, tutors, and my fabulous Mom to help me learn to cope and succeed despite the disability.

    Reply
  17. Both my husband and I are dyslexic. His presents in a more severe form than mine. He has a high school education, but could not adapt to the demands of college. He then joined the Navy and succeeded as a Aviation Hydraulics Mate, and in his civilian career. I also present as dysgraphic as there is a disconnect between what I see and what my hand writes. I graduated from college and have continued my formal education. He and I are both life-long learners. He has learned how to skim while reading and picking up the content. Me, I have to read every word to understand content. He doesn’t read for pleasure as I do. When I become too tired to read, the words shift on the page making it impossible to read further. He doesn’t write, but I do for pleasure. The word processing programs made correcting and editing a breeze where the typed our handwritten page would have to be rewritten multiple times, opening more opportunities to create mistakes. I still have to see my hands when I type, so no touch typing for me! It is interesting how the disability manifests itself differently from person to person.
    I was fortunate to have a 1st grade teacher early 1970s who had taken a workshop about dyslexia and contacted my parents. My mother was a former teacher before she had children so she learned everything she could to help me improve my writing and reading skills. I’m fortunate to have been diagnosed at such a young age and have teachers, tutors, and my fabulous Mom to help me learn to cope and succeed despite the disability.

    Reply
  18. Both my husband and I are dyslexic. His presents in a more severe form than mine. He has a high school education, but could not adapt to the demands of college. He then joined the Navy and succeeded as a Aviation Hydraulics Mate, and in his civilian career. I also present as dysgraphic as there is a disconnect between what I see and what my hand writes. I graduated from college and have continued my formal education. He and I are both life-long learners. He has learned how to skim while reading and picking up the content. Me, I have to read every word to understand content. He doesn’t read for pleasure as I do. When I become too tired to read, the words shift on the page making it impossible to read further. He doesn’t write, but I do for pleasure. The word processing programs made correcting and editing a breeze where the typed our handwritten page would have to be rewritten multiple times, opening more opportunities to create mistakes. I still have to see my hands when I type, so no touch typing for me! It is interesting how the disability manifests itself differently from person to person.
    I was fortunate to have a 1st grade teacher early 1970s who had taken a workshop about dyslexia and contacted my parents. My mother was a former teacher before she had children so she learned everything she could to help me improve my writing and reading skills. I’m fortunate to have been diagnosed at such a young age and have teachers, tutors, and my fabulous Mom to help me learn to cope and succeed despite the disability.

    Reply
  19. Both my husband and I are dyslexic. His presents in a more severe form than mine. He has a high school education, but could not adapt to the demands of college. He then joined the Navy and succeeded as a Aviation Hydraulics Mate, and in his civilian career. I also present as dysgraphic as there is a disconnect between what I see and what my hand writes. I graduated from college and have continued my formal education. He and I are both life-long learners. He has learned how to skim while reading and picking up the content. Me, I have to read every word to understand content. He doesn’t read for pleasure as I do. When I become too tired to read, the words shift on the page making it impossible to read further. He doesn’t write, but I do for pleasure. The word processing programs made correcting and editing a breeze where the typed our handwritten page would have to be rewritten multiple times, opening more opportunities to create mistakes. I still have to see my hands when I type, so no touch typing for me! It is interesting how the disability manifests itself differently from person to person.
    I was fortunate to have a 1st grade teacher early 1970s who had taken a workshop about dyslexia and contacted my parents. My mother was a former teacher before she had children so she learned everything she could to help me improve my writing and reading skills. I’m fortunate to have been diagnosed at such a young age and have teachers, tutors, and my fabulous Mom to help me learn to cope and succeed despite the disability.

    Reply
  20. Both my husband and I are dyslexic. His presents in a more severe form than mine. He has a high school education, but could not adapt to the demands of college. He then joined the Navy and succeeded as a Aviation Hydraulics Mate, and in his civilian career. I also present as dysgraphic as there is a disconnect between what I see and what my hand writes. I graduated from college and have continued my formal education. He and I are both life-long learners. He has learned how to skim while reading and picking up the content. Me, I have to read every word to understand content. He doesn’t read for pleasure as I do. When I become too tired to read, the words shift on the page making it impossible to read further. He doesn’t write, but I do for pleasure. The word processing programs made correcting and editing a breeze where the typed our handwritten page would have to be rewritten multiple times, opening more opportunities to create mistakes. I still have to see my hands when I type, so no touch typing for me! It is interesting how the disability manifests itself differently from person to person.
    I was fortunate to have a 1st grade teacher early 1970s who had taken a workshop about dyslexia and contacted my parents. My mother was a former teacher before she had children so she learned everything she could to help me improve my writing and reading skills. I’m fortunate to have been diagnosed at such a young age and have teachers, tutors, and my fabulous Mom to help me learn to cope and succeed despite the disability.

    Reply
  21. I agree there’s an entire spectrum of difficulties, which is probably why these kind of things are so difficult to diagnose. Do all kids who can’t spell have dyslexia? Or are they lazy? Or do they have another problem? We need more brain science.

    Reply
  22. I agree there’s an entire spectrum of difficulties, which is probably why these kind of things are so difficult to diagnose. Do all kids who can’t spell have dyslexia? Or are they lazy? Or do they have another problem? We need more brain science.

