All-Time Champion List

A Wench Classic post from a while back…looking this post over, I realized that so much of this still applies, and it would be fun to revisit the All-Time Keeper list (the ATK!). These still apply for me, and I'd love to know if yours have new additions …

BooksPondering the books on my bookshelves – many, many well-thumbed volumes, dusty or in use, and more than a few of them, ahem, not entirely read –  I started thinking about the books that have found a permanent place in my heart and my thoughts. We've all read a staggering number of books in our lives (some of us have time to read a staggering number every week/month/year!) — yet only a fraction of those stick with us forever. For each of us, that list is undoubtedly different, with a few beloved stories in common. (I'm talking fiction here, though an all-time keeper list of nonfiction would be a fun blog — I'll try that next time!)

I have a short list (and a really loooooooong list) of books that I will always remember — books that have moved me, made me think, thrilled me with story or characters or artfulness of writing–and the best hit all three elements at once in wild and wonderful combinations. For me, the quality of the writing is as important as the story and characters, and the ones I love best weave it all masterfully together.

Some books are part of my ATK list for emotional, personal, and very individual reasons. Some stories have influenced or touched me deeply at certain points in my life and are sentimental favorites, some have taught me something I needed to learn at the time, and others kept me going or gave me a temporary escape hatch when I needed one. I'll be forever grateful to those books, and those authors.

What books would you list as your ultimate favorites? What books are the cream of the crop for you personally, books that will stay with you forever, treasured on your bookshelf and in your heart and head. What books have resonated so deeply with you that you will read them again and again, or at least keep them on your shelves always?

Here's a list of some of my ultimate favorites, off the top of my head — I'm not home today to peruse my bookshelves and remind myself, so these are the ones that pop to mind first. Some are "great" or classic books, some are personally dear to me, some are gorgeously written, and some are just cracking good stories.
And I'd love the time to read them all again, and recapture the wonderful sense of thrill and discovery and resonance that I experienced when I first read them. The intriguing question — would I recapture that feeling? I'm a different person now than when I read some of these. Hmm…. anyway, here are SOME of my classic fave reads…the whole list would be very long and is always growing….

In no particular order:

Moonspinners The Ivy Tree, Moonspinners, This Rough Magic, The Crystal Cave…and just about anything by Mary Stewart (these are my comfort reads, exquisite writing and masterful storytelling)
Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier (just breathtaking in all its aspects)
Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte (my classic read)

 

Anne of Cambray, Mary Lide (what a poet can do with a medieval romance — exquisite)
Gone With the Wind, Margaret Mitchell (I read this five times in high school!)

Wolfanddove_2 The Wolf and the Dove, Kathleen Woodiwiss (my treasured introduction to historical romance) — and the quick list of some of my favorite historical romances, ever: Prince of Midnight, Laura Prince of Midnight_Kinsale Kinsale, Lord of Scoundrels, Loretta Chase, The Wild Child, Mary Jo Putney, Tapestry of Dreams, Roberta Gellis…and way too many more to count….

Pippi Longstocking (really this could be #1 on my hit list, if we are gauging pure enjoyment)
The Far Pavilions, M.M. Kaye (another sentimental favorite, as I was stuck in a hospital bed the week I read it, so this is one of those savior books for me)
Vision of Light, Judith Merkle Riley (adored it, start to finish, thank you, Judith!)
The Hobbit, J. R. R. Tolkein (and the rest of the series, though The Hobbit for me was The Best Ever in fantasy and the epic, leading into the visionary storytelling of LOTR)

Henderson_2 Henderson the Rain King, Saul Bellow  (deep, insightful, poignant, wacky, funny, dark and fascinating — I loved it the first time I read it for a college course, and have read it since, gobbling its rich and dynamic and slightly crazy story.)
One Hundred Years of Solitude, Gabriel Garcia Marquez (dazzling writing, wild and gorgeous story and craft)

To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee (moved me as a kid, when I didn't fully understand it, and as an adult, when I did)
Kristin Lavransdatter, Sigrid Undset (masterful on every level, with an unforgettable characters and setting)
Moby Dick, Herman Melville (once I got past the "assigned reading" mentality, I loved it–pure writing, as good as it gets in parts)
A Tale of Two Cities, Dickens (I love his work, but of all of his books, this and A Christmas Carol speak most closely to me)

Pride_and_prejudice_3 Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen (in college, not only did I love the story, it fascinated me how very readable this was) and another personal JA fave, Northanger Abbey.

So there's a few of my all-time ultimate champion books … I'm sure there are more, and there are a TON of romances to add to it, but I'm not home to see them (and I am a visual thinker). As soon as I go downstairs, I'll look at my bookshelves and smack my forehead: "Oh yeah! that one! and that one too!"…. 

I'd love to know some of your all-time favorites. We all respond to books individually and the favorites may differ widely…and yet, some of them I am willing to bet are exactly the same….

~Susan Sarah

108 thoughts on “All-Time Champion List”

  1. Wow, books that stay with me . . .
    “Love in the Time of Cholera” Gabriel Garcia Marquez. My specialization in Lit as an undergrad was in Magical Realism, and this was my favorite novel.
    “The Mark of the Horselord” Rosemary Sutcliff. Makes me cry to this day.
    “Anne of Green Gables” Lucy Maud Montgomery. I read this at least once a year. In fact, I think I’m about due . . .
    “Stranger in A Strange Land” Robert A. Heinlein. The ultimate hippie-kid’s book.
    “Lord Valentine’s Castle” Robert Silverberg. Quite possibley one of the top 5 sci-fi books ever written.
    “The Snow Queen” Joan D. Vinge. See above.
    “”Dune” Frank Herbert. But only “Dune”. Don’t like the rest of the series.
    “The Forever War” Joe Haldeman. Possibly the best book I’ve ever read about war, society, and just how ridiculous everything is.
    “The Legions of the Mist “Amanda Cockrell. Yeah, she’s my godmother, but I LOVE this book!
    “The Hobbit” J. R. R. Tolkien. I like LOTR, I love “The Hobbit”.
    “Pride and Prejudice” Jane Austen. It’s everyone’s fav, but that’s no reason for me not to love it, too.
    “Jane Eyre” Charlotte Bronte. Although to be honest, I only reread the last few chapters. LOL!
    “Venetia” Georgette Heyer. I love so many, but this one is the one I reread the most.
    Ok, that’s enough. I could go on and on and on . . .

    Reply
  2. Wow, books that stay with me . . .
    “Love in the Time of Cholera” Gabriel Garcia Marquez. My specialization in Lit as an undergrad was in Magical Realism, and this was my favorite novel.
    “The Mark of the Horselord” Rosemary Sutcliff. Makes me cry to this day.
    “Anne of Green Gables” Lucy Maud Montgomery. I read this at least once a year. In fact, I think I’m about due . . .
    “Stranger in A Strange Land” Robert A. Heinlein. The ultimate hippie-kid’s book.
    “Lord Valentine’s Castle” Robert Silverberg. Quite possibley one of the top 5 sci-fi books ever written.
    “The Snow Queen” Joan D. Vinge. See above.
    “”Dune” Frank Herbert. But only “Dune”. Don’t like the rest of the series.
    “The Forever War” Joe Haldeman. Possibly the best book I’ve ever read about war, society, and just how ridiculous everything is.
    “The Legions of the Mist “Amanda Cockrell. Yeah, she’s my godmother, but I LOVE this book!
    “The Hobbit” J. R. R. Tolkien. I like LOTR, I love “The Hobbit”.
    “Pride and Prejudice” Jane Austen. It’s everyone’s fav, but that’s no reason for me not to love it, too.
    “Jane Eyre” Charlotte Bronte. Although to be honest, I only reread the last few chapters. LOL!
    “Venetia” Georgette Heyer. I love so many, but this one is the one I reread the most.
    Ok, that’s enough. I could go on and on and on . . .

    Reply
  3. Wow, books that stay with me . . .
    “Love in the Time of Cholera” Gabriel Garcia Marquez. My specialization in Lit as an undergrad was in Magical Realism, and this was my favorite novel.
    “The Mark of the Horselord” Rosemary Sutcliff. Makes me cry to this day.
    “Anne of Green Gables” Lucy Maud Montgomery. I read this at least once a year. In fact, I think I’m about due . . .
    “Stranger in A Strange Land” Robert A. Heinlein. The ultimate hippie-kid’s book.
    “Lord Valentine’s Castle” Robert Silverberg. Quite possibley one of the top 5 sci-fi books ever written.
    “The Snow Queen” Joan D. Vinge. See above.
    “”Dune” Frank Herbert. But only “Dune”. Don’t like the rest of the series.
    “The Forever War” Joe Haldeman. Possibly the best book I’ve ever read about war, society, and just how ridiculous everything is.
    “The Legions of the Mist “Amanda Cockrell. Yeah, she’s my godmother, but I LOVE this book!
    “The Hobbit” J. R. R. Tolkien. I like LOTR, I love “The Hobbit”.
    “Pride and Prejudice” Jane Austen. It’s everyone’s fav, but that’s no reason for me not to love it, too.
    “Jane Eyre” Charlotte Bronte. Although to be honest, I only reread the last few chapters. LOL!
    “Venetia” Georgette Heyer. I love so many, but this one is the one I reread the most.
    Ok, that’s enough. I could go on and on and on . . .

