All that glistens is not . . . goldfish

Joanna here, talking about English Goldfish. 

You've probably asked yourself, from time to time, if there are any Shakespeare  Thomas Benjamin Kennington quotes about goldfish. 

Did Shakespeare say, "That which we call a goldfish, by any other name would be as bright"? 
Or insult some catiff with a, "Thou wimpled, reeling-ripe goldfish-licker!" 

He did not. 
Goldfish didn't make it to England till nearly a century after Shakespeare's death.  We got Shakespearean dogs and cats, camels, carp, marmosets, mackerel, and whales . . . but no goldfish. 

Basically, the goldfish is the carp who made good. 

The carp is a wide-spread, useful and tasty fish that's been domesticated for a couple millennia in China.  While the Chinese were raising carp for the table, they'd noticed a common mutation that threw an orange or gold fish Grabbing_for_goldfishin among the ordinary ones. 

After centuies of noticing that, about a thousand years ago, the Chinese set down to the serious business of breeding these bright-colored fishes as garden ornaments.  The women of the imperial court doubtless engaged in a little friendly rivalry as to the beauty and vigor of their particular line of goldfish.  They'd bring them inside in big porcelain basins to enjoy.  Especially favored courtiers would be invited over to watch the fish swim, this being before TV and Wii.

When trade routes opened in the 1600s, goldfish were freed from their splendid isolation in the Mandarin's garden and went travelling the world.  Japan first.  Then southern Europe, coming in through Portugal.  Then just about everywhere.

The Japanese Kanji characters for goldfish are 'gold' and 'fish'.  'King yo'.  In Dutch, goldfish is goudvis.  French, poisson d'or.  Spanish, carpa dorada.  Goldfish tend to be called 'goldfish'. 
Utamaro_goldfish
When goldfish hit Europe, it settled a bit of an artistic conundrum.  Chinese  paintings had been arriving in Europe with representations of goldfish.  "Pooh," said some.  "Mythical animals." 

Turned out it wasn't artistic license. 
It was fish.

Legend has it goldfish were brought to France as a present for Madame de Pompadour.  In Russia, Prince Potemkin gave goldfish to Catherine the Great. 

Goldfish were the Tiffany trinket of the Eighteenth Century.

And across southern Europe in those years, it became a tradition for husbands to give their wives a goldfish on the first anniversary as a symbol for prosperous years to come.

1800boillyjfillesafentre crop1800boillyjfillesafentre 

Here's a pair of impeccable French goldfish from 1800 in an impeccable period fishbowl. 

Goldfish moved into England in 1728, brought over to a Sir Matthew Dekker who handed them out to his friends and neighbors in London. 

They were, when first introduced into England, considered rare and fragile.  As late as 1821, a naturalist could write,

"Great care is necessary to preserve them; for they are extremely delicate, and sensible of the least injuries of the air; a loud noise, such as that of thunder or cannon; a strong smell, a violent shaking of the vessel or a single touch, will often destroy them."

Admittedly, the survival of a goldfish in the care of a ten-year-old boy is somewhat of a crap shoot.  But it's not as bad as that.

The most illustrious patron of goldfish in Georgian England was Horace Walpole, who kept a pond of them at his home, Strawberry Hill, bred them and gifted them about Europe. 

Horace walpole  Said Walpole: 

"I have lately given count Perron some gold-fish, which he has carried in his post-chaise to Turin: he has already carried some before. The Russian minister has asked me for some too, but I doubt their succeeding there . . ."

Goldfish:  Eighteenth Century baksheesh, greasing the wheels of international diplomacy.

Strawberry-hill3

 

Walpole tells the story:  

"I Was prevented from finishing my letter yesterday, by what do you think ? By no less magnificent a circumstance than a deluge  . . .  About four arrived such a flood, that we could not see out of the windows: the whole lawn was a lake . . .  I had but just, time to collect two dogs, a couple of sheep, a pair of bantams, and a brace of gold-fish; for, in the haste of my zeal to imitate my ancestor Noah, I forgot that fish would not easily be drowned.

The goldfish by henri matisse In short, if you chance to spy a little ark with pinnacles sailing towards Jersey, open the sky-light, and you will find some of your acquaintance. You never saw such desolation ! A pigeon brings word that Mabland has fared still worse."

I can see Walpole, retreating from his flooded house with his 'brace of goldfish'.  (ETA:  This is Horace Walpole, not Robert Walpole, as I originally wrote.  Jeesh.  Pay attention, Joanna.)

That's Strawberry Hill somewhat far above, Walpole's magnificent Gothic madness.  To the left and slightly above is an entirely unrelated set of Matisse goldfish.

Elsewhere Walpole says,

"You may get your pond ready as soon as you please; the gold fish swarm: Mr. Bentley carried a dozen to town t'other day in a decanter.
You would be entertained with our fishing; instead of nets and rods and lines and worms, we use nothing but a pail and a basin and a tea-strainer, which I persuade my neighbours is the Chinese method."

It's not impossible your goldfish — if you have one — is descended from the adventurous fish of Walpole's pond at Strawberry Hill.

By the Regency, goldfish were a commonplace in the parlor, kept in goldfish  bowls that looked exactly like the modern variety.  Goldfish seem to have made 'unexceptional', affectionate presents.

In Maria Edgeworth's novel, Belinda, goldfish are sent to an invalid. — "I have  some gold fish, which you know cannot make the least noise: may I send them to her?"

This picture to the right is Kitty Fisher, Eighteenth CenNathaniel Hone portrait of Kitty Fisher, her cat, and the goldfish bowltury courtesan, with goldfish bowl and cat.

Developing on the courtesan theme, below Kitty is the courtesan Wakamurasaki playing with a goldfish.  

Folks tended to moralize about the whole 'gold' thing.  In Thomas Gray's poem, The Cat and the Gold Fish, the poor cat falls into the goldfish vase:

No master came, no servant stirr'd;
Nor cruel Tom, nor Susan heard :
A fav'rite has no friend!

Learn hence, ye fair ones, undeceiv'd,Chokosai-eisho-a-bust-portrait-of-the-courtesan-wakamurasaki-of-the-tsunotamaya-playing-with-goldfish
False steps are hard to be retriev'd,
And be with caution bold.

Not all that tempts your wand'ring eyes,
And heedless hearts, is lawful prize;
Nor all that glisters gold.

In Regency England, if you weren't lucky enough to be gifted with goldfish, you might buy your own from the itinerant goldfish peddler.  The Regency was a great time for merchandise coming to you instead of t'other way round. 

George Dunlop, R.A., LeslieThe Goldfish Seller

In the interests of providing a full audio-visual experience, I'm going to wander far afield from the Regency and bring in Debussy's piano piece, Poisson d'or

Poisson d'or — 'Goldfish', of course.   Debussy's work was inspired by this particular lacquer artwPoissonsD'Or+19thCenturyJapaneseLaquer+MuseeClaudeDebussy+Saint-Germain-En-Layeork here to the right.  It hung in his study. 

You can listen to Poisson d'or here.  That's Magda Tagliaferro playing, and she's 92.

Debussy used to call the times when inspiration ran dry, his 'factory of  nothingness."

While you're listening to that goldfish music . . .

I became interested in the question of Regency and French Revolutionary goldfish, (allow me to pause while I rid my mind of the image of small revolutionary fish carrying banners,) because, in my book, The Forbidden Rose, my heroine keeps fish.
Well . . . she kept fish.

In this scene her chateau has been burned and looted, and naturally no one thinks about the fish in a situation like this.  It's always the innocent fish that suffer.

***** ***

Aaajapanese fb He stood, looking formidable. Behind him, dawn curved like a shell.

The wide granite pool was white as the moon.  It was cold as the moon when she dipped her hand beneath the surface of the reflection. “Will you tell me what you plan to do with me? I am naturally curious.”

“We’ll talk about it when we’re on the road. I want to get away from here. Soap.” LeBreton laid it beside the towels.  A metal box of soft and greasy-looking soap. “Probably not what you’re used to.”

“It is lovely. Thank you.”

“Don’t get any in the pool.”

Fish were poisoned by soap. She liked it that LeBreton knew that, and cared. It is in such small things that men reveal themselves.

Goldfish came and nibbled at her fingers. She had named them all when she was a child. Moses—because he parted the waters—and Blondine and fat, lazy Rousseau.  Once the noisy Jacobin riffraff took themselves off, Mayor Leclerc would come from the village with tubs to steal her fish for his own pond. He had coveted them for many years.  She hoped he would hurry. They should not be neglected in this fashion.

. . . (and later) . . .

She wore nothing at all. It was strange to be unclothed under the open sky. 

Her reflection looked up at her from the fish basin, more pale than the sky, rippling in the circles that spread where fish came to lip at the surface. The rim of the basin was gritty under her, with little puddles in every unevenness. The wind of the new day scraped her skin like a dull knife. She put her feet in the water. The slippery film of mud at the bottom of the pool crept up between her toes.

Cold. Immeasurably cold.

Quickly, before she lost her courage, she wet half the towel, rubbed water down her arms, over her stomach, hissing every breath in and out. Then up and down her thighs. She washed every scratch, every cut. There was not one of them without a sting. It was not helpful to remind herself that she was the descendent of warriors.

Moses and Rousseau and the other great rulers of the pool held themselves aloof, but many small fish came to nibble at her calves and ankles and the knuckles of her hands with little bites, like kittens.

*****  ***

Author anecdote here:  My aunt had a goldfish named Moses who lived in a big ornamental pond behind her house.  He used to come up to the top and blow bubbles when she rang a bell.  When you write your own books you get to name the fictional goldfish after goldfish you have known personally.

Anyhow . . . While goldfish were swimming happily about in English drawing rooms in 1730-ish, they didn't arrive in America till about a century later.  They showed up sometime in the early years of the Nineteenth Century.  No one knows just when.  Actress Fanny Kemble recounts finding goldfish in a pool at a florists in New York in the 1830s.

Which brings us at last to the vexatious question of goldfish versus koi. 
The cagematch.

Koi to the left.  Goldfish to the right.   

Both g-Koi_wiki commonsoldfish and koi were bred from wild carp Goldfish bfraz licence cc by nc sapopulations.  
Goldfish started out in China, a thousand years ago.  Koi arose from a different breed of carp, in Japan, in the mid Nineteenth Century. 

Koi are Johnnies-come-lately.  No Regency koi, alas.

Since I cannot resist talking about koi anyway:  The Japanese word 'koi' means simply 'carp'.  What we call koi the Japanese call 'nishikigoi'.  'Brocaded carp'. 
By chance, the Japanese word, 'koi', is a homophone  for another word that means 'affection' or 'love'.  Koi are therefore symbols of love and friendship in Japan.