    Reply
  23. I agree there’s an entire spectrum of difficulties, which is probably why these kind of things are so difficult to diagnose. Do all kids who can’t spell have dyslexia? Or are they lazy? Or do they have another problem? We need more brain science.

    Reply
  24. I agree there’s an entire spectrum of difficulties, which is probably why these kind of things are so difficult to diagnose. Do all kids who can’t spell have dyslexia? Or are they lazy? Or do they have another problem? We need more brain science.

    Reply
  25. I agree there’s an entire spectrum of difficulties, which is probably why these kind of things are so difficult to diagnose. Do all kids who can’t spell have dyslexia? Or are they lazy? Or do they have another problem? We need more brain science.

    Reply
  26. You can’t feel guilty for what the education system failed to accept as a problem. So very many students were labeled “stupid” simply because they had difficulty reading–when the knowledge of what was wrong was right there at hand but no one believed it. I hope today’s educators have better knowledge.

    Reply
  27. You can’t feel guilty for what the education system failed to accept as a problem. So very many students were labeled “stupid” simply because they had difficulty reading–when the knowledge of what was wrong was right there at hand but no one believed it. I hope today’s educators have better knowledge.

    Reply
  28. You can’t feel guilty for what the education system failed to accept as a problem. So very many students were labeled “stupid” simply because they had difficulty reading–when the knowledge of what was wrong was right there at hand but no one believed it. I hope today’s educators have better knowledge.

    Reply
  29. You can’t feel guilty for what the education system failed to accept as a problem. So very many students were labeled “stupid” simply because they had difficulty reading–when the knowledge of what was wrong was right there at hand but no one believed it. I hope today’s educators have better knowledge.

    Reply
  30. You can’t feel guilty for what the education system failed to accept as a problem. So very many students were labeled “stupid” simply because they had difficulty reading–when the knowledge of what was wrong was right there at hand but no one believed it. I hope today’s educators have better knowledge.

    Reply
  31. You were extremely fortunate to have that smart teacher and a mother who could help, especially in the 70s, when dyslexia was just barely being recognized. And isn’t spell check a blessing?

    Reply
  32. You were extremely fortunate to have that smart teacher and a mother who could help, especially in the 70s, when dyslexia was just barely being recognized. And isn’t spell check a blessing?

    Reply
  33. You were extremely fortunate to have that smart teacher and a mother who could help, especially in the 70s, when dyslexia was just barely being recognized. And isn’t spell check a blessing?

    Reply
  34. You were extremely fortunate to have that smart teacher and a mother who could help, especially in the 70s, when dyslexia was just barely being recognized. And isn’t spell check a blessing?

    Reply
  35. You were extremely fortunate to have that smart teacher and a mother who could help, especially in the 70s, when dyslexia was just barely being recognized. And isn’t spell check a blessing?

    Reply
  36. What a fascinating post, Patricia! I feel fortunate to not have dyslexia; I cannot imagine how difficult that must make life for many. Best wishes for the success of THE LIBRARIAN’S SPELL. (Incidentally, the link above takes one back here.)

    Reply
  37. What a fascinating post, Patricia! I feel fortunate to not have dyslexia; I cannot imagine how difficult that must make life for many. Best wishes for the success of THE LIBRARIAN’S SPELL. (Incidentally, the link above takes one back here.)

    Reply
  38. What a fascinating post, Patricia! I feel fortunate to not have dyslexia; I cannot imagine how difficult that must make life for many. Best wishes for the success of THE LIBRARIAN’S SPELL. (Incidentally, the link above takes one back here.)

    Reply
  39. What a fascinating post, Patricia! I feel fortunate to not have dyslexia; I cannot imagine how difficult that must make life for many. Best wishes for the success of THE LIBRARIAN’S SPELL. (Incidentally, the link above takes one back here.)

    Reply
  40. What a fascinating post, Patricia! I feel fortunate to not have dyslexia; I cannot imagine how difficult that must make life for many. Best wishes for the success of THE LIBRARIAN’S SPELL. (Incidentally, the link above takes one back here.)

    Reply
  41. I have an 18 year old great niece who is dyslectic and has other serious learning disabilities. At first they thought it was just a speech problem, but it turned out to be much more serious. She was diagnosed early in life as having cognitive deficits and a low IQ. But she was blessed with two parents who were determined to do the best that they could for her.
    They managed to get her into a special school – she is now in her last year of high school. It was not easy because it is an expensive school and they are not wealthy. Dad works two jobs and Mom works one job plus taking care of four other kids and the house as well as taking my niece to extra therapy that she has required over the years.
    She is old enough now to know what she doesn’t know. Found her crying recently because she was upset about all the things her brother and sisters can do that she might might never be able to do. She ended the litany by saying she wants to play with her Barbie dolls but knows she is too old. Well her mother set her straight on all that.
    For all her problems, she is fortunate that she was born in a time when there are answers to some of those problems. If she had been born in the 1940s like I was, she probably would have been labeled a troublemaker who couldn’t or wouldn’t learn.
    Such an interesting and important post.