    Reply
  4. Wow, books that stay with me . . .
    “Love in the Time of Cholera” Gabriel Garcia Marquez. My specialization in Lit as an undergrad was in Magical Realism, and this was my favorite novel.
    “The Mark of the Horselord” Rosemary Sutcliff. Makes me cry to this day.
    “Anne of Green Gables” Lucy Maud Montgomery. I read this at least once a year. In fact, I think I’m about due . . .
    “Stranger in A Strange Land” Robert A. Heinlein. The ultimate hippie-kid’s book.
    “Lord Valentine’s Castle” Robert Silverberg. Quite possibley one of the top 5 sci-fi books ever written.
    “The Snow Queen” Joan D. Vinge. See above.
    “”Dune” Frank Herbert. But only “Dune”. Don’t like the rest of the series.
    “The Forever War” Joe Haldeman. Possibly the best book I’ve ever read about war, society, and just how ridiculous everything is.
    “The Legions of the Mist “Amanda Cockrell. Yeah, she’s my godmother, but I LOVE this book!
    “The Hobbit” J. R. R. Tolkien. I like LOTR, I love “The Hobbit”.
    “Pride and Prejudice” Jane Austen. It’s everyone’s fav, but that’s no reason for me not to love it, too.
    “Jane Eyre” Charlotte Bronte. Although to be honest, I only reread the last few chapters. LOL!
    “Venetia” Georgette Heyer. I love so many, but this one is the one I reread the most.
    Ok, that’s enough. I could go on and on and on . . .

    Reply
  5. I made up my list based upon the approximate number of times I’ve re-read these. In other words, these are “can’t live without them” stories:
    Love in a Cold Climate and The Pursuit of Love, Nancy Mitford
    To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee
    A Chance to Sit Down, Meredith Daneman
    Pride & Prejudice and Persuasion, Jane Austen
    Cousin Bette, Honoré Balzac
    Far from the Madding Crowd, Thomas Hardy
    Nicholas Nickleby and Little Dorrit, Charles Dickens
    Devil’s Cub, Venetia, Arabella, Georgette Heyer
    Once in a Blue Moon, Penelope Williamson
    I could continue, but must leave room for other people!

    Reply
  6. I made up my list based upon the approximate number of times I’ve re-read these. In other words, these are “can’t live without them” stories:
    Love in a Cold Climate and The Pursuit of Love, Nancy Mitford
    To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee
    A Chance to Sit Down, Meredith Daneman
    Pride & Prejudice and Persuasion, Jane Austen
    Cousin Bette, Honoré Balzac
    Far from the Madding Crowd, Thomas Hardy
    Nicholas Nickleby and Little Dorrit, Charles Dickens
    Devil’s Cub, Venetia, Arabella, Georgette Heyer
    Once in a Blue Moon, Penelope Williamson
    I could continue, but must leave room for other people!

    Reply
  7. I made up my list based upon the approximate number of times I’ve re-read these. In other words, these are “can’t live without them” stories:
    Love in a Cold Climate and The Pursuit of Love, Nancy Mitford
    To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee
    A Chance to Sit Down, Meredith Daneman
    Pride & Prejudice and Persuasion, Jane Austen
    Cousin Bette, Honoré Balzac
    Far from the Madding Crowd, Thomas Hardy
    Nicholas Nickleby and Little Dorrit, Charles Dickens
    Devil’s Cub, Venetia, Arabella, Georgette Heyer
    Once in a Blue Moon, Penelope Williamson
    I could continue, but must leave room for other people!

    Reply
  8. I made up my list based upon the approximate number of times I’ve re-read these. In other words, these are “can’t live without them” stories:
    Love in a Cold Climate and The Pursuit of Love, Nancy Mitford
    To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee
    A Chance to Sit Down, Meredith Daneman
    Pride & Prejudice and Persuasion, Jane Austen
    Cousin Bette, Honoré Balzac
    Far from the Madding Crowd, Thomas Hardy
    Nicholas Nickleby and Little Dorrit, Charles Dickens
    Devil’s Cub, Venetia, Arabella, Georgette Heyer
    Once in a Blue Moon, Penelope Williamson
    I could continue, but must leave room for other people!

    Reply
  9. First of all, Susan/Sarah, I have to recommend LibraryThing–that way you can view your entire collection from anywhere with an internet connection!
    Now, some of my favorites. In cases of series, I’ve tried to list the one book I love most of the lot:
    Anne’s House of Dreams, LM Montgomery. SO atmospheric and romantic.
    Blue at the Mizzen, Patrick O’Brian. Love the whole series, but I keep re-reading the ending of this one.
    Gaudy Night, Dorothy Sayers. Can’t get enough Peter and Harriet…
    In This House of Brede, Rumer Godden. I’ve never been able to figure out quite why I’m so fascinated by a novel about nuns (I’m a Presbyterian!), but the characters and place are just so real to me.
    Jennie, About to Be, Elisabeth Ogilvie. My favorite book that no one has ever heard of. Taken with its sequel, The World of Jennie G., it’s a romance, and a wonderful one.
    Kushiel’s Dart/Kushiel’s Avatar, Jacqueline Carey. I love all four books in this series, but Dart is the one I keep reading, and Avatar has this one scene that’s an aspiration point of sorts for me–if I can ever write something that cathartic and powerful, I’ll know I’ve arrived as a writer.
    One Perfect Rose, Mary Jo Putney. First romance I read after years of being told that Good Christian Girls didn’t read THOSE books–it was enough to make a rebel of me. 🙂
    Persuasion/Pride & Prejudice, Jane Austen. I can’t pick just one, I really can’t.
    Rose in Bloom, Louisa May Alcott. MUCH more satisfying than Little Women, IMHO.
    Sharpe’s Trafalgar, Bernard Cornwell. Love all of them, this is the one I keep re-reading.
    The Silver Chair, CS Lewis. My least favorite Narnia as a child; now the one I keep returning to.
    Silver Pigs, Lindsey Davis. Falco and Helena are among my favorite couples from any genre.
    His Majesty’s Dragon, Naomi Novik. Sure, it just came out last year, but I’ve already read it at least ten times…
    A Vision of Light, Judith Merkle Riley. Love the heroine.
    Wild at Heart, Patricia Gaffney. Such a wonderful hero.
    Like the others, I could keep going!

    Reply
  10. First of all, Susan/Sarah, I have to recommend LibraryThing–that way you can view your entire collection from anywhere with an internet connection!
    Now, some of my favorites. In cases of series, I’ve tried to list the one book I love most of the lot:
    Anne’s House of Dreams, LM Montgomery. SO atmospheric and romantic.
    Blue at the Mizzen, Patrick O’Brian. Love the whole series, but I keep re-reading the ending of this one.
    Gaudy Night, Dorothy Sayers. Can’t get enough Peter and Harriet…
    In This House of Brede, Rumer Godden. I’ve never been able to figure out quite why I’m so fascinated by a novel about nuns (I’m a Presbyterian!), but the characters and place are just so real to me.
    Jennie, About to Be, Elisabeth Ogilvie. My favorite book that no one has ever heard of. Taken with its sequel, The World of Jennie G., it’s a romance, and a wonderful one.
    Kushiel’s Dart/Kushiel’s Avatar, Jacqueline Carey. I love all four books in this series, but Dart is the one I keep reading, and Avatar has this one scene that’s an aspiration point of sorts for me–if I can ever write something that cathartic and powerful, I’ll know I’ve arrived as a writer.
    One Perfect Rose, Mary Jo Putney. First romance I read after years of being told that Good Christian Girls didn’t read THOSE books–it was enough to make a rebel of me. 🙂
    Persuasion/Pride & Prejudice, Jane Austen. I can’t pick just one, I really can’t.
    Rose in Bloom, Louisa May Alcott. MUCH more satisfying than Little Women, IMHO.
    Sharpe’s Trafalgar, Bernard Cornwell. Love all of them, this is the one I keep re-reading.
    The Silver Chair, CS Lewis. My least favorite Narnia as a child; now the one I keep returning to.
    Silver Pigs, Lindsey Davis. Falco and Helena are among my favorite couples from any genre.
    His Majesty’s Dragon, Naomi Novik. Sure, it just came out last year, but I’ve already read it at least ten times…
    A Vision of Light, Judith Merkle Riley. Love the heroine.
    Wild at Heart, Patricia Gaffney. Such a wonderful hero.
    Like the others, I could keep going!

    Reply
  11. First of all, Susan/Sarah, I have to recommend LibraryThing–that way you can view your entire collection from anywhere with an internet connection!
    Now, some of my favorites. In cases of series, I’ve tried to list the one book I love most of the lot:
    Anne’s House of Dreams, LM Montgomery. SO atmospheric and romantic.
    Blue at the Mizzen, Patrick O’Brian. Love the whole series, but I keep re-reading the ending of this one.
    Gaudy Night, Dorothy Sayers. Can’t get enough Peter and Harriet…
    In This House of Brede, Rumer Godden. I’ve never been able to figure out quite why I’m so fascinated by a novel about nuns (I’m a Presbyterian!), but the characters and place are just so real to me.
    Jennie, About to Be, Elisabeth Ogilvie. My favorite book that no one has ever heard of. Taken with its sequel, The World of Jennie G., it’s a romance, and a wonderful one.
    Kushiel’s Dart/Kushiel’s Avatar, Jacqueline Carey. I love all four books in this series, but Dart is the one I keep reading, and Avatar has this one scene that’s an aspiration point of sorts for me–if I can ever write something that cathartic and powerful, I’ll know I’ve arrived as a writer.
    One Perfect Rose, Mary Jo Putney. First romance I read after years of being told that Good Christian Girls didn’t read THOSE books–it was enough to make a rebel of me. 🙂
    Persuasion/Pride & Prejudice, Jane Austen. I can’t pick just one, I really can’t.
    Rose in Bloom, Louisa May Alcott. MUCH more satisfying than Little Women, IMHO.
    Sharpe’s Trafalgar, Bernard Cornwell. Love all of them, this is the one I keep re-reading.
    The Silver Chair, CS Lewis. My least favorite Narnia as a child; now the one I keep returning to.
    Silver Pigs, Lindsey Davis. Falco and Helena are among my favorite couples from any genre.
    His Majesty’s Dragon, Naomi Novik. Sure, it just came out last year, but I’ve already read it at least ten times…
    A Vision of Light, Judith Merkle Riley. Love the heroine.
    Wild at Heart, Patricia Gaffney. Such a wonderful hero.
    Like the others, I could keep going!