In celebration of the goldfishes Blondine, Rousseau and Moses, I'll be giving away a copy of either The Forbidden Rose or the trade paperback of Spymaster's Lady, (your choice,) to one lucky poster in the comment trail.

So — what pet should the Romance heroine, (or hero,) keep?  Monkey, hedgehog, ferret, hummingbird?  Maybe an attack dog?

260 thoughts on “All that glistens is not . . . goldfish”

  1. I thought the best line I’d see tonight would be on Mad Men. I was wrong.
    “Goldfish tend to be called ‘goldfish’. ”
    That is some hilariously powerful branding. I laughed while I read this, I thought of all the ping pong bowls in all the fairs of my life during the bit about goldfish longevity. Poor things – from gifts between the wealthy to items to swallow and thump about in ziploc bags.
    I think I’m going to buy my kids a fishtank. Now where to put it. No, I think we’ll just snorkel. But no goldfish!! It’s a problem. Hm. (The local outdoor mall keeps putting koi in all the ponds. It keeps the egrets happy and the mall owners frustrated.)

    Reply
  2. I thought the best line I’d see tonight would be on Mad Men. I was wrong.
    “Goldfish tend to be called ‘goldfish’. ”
    That is some hilariously powerful branding. I laughed while I read this, I thought of all the ping pong bowls in all the fairs of my life during the bit about goldfish longevity. Poor things – from gifts between the wealthy to items to swallow and thump about in ziploc bags.
    I think I’m going to buy my kids a fishtank. Now where to put it. No, I think we’ll just snorkel. But no goldfish!! It’s a problem. Hm. (The local outdoor mall keeps putting koi in all the ponds. It keeps the egrets happy and the mall owners frustrated.)

    Reply
  3. I thought the best line I’d see tonight would be on Mad Men. I was wrong.
    “Goldfish tend to be called ‘goldfish’. ”
    That is some hilariously powerful branding. I laughed while I read this, I thought of all the ping pong bowls in all the fairs of my life during the bit about goldfish longevity. Poor things – from gifts between the wealthy to items to swallow and thump about in ziploc bags.
    I think I’m going to buy my kids a fishtank. Now where to put it. No, I think we’ll just snorkel. But no goldfish!! It’s a problem. Hm. (The local outdoor mall keeps putting koi in all the ponds. It keeps the egrets happy and the mall owners frustrated.)

    Reply
  4. I thought the best line I’d see tonight would be on Mad Men. I was wrong.
    “Goldfish tend to be called ‘goldfish’. ”
    That is some hilariously powerful branding. I laughed while I read this, I thought of all the ping pong bowls in all the fairs of my life during the bit about goldfish longevity. Poor things – from gifts between the wealthy to items to swallow and thump about in ziploc bags.
    I think I’m going to buy my kids a fishtank. Now where to put it. No, I think we’ll just snorkel. But no goldfish!! It’s a problem. Hm. (The local outdoor mall keeps putting koi in all the ponds. It keeps the egrets happy and the mall owners frustrated.)

    Reply
  5. I thought the best line I’d see tonight would be on Mad Men. I was wrong.
    “Goldfish tend to be called ‘goldfish’. ”
    That is some hilariously powerful branding. I laughed while I read this, I thought of all the ping pong bowls in all the fairs of my life during the bit about goldfish longevity. Poor things – from gifts between the wealthy to items to swallow and thump about in ziploc bags.
    I think I’m going to buy my kids a fishtank. Now where to put it. No, I think we’ll just snorkel. But no goldfish!! It’s a problem. Hm. (The local outdoor mall keeps putting koi in all the ponds. It keeps the egrets happy and the mall owners frustrated.)

    Reply
  6. I had never thought much about goldfish or their history so I had no idea they were a carp. When my children were younger they each received a goldfish from our church fair. This did not make me happy as we already had a dog and cat and I was not interested in trying to keep goldfish safe. My husband brought the children to the pet store where we purchased everything needed to care for the fish. As I expected, they did not live long which is why I much prefer a dog or cat but at home and in my stories.

    Reply
  7. I had never thought much about goldfish or their history so I had no idea they were a carp. When my children were younger they each received a goldfish from our church fair. This did not make me happy as we already had a dog and cat and I was not interested in trying to keep goldfish safe. My husband brought the children to the pet store where we purchased everything needed to care for the fish. As I expected, they did not live long which is why I much prefer a dog or cat but at home and in my stories.

    Reply
  8. I had never thought much about goldfish or their history so I had no idea they were a carp. When my children were younger they each received a goldfish from our church fair. This did not make me happy as we already had a dog and cat and I was not interested in trying to keep goldfish safe. My husband brought the children to the pet store where we purchased everything needed to care for the fish. As I expected, they did not live long which is why I much prefer a dog or cat but at home and in my stories.

    Reply
  9. I had never thought much about goldfish or their history so I had no idea they were a carp. When my children were younger they each received a goldfish from our church fair. This did not make me happy as we already had a dog and cat and I was not interested in trying to keep goldfish safe. My husband brought the children to the pet store where we purchased everything needed to care for the fish. As I expected, they did not live long which is why I much prefer a dog or cat but at home and in my stories.

    Reply
  10. I had never thought much about goldfish or their history so I had no idea they were a carp. When my children were younger they each received a goldfish from our church fair. This did not make me happy as we already had a dog and cat and I was not interested in trying to keep goldfish safe. My husband brought the children to the pet store where we purchased everything needed to care for the fish. As I expected, they did not live long which is why I much prefer a dog or cat but at home and in my stories.

    Reply
  11. When my grandson was about four, he ended up with three goldfish whom he named Melchior, Balthazar and Caspar for the Three Kings. He liked the names.
    Unfortunately, the fish didn’t last long.
    Fortunately, his interest in names and words has persisted.

    Reply
  12. When my grandson was about four, he ended up with three goldfish whom he named Melchior, Balthazar and Caspar for the Three Kings. He liked the names.
    Unfortunately, the fish didn’t last long.
    Fortunately, his interest in names and words has persisted.

    Reply
  13. When my grandson was about four, he ended up with three goldfish whom he named Melchior, Balthazar and Caspar for the Three Kings. He liked the names.
    Unfortunately, the fish didn’t last long.
    Fortunately, his interest in names and words has persisted.

    Reply
  14. When my grandson was about four, he ended up with three goldfish whom he named Melchior, Balthazar and Caspar for the Three Kings. He liked the names.
    Unfortunately, the fish didn’t last long.
    Fortunately, his interest in names and words has persisted.

    Reply
  15. When my grandson was about four, he ended up with three goldfish whom he named Melchior, Balthazar and Caspar for the Three Kings. He liked the names.
    Unfortunately, the fish didn’t last long.
    Fortunately, his interest in names and words has persisted.

    Reply
  16. I love this post! I’ve kept goldfish over the years. Sometimes singularly in a bowl, sometimes in my tank. When I’m angry or upset, I sit in front of them and watch them swim. Lovely motion. Something I am destined never to do for I don’t even get my face wet in the shower. (One would have to drown as a child and be fortunate enough to come back in order to appreciate the whole ‘I never get my face wet if I can help it’ thing)
    I’m still trying to talk my DH into a fish pond in our yard. We have an acre so have the room. We’d have to heat is because the Michigan winters would be hard on them. I fear feeding the hawks would become too expensive though, so I shall read about them vicariously through you! :o)

    Reply
  17. I love this post! I’ve kept goldfish over the years. Sometimes singularly in a bowl, sometimes in my tank. When I’m angry or upset, I sit in front of them and watch them swim. Lovely motion. Something I am destined never to do for I don’t even get my face wet in the shower. (One would have to drown as a child and be fortunate enough to come back in order to appreciate the whole ‘I never get my face wet if I can help it’ thing)
    I’m still trying to talk my DH into a fish pond in our yard. We have an acre so have the room. We’d have to heat is because the Michigan winters would be hard on them. I fear feeding the hawks would become too expensive though, so I shall read about them vicariously through you! :o)

    Reply
  18. I love this post! I’ve kept goldfish over the years. Sometimes singularly in a bowl, sometimes in my tank. When I’m angry or upset, I sit in front of them and watch them swim. Lovely motion. Something I am destined never to do for I don’t even get my face wet in the shower. (One would have to drown as a child and be fortunate enough to come back in order to appreciate the whole ‘I never get my face wet if I can help it’ thing)
    I’m still trying to talk my DH into a fish pond in our yard. We have an acre so have the room. We’d have to heat is because the Michigan winters would be hard on them. I fear feeding the hawks would become too expensive though, so I shall read about them vicariously through you! :o)

    Reply
  19. I love this post! I’ve kept goldfish over the years. Sometimes singularly in a bowl, sometimes in my tank. When I’m angry or upset, I sit in front of them and watch them swim. Lovely motion. Something I am destined never to do for I don’t even get my face wet in the shower. (One would have to drown as a child and be fortunate enough to come back in order to appreciate the whole ‘I never get my face wet if I can help it’ thing)
    I’m still trying to talk my DH into a fish pond in our yard. We have an acre so have the room. We’d have to heat is because the Michigan winters would be hard on them. I fear feeding the hawks would become too expensive though, so I shall read about them vicariously through you! :o)

    Reply
  20. I love this post! I’ve kept goldfish over the years. Sometimes singularly in a bowl, sometimes in my tank. When I’m angry or upset, I sit in front of them and watch them swim. Lovely motion. Something I am destined never to do for I don’t even get my face wet in the shower. (One would have to drown as a child and be fortunate enough to come back in order to appreciate the whole ‘I never get my face wet if I can help it’ thing)
    I’m still trying to talk my DH into a fish pond in our yard. We have an acre so have the room. We’d have to heat is because the Michigan winters would be hard on them. I fear feeding the hawks would become too expensive though, so I shall read about them vicariously through you! :o)

    Reply
  21. My parents had a small goldfish pond that was home to a long-lived company whose names changed as each grandchild reached the Adamic naming stage. The fish remained happily oblivious to their nominal recreation. (And I’m happy to have the goldfish-koi difference explained.)
    I think Knox, the mysogynistic parrot, pet of the hero in Jo’s Forbidden Magic, is one of the most memorable fictional pets I’ve met. I’d love to see a heroine with a misandric parrot.