    Reply
  42. I have an 18 year old great niece who is dyslectic and has other serious learning disabilities. At first they thought it was just a speech problem, but it turned out to be much more serious. She was diagnosed early in life as having cognitive deficits and a low IQ. But she was blessed with two parents who were determined to do the best that they could for her.
    They managed to get her into a special school – she is now in her last year of high school. It was not easy because it is an expensive school and they are not wealthy. Dad works two jobs and Mom works one job plus taking care of four other kids and the house as well as taking my niece to extra therapy that she has required over the years.
    She is old enough now to know what she doesn’t know. Found her crying recently because she was upset about all the things her brother and sisters can do that she might might never be able to do. She ended the litany by saying she wants to play with her Barbie dolls but knows she is too old. Well her mother set her straight on all that.
    For all her problems, she is fortunate that she was born in a time when there are answers to some of those problems. If she had been born in the 1940s like I was, she probably would have been labeled a troublemaker who couldn’t or wouldn’t learn.
    Such an interesting and important post.

    Reply
  43. I have an 18 year old great niece who is dyslectic and has other serious learning disabilities. At first they thought it was just a speech problem, but it turned out to be much more serious. She was diagnosed early in life as having cognitive deficits and a low IQ. But she was blessed with two parents who were determined to do the best that they could for her.
    They managed to get her into a special school – she is now in her last year of high school. It was not easy because it is an expensive school and they are not wealthy. Dad works two jobs and Mom works one job plus taking care of four other kids and the house as well as taking my niece to extra therapy that she has required over the years.
    She is old enough now to know what she doesn’t know. Found her crying recently because she was upset about all the things her brother and sisters can do that she might might never be able to do. She ended the litany by saying she wants to play with her Barbie dolls but knows she is too old. Well her mother set her straight on all that.
    For all her problems, she is fortunate that she was born in a time when there are answers to some of those problems. If she had been born in the 1940s like I was, she probably would have been labeled a troublemaker who couldn’t or wouldn’t learn.
    Such an interesting and important post.

    Reply
  44. I have an 18 year old great niece who is dyslectic and has other serious learning disabilities. At first they thought it was just a speech problem, but it turned out to be much more serious. She was diagnosed early in life as having cognitive deficits and a low IQ. But she was blessed with two parents who were determined to do the best that they could for her.
    They managed to get her into a special school – she is now in her last year of high school. It was not easy because it is an expensive school and they are not wealthy. Dad works two jobs and Mom works one job plus taking care of four other kids and the house as well as taking my niece to extra therapy that she has required over the years.
    She is old enough now to know what she doesn’t know. Found her crying recently because she was upset about all the things her brother and sisters can do that she might might never be able to do. She ended the litany by saying she wants to play with her Barbie dolls but knows she is too old. Well her mother set her straight on all that.
    For all her problems, she is fortunate that she was born in a time when there are answers to some of those problems. If she had been born in the 1940s like I was, she probably would have been labeled a troublemaker who couldn’t or wouldn’t learn.
    Such an interesting and important post.

    Reply
  45. I have an 18 year old great niece who is dyslectic and has other serious learning disabilities. At first they thought it was just a speech problem, but it turned out to be much more serious. She was diagnosed early in life as having cognitive deficits and a low IQ. But she was blessed with two parents who were determined to do the best that they could for her.
    They managed to get her into a special school – she is now in her last year of high school. It was not easy because it is an expensive school and they are not wealthy. Dad works two jobs and Mom works one job plus taking care of four other kids and the house as well as taking my niece to extra therapy that she has required over the years.
    She is old enough now to know what she doesn’t know. Found her crying recently because she was upset about all the things her brother and sisters can do that she might might never be able to do. She ended the litany by saying she wants to play with her Barbie dolls but knows she is too old. Well her mother set her straight on all that.
    For all her problems, she is fortunate that she was born in a time when there are answers to some of those problems. If she had been born in the 1940s like I was, she probably would have been labeled a troublemaker who couldn’t or wouldn’t learn.
    Such an interesting and important post.

    Reply
  46. Two out of three of my children are dyslexic. My daughter has classic dyslexia ie spelling and reading issues. The teachers always said how well illustrated her work was but impossible to make sense of otherwise. I spent many evenings teaching her to read from scratch. She is a gifted artist but her most surprising skill is she is very good at word games! My son has trouble getting his thoughts onto paper so his answers in class were great and the written work never matched up. He now does IT which gets round this nicely. It has been very frustrating for them and us. Often they were dismissed as being thick or lazy. It takes all sorts to make a world and some of the most successful entrepreneurs are dyslexic – sometimes they find it easier to think outside the box as they are not so bound by the rules as the rest of us.

    Reply
  47. Two out of three of my children are dyslexic. My daughter has classic dyslexia ie spelling and reading issues. The teachers always said how well illustrated her work was but impossible to make sense of otherwise. I spent many evenings teaching her to read from scratch. She is a gifted artist but her most surprising skill is she is very good at word games! My son has trouble getting his thoughts onto paper so his answers in class were great and the written work never matched up. He now does IT which gets round this nicely. It has been very frustrating for them and us. Often they were dismissed as being thick or lazy. It takes all sorts to make a world and some of the most successful entrepreneurs are dyslexic – sometimes they find it easier to think outside the box as they are not so bound by the rules as the rest of us.

    Reply
  48. Two out of three of my children are dyslexic. My daughter has classic dyslexia ie spelling and reading issues. The teachers always said how well illustrated her work was but impossible to make sense of otherwise. I spent many evenings teaching her to read from scratch. She is a gifted artist but her most surprising skill is she is very good at word games! My son has trouble getting his thoughts onto paper so his answers in class were great and the written work never matched up. He now does IT which gets round this nicely. It has been very frustrating for them and us. Often they were dismissed as being thick or lazy. It takes all sorts to make a world and some of the most successful entrepreneurs are dyslexic – sometimes they find it easier to think outside the box as they are not so bound by the rules as the rest of us.