    Reply
  12. First of all, Susan/Sarah, I have to recommend LibraryThing–that way you can view your entire collection from anywhere with an internet connection!
    Now, some of my favorites. In cases of series, I’ve tried to list the one book I love most of the lot:
    Anne’s House of Dreams, LM Montgomery. SO atmospheric and romantic.
    Blue at the Mizzen, Patrick O’Brian. Love the whole series, but I keep re-reading the ending of this one.
    Gaudy Night, Dorothy Sayers. Can’t get enough Peter and Harriet…
    In This House of Brede, Rumer Godden. I’ve never been able to figure out quite why I’m so fascinated by a novel about nuns (I’m a Presbyterian!), but the characters and place are just so real to me.
    Jennie, About to Be, Elisabeth Ogilvie. My favorite book that no one has ever heard of. Taken with its sequel, The World of Jennie G., it’s a romance, and a wonderful one.
    Kushiel’s Dart/Kushiel’s Avatar, Jacqueline Carey. I love all four books in this series, but Dart is the one I keep reading, and Avatar has this one scene that’s an aspiration point of sorts for me–if I can ever write something that cathartic and powerful, I’ll know I’ve arrived as a writer.
    One Perfect Rose, Mary Jo Putney. First romance I read after years of being told that Good Christian Girls didn’t read THOSE books–it was enough to make a rebel of me. 🙂
    Persuasion/Pride & Prejudice, Jane Austen. I can’t pick just one, I really can’t.
    Rose in Bloom, Louisa May Alcott. MUCH more satisfying than Little Women, IMHO.
    Sharpe’s Trafalgar, Bernard Cornwell. Love all of them, this is the one I keep re-reading.
    The Silver Chair, CS Lewis. My least favorite Narnia as a child; now the one I keep returning to.
    Silver Pigs, Lindsey Davis. Falco and Helena are among my favorite couples from any genre.
    His Majesty’s Dragon, Naomi Novik. Sure, it just came out last year, but I’ve already read it at least ten times…
    A Vision of Light, Judith Merkle Riley. Love the heroine.
    Wild at Heart, Patricia Gaffney. Such a wonderful hero.
    Like the others, I could keep going!

    Reply
  13. Just off the top of my head and without surveying the bookshelf, here’s a little list of some (non-wench) books (fiction, non-fiction and poetry!) that have astounded me, changed me, and comforted me over the years.
    A number of these are never shelved but live permanently by the side of the bed. Some of the others are/were just the most amazing things I have ever read and I remember closing their covers with Shock and Awe.
    They Loved to Laugh, Kathryn Worth
    Anne of Green Gables, LM Montgomery
    A Room with a View, EM Forster
    Brideshead Revisited, Evelyn Waugh
    Pride & Prejudice, Jane Austen
    Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov
    Beloved, Toni Morrison
    Possession, AS Byatt
    Selected Poems, WH Auden (edited by Mendelson)
    Bridget Jones’ Diary, Helen Fielding
    The Masqueraders, Georgette Heyer
    The Beekeeper’s Apprentice, Laurie R. King
    Beyond God the Father, Mary Daly
    The Beauty Myth, Naomi Wolf

    Reply
  14. Just off the top of my head and without surveying the bookshelf, here’s a little list of some (non-wench) books (fiction, non-fiction and poetry!) that have astounded me, changed me, and comforted me over the years.
    A number of these are never shelved but live permanently by the side of the bed. Some of the others are/were just the most amazing things I have ever read and I remember closing their covers with Shock and Awe.
    They Loved to Laugh, Kathryn Worth
    Anne of Green Gables, LM Montgomery
    A Room with a View, EM Forster
    Brideshead Revisited, Evelyn Waugh
    Pride & Prejudice, Jane Austen
    Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov
    Beloved, Toni Morrison
    Possession, AS Byatt
    Selected Poems, WH Auden (edited by Mendelson)
    Bridget Jones’ Diary, Helen Fielding
    The Masqueraders, Georgette Heyer
    The Beekeeper’s Apprentice, Laurie R. King
    Beyond God the Father, Mary Daly
    The Beauty Myth, Naomi Wolf

    Reply
  15. Just off the top of my head and without surveying the bookshelf, here’s a little list of some (non-wench) books (fiction, non-fiction and poetry!) that have astounded me, changed me, and comforted me over the years.
    A number of these are never shelved but live permanently by the side of the bed. Some of the others are/were just the most amazing things I have ever read and I remember closing their covers with Shock and Awe.
    They Loved to Laugh, Kathryn Worth
    Anne of Green Gables, LM Montgomery
    A Room with a View, EM Forster
    Brideshead Revisited, Evelyn Waugh
    Pride & Prejudice, Jane Austen
    Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov
    Beloved, Toni Morrison
    Possession, AS Byatt
    Selected Poems, WH Auden (edited by Mendelson)
    Bridget Jones’ Diary, Helen Fielding
    The Masqueraders, Georgette Heyer
    The Beekeeper’s Apprentice, Laurie R. King
    Beyond God the Father, Mary Daly
    The Beauty Myth, Naomi Wolf

    Reply
  16. Just off the top of my head and without surveying the bookshelf, here’s a little list of some (non-wench) books (fiction, non-fiction and poetry!) that have astounded me, changed me, and comforted me over the years.
    A number of these are never shelved but live permanently by the side of the bed. Some of the others are/were just the most amazing things I have ever read and I remember closing their covers with Shock and Awe.
    They Loved to Laugh, Kathryn Worth
    Anne of Green Gables, LM Montgomery
    A Room with a View, EM Forster
    Brideshead Revisited, Evelyn Waugh
    Pride & Prejudice, Jane Austen
    Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov
    Beloved, Toni Morrison
    Possession, AS Byatt
    Selected Poems, WH Auden (edited by Mendelson)
    Bridget Jones’ Diary, Helen Fielding
    The Masqueraders, Georgette Heyer
    The Beekeeper’s Apprentice, Laurie R. King
    Beyond God the Father, Mary Daly
    The Beauty Myth, Naomi Wolf

    Reply
  17. Wow! Where do I start?
    Half Magic by Edward Eager
    All of Jane Austen (I read the whole batch about once a year)
    A Frolic of His Own by William Gaddis
    I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith (which I loved LONG before the movie was made)
    Miss Buncle’s Book by D.E. Stevenson
    All of Charlaine Harris’s Sookie Stackhouse books
    Lord of Scoundrels by Loretta Chase
    The Diabolical Baron by Mary Jo Putney
    Scandal by Amanda Quick
    Madensky Square by Eva Ibbotson
    The Oysters of Locmariaquer by Eleanor Clark
    Paris to the Moon by Adam Gopnik
    All the Porfiry Rostnikov mysteries by Stuart Kaminsky
    All the Granny Weatherwax books by Terry Pratchett
    May This House Be Safe From Tigers by Alexander King
    Member of the Wedding by Carson McCullers
    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson
    Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl (pretty much shaped the way I’ve looked at life ever since I first read it at 16)
    No doubt a few hundred more will leap to mind the moment this is posted.
    I’m looking forward to some great new reading gleaned from other people’s lists!

    Reply
  18. Wow! Where do I start?
    Half Magic by Edward Eager
    All of Jane Austen (I read the whole batch about once a year)
    A Frolic of His Own by William Gaddis
    I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith (which I loved LONG before the movie was made)
    Miss Buncle’s Book by D.E. Stevenson
    All of Charlaine Harris’s Sookie Stackhouse books
    Lord of Scoundrels by Loretta Chase
    The Diabolical Baron by Mary Jo Putney
    Scandal by Amanda Quick
    Madensky Square by Eva Ibbotson
    The Oysters of Locmariaquer by Eleanor Clark
    Paris to the Moon by Adam Gopnik
    All the Porfiry Rostnikov mysteries by Stuart Kaminsky
    All the Granny Weatherwax books by Terry Pratchett
    May This House Be Safe From Tigers by Alexander King
    Member of the Wedding by Carson McCullers
    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson
    Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl (pretty much shaped the way I’ve looked at life ever since I first read it at 16)
    No doubt a few hundred more will leap to mind the moment this is posted.
    I’m looking forward to some great new reading gleaned from other people’s lists!

    Reply
  19. Wow! Where do I start?
    Half Magic by Edward Eager
    All of Jane Austen (I read the whole batch about once a year)
    A Frolic of His Own by William Gaddis
    I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith (which I loved LONG before the movie was made)
    Miss Buncle’s Book by D.E. Stevenson
    All of Charlaine Harris’s Sookie Stackhouse books
    Lord of Scoundrels by Loretta Chase
    The Diabolical Baron by Mary Jo Putney
    Scandal by Amanda Quick
    Madensky Square by Eva Ibbotson
    The Oysters of Locmariaquer by Eleanor Clark
    Paris to the Moon by Adam Gopnik
    All the Porfiry Rostnikov mysteries by Stuart Kaminsky
    All the Granny Weatherwax books by Terry Pratchett
    May This House Be Safe From Tigers by Alexander King
    Member of the Wedding by Carson McCullers
    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson
    Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl (pretty much shaped the way I’ve looked at life ever since I first read it at 16)
    No doubt a few hundred more will leap to mind the moment this is posted.
    I’m looking forward to some great new reading gleaned from other people’s lists!