    Reply
  22. My parents had a small goldfish pond that was home to a long-lived company whose names changed as each grandchild reached the Adamic naming stage. The fish remained happily oblivious to their nominal recreation. (And I’m happy to have the goldfish-koi difference explained.)
    I think Knox, the mysogynistic parrot, pet of the hero in Jo’s Forbidden Magic, is one of the most memorable fictional pets I’ve met. I’d love to see a heroine with a misandric parrot.

    Reply
  23. My parents had a small goldfish pond that was home to a long-lived company whose names changed as each grandchild reached the Adamic naming stage. The fish remained happily oblivious to their nominal recreation. (And I’m happy to have the goldfish-koi difference explained.)
    I think Knox, the mysogynistic parrot, pet of the hero in Jo’s Forbidden Magic, is one of the most memorable fictional pets I’ve met. I’d love to see a heroine with a misandric parrot.

    Reply
  24. My parents had a small goldfish pond that was home to a long-lived company whose names changed as each grandchild reached the Adamic naming stage. The fish remained happily oblivious to their nominal recreation. (And I’m happy to have the goldfish-koi difference explained.)
    I think Knox, the mysogynistic parrot, pet of the hero in Jo’s Forbidden Magic, is one of the most memorable fictional pets I’ve met. I’d love to see a heroine with a misandric parrot.

    Reply
  25. My parents had a small goldfish pond that was home to a long-lived company whose names changed as each grandchild reached the Adamic naming stage. The fish remained happily oblivious to their nominal recreation. (And I’m happy to have the goldfish-koi difference explained.)
    I think Knox, the mysogynistic parrot, pet of the hero in Jo’s Forbidden Magic, is one of the most memorable fictional pets I’ve met. I’d love to see a heroine with a misandric parrot.

    Reply
  26. Fascinating, Joanna! Another bit for my research notebook. I have five acres of mostly wooded land and I would love to have a pond in my front garden. Wonder if I can persuade the nephew to engineer one for me on his next holiday from university.
    I seem to have pets in all of my manuscripts. A shoe stealing rabbit named Percival features in my first novel and he is making a return in my fourth. A three-legged hedgehog appears in my second manuscript. His name is Dash because he bites everyone, but as he belongs to a child those he bites can’t say “damn” when he bites – hence his name. My third manuscript has a very old very large English mastiff named Bounder in it. And my newest WIP has the return of Percival and a heroine who keeps reptiles, including a very large Burmese python named Shiva who accidentally “ties up” the hero.
    I think any pet adds to a romance novel so long as it is period correct and fun!

    Reply
  27. Fascinating, Joanna! Another bit for my research notebook. I have five acres of mostly wooded land and I would love to have a pond in my front garden. Wonder if I can persuade the nephew to engineer one for me on his next holiday from university.
    I seem to have pets in all of my manuscripts. A shoe stealing rabbit named Percival features in my first novel and he is making a return in my fourth. A three-legged hedgehog appears in my second manuscript. His name is Dash because he bites everyone, but as he belongs to a child those he bites can’t say “damn” when he bites – hence his name. My third manuscript has a very old very large English mastiff named Bounder in it. And my newest WIP has the return of Percival and a heroine who keeps reptiles, including a very large Burmese python named Shiva who accidentally “ties up” the hero.
    I think any pet adds to a romance novel so long as it is period correct and fun!

    Reply
  28. Fascinating, Joanna! Another bit for my research notebook. I have five acres of mostly wooded land and I would love to have a pond in my front garden. Wonder if I can persuade the nephew to engineer one for me on his next holiday from university.
    I seem to have pets in all of my manuscripts. A shoe stealing rabbit named Percival features in my first novel and he is making a return in my fourth. A three-legged hedgehog appears in my second manuscript. His name is Dash because he bites everyone, but as he belongs to a child those he bites can’t say “damn” when he bites – hence his name. My third manuscript has a very old very large English mastiff named Bounder in it. And my newest WIP has the return of Percival and a heroine who keeps reptiles, including a very large Burmese python named Shiva who accidentally “ties up” the hero.
    I think any pet adds to a romance novel so long as it is period correct and fun!

    Reply
  29. Fascinating, Joanna! Another bit for my research notebook. I have five acres of mostly wooded land and I would love to have a pond in my front garden. Wonder if I can persuade the nephew to engineer one for me on his next holiday from university.
    I seem to have pets in all of my manuscripts. A shoe stealing rabbit named Percival features in my first novel and he is making a return in my fourth. A three-legged hedgehog appears in my second manuscript. His name is Dash because he bites everyone, but as he belongs to a child those he bites can’t say “damn” when he bites – hence his name. My third manuscript has a very old very large English mastiff named Bounder in it. And my newest WIP has the return of Percival and a heroine who keeps reptiles, including a very large Burmese python named Shiva who accidentally “ties up” the hero.
    I think any pet adds to a romance novel so long as it is period correct and fun!

    Reply
  30. Fascinating, Joanna! Another bit for my research notebook. I have five acres of mostly wooded land and I would love to have a pond in my front garden. Wonder if I can persuade the nephew to engineer one for me on his next holiday from university.
    I seem to have pets in all of my manuscripts. A shoe stealing rabbit named Percival features in my first novel and he is making a return in my fourth. A three-legged hedgehog appears in my second manuscript. His name is Dash because he bites everyone, but as he belongs to a child those he bites can’t say “damn” when he bites – hence his name. My third manuscript has a very old very large English mastiff named Bounder in it. And my newest WIP has the return of Percival and a heroine who keeps reptiles, including a very large Burmese python named Shiva who accidentally “ties up” the hero.
    I think any pet adds to a romance novel so long as it is period correct and fun!

    Reply
  31. Hi mesokop —
    Five or six years ago I bought a little goldfish in my local pet store. About one-joint-of-your-thumb-sized goldfish.
    He was in a tank with a skillion other similarly small goldfish. And he cost 10 cents.
    “How do you make money selling fish for ten cents?” says I.
    “We sell a lot of them.”
    I called him ‘Bait’.
    Fastforward six years and I have this four-foot-long tank with ten inches of goldfish swimming in it. Every time he bumps the end of the tank it goes ‘thump’ in a manner that can be heard across the house.
    And he’s still growing.
    “Hmmm,” hmms I. “This has got to stop.”
    Now I could do what that hearty lady did in Born Free and when her lion cub outgrew the back yard, she moved to the bush where there were lions running lose so Elsa would be a happy lion.
    I could move to a house with a huge pond. But I decided we would give up the fish instead of the house.
    First I tried a famous botanical garden in Richmond. They said they didn’t keep goldfish any more because the herons came and ate them out one by one yum yum yum and it was nice for the herons but not so cool for the fish.
    Fortunately, I found a nice woman who has a big pond and her very own well-established goldfish.
    I do not know what she does about herons and hawks. Maybe they just don’t mess with her.
    Anyhow, Bait went to live with her pack and became a member in good standing and high esteem and seems happily acclimated to the whole idea of not bumping his nose on the edge of a tank every minute and a half.

    Reply
  32. Hi mesokop —
    Five or six years ago I bought a little goldfish in my local pet store. About one-joint-of-your-thumb-sized goldfish.
    He was in a tank with a skillion other similarly small goldfish. And he cost 10 cents.
    “How do you make money selling fish for ten cents?” says I.
    “We sell a lot of them.”
    I called him ‘Bait’.
    Fastforward six years and I have this four-foot-long tank with ten inches of goldfish swimming in it. Every time he bumps the end of the tank it goes ‘thump’ in a manner that can be heard across the house.
    And he’s still growing.
    “Hmmm,” hmms I. “This has got to stop.”
    Now I could do what that hearty lady did in Born Free and when her lion cub outgrew the back yard, she moved to the bush where there were lions running lose so Elsa would be a happy lion.
    I could move to a house with a huge pond. But I decided we would give up the fish instead of the house.
    First I tried a famous botanical garden in Richmond. They said they didn’t keep goldfish any more because the herons came and ate them out one by one yum yum yum and it was nice for the herons but not so cool for the fish.
    Fortunately, I found a nice woman who has a big pond and her very own well-established goldfish.
    I do not know what she does about herons and hawks. Maybe they just don’t mess with her.
    Anyhow, Bait went to live with her pack and became a member in good standing and high esteem and seems happily acclimated to the whole idea of not bumping his nose on the edge of a tank every minute and a half.

    Reply
  33. Hi mesokop —
    Five or six years ago I bought a little goldfish in my local pet store. About one-joint-of-your-thumb-sized goldfish.
    He was in a tank with a skillion other similarly small goldfish. And he cost 10 cents.
    “How do you make money selling fish for ten cents?” says I.
    “We sell a lot of them.”
    I called him ‘Bait’.
    Fastforward six years and I have this four-foot-long tank with ten inches of goldfish swimming in it. Every time he bumps the end of the tank it goes ‘thump’ in a manner that can be heard across the house.
    And he’s still growing.
    “Hmmm,” hmms I. “This has got to stop.”
    Now I could do what that hearty lady did in Born Free and when her lion cub outgrew the back yard, she moved to the bush where there were lions running lose so Elsa would be a happy lion.
    I could move to a house with a huge pond. But I decided we would give up the fish instead of the house.
    First I tried a famous botanical garden in Richmond. They said they didn’t keep goldfish any more because the herons came and ate them out one by one yum yum yum and it was nice for the herons but not so cool for the fish.
    Fortunately, I found a nice woman who has a big pond and her very own well-established goldfish.
    I do not know what she does about herons and hawks. Maybe they just don’t mess with her.
    Anyhow, Bait went to live with her pack and became a member in good standing and high esteem and seems happily acclimated to the whole idea of not bumping his nose on the edge of a tank every minute and a half.

    Reply
  34. Hi mesokop —
    Five or six years ago I bought a little goldfish in my local pet store. About one-joint-of-your-thumb-sized goldfish.
    He was in a tank with a skillion other similarly small goldfish. And he cost 10 cents.
    “How do you make money selling fish for ten cents?” says I.
    “We sell a lot of them.”
    I called him ‘Bait’.
    Fastforward six years and I have this four-foot-long tank with ten inches of goldfish swimming in it. Every time he bumps the end of the tank it goes ‘thump’ in a manner that can be heard across the house.
    And he’s still growing.
    “Hmmm,” hmms I. “This has got to stop.”
    Now I could do what that hearty lady did in Born Free and when her lion cub outgrew the back yard, she moved to the bush where there were lions running lose so Elsa would be a happy lion.
    I could move to a house with a huge pond. But I decided we would give up the fish instead of the house.
    First I tried a famous botanical garden in Richmond. They said they didn’t keep goldfish any more because the herons came and ate them out one by one yum yum yum and it was nice for the herons but not so cool for the fish.
    Fortunately, I found a nice woman who has a big pond and her very own well-established goldfish.
    I do not know what she does about herons and hawks. Maybe they just don’t mess with her.
    Anyhow, Bait went to live with her pack and became a member in good standing and high esteem and seems happily acclimated to the whole idea of not bumping his nose on the edge of a tank every minute and a half.