    Reply
  49. Two out of three of my children are dyslexic. My daughter has classic dyslexia ie spelling and reading issues. The teachers always said how well illustrated her work was but impossible to make sense of otherwise. I spent many evenings teaching her to read from scratch. She is a gifted artist but her most surprising skill is she is very good at word games! My son has trouble getting his thoughts onto paper so his answers in class were great and the written work never matched up. He now does IT which gets round this nicely. It has been very frustrating for them and us. Often they were dismissed as being thick or lazy. It takes all sorts to make a world and some of the most successful entrepreneurs are dyslexic – sometimes they find it easier to think outside the box as they are not so bound by the rules as the rest of us.

    Reply
  50. Two out of three of my children are dyslexic. My daughter has classic dyslexia ie spelling and reading issues. The teachers always said how well illustrated her work was but impossible to make sense of otherwise. I spent many evenings teaching her to read from scratch. She is a gifted artist but her most surprising skill is she is very good at word games! My son has trouble getting his thoughts onto paper so his answers in class were great and the written work never matched up. He now does IT which gets round this nicely. It has been very frustrating for them and us. Often they were dismissed as being thick or lazy. It takes all sorts to make a world and some of the most successful entrepreneurs are dyslexic – sometimes they find it easier to think outside the box as they are not so bound by the rules as the rest of us.

    Reply
  51. I don’t have dislexia; I DO have disnumeria. When I am doing genealogy I see a date 1870, write down 1780, and read it back as 1870 (until I return to the entry another time).
    I do the same thing in regular arithmatic. Mind is mild and I have found work arounds. But believe me it’s no fun!

    Reply
  52. I don’t have dislexia; I DO have disnumeria. When I am doing genealogy I see a date 1870, write down 1780, and read it back as 1870 (until I return to the entry another time).
    I do the same thing in regular arithmatic. Mind is mild and I have found work arounds. But believe me it’s no fun!

    Reply
  53. I don’t have dislexia; I DO have disnumeria. When I am doing genealogy I see a date 1870, write down 1780, and read it back as 1870 (until I return to the entry another time).
    I do the same thing in regular arithmatic. Mind is mild and I have found work arounds. But believe me it’s no fun!

    Reply
  54. I don’t have dislexia; I DO have disnumeria. When I am doing genealogy I see a date 1870, write down 1780, and read it back as 1870 (until I return to the entry another time).
    I do the same thing in regular arithmatic. Mind is mild and I have found work arounds. But believe me it’s no fun!

    Reply
  55. I don’t have dislexia; I DO have disnumeria. When I am doing genealogy I see a date 1870, write down 1780, and read it back as 1870 (until I return to the entry another time).
    I do the same thing in regular arithmatic. Mind is mild and I have found work arounds. But believe me it’s no fun!

    Reply
  56. Hello Ladies, thought you might like to hear from someone who was told she had reversalism or as it now know as dyslexia. I remember as a child being embarrassed and ashamed. I was a very bad speller, would read words not on page and not see words on the page. Fast forward to today. I am an avid reader and much better speller (after helping my daughter with phonics- which helped me)! Your self image is damaged and in my experience took years to build. To be fair I am now in my 70’s so it was many years before dyslexia was really acknowledged. Thanks to you ladies I have had many years of great reads and look forward to many more years of great reads.

    Reply
  57. Hello Ladies, thought you might like to hear from someone who was told she had reversalism or as it now know as dyslexia. I remember as a child being embarrassed and ashamed. I was a very bad speller, would read words not on page and not see words on the page. Fast forward to today. I am an avid reader and much better speller (after helping my daughter with phonics- which helped me)! Your self image is damaged and in my experience took years to build. To be fair I am now in my 70’s so it was many years before dyslexia was really acknowledged. Thanks to you ladies I have had many years of great reads and look forward to many more years of great reads.

    Reply
  58. Hello Ladies, thought you might like to hear from someone who was told she had reversalism or as it now know as dyslexia. I remember as a child being embarrassed and ashamed. I was a very bad speller, would read words not on page and not see words on the page. Fast forward to today. I am an avid reader and much better speller (after helping my daughter with phonics- which helped me)! Your self image is damaged and in my experience took years to build. To be fair I am now in my 70’s so it was many years before dyslexia was really acknowledged. Thanks to you ladies I have had many years of great reads and look forward to many more years of great reads.

    Reply
  59. Hello Ladies, thought you might like to hear from someone who was told she had reversalism or as it now know as dyslexia. I remember as a child being embarrassed and ashamed. I was a very bad speller, would read words not on page and not see words on the page. Fast forward to today. I am an avid reader and much better speller (after helping my daughter with phonics- which helped me)! Your self image is damaged and in my experience took years to build. To be fair I am now in my 70’s so it was many years before dyslexia was really acknowledged. Thanks to you ladies I have had many years of great reads and look forward to many more years of great reads.