    Reply
  20. Wow! Where do I start?
    Half Magic by Edward Eager
    All of Jane Austen (I read the whole batch about once a year)
    A Frolic of His Own by William Gaddis
    I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith (which I loved LONG before the movie was made)
    Miss Buncle’s Book by D.E. Stevenson
    All of Charlaine Harris’s Sookie Stackhouse books
    Lord of Scoundrels by Loretta Chase
    The Diabolical Baron by Mary Jo Putney
    Scandal by Amanda Quick
    Madensky Square by Eva Ibbotson
    The Oysters of Locmariaquer by Eleanor Clark
    Paris to the Moon by Adam Gopnik
    All the Porfiry Rostnikov mysteries by Stuart Kaminsky
    All the Granny Weatherwax books by Terry Pratchett
    May This House Be Safe From Tigers by Alexander King
    Member of the Wedding by Carson McCullers
    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson
    Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl (pretty much shaped the way I’ve looked at life ever since I first read it at 16)
    No doubt a few hundred more will leap to mind the moment this is posted.
    I’m looking forward to some great new reading gleaned from other people’s lists!

    Reply
  21. So many books on other peoples’ lists that I too have loved, and so many I think I’m about to love . . . LOL!
    I forgot one very important book: “A Song for Arbonne” by Guy Gavriel Kay. I LOVE LOVE LOVE that book!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  22. So many books on other peoples’ lists that I too have loved, and so many I think I’m about to love . . . LOL!
    I forgot one very important book: “A Song for Arbonne” by Guy Gavriel Kay. I LOVE LOVE LOVE that book!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  23. So many books on other peoples’ lists that I too have loved, and so many I think I’m about to love . . . LOL!
    I forgot one very important book: “A Song for Arbonne” by Guy Gavriel Kay. I LOVE LOVE LOVE that book!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  24. So many books on other peoples’ lists that I too have loved, and so many I think I’m about to love . . . LOL!
    I forgot one very important book: “A Song for Arbonne” by Guy Gavriel Kay. I LOVE LOVE LOVE that book!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  25. Several faves of mine showed up on Susan W.’s list: In this House of Brede, Rose in Bloom. I remember enjoying Jennie, About to Be very much indeed. And Wild at Heart.
    I definitely would’ve added Brideshead and Room with a View to my original list, had I taken in enough caffeine to jolt my brain–or stepped into the other book room!

    Reply
  26. Several faves of mine showed up on Susan W.’s list: In this House of Brede, Rose in Bloom. I remember enjoying Jennie, About to Be very much indeed. And Wild at Heart.
    I definitely would’ve added Brideshead and Room with a View to my original list, had I taken in enough caffeine to jolt my brain–or stepped into the other book room!

    Reply
  27. Several faves of mine showed up on Susan W.’s list: In this House of Brede, Rose in Bloom. I remember enjoying Jennie, About to Be very much indeed. And Wild at Heart.
    I definitely would’ve added Brideshead and Room with a View to my original list, had I taken in enough caffeine to jolt my brain–or stepped into the other book room!

    Reply
  28. Several faves of mine showed up on Susan W.’s list: In this House of Brede, Rose in Bloom. I remember enjoying Jennie, About to Be very much indeed. And Wild at Heart.
    I definitely would’ve added Brideshead and Room with a View to my original list, had I taken in enough caffeine to jolt my brain–or stepped into the other book room!

    Reply
  29. Oh wow, now my list has gotten a lot longer — how could I forget Dorothy Sayers, Lousia May Alcott, Lindsey Davis? How could I forget I Capture the Castle or Possession, both of which I loved?!
    What’s interesting to me is how many well-beloved books we have in common — and how most of us are mentioning fiction, though some have brought in some nonfiction titles on their All-Time Greatest Hits List. I have a long, long list of nonfiction too, and that would be another interesting comparison someday.
    It’s always fascinating to me how much readers love, love, love to talk about books… sharing is part of the pleasure of reading, I think.
    More lists! Let’s see more lists!
    I’m noting down books that I haven’t read yet, to check them out. Thank you!
    What’s LibraryThing, Susan W.? Sounds handy…though it sounds like potential work too….
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  30. Oh wow, now my list has gotten a lot longer — how could I forget Dorothy Sayers, Lousia May Alcott, Lindsey Davis? How could I forget I Capture the Castle or Possession, both of which I loved?!
    What’s interesting to me is how many well-beloved books we have in common — and how most of us are mentioning fiction, though some have brought in some nonfiction titles on their All-Time Greatest Hits List. I have a long, long list of nonfiction too, and that would be another interesting comparison someday.
    It’s always fascinating to me how much readers love, love, love to talk about books… sharing is part of the pleasure of reading, I think.
    More lists! Let’s see more lists!
    I’m noting down books that I haven’t read yet, to check them out. Thank you!
    What’s LibraryThing, Susan W.? Sounds handy…though it sounds like potential work too….
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  31. Oh wow, now my list has gotten a lot longer — how could I forget Dorothy Sayers, Lousia May Alcott, Lindsey Davis? How could I forget I Capture the Castle or Possession, both of which I loved?!
    What’s interesting to me is how many well-beloved books we have in common — and how most of us are mentioning fiction, though some have brought in some nonfiction titles on their All-Time Greatest Hits List. I have a long, long list of nonfiction too, and that would be another interesting comparison someday.
    It’s always fascinating to me how much readers love, love, love to talk about books… sharing is part of the pleasure of reading, I think.
    More lists! Let’s see more lists!
    I’m noting down books that I haven’t read yet, to check them out. Thank you!
    What’s LibraryThing, Susan W.? Sounds handy…though it sounds like potential work too….
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  32. Oh wow, now my list has gotten a lot longer — how could I forget Dorothy Sayers, Lousia May Alcott, Lindsey Davis? How could I forget I Capture the Castle or Possession, both of which I loved?!
    What’s interesting to me is how many well-beloved books we have in common — and how most of us are mentioning fiction, though some have brought in some nonfiction titles on their All-Time Greatest Hits List. I have a long, long list of nonfiction too, and that would be another interesting comparison someday.
    It’s always fascinating to me how much readers love, love, love to talk about books… sharing is part of the pleasure of reading, I think.
    More lists! Let’s see more lists!
    I’m noting down books that I haven’t read yet, to check them out. Thank you!
    What’s LibraryThing, Susan W.? Sounds handy…though it sounds like potential work too….
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  33. Fiction
    all of jane austen
    dorothy sayers- Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon
    Scaramouche -Sabatini
    poems of John Donne, swinburne, emily dickenson
    the crocodile on the sandbank-elizabeth peters
    sherlock holmes
    the beekeepers apprentice
    I claudius
    diabolical baron, the rake, TMS-MJP
    Jo’s malloran books
    julia quinn’s bridgerton books
    mary balog’s slightly books
    An Assembly Such as This
    non-ficton
    More on the gentle art of verbal self-defense susan elgin
    The mass psychology of facism & character analysis -Wilhelm Reich
    The hidden injuries of class- Richard Sennett
    Sisterhood is Powerful- Robin Morgan
    The Gestalt approach- Fritz Perls
    (I think I have already mentioned that I’m a therapist)
    Merry

    Reply
  34. Fiction
    all of jane austen
    dorothy sayers- Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon
    Scaramouche -Sabatini
    poems of John Donne, swinburne, emily dickenson
    the crocodile on the sandbank-elizabeth peters
    sherlock holmes
    the beekeepers apprentice
    I claudius
    diabolical baron, the rake, TMS-MJP
    Jo’s malloran books
    julia quinn’s bridgerton books
    mary balog’s slightly books
    An Assembly Such as This
    non-ficton
    More on the gentle art of verbal self-defense susan elgin
    The mass psychology of facism & character analysis -Wilhelm Reich
    The hidden injuries of class- Richard Sennett
    Sisterhood is Powerful- Robin Morgan
    The Gestalt approach- Fritz Perls
    (I think I have already mentioned that I’m a therapist)
    Merry

    Reply
  35. Fiction
    all of jane austen
    dorothy sayers- Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon
    Scaramouche -Sabatini
    poems of John Donne, swinburne, emily dickenson
    the crocodile on the sandbank-elizabeth peters
    sherlock holmes
    the beekeepers apprentice
    I claudius
    diabolical baron, the rake, TMS-MJP
    Jo’s malloran books
    julia quinn’s bridgerton books
    mary balog’s slightly books
    An Assembly Such as This
    non-ficton
    More on the gentle art of verbal self-defense susan elgin
    The mass psychology of facism & character analysis -Wilhelm Reich
    The hidden injuries of class- Richard Sennett
    Sisterhood is Powerful- Robin Morgan
    The Gestalt approach- Fritz Perls
    (I think I have already mentioned that I’m a therapist)
    Merry

    Reply
  36. Fiction
    all of jane austen
    dorothy sayers- Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon
    Scaramouche -Sabatini
    poems of John Donne, swinburne, emily dickenson
    the crocodile on the sandbank-elizabeth peters
    sherlock holmes
    the beekeepers apprentice
    I claudius
    diabolical baron, the rake, TMS-MJP
    Jo’s malloran books
    julia quinn’s bridgerton books
    mary balog’s slightly books
    An Assembly Such as This
    non-ficton
    More on the gentle art of verbal self-defense susan elgin
    The mass psychology of facism & character analysis -Wilhelm Reich
    The hidden injuries of class- Richard Sennett
    Sisterhood is Powerful- Robin Morgan
    The Gestalt approach- Fritz Perls
    (I think I have already mentioned that I’m a therapist)
    Merry

    Reply
  37. Well, Dickens.
    Pride & Prejudice
    Anne of Green Gables et al
    The Wind in the Willows
    The Silver Pigs et al
    Vanity Fair
    Flashman books
    Aubrey-Maturin books by Patrick O’Brian
    Good-bye to All That–Robert Graves
    Lots of books I love but these definitely stay with me. I’ll probably think of more as soon as I post this.

    Reply
  38. Well, Dickens.
    Pride & Prejudice
    Anne of Green Gables et al
    The Wind in the Willows
    The Silver Pigs et al
    Vanity Fair
    Flashman books
    Aubrey-Maturin books by Patrick O’Brian
    Good-bye to All That–Robert Graves
    Lots of books I love but these definitely stay with me. I’ll probably think of more as soon as I post this.