    Reply
  35. Hi mesokop —
    Five or six years ago I bought a little goldfish in my local pet store. About one-joint-of-your-thumb-sized goldfish.
    He was in a tank with a skillion other similarly small goldfish. And he cost 10 cents.
    “How do you make money selling fish for ten cents?” says I.
    “We sell a lot of them.”
    I called him ‘Bait’.
    Fastforward six years and I have this four-foot-long tank with ten inches of goldfish swimming in it. Every time he bumps the end of the tank it goes ‘thump’ in a manner that can be heard across the house.
    And he’s still growing.
    “Hmmm,” hmms I. “This has got to stop.”
    Now I could do what that hearty lady did in Born Free and when her lion cub outgrew the back yard, she moved to the bush where there were lions running lose so Elsa would be a happy lion.
    I could move to a house with a huge pond. But I decided we would give up the fish instead of the house.
    First I tried a famous botanical garden in Richmond. They said they didn’t keep goldfish any more because the herons came and ate them out one by one yum yum yum and it was nice for the herons but not so cool for the fish.
    Fortunately, I found a nice woman who has a big pond and her very own well-established goldfish.
    I do not know what she does about herons and hawks. Maybe they just don’t mess with her.
    Anyhow, Bait went to live with her pack and became a member in good standing and high esteem and seems happily acclimated to the whole idea of not bumping his nose on the edge of a tank every minute and a half.

    Reply
  36. Hi Maureen —
    In keeping with my high standards of escapist literature, no animals will be harmed in the making of my stories.
    The animals who have it hardest, it has always seemed to me, are the horses.
    I think this is because writers are not necessarily ‘horse people’, so they may inadvertently set their horses galloping headlong for three miles across broken country, carrying double.
    “Ouch,” says I, on the horse’s behalf.
    Goldfish are not similarly mistreated because no one seems to have noticed they were around. I am sure there must be stories with goldfish in the parlour, but I cannot call any to mind.

    Reply
  37. Hi Maureen —
    In keeping with my high standards of escapist literature, no animals will be harmed in the making of my stories.
    The animals who have it hardest, it has always seemed to me, are the horses.
    I think this is because writers are not necessarily ‘horse people’, so they may inadvertently set their horses galloping headlong for three miles across broken country, carrying double.
    “Ouch,” says I, on the horse’s behalf.
    Goldfish are not similarly mistreated because no one seems to have noticed they were around. I am sure there must be stories with goldfish in the parlour, but I cannot call any to mind.

    Reply
  38. Hi Maureen —
    In keeping with my high standards of escapist literature, no animals will be harmed in the making of my stories.
    The animals who have it hardest, it has always seemed to me, are the horses.
    I think this is because writers are not necessarily ‘horse people’, so they may inadvertently set their horses galloping headlong for three miles across broken country, carrying double.
    “Ouch,” says I, on the horse’s behalf.
    Goldfish are not similarly mistreated because no one seems to have noticed they were around. I am sure there must be stories with goldfish in the parlour, but I cannot call any to mind.

    Reply
  39. Hi Maureen —
    In keeping with my high standards of escapist literature, no animals will be harmed in the making of my stories.
    The animals who have it hardest, it has always seemed to me, are the horses.
    I think this is because writers are not necessarily ‘horse people’, so they may inadvertently set their horses galloping headlong for three miles across broken country, carrying double.
    “Ouch,” says I, on the horse’s behalf.
    Goldfish are not similarly mistreated because no one seems to have noticed they were around. I am sure there must be stories with goldfish in the parlour, but I cannot call any to mind.

    Reply
  40. Hi Maureen —
    In keeping with my high standards of escapist literature, no animals will be harmed in the making of my stories.
    The animals who have it hardest, it has always seemed to me, are the horses.
    I think this is because writers are not necessarily ‘horse people’, so they may inadvertently set their horses galloping headlong for three miles across broken country, carrying double.
    “Ouch,” says I, on the horse’s behalf.
    Goldfish are not similarly mistreated because no one seems to have noticed they were around. I am sure there must be stories with goldfish in the parlour, but I cannot call any to mind.

    Reply
  41. Hi Janga —
    Knox. A wonderful parrot.
    And didn’t Sophie have a parrot in Heyer’s The Grand Sophie? In Lightening That Lingers by Laura London there’s an owl. I love that owl. And Uncommon Vows by Mary Jo has a falcon.
    And then there’s the hedgehog in Kinsale’s Midsummer Moon.

    Reply
  42. Hi Janga —
    Knox. A wonderful parrot.
    And didn’t Sophie have a parrot in Heyer’s The Grand Sophie? In Lightening That Lingers by Laura London there’s an owl. I love that owl. And Uncommon Vows by Mary Jo has a falcon.
    And then there’s the hedgehog in Kinsale’s Midsummer Moon.

    Reply
  43. Hi Janga —
    Knox. A wonderful parrot.
    And didn’t Sophie have a parrot in Heyer’s The Grand Sophie? In Lightening That Lingers by Laura London there’s an owl. I love that owl. And Uncommon Vows by Mary Jo has a falcon.
    And then there’s the hedgehog in Kinsale’s Midsummer Moon.

    Reply
  44. Hi Janga —
    Knox. A wonderful parrot.
    And didn’t Sophie have a parrot in Heyer’s The Grand Sophie? In Lightening That Lingers by Laura London there’s an owl. I love that owl. And Uncommon Vows by Mary Jo has a falcon.
    And then there’s the hedgehog in Kinsale’s Midsummer Moon.

    Reply
  45. Hi Janga —
    Knox. A wonderful parrot.
    And didn’t Sophie have a parrot in Heyer’s The Grand Sophie? In Lightening That Lingers by Laura London there’s an owl. I love that owl. And Uncommon Vows by Mary Jo has a falcon.
    And then there’s the hedgehog in Kinsale’s Midsummer Moon.

    Reply
  46. Ducks! My heroes and heroines should keep ducks! I love ducks. They’re beautiful birds and they’re big enough to see easily. I’ll opt for geese or swans if no ducks are available, although geese and swans are a little big. But then, birds should stay outside, because we know what birds do a lot and we want to keep the house clean. *g*

    Reply
  47. Ducks! My heroes and heroines should keep ducks! I love ducks. They’re beautiful birds and they’re big enough to see easily. I’ll opt for geese or swans if no ducks are available, although geese and swans are a little big. But then, birds should stay outside, because we know what birds do a lot and we want to keep the house clean. *g*

    Reply
  48. Ducks! My heroes and heroines should keep ducks! I love ducks. They’re beautiful birds and they’re big enough to see easily. I’ll opt for geese or swans if no ducks are available, although geese and swans are a little big. But then, birds should stay outside, because we know what birds do a lot and we want to keep the house clean. *g*

    Reply
  49. Ducks! My heroes and heroines should keep ducks! I love ducks. They’re beautiful birds and they’re big enough to see easily. I’ll opt for geese or swans if no ducks are available, although geese and swans are a little big. But then, birds should stay outside, because we know what birds do a lot and we want to keep the house clean. *g*

    Reply
  50. Ducks! My heroes and heroines should keep ducks! I love ducks. They’re beautiful birds and they’re big enough to see easily. I’ll opt for geese or swans if no ducks are available, although geese and swans are a little big. But then, birds should stay outside, because we know what birds do a lot and we want to keep the house clean. *g*

    Reply
  51. Hi Jane —
    Part of the fun of having pets is you get to name them.
    Though now that I think about it, I never do seem to have got to name a pet, pets in my vicinity being fairly durable and me having either a kid or a younger sibling around at all times.
    Those are lovely names for fish. There’s a ping between the Gift of Gold and goldfish, isn’t there?
    I wonder if some small part of the impetus to write comes from the desire to be ‘Adamic’ and name things.

    Reply
  52. Hi Jane —
    Part of the fun of having pets is you get to name them.
    Though now that I think about it, I never do seem to have got to name a pet, pets in my vicinity being fairly durable and me having either a kid or a younger sibling around at all times.
    Those are lovely names for fish. There’s a ping between the Gift of Gold and goldfish, isn’t there?
    I wonder if some small part of the impetus to write comes from the desire to be ‘Adamic’ and name things.

    Reply
  53. Hi Jane —
    Part of the fun of having pets is you get to name them.
    Though now that I think about it, I never do seem to have got to name a pet, pets in my vicinity being fairly durable and me having either a kid or a younger sibling around at all times.
    Those are lovely names for fish. There’s a ping between the Gift of Gold and goldfish, isn’t there?
    I wonder if some small part of the impetus to write comes from the desire to be ‘Adamic’ and name things.

    Reply
  54. Hi Jane —
    Part of the fun of having pets is you get to name them.
    Though now that I think about it, I never do seem to have got to name a pet, pets in my vicinity being fairly durable and me having either a kid or a younger sibling around at all times.
    Those are lovely names for fish. There’s a ping between the Gift of Gold and goldfish, isn’t there?
    I wonder if some small part of the impetus to write comes from the desire to be ‘Adamic’ and name things.

    Reply
  55. Hi Jane —
    Part of the fun of having pets is you get to name them.
    Though now that I think about it, I never do seem to have got to name a pet, pets in my vicinity being fairly durable and me having either a kid or a younger sibling around at all times.
    Those are lovely names for fish. There’s a ping between the Gift of Gold and goldfish, isn’t there?
    I wonder if some small part of the impetus to write comes from the desire to be ‘Adamic’ and name things.

    Reply
  56. Hi Theo —
    I do not know how hard it would be for goldfish to survive in Michigan. I will admit to standing in awe of anyone or anything that survives a Michigan winter.
    But, if I recall correctly, Michigan is rather famous for its huge lake bass. Is that right? Surely if bass can flourish, goldfish would be able to.
    As for hawks.
    I am trying to remember what my aunt said about hawks in re her fishpond. She had a stone bridge to span over the little pond, which is apparently an irresistible impulse to those with little ponds.
    If I had a pond I would immediately set about bruilding a bridge over it. An arched sort of bridge.
    I think she said the fish hid under that bridge.