    Reply
  60. Hello Ladies, thought you might like to hear from someone who was told she had reversalism or as it now know as dyslexia. I remember as a child being embarrassed and ashamed. I was a very bad speller, would read words not on page and not see words on the page. Fast forward to today. I am an avid reader and much better speller (after helping my daughter with phonics- which helped me)! Your self image is damaged and in my experience took years to build. To be fair I am now in my 70’s so it was many years before dyslexia was really acknowledged. Thanks to you ladies I have had many years of great reads and look forward to many more years of great reads.

    Reply
  61. oh wow, thank you for telling me. Looks my linker has gone AWOL. I’m trying to summon one that provides links everywhere but I’ll have to just use the website I guess. Sorry!

    Reply
  62. oh wow, thank you for telling me. Looks my linker has gone AWOL. I’m trying to summon one that provides links everywhere but I’ll have to just use the website I guess. Sorry!

    Reply
  63. oh wow, thank you for telling me. Looks my linker has gone AWOL. I’m trying to summon one that provides links everywhere but I’ll have to just use the website I guess. Sorry!

    Reply
  64. oh wow, thank you for telling me. Looks my linker has gone AWOL. I’m trying to summon one that provides links everywhere but I’ll have to just use the website I guess. Sorry!

    Reply
  65. oh wow, thank you for telling me. Looks my linker has gone AWOL. I’m trying to summon one that provides links everywhere but I’ll have to just use the website I guess. Sorry!

    Reply
  66. oh blessings on you and your family for caring about your special niece! I know it’s human nature to expect everyone to be pegs that fit in similar holes, but what a boring world it would be if so. And yes, it’s marvelous that we’ve come so far. In historical times, your niece probably would have been set to scrubbing pots!

    Reply
  67. oh blessings on you and your family for caring about your special niece! I know it’s human nature to expect everyone to be pegs that fit in similar holes, but what a boring world it would be if so. And yes, it’s marvelous that we’ve come so far. In historical times, your niece probably would have been set to scrubbing pots!

    Reply
  68. oh blessings on you and your family for caring about your special niece! I know it’s human nature to expect everyone to be pegs that fit in similar holes, but what a boring world it would be if so. And yes, it’s marvelous that we’ve come so far. In historical times, your niece probably would have been set to scrubbing pots!

    Reply
  69. oh blessings on you and your family for caring about your special niece! I know it’s human nature to expect everyone to be pegs that fit in similar holes, but what a boring world it would be if so. And yes, it’s marvelous that we’ve come so far. In historical times, your niece probably would have been set to scrubbing pots!

    Reply
  70. oh blessings on you and your family for caring about your special niece! I know it’s human nature to expect everyone to be pegs that fit in similar holes, but what a boring world it would be if so. And yes, it’s marvelous that we’ve come so far. In historical times, your niece probably would have been set to scrubbing pots!

    Reply
  71. Exactly! That’s what I just said to Mary T above, but you said it better. My dyslexic husband is also in IT. And artists see the world differently, perhaps because their brains are wired differently. We need the differences!

    Reply
  72. Exactly! That’s what I just said to Mary T above, but you said it better. My dyslexic husband is also in IT. And artists see the world differently, perhaps because their brains are wired differently. We need the differences!

    Reply
  73. Exactly! That’s what I just said to Mary T above, but you said it better. My dyslexic husband is also in IT. And artists see the world differently, perhaps because their brains are wired differently. We need the differences!

    Reply
  74. Exactly! That’s what I just said to Mary T above, but you said it better. My dyslexic husband is also in IT. And artists see the world differently, perhaps because their brains are wired differently. We need the differences!

    Reply
  75. Exactly! That’s what I just said to Mary T above, but you said it better. My dyslexic husband is also in IT. And artists see the world differently, perhaps because their brains are wired differently. We need the differences!

    Reply
  76. I am so glad you weren’t discouraged! My husband is a near genius but was made to think he was stupid by teachers who didn’t understand. And yes, if they’d grasped the problem and taught with phonics, it might have made an immense difference! There is no one way to learn.

    Reply
  77. I am so glad you weren’t discouraged! My husband is a near genius but was made to think he was stupid by teachers who didn’t understand. And yes, if they’d grasped the problem and taught with phonics, it might have made an immense difference! There is no one way to learn.

    Reply
  78. I am so glad you weren’t discouraged! My husband is a near genius but was made to think he was stupid by teachers who didn’t understand. And yes, if they’d grasped the problem and taught with phonics, it might have made an immense difference! There is no one way to learn.

    Reply
  79. I am so glad you weren’t discouraged! My husband is a near genius but was made to think he was stupid by teachers who didn’t understand. And yes, if they’d grasped the problem and taught with phonics, it might have made an immense difference! There is no one way to learn.

    Reply
  80. I am so glad you weren’t discouraged! My husband is a near genius but was made to think he was stupid by teachers who didn’t understand. And yes, if they’d grasped the problem and taught with phonics, it might have made an immense difference! There is no one way to learn.

    Reply
  81. I have just finished “The Librarian’s Spell”; it is a worthy member of the Malcom/Ives sagas. I advised people to read it.
    PS. There is a happy footnote to an earlier event also!

    Reply
  82. I have just finished “The Librarian’s Spell”; it is a worthy member of the Malcom/Ives sagas. I advised people to read it.
    PS. There is a happy footnote to an earlier event also!

    Reply
  83. I have just finished “The Librarian’s Spell”; it is a worthy member of the Malcom/Ives sagas. I advised people to read it.
    PS. There is a happy footnote to an earlier event also!