    Reply
  39. Well, Dickens.
    Pride & Prejudice
    Anne of Green Gables et al
    The Wind in the Willows
    The Silver Pigs et al
    Vanity Fair
    Flashman books
    Aubrey-Maturin books by Patrick O’Brian
    Good-bye to All That–Robert Graves
    Lots of books I love but these definitely stay with me. I’ll probably think of more as soon as I post this.

    Reply
  40. Well, Dickens.
    Pride & Prejudice
    Anne of Green Gables et al
    The Wind in the Willows
    The Silver Pigs et al
    Vanity Fair
    Flashman books
    Aubrey-Maturin books by Patrick O’Brian
    Good-bye to All That–Robert Graves
    Lots of books I love but these definitely stay with me. I’ll probably think of more as soon as I post this.

    Reply
  41. I forgot Nicholson Baker! How could I forget Nicholson Baker? He’s so expletive-deleted brilliant. I particularly loved The Everlasting Story of Norry, but Room Temperature is the one that made me want to marry him.
    And what about the Adrian Mole diaries? And Louise Rennison’s “Confessions of Georgia Nicolson” series… a scream!
    See… I told you I would remember more… and more… and more…

    Reply
  42. I forgot Nicholson Baker! How could I forget Nicholson Baker? He’s so expletive-deleted brilliant. I particularly loved The Everlasting Story of Norry, but Room Temperature is the one that made me want to marry him.
    And what about the Adrian Mole diaries? And Louise Rennison’s “Confessions of Georgia Nicolson” series… a scream!
    See… I told you I would remember more… and more… and more…

    Reply
  43. I forgot Nicholson Baker! How could I forget Nicholson Baker? He’s so expletive-deleted brilliant. I particularly loved The Everlasting Story of Norry, but Room Temperature is the one that made me want to marry him.
    And what about the Adrian Mole diaries? And Louise Rennison’s “Confessions of Georgia Nicolson” series… a scream!
    See… I told you I would remember more… and more… and more…

    Reply
  44. I forgot Nicholson Baker! How could I forget Nicholson Baker? He’s so expletive-deleted brilliant. I particularly loved The Everlasting Story of Norry, but Room Temperature is the one that made me want to marry him.
    And what about the Adrian Mole diaries? And Louise Rennison’s “Confessions of Georgia Nicolson” series… a scream!
    See… I told you I would remember more… and more… and more…

    Reply
  45. How lovely to be reminded of Elizabeth Ogilvie and D.E. Stevenson!
    By ruthlessly pruning my list of all romance titles (Wench and non-Wench) from 1985-2007 and all the pre-19th-century literary classics, I limited mine to 25. And if my list seems self-indulgently long, know that I have been reading longer than most of you. 🙂
    Little Women Louisa M. Alcott
    Rose in Bloom Louisa M. Alcott
    Aunt Dimity’s Ghost Nancy Atherton
    Persuasion Jane Austen
    Pride and Prejudice Jane Austen
    A Fine and Private Place Peter Beagle
    The Man in the Brown Suit Agatha Christie
    Complete Poems Emily Dickinson
    Absalom, Absalom! William Faulkner
    Opened Ground: Selected Poems Seamus Heaney
    The Temple George Herbert
    Frederica Georgette Heyer
    Magic Flutes Eva Ibbotson
    The Dean’s Watch Elizabeth Goudge
    A Circle of Quiet Madeleine L’Engle
    The Voyage of The Dawn Treader C. S. Lewis
    Betsy and the Great World Maud Hart Lovelace
    Bootlegger’s Daughter Margaret Maron
    The Hangman’s Beautiful Daughter Sharyn McCrumb
    Anne of Green Gables L.M. Montgomery
    Mystery and Manners Flannery O’Connor
    Gilead Marilynne Robinson
    This Rough Magic Mary Stewart
    Dawn’s Early Light Elswyth Thane
    Losing Battles Eudora Welty

    Reply
  46. How lovely to be reminded of Elizabeth Ogilvie and D.E. Stevenson!
    By ruthlessly pruning my list of all romance titles (Wench and non-Wench) from 1985-2007 and all the pre-19th-century literary classics, I limited mine to 25. And if my list seems self-indulgently long, know that I have been reading longer than most of you. 🙂
    Little Women Louisa M. Alcott
    Rose in Bloom Louisa M. Alcott
    Aunt Dimity’s Ghost Nancy Atherton
    Persuasion Jane Austen
    Pride and Prejudice Jane Austen
    A Fine and Private Place Peter Beagle
    The Man in the Brown Suit Agatha Christie
    Complete Poems Emily Dickinson
    Absalom, Absalom! William Faulkner
    Opened Ground: Selected Poems Seamus Heaney
    The Temple George Herbert
    Frederica Georgette Heyer
    Magic Flutes Eva Ibbotson
    The Dean’s Watch Elizabeth Goudge
    A Circle of Quiet Madeleine L’Engle
    The Voyage of The Dawn Treader C. S. Lewis
    Betsy and the Great World Maud Hart Lovelace
    Bootlegger’s Daughter Margaret Maron
    The Hangman’s Beautiful Daughter Sharyn McCrumb
    Anne of Green Gables L.M. Montgomery
    Mystery and Manners Flannery O’Connor
    Gilead Marilynne Robinson
    This Rough Magic Mary Stewart
    Dawn’s Early Light Elswyth Thane
    Losing Battles Eudora Welty

    Reply
  47. How lovely to be reminded of Elizabeth Ogilvie and D.E. Stevenson!
    By ruthlessly pruning my list of all romance titles (Wench and non-Wench) from 1985-2007 and all the pre-19th-century literary classics, I limited mine to 25. And if my list seems self-indulgently long, know that I have been reading longer than most of you. 🙂
    Little Women Louisa M. Alcott
    Rose in Bloom Louisa M. Alcott
    Aunt Dimity’s Ghost Nancy Atherton
    Persuasion Jane Austen
    Pride and Prejudice Jane Austen
    A Fine and Private Place Peter Beagle
    The Man in the Brown Suit Agatha Christie
    Complete Poems Emily Dickinson
    Absalom, Absalom! William Faulkner
    Opened Ground: Selected Poems Seamus Heaney
    The Temple George Herbert
    Frederica Georgette Heyer
    Magic Flutes Eva Ibbotson
    The Dean’s Watch Elizabeth Goudge
    A Circle of Quiet Madeleine L’Engle
    The Voyage of The Dawn Treader C. S. Lewis
    Betsy and the Great World Maud Hart Lovelace
    Bootlegger’s Daughter Margaret Maron
    The Hangman’s Beautiful Daughter Sharyn McCrumb
    Anne of Green Gables L.M. Montgomery
    Mystery and Manners Flannery O’Connor
    Gilead Marilynne Robinson
    This Rough Magic Mary Stewart
    Dawn’s Early Light Elswyth Thane
    Losing Battles Eudora Welty

    Reply
  48. How lovely to be reminded of Elizabeth Ogilvie and D.E. Stevenson!
    By ruthlessly pruning my list of all romance titles (Wench and non-Wench) from 1985-2007 and all the pre-19th-century literary classics, I limited mine to 25. And if my list seems self-indulgently long, know that I have been reading longer than most of you. 🙂
    Little Women Louisa M. Alcott
    Rose in Bloom Louisa M. Alcott
    Aunt Dimity’s Ghost Nancy Atherton
    Persuasion Jane Austen
    Pride and Prejudice Jane Austen
    A Fine and Private Place Peter Beagle
    The Man in the Brown Suit Agatha Christie
    Complete Poems Emily Dickinson
    Absalom, Absalom! William Faulkner
    Opened Ground: Selected Poems Seamus Heaney
    The Temple George Herbert
    Frederica Georgette Heyer
    Magic Flutes Eva Ibbotson
    The Dean’s Watch Elizabeth Goudge
    A Circle of Quiet Madeleine L’Engle
    The Voyage of The Dawn Treader C. S. Lewis
    Betsy and the Great World Maud Hart Lovelace
    Bootlegger’s Daughter Margaret Maron
    The Hangman’s Beautiful Daughter Sharyn McCrumb
    Anne of Green Gables L.M. Montgomery
    Mystery and Manners Flannery O’Connor
    Gilead Marilynne Robinson
    This Rough Magic Mary Stewart
    Dawn’s Early Light Elswyth Thane
    Losing Battles Eudora Welty

    Reply
  49. Short list, off the top of my head:
    Indiscreet, Mary Balogh
    A Gypsy at Almack’s, Chloe Cheshire
    These Old Shades, Georgette Heyer
    Outlander, Diana Gabaldon
    Vice Avenged: A Moral Tale, Lolah Burford
    The SAS Survival Handbook, John Wiseman (SAS = British Special Air Service. An absolute gem of a research book for writers, and a fascinating bedtime read. This book has been reprinted a gazillion times. Did you know you should build a fire at the BACK of a cave instead of the front? A fire in the front will smoke you out and lose heat, but a fire at the back won’t, because the smoke will rise and be drawn along the ceiling and out the front of the cave, while the heat remains inside.)

    Reply
  50. Short list, off the top of my head:
    Indiscreet, Mary Balogh
    A Gypsy at Almack’s, Chloe Cheshire
    These Old Shades, Georgette Heyer
    Outlander, Diana Gabaldon
    Vice Avenged: A Moral Tale, Lolah Burford
    The SAS Survival Handbook, John Wiseman (SAS = British Special Air Service. An absolute gem of a research book for writers, and a fascinating bedtime read. This book has been reprinted a gazillion times. Did you know you should build a fire at the BACK of a cave instead of the front? A fire in the front will smoke you out and lose heat, but a fire at the back won’t, because the smoke will rise and be drawn along the ceiling and out the front of the cave, while the heat remains inside.)