    Reply
  57. Hi Theo —
    I do not know how hard it would be for goldfish to survive in Michigan. I will admit to standing in awe of anyone or anything that survives a Michigan winter.
    But, if I recall correctly, Michigan is rather famous for its huge lake bass. Is that right? Surely if bass can flourish, goldfish would be able to.
    As for hawks.
    I am trying to remember what my aunt said about hawks in re her fishpond. She had a stone bridge to span over the little pond, which is apparently an irresistible impulse to those with little ponds.
    If I had a pond I would immediately set about bruilding a bridge over it. An arched sort of bridge.
    I think she said the fish hid under that bridge.

    Reply
  58. Hi Theo —
    I do not know how hard it would be for goldfish to survive in Michigan. I will admit to standing in awe of anyone or anything that survives a Michigan winter.
    But, if I recall correctly, Michigan is rather famous for its huge lake bass. Is that right? Surely if bass can flourish, goldfish would be able to.
    As for hawks.
    I am trying to remember what my aunt said about hawks in re her fishpond. She had a stone bridge to span over the little pond, which is apparently an irresistible impulse to those with little ponds.
    If I had a pond I would immediately set about bruilding a bridge over it. An arched sort of bridge.
    I think she said the fish hid under that bridge.

    Reply
  59. Hi Theo —
    I do not know how hard it would be for goldfish to survive in Michigan. I will admit to standing in awe of anyone or anything that survives a Michigan winter.
    But, if I recall correctly, Michigan is rather famous for its huge lake bass. Is that right? Surely if bass can flourish, goldfish would be able to.
    As for hawks.
    I am trying to remember what my aunt said about hawks in re her fishpond. She had a stone bridge to span over the little pond, which is apparently an irresistible impulse to those with little ponds.
    If I had a pond I would immediately set about bruilding a bridge over it. An arched sort of bridge.
    I think she said the fish hid under that bridge.

    Reply
  60. Hi Theo —
    I do not know how hard it would be for goldfish to survive in Michigan. I will admit to standing in awe of anyone or anything that survives a Michigan winter.
    But, if I recall correctly, Michigan is rather famous for its huge lake bass. Is that right? Surely if bass can flourish, goldfish would be able to.
    As for hawks.
    I am trying to remember what my aunt said about hawks in re her fishpond. She had a stone bridge to span over the little pond, which is apparently an irresistible impulse to those with little ponds.
    If I had a pond I would immediately set about bruilding a bridge over it. An arched sort of bridge.
    I think she said the fish hid under that bridge.

    Reply
  61. Hi Louisa Cornell —
    I’ll admit to liking animals in a manuscript myself.
    They give the character somebody to talk to when she’s by herself, which takes all that out of Internal Monologue.
    The first scene in Forbidden Rose is an example of that, also the scene where Jess is on the roof in My Lord and Spymaster.
    Animals reveal the characters. Anneka’s wariness of guard dogs in The Spymaster’s Lady is because she’s used to seeing them as adversaries when she goes aspying;
    Jess spoiling her pet ferret in My Lord and Spymaster shows us she doesn’t have many folks in her life to lavish spoiling upon;
    Adrian coming to terms with stubborn donkeys in The Forbidden Rose is him learning patience.
    And people just plain like pets. Everywhere. Always. It’s human nature. It’d be a pity not to take this into account in building the fictive world.

    Reply
  62. Hi Louisa Cornell —
    I’ll admit to liking animals in a manuscript myself.
    They give the character somebody to talk to when she’s by herself, which takes all that out of Internal Monologue.
    The first scene in Forbidden Rose is an example of that, also the scene where Jess is on the roof in My Lord and Spymaster.
    Animals reveal the characters. Anneka’s wariness of guard dogs in The Spymaster’s Lady is because she’s used to seeing them as adversaries when she goes aspying;
    Jess spoiling her pet ferret in My Lord and Spymaster shows us she doesn’t have many folks in her life to lavish spoiling upon;
    Adrian coming to terms with stubborn donkeys in The Forbidden Rose is him learning patience.
    And people just plain like pets. Everywhere. Always. It’s human nature. It’d be a pity not to take this into account in building the fictive world.

    Reply
  63. Hi Louisa Cornell —
    I’ll admit to liking animals in a manuscript myself.
    They give the character somebody to talk to when she’s by herself, which takes all that out of Internal Monologue.
    The first scene in Forbidden Rose is an example of that, also the scene where Jess is on the roof in My Lord and Spymaster.
    Animals reveal the characters. Anneka’s wariness of guard dogs in The Spymaster’s Lady is because she’s used to seeing them as adversaries when she goes aspying;
    Jess spoiling her pet ferret in My Lord and Spymaster shows us she doesn’t have many folks in her life to lavish spoiling upon;
    Adrian coming to terms with stubborn donkeys in The Forbidden Rose is him learning patience.
    And people just plain like pets. Everywhere. Always. It’s human nature. It’d be a pity not to take this into account in building the fictive world.

    Reply
  64. Hi Louisa Cornell —
    I’ll admit to liking animals in a manuscript myself.
    They give the character somebody to talk to when she’s by herself, which takes all that out of Internal Monologue.
    The first scene in Forbidden Rose is an example of that, also the scene where Jess is on the roof in My Lord and Spymaster.
    Animals reveal the characters. Anneka’s wariness of guard dogs in The Spymaster’s Lady is because she’s used to seeing them as adversaries when she goes aspying;
    Jess spoiling her pet ferret in My Lord and Spymaster shows us she doesn’t have many folks in her life to lavish spoiling upon;
    Adrian coming to terms with stubborn donkeys in The Forbidden Rose is him learning patience.
    And people just plain like pets. Everywhere. Always. It’s human nature. It’d be a pity not to take this into account in building the fictive world.

    Reply
  65. Hi Louisa Cornell —
    I’ll admit to liking animals in a manuscript myself.
    They give the character somebody to talk to when she’s by herself, which takes all that out of Internal Monologue.
    The first scene in Forbidden Rose is an example of that, also the scene where Jess is on the roof in My Lord and Spymaster.
    Animals reveal the characters. Anneka’s wariness of guard dogs in The Spymaster’s Lady is because she’s used to seeing them as adversaries when she goes aspying;
    Jess spoiling her pet ferret in My Lord and Spymaster shows us she doesn’t have many folks in her life to lavish spoiling upon;
    Adrian coming to terms with stubborn donkeys in The Forbidden Rose is him learning patience.
    And people just plain like pets. Everywhere. Always. It’s human nature. It’d be a pity not to take this into account in building the fictive world.

    Reply
  66. Hi Linda —
    Ducks are good. Some are just startling beautiful. I used to go to Regents Park in London and we’d count a dozen different species of ducks in the water.
    I think I’d keep chickens, myself. For the eggs, y’know. Or does that seem very cynical and self-serving? I have a friend who keeps chickens and they apparently have complex and fascinating social lives.
    No geese though. Geese are big and mean.

    Reply
  67. Hi Linda —
    Ducks are good. Some are just startling beautiful. I used to go to Regents Park in London and we’d count a dozen different species of ducks in the water.
    I think I’d keep chickens, myself. For the eggs, y’know. Or does that seem very cynical and self-serving? I have a friend who keeps chickens and they apparently have complex and fascinating social lives.
    No geese though. Geese are big and mean.

    Reply
  68. Hi Linda —
    Ducks are good. Some are just startling beautiful. I used to go to Regents Park in London and we’d count a dozen different species of ducks in the water.
    I think I’d keep chickens, myself. For the eggs, y’know. Or does that seem very cynical and self-serving? I have a friend who keeps chickens and they apparently have complex and fascinating social lives.
    No geese though. Geese are big and mean.

    Reply
  69. Hi Linda —
    Ducks are good. Some are just startling beautiful. I used to go to Regents Park in London and we’d count a dozen different species of ducks in the water.
    I think I’d keep chickens, myself. For the eggs, y’know. Or does that seem very cynical and self-serving? I have a friend who keeps chickens and they apparently have complex and fascinating social lives.
    No geese though. Geese are big and mean.

    Reply
  70. Hi Linda —
    Ducks are good. Some are just startling beautiful. I used to go to Regents Park in London and we’d count a dozen different species of ducks in the water.
    I think I’d keep chickens, myself. For the eggs, y’know. Or does that seem very cynical and self-serving? I have a friend who keeps chickens and they apparently have complex and fascinating social lives.
    No geese though. Geese are big and mean.

    Reply
  71. How goldfish became the harbinger of bad news for my family.
    My brother kept goldfish when I was growing up. The tank sat on a living room counter and I paid it no mind. Then one autumn day, a pair of goldfish that swam happily the day before ended up belly up. No one knew how it happened. A day or two later we received news that my grandfather had passed away unexpectedly (in another country), my mother believes til this day that the goldfish dying was a SIGN. We didn’t keep any more goldfish after that because who wants to know bad news in advance? I don’t relay this to be morbid but when would I ever get to talk about goldfish! 🙂
    I do adore pets in fiction, esp. dogs. I especially like it when the hero has a lot of affection for his pet. I guess in my mind it translates to a loving being.

    Reply
  72. How goldfish became the harbinger of bad news for my family.
    My brother kept goldfish when I was growing up. The tank sat on a living room counter and I paid it no mind. Then one autumn day, a pair of goldfish that swam happily the day before ended up belly up. No one knew how it happened. A day or two later we received news that my grandfather had passed away unexpectedly (in another country), my mother believes til this day that the goldfish dying was a SIGN. We didn’t keep any more goldfish after that because who wants to know bad news in advance? I don’t relay this to be morbid but when would I ever get to talk about goldfish! 🙂
    I do adore pets in fiction, esp. dogs. I especially like it when the hero has a lot of affection for his pet. I guess in my mind it translates to a loving being.

    Reply
  73. How goldfish became the harbinger of bad news for my family.
    My brother kept goldfish when I was growing up. The tank sat on a living room counter and I paid it no mind. Then one autumn day, a pair of goldfish that swam happily the day before ended up belly up. No one knew how it happened. A day or two later we received news that my grandfather had passed away unexpectedly (in another country), my mother believes til this day that the goldfish dying was a SIGN. We didn’t keep any more goldfish after that because who wants to know bad news in advance? I don’t relay this to be morbid but when would I ever get to talk about goldfish! 🙂
    I do adore pets in fiction, esp. dogs. I especially like it when the hero has a lot of affection for his pet. I guess in my mind it translates to a loving being.