    Reply
  84. I have just finished “The Librarian’s Spell”; it is a worthy member of the Malcom/Ives sagas. I advised people to read it.
    PS. There is a happy footnote to an earlier event also!

    Reply
  85. I have just finished “The Librarian’s Spell”; it is a worthy member of the Malcom/Ives sagas. I advised people to read it.
    PS. There is a happy footnote to an earlier event also!

    Reply
  86. Thank you for all the information from each of you.
    I can not imagine the difficulties people have faced. And I believe just as it has been mentioned here, people who are dyslexic apparently must be very intelligent just to survive and thrive.
    I am glad that things are improved. Eventually we can hope that there will never be a child who faces difficulties that are not recognized.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  87. Thank you for all the information from each of you.
    I can not imagine the difficulties people have faced. And I believe just as it has been mentioned here, people who are dyslexic apparently must be very intelligent just to survive and thrive.
    I am glad that things are improved. Eventually we can hope that there will never be a child who faces difficulties that are not recognized.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  88. Thank you for all the information from each of you.
    I can not imagine the difficulties people have faced. And I believe just as it has been mentioned here, people who are dyslexic apparently must be very intelligent just to survive and thrive.
    I am glad that things are improved. Eventually we can hope that there will never be a child who faces difficulties that are not recognized.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  89. Thank you for all the information from each of you.
    I can not imagine the difficulties people have faced. And I believe just as it has been mentioned here, people who are dyslexic apparently must be very intelligent just to survive and thrive.
    I am glad that things are improved. Eventually we can hope that there will never be a child who faces difficulties that are not recognized.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  90. Thank you for all the information from each of you.
    I can not imagine the difficulties people have faced. And I believe just as it has been mentioned here, people who are dyslexic apparently must be very intelligent just to survive and thrive.
    I am glad that things are improved. Eventually we can hope that there will never be a child who faces difficulties that are not recognized.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  91. My best friend from school is dyslexic and no one ever realised until she was older. We used to have a spelling test every week and whenever I got a better mark, I would feel triumphant – now not so much because I know she was at a disadvantage! (She has forgiven me though and we are still friends even after all these years)

    Reply
  92. My best friend from school is dyslexic and no one ever realised until she was older. We used to have a spelling test every week and whenever I got a better mark, I would feel triumphant – now not so much because I know she was at a disadvantage! (She has forgiven me though and we are still friends even after all these years)

    Reply
  93. My best friend from school is dyslexic and no one ever realised until she was older. We used to have a spelling test every week and whenever I got a better mark, I would feel triumphant – now not so much because I know she was at a disadvantage! (She has forgiven me though and we are still friends even after all these years)

    Reply
  94. My best friend from school is dyslexic and no one ever realised until she was older. We used to have a spelling test every week and whenever I got a better mark, I would feel triumphant – now not so much because I know she was at a disadvantage! (She has forgiven me though and we are still friends even after all these years)

    Reply
  95. My best friend from school is dyslexic and no one ever realised until she was older. We used to have a spelling test every week and whenever I got a better mark, I would feel triumphant – now not so much because I know she was at a disadvantage! (She has forgiven me though and we are still friends even after all these years)

    Reply
  96. My husband and daughter are both dyslexic. I figured out my daughter’s problem when she wrote a story that featured “Dirty Dan” as a character. She spelled it “Drity Dan” but when I pointed it out to her (dirty is spelled d i r t y) and she insisted that was what she’d written, I realized she literally did not see the reversal. It wasn’t until we figured out the problem with my daughter that my husband understood that he had the same disability. (Though his scope differed from hers). Both of them belived the were not smart (it didn’t help my daughter’s self-image to know that her brother was reading by age 4- we don’t know for sure how early since we didn’t hear him reading aloud to himself until the day before his birthday). My husband found that reading his college texts into a tape recorder, then playing it back allowed him to comprehend what he was reading. He also looked for 6’s and 9’s in ledger entries when things didn’t match(he was an accountant) when he realized most of the errors were multibles of 3. One way to explain the frustration of dislexia is to consider how some letters are formed– a line and a circle are essentually how the letters b d p q are made. Since the letters often “flip” or “reverse” their position to a deslexic it makes reading with comprehension difficult. By the time the reader works out the actual word, the context of the sentence meaning is gone. I used to take a paragraph from a textbook and type it with random flips and reverses of all the b’s d’s etc. and have non-dislexic students read it once, then ask them what the paragraph said. I don’t think any them could answer without hearing it read aloud (translation of letters made). Light spectrum forms also occur- my husband needs yellowed lighting for easier reading. I passed out different colors of plastic page dividers to my class one day and asked them to place them over the page of their books to see if anyone noticed any difference other than color in how easily they could read the page. Most looked, then passed the plastic to the next kid without comment. One boy, however, visibly started when he put a blue one on the page. He was in special ed classes because of his low performance in school, so I contacted his supervising teacher. They tested him (it turned out an even darker blue made an even greater difference) and he went from a barely passing “D” student to all “B’s” by the end of the semester. I made sure my students understood that dislexia had absolutely nothing to do with intelligence or the need for glasses, but was a “glitch” in the transference from eye to brain.