    Reply
  51. Short list, off the top of my head:
    Indiscreet, Mary Balogh
    A Gypsy at Almack’s, Chloe Cheshire
    These Old Shades, Georgette Heyer
    Outlander, Diana Gabaldon
    Vice Avenged: A Moral Tale, Lolah Burford
    The SAS Survival Handbook, John Wiseman (SAS = British Special Air Service. An absolute gem of a research book for writers, and a fascinating bedtime read. This book has been reprinted a gazillion times. Did you know you should build a fire at the BACK of a cave instead of the front? A fire in the front will smoke you out and lose heat, but a fire at the back won’t, because the smoke will rise and be drawn along the ceiling and out the front of the cave, while the heat remains inside.)

    Reply
  52. Short list, off the top of my head:
    Indiscreet, Mary Balogh
    A Gypsy at Almack’s, Chloe Cheshire
    These Old Shades, Georgette Heyer
    Outlander, Diana Gabaldon
    Vice Avenged: A Moral Tale, Lolah Burford
    The SAS Survival Handbook, John Wiseman (SAS = British Special Air Service. An absolute gem of a research book for writers, and a fascinating bedtime read. This book has been reprinted a gazillion times. Did you know you should build a fire at the BACK of a cave instead of the front? A fire in the front will smoke you out and lose heat, but a fire at the back won’t, because the smoke will rise and be drawn along the ceiling and out the front of the cave, while the heat remains inside.)

    Reply
  53. Pawn of Prophecy by David Eddings
    Black Jewels Trilogy by Anne Bishop
    Ransom by Julie Garwood
    The Gift by Julie Garwood
    Heaven, Texas by Susan Elizabeth Phillips
    The White Dragon by Anne McCaffrey
    Lord of Scoundrels by Loretta Chase
    Faking It by Jennifer Crusie
    Dark Desire by Christine Feehan
    Fantasy Lover by Sherrilyn Kenyon
    Bitten by Kelley Armstrong
    The Windflower by Laura London
    Okay they’re the ones I can remember off the top of my head, but there are more that I read frequently.

    Reply
  54. Pawn of Prophecy by David Eddings
    Black Jewels Trilogy by Anne Bishop
    Ransom by Julie Garwood
    The Gift by Julie Garwood
    Heaven, Texas by Susan Elizabeth Phillips
    The White Dragon by Anne McCaffrey
    Lord of Scoundrels by Loretta Chase
    Faking It by Jennifer Crusie
    Dark Desire by Christine Feehan
    Fantasy Lover by Sherrilyn Kenyon
    Bitten by Kelley Armstrong
    The Windflower by Laura London
    Okay they’re the ones I can remember off the top of my head, but there are more that I read frequently.

    Reply
  55. Pawn of Prophecy by David Eddings
    Black Jewels Trilogy by Anne Bishop
    Ransom by Julie Garwood
    The Gift by Julie Garwood
    Heaven, Texas by Susan Elizabeth Phillips
    The White Dragon by Anne McCaffrey
    Lord of Scoundrels by Loretta Chase
    Faking It by Jennifer Crusie
    Dark Desire by Christine Feehan
    Fantasy Lover by Sherrilyn Kenyon
    Bitten by Kelley Armstrong
    The Windflower by Laura London
    Okay they’re the ones I can remember off the top of my head, but there are more that I read frequently.

    Reply
  56. Pawn of Prophecy by David Eddings
    Black Jewels Trilogy by Anne Bishop
    Ransom by Julie Garwood
    The Gift by Julie Garwood
    Heaven, Texas by Susan Elizabeth Phillips
    The White Dragon by Anne McCaffrey
    Lord of Scoundrels by Loretta Chase
    Faking It by Jennifer Crusie
    Dark Desire by Christine Feehan
    Fantasy Lover by Sherrilyn Kenyon
    Bitten by Kelley Armstrong
    The Windflower by Laura London
    Okay they’re the ones I can remember off the top of my head, but there are more that I read frequently.

    Reply
  57. My list is somewhat different from most of the ones posted so far. Not a classic in the bunch, well maybe one, and almost all of them written in the 20th century. But these are the books that stay with me and that I’ve read several times over.
    I’ll start off with my one semi-classic – Swiss Family Robinson, read it when I was a kid and I still pull it out and re-read it every few years almost four decades later.
    Any writer of age of sail stories has to include C.S. Forester’s Horatio Hornblower novels, in particular – Beat to Quarters, Ship of the Line, and Flying Colors.
    Also Alexander Kent’s Richard Bolitho series in particular – In Gallant Company, Sloop of War, Command a King’s Ship, and Signal – Close Action!.
    James Clavell’s – Noble House (which I’ve read over a dozen times) and the earlier Struan story – Tai-Pan. They both have such a magnificient sweep to them and multiple intertwining plotlines.
    I’ve enjoyed all of Ian Fleming’s James Bond thrillers but I like From Russia with Love the most, even though Bond doesn’t appear until about a third of the way into the book.
    Robert B. Parker’s Spenser mysteries are old friends. I prefer the earlier ones and my favorites are – Mortal Stakes, Looking for Rachel Wallace, and A Catskill Eagle.
    Tom Clancy’s – The Hunt of Red October is a favorite, also Patriot Games is good.
    The last on my list is David Weber’s Honor Harrington series. Cross Hornblower with Star Wars and you’ll get this series set in the far future during the conflicts between the Star Kingdom of Manticore (England) and the Peoples Republic of Haven (France). Field of Dishonor and Ashes of Victory are my favorites.

    Reply
  58. My list is somewhat different from most of the ones posted so far. Not a classic in the bunch, well maybe one, and almost all of them written in the 20th century. But these are the books that stay with me and that I’ve read several times over.
    I’ll start off with my one semi-classic – Swiss Family Robinson, read it when I was a kid and I still pull it out and re-read it every few years almost four decades later.
    Any writer of age of sail stories has to include C.S. Forester’s Horatio Hornblower novels, in particular – Beat to Quarters, Ship of the Line, and Flying Colors.
    Also Alexander Kent’s Richard Bolitho series in particular – In Gallant Company, Sloop of War, Command a King’s Ship, and Signal – Close Action!.
    James Clavell’s – Noble House (which I’ve read over a dozen times) and the earlier Struan story – Tai-Pan. They both have such a magnificient sweep to them and multiple intertwining plotlines.
    I’ve enjoyed all of Ian Fleming’s James Bond thrillers but I like From Russia with Love the most, even though Bond doesn’t appear until about a third of the way into the book.
    Robert B. Parker’s Spenser mysteries are old friends. I prefer the earlier ones and my favorites are – Mortal Stakes, Looking for Rachel Wallace, and A Catskill Eagle.
    Tom Clancy’s – The Hunt of Red October is a favorite, also Patriot Games is good.
    The last on my list is David Weber’s Honor Harrington series. Cross Hornblower with Star Wars and you’ll get this series set in the far future during the conflicts between the Star Kingdom of Manticore (England) and the Peoples Republic of Haven (France). Field of Dishonor and Ashes of Victory are my favorites.

    Reply
  59. My list is somewhat different from most of the ones posted so far. Not a classic in the bunch, well maybe one, and almost all of them written in the 20th century. But these are the books that stay with me and that I’ve read several times over.
    I’ll start off with my one semi-classic – Swiss Family Robinson, read it when I was a kid and I still pull it out and re-read it every few years almost four decades later.
    Any writer of age of sail stories has to include C.S. Forester’s Horatio Hornblower novels, in particular – Beat to Quarters, Ship of the Line, and Flying Colors.
    Also Alexander Kent’s Richard Bolitho series in particular – In Gallant Company, Sloop of War, Command a King’s Ship, and Signal – Close Action!.
    James Clavell’s – Noble House (which I’ve read over a dozen times) and the earlier Struan story – Tai-Pan. They both have such a magnificient sweep to them and multiple intertwining plotlines.
    I’ve enjoyed all of Ian Fleming’s James Bond thrillers but I like From Russia with Love the most, even though Bond doesn’t appear until about a third of the way into the book.
    Robert B. Parker’s Spenser mysteries are old friends. I prefer the earlier ones and my favorites are – Mortal Stakes, Looking for Rachel Wallace, and A Catskill Eagle.
    Tom Clancy’s – The Hunt of Red October is a favorite, also Patriot Games is good.
    The last on my list is David Weber’s Honor Harrington series. Cross Hornblower with Star Wars and you’ll get this series set in the far future during the conflicts between the Star Kingdom of Manticore (England) and the Peoples Republic of Haven (France). Field of Dishonor and Ashes of Victory are my favorites.

    Reply
  60. My list is somewhat different from most of the ones posted so far. Not a classic in the bunch, well maybe one, and almost all of them written in the 20th century. But these are the books that stay with me and that I’ve read several times over.
    I’ll start off with my one semi-classic – Swiss Family Robinson, read it when I was a kid and I still pull it out and re-read it every few years almost four decades later.
    Any writer of age of sail stories has to include C.S. Forester’s Horatio Hornblower novels, in particular – Beat to Quarters, Ship of the Line, and Flying Colors.
    Also Alexander Kent’s Richard Bolitho series in particular – In Gallant Company, Sloop of War, Command a King’s Ship, and Signal – Close Action!.
    James Clavell’s – Noble House (which I’ve read over a dozen times) and the earlier Struan story – Tai-Pan. They both have such a magnificient sweep to them and multiple intertwining plotlines.
    I’ve enjoyed all of Ian Fleming’s James Bond thrillers but I like From Russia with Love the most, even though Bond doesn’t appear until about a third of the way into the book.
    Robert B. Parker’s Spenser mysteries are old friends. I prefer the earlier ones and my favorites are – Mortal Stakes, Looking for Rachel Wallace, and A Catskill Eagle.
    Tom Clancy’s – The Hunt of Red October is a favorite, also Patriot Games is good.
    The last on my list is David Weber’s Honor Harrington series. Cross Hornblower with Star Wars and you’ll get this series set in the far future during the conflicts between the Star Kingdom of Manticore (England) and the Peoples Republic of Haven (France). Field of Dishonor and Ashes of Victory are my favorites.