    Reply
  74. How goldfish became the harbinger of bad news for my family.
    My brother kept goldfish when I was growing up. The tank sat on a living room counter and I paid it no mind. Then one autumn day, a pair of goldfish that swam happily the day before ended up belly up. No one knew how it happened. A day or two later we received news that my grandfather had passed away unexpectedly (in another country), my mother believes til this day that the goldfish dying was a SIGN. We didn’t keep any more goldfish after that because who wants to know bad news in advance? I don’t relay this to be morbid but when would I ever get to talk about goldfish! 🙂
    I do adore pets in fiction, esp. dogs. I especially like it when the hero has a lot of affection for his pet. I guess in my mind it translates to a loving being.

    Reply
  75. How goldfish became the harbinger of bad news for my family.
    My brother kept goldfish when I was growing up. The tank sat on a living room counter and I paid it no mind. Then one autumn day, a pair of goldfish that swam happily the day before ended up belly up. No one knew how it happened. A day or two later we received news that my grandfather had passed away unexpectedly (in another country), my mother believes til this day that the goldfish dying was a SIGN. We didn’t keep any more goldfish after that because who wants to know bad news in advance? I don’t relay this to be morbid but when would I ever get to talk about goldfish! 🙂
    I do adore pets in fiction, esp. dogs. I especially like it when the hero has a lot of affection for his pet. I guess in my mind it translates to a loving being.

    Reply
  76. Thank you for telling us why the topic of goldfish came up for research! You have the most delightful posts on things I’ve never known. I did know goldfish were carp and wondered why they didn’t grow up to be koi. Now I know. That, and the goldfish bowls are too small.
    Around here, fish in ponds are victims of raccoons. We’ve resisted adding fish to ours.
    Although the book I’m currently working on contains parrots. An attack parrot would be fun, but his owners would probably spend a great deal of time hunting him down after guests chased him out the door, so I refrained.
    Maybe I should write fantasy where fish fight the raccoons and parrots come when called. But I love your pet goldfish idea!

    Reply
  77. Thank you for telling us why the topic of goldfish came up for research! You have the most delightful posts on things I’ve never known. I did know goldfish were carp and wondered why they didn’t grow up to be koi. Now I know. That, and the goldfish bowls are too small.
    Around here, fish in ponds are victims of raccoons. We’ve resisted adding fish to ours.
    Although the book I’m currently working on contains parrots. An attack parrot would be fun, but his owners would probably spend a great deal of time hunting him down after guests chased him out the door, so I refrained.
    Maybe I should write fantasy where fish fight the raccoons and parrots come when called. But I love your pet goldfish idea!

    Reply
  78. Thank you for telling us why the topic of goldfish came up for research! You have the most delightful posts on things I’ve never known. I did know goldfish were carp and wondered why they didn’t grow up to be koi. Now I know. That, and the goldfish bowls are too small.
    Around here, fish in ponds are victims of raccoons. We’ve resisted adding fish to ours.
    Although the book I’m currently working on contains parrots. An attack parrot would be fun, but his owners would probably spend a great deal of time hunting him down after guests chased him out the door, so I refrained.
    Maybe I should write fantasy where fish fight the raccoons and parrots come when called. But I love your pet goldfish idea!

    Reply
  79. Thank you for telling us why the topic of goldfish came up for research! You have the most delightful posts on things I’ve never known. I did know goldfish were carp and wondered why they didn’t grow up to be koi. Now I know. That, and the goldfish bowls are too small.
    Around here, fish in ponds are victims of raccoons. We’ve resisted adding fish to ours.
    Although the book I’m currently working on contains parrots. An attack parrot would be fun, but his owners would probably spend a great deal of time hunting him down after guests chased him out the door, so I refrained.
    Maybe I should write fantasy where fish fight the raccoons and parrots come when called. But I love your pet goldfish idea!

    Reply
  80. Thank you for telling us why the topic of goldfish came up for research! You have the most delightful posts on things I’ve never known. I did know goldfish were carp and wondered why they didn’t grow up to be koi. Now I know. That, and the goldfish bowls are too small.
    Around here, fish in ponds are victims of raccoons. We’ve resisted adding fish to ours.
    Although the book I’m currently working on contains parrots. An attack parrot would be fun, but his owners would probably spend a great deal of time hunting him down after guests chased him out the door, so I refrained.
    Maybe I should write fantasy where fish fight the raccoons and parrots come when called. But I love your pet goldfish idea!

    Reply
  81. Our kids had goldfish when they were young…none of which lasted very long. When I was young (more years ago than I care to remember) I fished in overflow ponds of the North Canadian River…caught about a foot long carp once…my Mom cooked it for me*…tasted good.

    Reply
  82. Our kids had goldfish when they were young…none of which lasted very long. When I was young (more years ago than I care to remember) I fished in overflow ponds of the North Canadian River…caught about a foot long carp once…my Mom cooked it for me*…tasted good.

    Reply
  83. Our kids had goldfish when they were young…none of which lasted very long. When I was young (more years ago than I care to remember) I fished in overflow ponds of the North Canadian River…caught about a foot long carp once…my Mom cooked it for me*…tasted good.

    Reply
  84. Our kids had goldfish when they were young…none of which lasted very long. When I was young (more years ago than I care to remember) I fished in overflow ponds of the North Canadian River…caught about a foot long carp once…my Mom cooked it for me*…tasted good.

    Reply
  85. Our kids had goldfish when they were young…none of which lasted very long. When I was young (more years ago than I care to remember) I fished in overflow ponds of the North Canadian River…caught about a foot long carp once…my Mom cooked it for me*…tasted good.

    Reply
  86. Wonderful post! I had a magnificent bronze Oranda named Menemeth (after one the dragons of Pern) in college. When it came time to move back home (3K miles away), I gave him to my godmother’s daughter. And I grew up with koi that were trained to come and eat from your hand when she slapped the water. Boy do they get HUGE.
    I love pets in books, but so far I’ve shied away from giving my characters crazy, exotic, or unusual ones (though I’m always tempted to do so). And seeing as I’m a dog person myself (the bigger the better, as I’m always telling my dinky little 150 lb mastiff), large dogs tend to be what show up in my books. There was an Italian mastiff in my first two books, and there’s a “mongrel mastiff” (basically a bullmastiff) in the one I just turned in.

    Reply
  87. Wonderful post! I had a magnificent bronze Oranda named Menemeth (after one the dragons of Pern) in college. When it came time to move back home (3K miles away), I gave him to my godmother’s daughter. And I grew up with koi that were trained to come and eat from your hand when she slapped the water. Boy do they get HUGE.
    I love pets in books, but so far I’ve shied away from giving my characters crazy, exotic, or unusual ones (though I’m always tempted to do so). And seeing as I’m a dog person myself (the bigger the better, as I’m always telling my dinky little 150 lb mastiff), large dogs tend to be what show up in my books. There was an Italian mastiff in my first two books, and there’s a “mongrel mastiff” (basically a bullmastiff) in the one I just turned in.

    Reply
  88. Wonderful post! I had a magnificent bronze Oranda named Menemeth (after one the dragons of Pern) in college. When it came time to move back home (3K miles away), I gave him to my godmother’s daughter. And I grew up with koi that were trained to come and eat from your hand when she slapped the water. Boy do they get HUGE.
    I love pets in books, but so far I’ve shied away from giving my characters crazy, exotic, or unusual ones (though I’m always tempted to do so). And seeing as I’m a dog person myself (the bigger the better, as I’m always telling my dinky little 150 lb mastiff), large dogs tend to be what show up in my books. There was an Italian mastiff in my first two books, and there’s a “mongrel mastiff” (basically a bullmastiff) in the one I just turned in.

    Reply
  89. Wonderful post! I had a magnificent bronze Oranda named Menemeth (after one the dragons of Pern) in college. When it came time to move back home (3K miles away), I gave him to my godmother’s daughter. And I grew up with koi that were trained to come and eat from your hand when she slapped the water. Boy do they get HUGE.
    I love pets in books, but so far I’ve shied away from giving my characters crazy, exotic, or unusual ones (though I’m always tempted to do so). And seeing as I’m a dog person myself (the bigger the better, as I’m always telling my dinky little 150 lb mastiff), large dogs tend to be what show up in my books. There was an Italian mastiff in my first two books, and there’s a “mongrel mastiff” (basically a bullmastiff) in the one I just turned in.

    Reply
  90. Wonderful post! I had a magnificent bronze Oranda named Menemeth (after one the dragons of Pern) in college. When it came time to move back home (3K miles away), I gave him to my godmother’s daughter. And I grew up with koi that were trained to come and eat from your hand when she slapped the water. Boy do they get HUGE.
    I love pets in books, but so far I’ve shied away from giving my characters crazy, exotic, or unusual ones (though I’m always tempted to do so). And seeing as I’m a dog person myself (the bigger the better, as I’m always telling my dinky little 150 lb mastiff), large dogs tend to be what show up in my books. There was an Italian mastiff in my first two books, and there’s a “mongrel mastiff” (basically a bullmastiff) in the one I just turned in.

    Reply
  91. I love ferrets and goldfish. I grew up with a huge aquarium of goldfish in my room, and loved them very much.
    Although I’ve always wanted a ferret as a pet. I enjoyed Lisa Kleypas heroine Cat from the Hathaway series having a ferret as a pet.
    Jo- I love your fun history of goldfish! Enlightening and fun at the same time.:)

    Reply
  92. I love ferrets and goldfish. I grew up with a huge aquarium of goldfish in my room, and loved them very much.
    Although I’ve always wanted a ferret as a pet. I enjoyed Lisa Kleypas heroine Cat from the Hathaway series having a ferret as a pet.
    Jo- I love your fun history of goldfish! Enlightening and fun at the same time.:)

    Reply
  93. I love ferrets and goldfish. I grew up with a huge aquarium of goldfish in my room, and loved them very much.
    Although I’ve always wanted a ferret as a pet. I enjoyed Lisa Kleypas heroine Cat from the Hathaway series having a ferret as a pet.
    Jo- I love your fun history of goldfish! Enlightening and fun at the same time.:)

    Reply
  94. I love ferrets and goldfish. I grew up with a huge aquarium of goldfish in my room, and loved them very much.
    Although I’ve always wanted a ferret as a pet. I enjoyed Lisa Kleypas heroine Cat from the Hathaway series having a ferret as a pet.
    Jo- I love your fun history of goldfish! Enlightening and fun at the same time.:)

    Reply
  95. I love ferrets and goldfish. I grew up with a huge aquarium of goldfish in my room, and loved them very much.
    Although I’ve always wanted a ferret as a pet. I enjoyed Lisa Kleypas heroine Cat from the Hathaway series having a ferret as a pet.
    Jo- I love your fun history of goldfish! Enlightening and fun at the same time.:)

    Reply
  96. Hi Scorpio —
    Goldfish as harbingers of doom . . .
    Well, after all, why shouldn’t goldfish be part of the family legend . . .
    “Eh. Achh,” muttered the ancient family retainer as he humped my bag up the last stair to the crumbling East Tower of Stark Castle. “There’s them as would tell ye to turn and run, Miss. Aye.”
    “I do not pay heed to such superstitions.”
    But in truth, chills ran up my spine like mice doing a 2.5 kilometer run, each carrying a small cold drinking bottle in a neoprene sleeve.
    “The Stark family guldfish are restless tonight. Thrice, they circled their bowl. And they wilna eat.” He shook his head gloomily. “Na even tha mealworms.”
    He dropped my bag on the hearthrug and stared at me from under great bristling eyebrows, veritable woolly caterpillars of eyebrows, if the caterpillars were albino ones and it was going to be a bad winter. “Beware, Missy. Beware when tha Stark guldfish splash a’ midnight.”
    As he limped off, it occurred to me that the whole Starkist Curse seemed a bit fishy.