    Reply
  97. My husband and daughter are both dyslexic. I figured out my daughter’s problem when she wrote a story that featured “Dirty Dan” as a character. She spelled it “Drity Dan” but when I pointed it out to her (dirty is spelled d i r t y) and she insisted that was what she’d written, I realized she literally did not see the reversal. It wasn’t until we figured out the problem with my daughter that my husband understood that he had the same disability. (Though his scope differed from hers). Both of them belived the were not smart (it didn’t help my daughter’s self-image to know that her brother was reading by age 4- we don’t know for sure how early since we didn’t hear him reading aloud to himself until the day before his birthday). My husband found that reading his college texts into a tape recorder, then playing it back allowed him to comprehend what he was reading. He also looked for 6’s and 9’s in ledger entries when things didn’t match(he was an accountant) when he realized most of the errors were multibles of 3. One way to explain the frustration of dislexia is to consider how some letters are formed– a line and a circle are essentually how the letters b d p q are made. Since the letters often “flip” or “reverse” their position to a deslexic it makes reading with comprehension difficult. By the time the reader works out the actual word, the context of the sentence meaning is gone. I used to take a paragraph from a textbook and type it with random flips and reverses of all the b’s d’s etc. and have non-dislexic students read it once, then ask them what the paragraph said. I don’t think any them could answer without hearing it read aloud (translation of letters made). Light spectrum forms also occur- my husband needs yellowed lighting for easier reading. I passed out different colors of plastic page dividers to my class one day and asked them to place them over the page of their books to see if anyone noticed any difference other than color in how easily they could read the page. Most looked, then passed the plastic to the next kid without comment. One boy, however, visibly started when he put a blue one on the page. He was in special ed classes because of his low performance in school, so I contacted his supervising teacher. They tested him (it turned out an even darker blue made an even greater difference) and he went from a barely passing “D” student to all “B’s” by the end of the semester. I made sure my students understood that dislexia had absolutely nothing to do with intelligence or the need for glasses, but was a “glitch” in the transference from eye to brain.

    Reply
  98. My husband and daughter are both dyslexic. I figured out my daughter’s problem when she wrote a story that featured “Dirty Dan” as a character. She spelled it “Drity Dan” but when I pointed it out to her (dirty is spelled d i r t y) and she insisted that was what she’d written, I realized she literally did not see the reversal. It wasn’t until we figured out the problem with my daughter that my husband understood that he had the same disability. (Though his scope differed from hers). Both of them belived the were not smart (it didn’t help my daughter’s self-image to know that her brother was reading by age 4- we don’t know for sure how early since we didn’t hear him reading aloud to himself until the day before his birthday). My husband found that reading his college texts into a tape recorder, then playing it back allowed him to comprehend what he was reading. He also looked for 6’s and 9’s in ledger entries when things didn’t match(he was an accountant) when he realized most of the errors were multibles of 3. One way to explain the frustration of dislexia is to consider how some letters are formed– a line and a circle are essentually how the letters b d p q are made. Since the letters often “flip” or “reverse” their position to a deslexic it makes reading with comprehension difficult. By the time the reader works out the actual word, the context of the sentence meaning is gone. I used to take a paragraph from a textbook and type it with random flips and reverses of all the b’s d’s etc. and have non-dislexic students read it once, then ask them what the paragraph said. I don’t think any them could answer without hearing it read aloud (translation of letters made). Light spectrum forms also occur- my husband needs yellowed lighting for easier reading. I passed out different colors of plastic page dividers to my class one day and asked them to place them over the page of their books to see if anyone noticed any difference other than color in how easily they could read the page. Most looked, then passed the plastic to the next kid without comment. One boy, however, visibly started when he put a blue one on the page. He was in special ed classes because of his low performance in school, so I contacted his supervising teacher. They tested him (it turned out an even darker blue made an even greater difference) and he went from a barely passing “D” student to all “B’s” by the end of the semester. I made sure my students understood that dislexia had absolutely nothing to do with intelligence or the need for glasses, but was a “glitch” in the transference from eye to brain.

    Reply
  99. My husband and daughter are both dyslexic. I figured out my daughter’s problem when she wrote a story that featured “Dirty Dan” as a character. She spelled it “Drity Dan” but when I pointed it out to her (dirty is spelled d i r t y) and she insisted that was what she’d written, I realized she literally did not see the reversal. It wasn’t until we figured out the problem with my daughter that my husband understood that he had the same disability. (Though his scope differed from hers). Both of them belived the were not smart (it didn’t help my daughter’s self-image to know that her brother was reading by age 4- we don’t know for sure how early since we didn’t hear him reading aloud to himself until the day before his birthday). My husband found that reading his college texts into a tape recorder, then playing it back allowed him to comprehend what he was reading. He also looked for 6’s and 9’s in ledger entries when things didn’t match(he was an accountant) when he realized most of the errors were multibles of 3. One way to explain the frustration of dislexia is to consider how some letters are formed– a line and a circle are essentually how the letters b d p q are made. Since the letters often “flip” or “reverse” their position to a deslexic it makes reading with comprehension difficult. By the time the reader works out the actual word, the context of the sentence meaning is gone. I used to take a paragraph from a textbook and type it with random flips and reverses of all the b’s d’s etc. and have non-dislexic students read it once, then ask them what the paragraph said. I don’t think any them could answer without hearing it read aloud (translation of letters made). Light spectrum forms also occur- my husband needs yellowed lighting for easier reading. I passed out different colors of plastic page dividers to my class one day and asked them to place them over the page of their books to see if anyone noticed any difference other than color in how easily they could read the page. Most looked, then passed the plastic to the next kid without comment. One boy, however, visibly started when he put a blue one on the page. He was in special ed classes because of his low performance in school, so I contacted his supervising teacher. They tested him (it turned out an even darker blue made an even greater difference) and he went from a barely passing “D” student to all “B’s” by the end of the semester. I made sure my students understood that dislexia had absolutely nothing to do with intelligence or the need for glasses, but was a “glitch” in the transference from eye to brain.