    Reply
  61. Looking at my list above, another related topic comes to mind. It’s what things we ended up reading, or becoming interested in, as a result of reading a romance or mystery. For me, Dorothy Sayers is the best example. She uses quotes from John Donne’s poems extensively in Busman’s Honeymoon. So I ended up reading his poems and loving them. (I, unlike many on the list, was not a literature major, so I wasn’t otherwise exposed.) Also, I really have no intrinsic interest in Egyptology, but I learned about Egypt through Elizabeth Peters books and became familiar with place names, etc. Laurie King (The Beekeeper Apprentice) studied theology and writes about hypotheses about Mary Magdelyne in “A letter of Mary” similar to those of The da Vinci Code. So, excluding the obvious (learning about the English regency period) I wonder what other subjects we were turned on to by our reading.
    Merry

    Reply
  62. Looking at my list above, another related topic comes to mind. It’s what things we ended up reading, or becoming interested in, as a result of reading a romance or mystery. For me, Dorothy Sayers is the best example. She uses quotes from John Donne’s poems extensively in Busman’s Honeymoon. So I ended up reading his poems and loving them. (I, unlike many on the list, was not a literature major, so I wasn’t otherwise exposed.) Also, I really have no intrinsic interest in Egyptology, but I learned about Egypt through Elizabeth Peters books and became familiar with place names, etc. Laurie King (The Beekeeper Apprentice) studied theology and writes about hypotheses about Mary Magdelyne in “A letter of Mary” similar to those of The da Vinci Code. So, excluding the obvious (learning about the English regency period) I wonder what other subjects we were turned on to by our reading.
    Merry

    Reply
  63. Looking at my list above, another related topic comes to mind. It’s what things we ended up reading, or becoming interested in, as a result of reading a romance or mystery. For me, Dorothy Sayers is the best example. She uses quotes from John Donne’s poems extensively in Busman’s Honeymoon. So I ended up reading his poems and loving them. (I, unlike many on the list, was not a literature major, so I wasn’t otherwise exposed.) Also, I really have no intrinsic interest in Egyptology, but I learned about Egypt through Elizabeth Peters books and became familiar with place names, etc. Laurie King (The Beekeeper Apprentice) studied theology and writes about hypotheses about Mary Magdelyne in “A letter of Mary” similar to those of The da Vinci Code. So, excluding the obvious (learning about the English regency period) I wonder what other subjects we were turned on to by our reading.
    Merry

    Reply
  64. Looking at my list above, another related topic comes to mind. It’s what things we ended up reading, or becoming interested in, as a result of reading a romance or mystery. For me, Dorothy Sayers is the best example. She uses quotes from John Donne’s poems extensively in Busman’s Honeymoon. So I ended up reading his poems and loving them. (I, unlike many on the list, was not a literature major, so I wasn’t otherwise exposed.) Also, I really have no intrinsic interest in Egyptology, but I learned about Egypt through Elizabeth Peters books and became familiar with place names, etc. Laurie King (The Beekeeper Apprentice) studied theology and writes about hypotheses about Mary Magdelyne in “A letter of Mary” similar to those of The da Vinci Code. So, excluding the obvious (learning about the English regency period) I wonder what other subjects we were turned on to by our reading.
    Merry

    Reply
  65. These lists are fantastic — I’m reminded of so many more treasured favorites — Crocodile on the Sandbank! The Windflower! and it could go on and on….
    John S., yours is a particularly interesting list in the mix as it brings in a different perspective on the books that stick with us for a very long time. I loved the Ian Fleming books, the early Tom Clancy, and Robert Parker. I haven’t read David Weber, but sounds very intriguing.
    So many books! Now I just want to curl up with a huge stack of the books named on these lists…
    thank you all!
    Merry, you brought up a very interesting question which would make a good blog one day!
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  66. These lists are fantastic — I’m reminded of so many more treasured favorites — Crocodile on the Sandbank! The Windflower! and it could go on and on….
    John S., yours is a particularly interesting list in the mix as it brings in a different perspective on the books that stick with us for a very long time. I loved the Ian Fleming books, the early Tom Clancy, and Robert Parker. I haven’t read David Weber, but sounds very intriguing.
    So many books! Now I just want to curl up with a huge stack of the books named on these lists…
    thank you all!
    Merry, you brought up a very interesting question which would make a good blog one day!
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  67. These lists are fantastic — I’m reminded of so many more treasured favorites — Crocodile on the Sandbank! The Windflower! and it could go on and on….
    John S., yours is a particularly interesting list in the mix as it brings in a different perspective on the books that stick with us for a very long time. I loved the Ian Fleming books, the early Tom Clancy, and Robert Parker. I haven’t read David Weber, but sounds very intriguing.
    So many books! Now I just want to curl up with a huge stack of the books named on these lists…
    thank you all!
    Merry, you brought up a very interesting question which would make a good blog one day!
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  68. These lists are fantastic — I’m reminded of so many more treasured favorites — Crocodile on the Sandbank! The Windflower! and it could go on and on….
    John S., yours is a particularly interesting list in the mix as it brings in a different perspective on the books that stick with us for a very long time. I loved the Ian Fleming books, the early Tom Clancy, and Robert Parker. I haven’t read David Weber, but sounds very intriguing.
    So many books! Now I just want to curl up with a huge stack of the books named on these lists…
    thank you all!
    Merry, you brought up a very interesting question which would make a good blog one day!
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  69. What about Anne MacCaffrey for her Pern series, her Rowan/Damia etc series (both science fiction series) and The Lady (romance set in Ireland)?

    Reply
  70. What about Anne MacCaffrey for her Pern series, her Rowan/Damia etc series (both science fiction series) and The Lady (romance set in Ireland)?

    Reply
  71. What about Anne MacCaffrey for her Pern series, her Rowan/Damia etc series (both science fiction series) and The Lady (romance set in Ireland)?

    Reply
  72. What about Anne MacCaffrey for her Pern series, her Rowan/Damia etc series (both science fiction series) and The Lady (romance set in Ireland)?

    Reply
  73. wow,
    So many good books, so little time, but to name a few of my fav..
    The whole outlander series from Diana Gabaldon, the Wilderness series from Sara Donati, Jude Deveraux,A knight in shining Armour and Rememberance, those two I really love…
    Julie Garwood “the Bride and The wedding, they just leave me with a smile in my heart.
    Lynn Kurland, love all her books because there fun and clean, so my daughter can read them too…
    Some new fav, Patricia Briggs, Kim Harrison, Jennifer Armintrout, Charlaine Harris, because their fun reads about “other beings” and last but not least Judith Merkle Riley’s books with A vision of light and it’s sequel the best of all.
    But eventhought the list is long already, there still many more that I just love but don’t need to own.

    Reply
  74. wow,
    So many good books, so little time, but to name a few of my fav..
    The whole outlander series from Diana Gabaldon, the Wilderness series from Sara Donati, Jude Deveraux,A knight in shining Armour and Rememberance, those two I really love…
    Julie Garwood “the Bride and The wedding, they just leave me with a smile in my heart.
    Lynn Kurland, love all her books because there fun and clean, so my daughter can read them too…
    Some new fav, Patricia Briggs, Kim Harrison, Jennifer Armintrout, Charlaine Harris, because their fun reads about “other beings” and last but not least Judith Merkle Riley’s books with A vision of light and it’s sequel the best of all.
    But eventhought the list is long already, there still many more that I just love but don’t need to own.

    Reply
  75. wow,
    So many good books, so little time, but to name a few of my fav..
    The whole outlander series from Diana Gabaldon, the Wilderness series from Sara Donati, Jude Deveraux,A knight in shining Armour and Rememberance, those two I really love…
    Julie Garwood “the Bride and The wedding, they just leave me with a smile in my heart.
    Lynn Kurland, love all her books because there fun and clean, so my daughter can read them too…
    Some new fav, Patricia Briggs, Kim Harrison, Jennifer Armintrout, Charlaine Harris, because their fun reads about “other beings” and last but not least Judith Merkle Riley’s books with A vision of light and it’s sequel the best of all.
    But eventhought the list is long already, there still many more that I just love but don’t need to own.

    Reply
  76. wow,
    So many good books, so little time, but to name a few of my fav..
    The whole outlander series from Diana Gabaldon, the Wilderness series from Sara Donati, Jude Deveraux,A knight in shining Armour and Rememberance, those two I really love…
    Julie Garwood “the Bride and The wedding, they just leave me with a smile in my heart.
    Lynn Kurland, love all her books because there fun and clean, so my daughter can read them too…
    Some new fav, Patricia Briggs, Kim Harrison, Jennifer Armintrout, Charlaine Harris, because their fun reads about “other beings” and last but not least Judith Merkle Riley’s books with A vision of light and it’s sequel the best of all.
    But eventhought the list is long already, there still many more that I just love but don’t need to own.