    Reply
  97. Hi Scorpio —
    Goldfish as harbingers of doom . . .
    Well, after all, why shouldn’t goldfish be part of the family legend . . .
    “Eh. Achh,” muttered the ancient family retainer as he humped my bag up the last stair to the crumbling East Tower of Stark Castle. “There’s them as would tell ye to turn and run, Miss. Aye.”
    “I do not pay heed to such superstitions.”
    But in truth, chills ran up my spine like mice doing a 2.5 kilometer run, each carrying a small cold drinking bottle in a neoprene sleeve.
    “The Stark family guldfish are restless tonight. Thrice, they circled their bowl. And they wilna eat.” He shook his head gloomily. “Na even tha mealworms.”
    He dropped my bag on the hearthrug and stared at me from under great bristling eyebrows, veritable woolly caterpillars of eyebrows, if the caterpillars were albino ones and it was going to be a bad winter. “Beware, Missy. Beware when tha Stark guldfish splash a’ midnight.”
    As he limped off, it occurred to me that the whole Starkist Curse seemed a bit fishy.

    Reply
  98. Hi Scorpio —
    Goldfish as harbingers of doom . . .
    Well, after all, why shouldn’t goldfish be part of the family legend . . .
    “Eh. Achh,” muttered the ancient family retainer as he humped my bag up the last stair to the crumbling East Tower of Stark Castle. “There’s them as would tell ye to turn and run, Miss. Aye.”
    “I do not pay heed to such superstitions.”
    But in truth, chills ran up my spine like mice doing a 2.5 kilometer run, each carrying a small cold drinking bottle in a neoprene sleeve.
    “The Stark family guldfish are restless tonight. Thrice, they circled their bowl. And they wilna eat.” He shook his head gloomily. “Na even tha mealworms.”
    He dropped my bag on the hearthrug and stared at me from under great bristling eyebrows, veritable woolly caterpillars of eyebrows, if the caterpillars were albino ones and it was going to be a bad winter. “Beware, Missy. Beware when tha Stark guldfish splash a’ midnight.”
    As he limped off, it occurred to me that the whole Starkist Curse seemed a bit fishy.

    Reply
  99. Hi Scorpio —
    Goldfish as harbingers of doom . . .
    Well, after all, why shouldn’t goldfish be part of the family legend . . .
    “Eh. Achh,” muttered the ancient family retainer as he humped my bag up the last stair to the crumbling East Tower of Stark Castle. “There’s them as would tell ye to turn and run, Miss. Aye.”
    “I do not pay heed to such superstitions.”
    But in truth, chills ran up my spine like mice doing a 2.5 kilometer run, each carrying a small cold drinking bottle in a neoprene sleeve.
    “The Stark family guldfish are restless tonight. Thrice, they circled their bowl. And they wilna eat.” He shook his head gloomily. “Na even tha mealworms.”
    He dropped my bag on the hearthrug and stared at me from under great bristling eyebrows, veritable woolly caterpillars of eyebrows, if the caterpillars were albino ones and it was going to be a bad winter. “Beware, Missy. Beware when tha Stark guldfish splash a’ midnight.”
    As he limped off, it occurred to me that the whole Starkist Curse seemed a bit fishy.

    Reply
  100. Hi Scorpio —
    Goldfish as harbingers of doom . . .
    Well, after all, why shouldn’t goldfish be part of the family legend . . .
    “Eh. Achh,” muttered the ancient family retainer as he humped my bag up the last stair to the crumbling East Tower of Stark Castle. “There’s them as would tell ye to turn and run, Miss. Aye.”
    “I do not pay heed to such superstitions.”
    But in truth, chills ran up my spine like mice doing a 2.5 kilometer run, each carrying a small cold drinking bottle in a neoprene sleeve.
    “The Stark family guldfish are restless tonight. Thrice, they circled their bowl. And they wilna eat.” He shook his head gloomily. “Na even tha mealworms.”
    He dropped my bag on the hearthrug and stared at me from under great bristling eyebrows, veritable woolly caterpillars of eyebrows, if the caterpillars were albino ones and it was going to be a bad winter. “Beware, Missy. Beware when tha Stark guldfish splash a’ midnight.”
    As he limped off, it occurred to me that the whole Starkist Curse seemed a bit fishy.

    Reply
  101. Hi Pat —
    Parrots. How utterly cool. When I lived in West Africa they had the most beautiful parrots.
    And little tiny kingfisher birds. You’d be swimming in the pool and lie back for a bit to look out over the landscape and kingfishers would start diving into the other end.
    I never found out what they thought was in there.
    As to the raccoons . . .
    it had not previously occurred to me what danger-filled and precarious lives fish live. Raccoons AND herons. Probably ducks too.
    On the other hand, goldfish never have to calculate the Alternate Minimum Tax so it probably all works out on some cosmic scale someplace.

    Reply
  102. Hi Pat —
    Parrots. How utterly cool. When I lived in West Africa they had the most beautiful parrots.
    And little tiny kingfisher birds. You’d be swimming in the pool and lie back for a bit to look out over the landscape and kingfishers would start diving into the other end.
    I never found out what they thought was in there.
    As to the raccoons . . .
    it had not previously occurred to me what danger-filled and precarious lives fish live. Raccoons AND herons. Probably ducks too.
    On the other hand, goldfish never have to calculate the Alternate Minimum Tax so it probably all works out on some cosmic scale someplace.

    Reply
  103. Hi Pat —
    Parrots. How utterly cool. When I lived in West Africa they had the most beautiful parrots.
    And little tiny kingfisher birds. You’d be swimming in the pool and lie back for a bit to look out over the landscape and kingfishers would start diving into the other end.
    I never found out what they thought was in there.
    As to the raccoons . . .
    it had not previously occurred to me what danger-filled and precarious lives fish live. Raccoons AND herons. Probably ducks too.
    On the other hand, goldfish never have to calculate the Alternate Minimum Tax so it probably all works out on some cosmic scale someplace.

    Reply
  104. Hi Pat —
    Parrots. How utterly cool. When I lived in West Africa they had the most beautiful parrots.
    And little tiny kingfisher birds. You’d be swimming in the pool and lie back for a bit to look out over the landscape and kingfishers would start diving into the other end.
    I never found out what they thought was in there.
    As to the raccoons . . .
    it had not previously occurred to me what danger-filled and precarious lives fish live. Raccoons AND herons. Probably ducks too.
    On the other hand, goldfish never have to calculate the Alternate Minimum Tax so it probably all works out on some cosmic scale someplace.

    Reply
  105. Hi Pat —
    Parrots. How utterly cool. When I lived in West Africa they had the most beautiful parrots.
    And little tiny kingfisher birds. You’d be swimming in the pool and lie back for a bit to look out over the landscape and kingfishers would start diving into the other end.
    I never found out what they thought was in there.
    As to the raccoons . . .
    it had not previously occurred to me what danger-filled and precarious lives fish live. Raccoons AND herons. Probably ducks too.
    On the other hand, goldfish never have to calculate the Alternate Minimum Tax so it probably all works out on some cosmic scale someplace.

    Reply
  106. Interesting post!
    Parrots would be an interesting pet in a romance book. They could definitely be a comic relief, that’s for sure! 🙂 Though a monkey would also be pretty cool LOL 😉

    Reply
  107. Interesting post!
    Parrots would be an interesting pet in a romance book. They could definitely be a comic relief, that’s for sure! 🙂 Though a monkey would also be pretty cool LOL 😉

    Reply
  108. Interesting post!
    Parrots would be an interesting pet in a romance book. They could definitely be a comic relief, that’s for sure! 🙂 Though a monkey would also be pretty cool LOL 😉

    Reply
  109. Interesting post!
    Parrots would be an interesting pet in a romance book. They could definitely be a comic relief, that’s for sure! 🙂 Though a monkey would also be pretty cool LOL 😉

    Reply
  110. Interesting post!
    Parrots would be an interesting pet in a romance book. They could definitely be a comic relief, that’s for sure! 🙂 Though a monkey would also be pretty cool LOL 😉

    Reply
  111. Hi Louis —
    After all, carp were cultivated for millennia for being tasty before they got spiffied up and valued for their beauty. I am sure there is a moral in that somewhere.
    Carp were esteemed in the Regency period as fine eating.
    The Cook’s dictionary, http://tinyurl.com/2al7qk8
    lists dozens of ways to prepare them. Carp with Caper Sauce, Carp au Committaire, Carp a la Chambord, and Carp a la Daube which involves cooking it with a pint of champagne . . .
    adding a pint of champagne is always a good idea when in doubt.

    Reply
  112. Hi Louis —
    After all, carp were cultivated for millennia for being tasty before they got spiffied up and valued for their beauty. I am sure there is a moral in that somewhere.
    Carp were esteemed in the Regency period as fine eating.
    The Cook’s dictionary, http://tinyurl.com/2al7qk8
    lists dozens of ways to prepare them. Carp with Caper Sauce, Carp au Committaire, Carp a la Chambord, and Carp a la Daube which involves cooking it with a pint of champagne . . .
    adding a pint of champagne is always a good idea when in doubt.

    Reply
  113. Hi Louis —
    After all, carp were cultivated for millennia for being tasty before they got spiffied up and valued for their beauty. I am sure there is a moral in that somewhere.
    Carp were esteemed in the Regency period as fine eating.
    The Cook’s dictionary, http://tinyurl.com/2al7qk8
    lists dozens of ways to prepare them. Carp with Caper Sauce, Carp au Committaire, Carp a la Chambord, and Carp a la Daube which involves cooking it with a pint of champagne . . .
    adding a pint of champagne is always a good idea when in doubt.