    Reply
  100. My husband and daughter are both dyslexic. I figured out my daughter’s problem when she wrote a story that featured “Dirty Dan” as a character. She spelled it “Drity Dan” but when I pointed it out to her (dirty is spelled d i r t y) and she insisted that was what she’d written, I realized she literally did not see the reversal. It wasn’t until we figured out the problem with my daughter that my husband understood that he had the same disability. (Though his scope differed from hers). Both of them belived the were not smart (it didn’t help my daughter’s self-image to know that her brother was reading by age 4- we don’t know for sure how early since we didn’t hear him reading aloud to himself until the day before his birthday). My husband found that reading his college texts into a tape recorder, then playing it back allowed him to comprehend what he was reading. He also looked for 6’s and 9’s in ledger entries when things didn’t match(he was an accountant) when he realized most of the errors were multibles of 3. One way to explain the frustration of dislexia is to consider how some letters are formed– a line and a circle are essentually how the letters b d p q are made. Since the letters often “flip” or “reverse” their position to a deslexic it makes reading with comprehension difficult. By the time the reader works out the actual word, the context of the sentence meaning is gone. I used to take a paragraph from a textbook and type it with random flips and reverses of all the b’s d’s etc. and have non-dislexic students read it once, then ask them what the paragraph said. I don’t think any them could answer without hearing it read aloud (translation of letters made). Light spectrum forms also occur- my husband needs yellowed lighting for easier reading. I passed out different colors of plastic page dividers to my class one day and asked them to place them over the page of their books to see if anyone noticed any difference other than color in how easily they could read the page. Most looked, then passed the plastic to the next kid without comment. One boy, however, visibly started when he put a blue one on the page. He was in special ed classes because of his low performance in school, so I contacted his supervising teacher. They tested him (it turned out an even darker blue made an even greater difference) and he went from a barely passing “D” student to all “B’s” by the end of the semester. I made sure my students understood that dislexia had absolutely nothing to do with intelligence or the need for glasses, but was a “glitch” in the transference from eye to brain.

    Reply
  101. yes, as kids, we just assumed the bad spellers werent as smart as we were. One hopes teachers now explain that we all learn differently and that we are all smarter in some ways than others.

    Reply
  102. yes, as kids, we just assumed the bad spellers werent as smart as we were. One hopes teachers now explain that we all learn differently and that we are all smarter in some ways than others.

    Reply
  103. yes, as kids, we just assumed the bad spellers werent as smart as we were. One hopes teachers now explain that we all learn differently and that we are all smarter in some ways than others.

    Reply
  104. yes, as kids, we just assumed the bad spellers werent as smart as we were. One hopes teachers now explain that we all learn differently and that we are all smarter in some ways than others.

    Reply
  105. yes, as kids, we just assumed the bad spellers werent as smart as we were. One hopes teachers now explain that we all learn differently and that we are all smarter in some ways than others.

    Reply
  106. Brilliant, thank you, Leslie! When I was teaching reading to underachievers we tried the colored frames as a just in case. Im just so glad that dyslexia is recognize now and that teachers are watching for it now.

    Reply
  107. Brilliant, thank you, Leslie! When I was teaching reading to underachievers we tried the colored frames as a just in case. Im just so glad that dyslexia is recognize now and that teachers are watching for it now.

    Reply
  108. Brilliant, thank you, Leslie! When I was teaching reading to underachievers we tried the colored frames as a just in case. Im just so glad that dyslexia is recognize now and that teachers are watching for it now.

    Reply
  109. Brilliant, thank you, Leslie! When I was teaching reading to underachievers we tried the colored frames as a just in case. Im just so glad that dyslexia is recognize now and that teachers are watching for it now.

    Reply
  110. Brilliant, thank you, Leslie! When I was teaching reading to underachievers we tried the colored frames as a just in case. Im just so glad that dyslexia is recognize now and that teachers are watching for it now.

    Reply
  111. Brilliant, thank you, Leslie! When I was teaching reading to underachievers we tried the colored frames as a just in case. Im just so glad that dyslexia is recognize now and that teachers are watching for it now.

    Reply
  112. Brilliant, thank you, Leslie! When I was teaching reading to underachievers we tried the colored frames as a just in case. Im just so glad that dyslexia is recognize now and that teachers are watching for it now.

    Reply
  113. Brilliant, thank you, Leslie! When I was teaching reading to underachievers we tried the colored frames as a just in case. Im just so glad that dyslexia is recognize now and that teachers are watching for it now.

    Reply
  114. Brilliant, thank you, Leslie! When I was teaching reading to underachievers we tried the colored frames as a just in case. Im just so glad that dyslexia is recognize now and that teachers are watching for it now.

    Reply
  115. Brilliant, thank you, Leslie! When I was teaching reading to underachievers we tried the colored frames as a just in case. Im just so glad that dyslexia is recognize now and that teachers are watching for it now.

    Reply

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