    Reply
  77. Susan/Sarah, if you’re interested in giving Mr. Weber a try, allow me to direct you over to the Baen Free Library where the first two books, On Basilisk Station and Honor of the Queen, are available in an electronic format direct from the publisher for free.
    The idea seems to be that if you like what you’ve read you’ll eventually buy the hard copies. They’ve been doing it for a number of years so it must be working out very well for both the authors and the publisher.
    Here’s the url:
    http://www.baen.com/library/

    Reply
  78. Susan/Sarah, if you’re interested in giving Mr. Weber a try, allow me to direct you over to the Baen Free Library where the first two books, On Basilisk Station and Honor of the Queen, are available in an electronic format direct from the publisher for free.
    The idea seems to be that if you like what you’ve read you’ll eventually buy the hard copies. They’ve been doing it for a number of years so it must be working out very well for both the authors and the publisher.
    Here’s the url:
    http://www.baen.com/library/

    Reply
  79. Susan/Sarah, if you’re interested in giving Mr. Weber a try, allow me to direct you over to the Baen Free Library where the first two books, On Basilisk Station and Honor of the Queen, are available in an electronic format direct from the publisher for free.
    The idea seems to be that if you like what you’ve read you’ll eventually buy the hard copies. They’ve been doing it for a number of years so it must be working out very well for both the authors and the publisher.
    Here’s the url:
    http://www.baen.com/library/

    Reply
  80. Susan/Sarah, if you’re interested in giving Mr. Weber a try, allow me to direct you over to the Baen Free Library where the first two books, On Basilisk Station and Honor of the Queen, are available in an electronic format direct from the publisher for free.
    The idea seems to be that if you like what you’ve read you’ll eventually buy the hard copies. They’ve been doing it for a number of years so it must be working out very well for both the authors and the publisher.
    Here’s the url:
    http://www.baen.com/library/

    Reply
  81. Wow, what fabulous lists! Brings back lots of memories. Let me throw into the non-genre pot:
    Catch-22, Joseph Heller
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Ken Kesey
    A Confederacy of Dunces, John Kenn edy Toole
    and anything Walker Percy
    (just to prove some Male Authors are exceedingly readable, highly entertaining, and even more cynical than I am)

    Reply
  82. Wow, what fabulous lists! Brings back lots of memories. Let me throw into the non-genre pot:
    Catch-22, Joseph Heller
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Ken Kesey
    A Confederacy of Dunces, John Kenn edy Toole
    and anything Walker Percy
    (just to prove some Male Authors are exceedingly readable, highly entertaining, and even more cynical than I am)

    Reply
  83. Wow, what fabulous lists! Brings back lots of memories. Let me throw into the non-genre pot:
    Catch-22, Joseph Heller
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Ken Kesey
    A Confederacy of Dunces, John Kenn edy Toole
    and anything Walker Percy
    (just to prove some Male Authors are exceedingly readable, highly entertaining, and even more cynical than I am)

    Reply
  84. Wow, what fabulous lists! Brings back lots of memories. Let me throw into the non-genre pot:
    Catch-22, Joseph Heller
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Ken Kesey
    A Confederacy of Dunces, John Kenn edy Toole
    and anything Walker Percy
    (just to prove some Male Authors are exceedingly readable, highly entertaining, and even more cynical than I am)

    Reply
  85. THANK YOU for loving Moby Dick, Susan Sarah. I think it may just be the 2 of us–the rest of the world doesn’t seem to get it! There are passages I go back to read again and again because they’re so beautifully written, like the chapter on the whiteness of the whale. I actually took a class in college on Moby Dick and War & Peace because I thought it might be the only way I would ever manage to read both of them. I expected to prefer War & Peace, but it was Melville who won my heart.
    I also adored Billy Budd, and the movie starring a young Terence Stamp was amazing.

    Reply
  86. THANK YOU for loving Moby Dick, Susan Sarah. I think it may just be the 2 of us–the rest of the world doesn’t seem to get it! There are passages I go back to read again and again because they’re so beautifully written, like the chapter on the whiteness of the whale. I actually took a class in college on Moby Dick and War & Peace because I thought it might be the only way I would ever manage to read both of them. I expected to prefer War & Peace, but it was Melville who won my heart.
    I also adored Billy Budd, and the movie starring a young Terence Stamp was amazing.

    Reply
  87. THANK YOU for loving Moby Dick, Susan Sarah. I think it may just be the 2 of us–the rest of the world doesn’t seem to get it! There are passages I go back to read again and again because they’re so beautifully written, like the chapter on the whiteness of the whale. I actually took a class in college on Moby Dick and War & Peace because I thought it might be the only way I would ever manage to read both of them. I expected to prefer War & Peace, but it was Melville who won my heart.
    I also adored Billy Budd, and the movie starring a young Terence Stamp was amazing.

    Reply
  88. THANK YOU for loving Moby Dick, Susan Sarah. I think it may just be the 2 of us–the rest of the world doesn’t seem to get it! There are passages I go back to read again and again because they’re so beautifully written, like the chapter on the whiteness of the whale. I actually took a class in college on Moby Dick and War & Peace because I thought it might be the only way I would ever manage to read both of them. I expected to prefer War & Peace, but it was Melville who won my heart.
    I also adored Billy Budd, and the movie starring a young Terence Stamp was amazing.

    Reply
  89. Talk about a tough assignment! To a lot of those above (someone else loves A Gypsy at Almack’s!)
    let me add:
    Frenchman’s Creek, Daphne Du Maurier
    Barbara Hambly’s Windrose Chronicles
    A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
    Dandelion Wine, Ray Bradbury
    anything Sharpe, my favorite being Sharpe’s Escape
    Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum series
    Jo’s Malloren series
    The Seduction, Julia Ross
    The Smoke Thief, Shana Abe
    Laurell K. Hamilton’s vampire series (it’s turning into pure erotica, but the first six are great).
    favorite Regencies:
    To Kiss A Thief, Kate Moore
    Miss Dower’s Paragon, Gayle Buck
    Lynn Kerstan’s The Heart of the Tiger,The Golden Leopard and The Silver Lion
    The Perfect Seduction, Leslie LaFoy
    The Marquess Lends a Hand, Monique Ellis
    Yours Until Dawn, Teresa Medeiros
    Deirdre and Don Juan, Jo Bev

    Reply
  90. Talk about a tough assignment! To a lot of those above (someone else loves A Gypsy at Almack’s!)
    let me add:
    Frenchman’s Creek, Daphne Du Maurier
    Barbara Hambly’s Windrose Chronicles
    A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
    Dandelion Wine, Ray Bradbury
    anything Sharpe, my favorite being Sharpe’s Escape
    Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum series
    Jo’s Malloren series
    The Seduction, Julia Ross
    The Smoke Thief, Shana Abe
    Laurell K. Hamilton’s vampire series (it’s turning into pure erotica, but the first six are great).
    favorite Regencies:
    To Kiss A Thief, Kate Moore
    Miss Dower’s Paragon, Gayle Buck
    Lynn Kerstan’s The Heart of the Tiger,The Golden Leopard and The Silver Lion
    The Perfect Seduction, Leslie LaFoy
    The Marquess Lends a Hand, Monique Ellis
    Yours Until Dawn, Teresa Medeiros
    Deirdre and Don Juan, Jo Bev

    Reply
  91. Talk about a tough assignment! To a lot of those above (someone else loves A Gypsy at Almack’s!)
    let me add:
    Frenchman’s Creek, Daphne Du Maurier
    Barbara Hambly’s Windrose Chronicles
    A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
    Dandelion Wine, Ray Bradbury
    anything Sharpe, my favorite being Sharpe’s Escape
    Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum series
    Jo’s Malloren series
    The Seduction, Julia Ross
    The Smoke Thief, Shana Abe
    Laurell K. Hamilton’s vampire series (it’s turning into pure erotica, but the first six are great).
    favorite Regencies:
    To Kiss A Thief, Kate Moore
    Miss Dower’s Paragon, Gayle Buck
    Lynn Kerstan’s The Heart of the Tiger,The Golden Leopard and The Silver Lion
    The Perfect Seduction, Leslie LaFoy
    The Marquess Lends a Hand, Monique Ellis
    Yours Until Dawn, Teresa Medeiros
    Deirdre and Don Juan, Jo Bev

    Reply
  92. Talk about a tough assignment! To a lot of those above (someone else loves A Gypsy at Almack’s!)
    let me add:
    Frenchman’s Creek, Daphne Du Maurier
    Barbara Hambly’s Windrose Chronicles
    A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
    Dandelion Wine, Ray Bradbury
    anything Sharpe, my favorite being Sharpe’s Escape
    Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum series
    Jo’s Malloren series
    The Seduction, Julia Ross
    The Smoke Thief, Shana Abe
    Laurell K. Hamilton’s vampire series (it’s turning into pure erotica, but the first six are great).
    favorite Regencies:
    To Kiss A Thief, Kate Moore
    Miss Dower’s Paragon, Gayle Buck
    Lynn Kerstan’s The Heart of the Tiger,The Golden Leopard and The Silver Lion
    The Perfect Seduction, Leslie LaFoy
    The Marquess Lends a Hand, Monique Ellis
    Yours Until Dawn, Teresa Medeiros
    Deirdre and Don Juan, Jo Bev

    Reply
  93. “How could I forget two of my favorites authors: anything by Dorothy Dunnett and Jack O’Brien.”
    What the …? Who wrote Jack O’Brien and signed my name to that comment? *g* That should be PATRICK O’BRIAN. Lawsy, lawsy, what’ll I write next?

    Reply
  94. “How could I forget two of my favorites authors: anything by Dorothy Dunnett and Jack O’Brien.”
    What the …? Who wrote Jack O’Brien and signed my name to that comment? *g* That should be PATRICK O’BRIAN. Lawsy, lawsy, what’ll I write next?

    Reply
  95. “How could I forget two of my favorites authors: anything by Dorothy Dunnett and Jack O’Brien.”
    What the …? Who wrote Jack O’Brien and signed my name to that comment? *g* That should be PATRICK O’BRIAN. Lawsy, lawsy, what’ll I write next?

    Reply
  96. “How could I forget two of my favorites authors: anything by Dorothy Dunnett and Jack O’Brien.”
    What the …? Who wrote Jack O’Brien and signed my name to that comment? *g* That should be PATRICK O’BRIAN. Lawsy, lawsy, what’ll I write next?

    Reply

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