    Reply
  114. Hi Louis —
    After all, carp were cultivated for millennia for being tasty before they got spiffied up and valued for their beauty. I am sure there is a moral in that somewhere.
    Carp were esteemed in the Regency period as fine eating.
    The Cook’s dictionary, http://tinyurl.com/2al7qk8
    lists dozens of ways to prepare them. Carp with Caper Sauce, Carp au Committaire, Carp a la Chambord, and Carp a la Daube which involves cooking it with a pint of champagne . . .
    adding a pint of champagne is always a good idea when in doubt.

    Reply
  115. Hi Louis —
    After all, carp were cultivated for millennia for being tasty before they got spiffied up and valued for their beauty. I am sure there is a moral in that somewhere.
    Carp were esteemed in the Regency period as fine eating.
    The Cook’s dictionary, http://tinyurl.com/2al7qk8
    lists dozens of ways to prepare them. Carp with Caper Sauce, Carp au Committaire, Carp a la Chambord, and Carp a la Daube which involves cooking it with a pint of champagne . . .
    adding a pint of champagne is always a good idea when in doubt.

    Reply
  116. Finally, an answer to the great mystery of the absence of goldfish in Shakespeare’s work! I have been -pining- to know, lo! this age.
    Critters of all sorts are great fun. I have a photo of the Mayhem consultant being chased by a black swan. He being a city boy, he hadn’t actually grasped the nuances of the fact that wild animals are–well–WILD!
    I’ll have to tell him of the restless Starkian goldfish. *g*

    Reply
  117. Finally, an answer to the great mystery of the absence of goldfish in Shakespeare’s work! I have been -pining- to know, lo! this age.
    Critters of all sorts are great fun. I have a photo of the Mayhem consultant being chased by a black swan. He being a city boy, he hadn’t actually grasped the nuances of the fact that wild animals are–well–WILD!
    I’ll have to tell him of the restless Starkian goldfish. *g*

    Reply
  118. Finally, an answer to the great mystery of the absence of goldfish in Shakespeare’s work! I have been -pining- to know, lo! this age.
    Critters of all sorts are great fun. I have a photo of the Mayhem consultant being chased by a black swan. He being a city boy, he hadn’t actually grasped the nuances of the fact that wild animals are–well–WILD!
    I’ll have to tell him of the restless Starkian goldfish. *g*

    Reply
  119. Finally, an answer to the great mystery of the absence of goldfish in Shakespeare’s work! I have been -pining- to know, lo! this age.
    Critters of all sorts are great fun. I have a photo of the Mayhem consultant being chased by a black swan. He being a city boy, he hadn’t actually grasped the nuances of the fact that wild animals are–well–WILD!
    I’ll have to tell him of the restless Starkian goldfish. *g*

    Reply
  120. Finally, an answer to the great mystery of the absence of goldfish in Shakespeare’s work! I have been -pining- to know, lo! this age.
    Critters of all sorts are great fun. I have a photo of the Mayhem consultant being chased by a black swan. He being a city boy, he hadn’t actually grasped the nuances of the fact that wild animals are–well–WILD!
    I’ll have to tell him of the restless Starkian goldfish. *g*

    Reply
  121. Hi Isobel —
    I am delighted to see dogs in books. It is so historically authentic.
    Dogs are everywhere in Georgian- and Regency- period paintings. See the people sitting in the park, taking an ice at Gunter’s, stopping to watch a puppet show, meeting the stage coach, and you will see their dogs.
    For writers and their dogs you can look at
    http://tiny.cc/j0yjg
    There is just something for everybody on the web.
    A large mixed-breed dog, Tiny, makes a brief appearance in The Spymaster’s Lady. I enjoyed writing him.
    And I need a dog in the current manuscript as well. I haven’t settled on what he’ll be. Something large. Mastiffs, like yours, are 100% historically accurate. Or I could do another large mix.
    I think he’s going to be named ‘Fluffy’.

    Reply
  122. Hi Isobel —
    I am delighted to see dogs in books. It is so historically authentic.
    Dogs are everywhere in Georgian- and Regency- period paintings. See the people sitting in the park, taking an ice at Gunter’s, stopping to watch a puppet show, meeting the stage coach, and you will see their dogs.
    For writers and their dogs you can look at
    http://tiny.cc/j0yjg
    There is just something for everybody on the web.
    A large mixed-breed dog, Tiny, makes a brief appearance in The Spymaster’s Lady. I enjoyed writing him.
    And I need a dog in the current manuscript as well. I haven’t settled on what he’ll be. Something large. Mastiffs, like yours, are 100% historically accurate. Or I could do another large mix.
    I think he’s going to be named ‘Fluffy’.

    Reply
  123. Hi Isobel —
    I am delighted to see dogs in books. It is so historically authentic.
    Dogs are everywhere in Georgian- and Regency- period paintings. See the people sitting in the park, taking an ice at Gunter’s, stopping to watch a puppet show, meeting the stage coach, and you will see their dogs.
    For writers and their dogs you can look at
    http://tiny.cc/j0yjg
    There is just something for everybody on the web.
    A large mixed-breed dog, Tiny, makes a brief appearance in The Spymaster’s Lady. I enjoyed writing him.
    And I need a dog in the current manuscript as well. I haven’t settled on what he’ll be. Something large. Mastiffs, like yours, are 100% historically accurate. Or I could do another large mix.
    I think he’s going to be named ‘Fluffy’.

    Reply
  124. Hi Isobel —
    I am delighted to see dogs in books. It is so historically authentic.
    Dogs are everywhere in Georgian- and Regency- period paintings. See the people sitting in the park, taking an ice at Gunter’s, stopping to watch a puppet show, meeting the stage coach, and you will see their dogs.
    For writers and their dogs you can look at
    http://tiny.cc/j0yjg
    There is just something for everybody on the web.
    A large mixed-breed dog, Tiny, makes a brief appearance in The Spymaster’s Lady. I enjoyed writing him.
    And I need a dog in the current manuscript as well. I haven’t settled on what he’ll be. Something large. Mastiffs, like yours, are 100% historically accurate. Or I could do another large mix.
    I think he’s going to be named ‘Fluffy’.

    Reply
  125. Hi Isobel —
    I am delighted to see dogs in books. It is so historically authentic.
    Dogs are everywhere in Georgian- and Regency- period paintings. See the people sitting in the park, taking an ice at Gunter’s, stopping to watch a puppet show, meeting the stage coach, and you will see their dogs.
    For writers and their dogs you can look at
    http://tiny.cc/j0yjg
    There is just something for everybody on the web.
    A large mixed-breed dog, Tiny, makes a brief appearance in The Spymaster’s Lady. I enjoyed writing him.
    And I need a dog in the current manuscript as well. I haven’t settled on what he’ll be. Something large. Mastiffs, like yours, are 100% historically accurate. Or I could do another large mix.
    I think he’s going to be named ‘Fluffy’.

    Reply
  126. Hi Kierstin Fure —
    A literary ferret I love is Freddie in Judith Ivory’s The Proposition. Lovely book. Beautiful characterization of the animal.
    And there’s a pair of ferrets in the movie The Beastmaster.
    I just loved the little critters in that movie. They stole the show. Petty theft, actually, but I loved the ferrets.
    The movie is based, reeeeeaallly loosely, on Andre Norton’s book of the same name. I read that so long ago — but I’m pretty sure Norton had meercats rather than ferrets.
    The stories, of course, are totally unrelated.
    I hope Ms Norton got lots of money when they made the movie.

    Reply
  127. Hi Kierstin Fure —
    A literary ferret I love is Freddie in Judith Ivory’s The Proposition. Lovely book. Beautiful characterization of the animal.
    And there’s a pair of ferrets in the movie The Beastmaster.
    I just loved the little critters in that movie. They stole the show. Petty theft, actually, but I loved the ferrets.
    The movie is based, reeeeeaallly loosely, on Andre Norton’s book of the same name. I read that so long ago — but I’m pretty sure Norton had meercats rather than ferrets.
    The stories, of course, are totally unrelated.
    I hope Ms Norton got lots of money when they made the movie.

    Reply
  128. Hi Kierstin Fure —
    A literary ferret I love is Freddie in Judith Ivory’s The Proposition. Lovely book. Beautiful characterization of the animal.
    And there’s a pair of ferrets in the movie The Beastmaster.
    I just loved the little critters in that movie. They stole the show. Petty theft, actually, but I loved the ferrets.
    The movie is based, reeeeeaallly loosely, on Andre Norton’s book of the same name. I read that so long ago — but I’m pretty sure Norton had meercats rather than ferrets.
    The stories, of course, are totally unrelated.
    I hope Ms Norton got lots of money when they made the movie.

    Reply
  129. Hi Kierstin Fure —
    A literary ferret I love is Freddie in Judith Ivory’s The Proposition. Lovely book. Beautiful characterization of the animal.
    And there’s a pair of ferrets in the movie The Beastmaster.
    I just loved the little critters in that movie. They stole the show. Petty theft, actually, but I loved the ferrets.
    The movie is based, reeeeeaallly loosely, on Andre Norton’s book of the same name. I read that so long ago — but I’m pretty sure Norton had meercats rather than ferrets.
    The stories, of course, are totally unrelated.
    I hope Ms Norton got lots of money when they made the movie.

    Reply
  130. Hi Kierstin Fure —
    A literary ferret I love is Freddie in Judith Ivory’s The Proposition. Lovely book. Beautiful characterization of the animal.
    And there’s a pair of ferrets in the movie The Beastmaster.
    I just loved the little critters in that movie. They stole the show. Petty theft, actually, but I loved the ferrets.
    The movie is based, reeeeeaallly loosely, on Andre Norton’s book of the same name. I read that so long ago — but I’m pretty sure Norton had meercats rather than ferrets.
    The stories, of course, are totally unrelated.
    I hope Ms Norton got lots of money when they made the movie.

    Reply
  131. Hi Chelsea —
    The funny things, the book I mentioned above —The Grand Sophie has both a monkey and a parrot. The Kleypas book Tempt Me at Twilight — Am I right about this? — does too.
    Oh. OH. I just remembered this. The Forbidden Rose has a monkey in it.
    “You have found me. You have been nimble and clever as . . . well . . . as a monkey. Wait, I will find a nut for you. Let me look. Shhh.”
    There were no nuts or raisins in her bedchamber, but there were anise comfits in a Limoges box on her bureau. Nico loved them.
    “These cannot possibly be good for you. I have told you time and time again.”
    But he played upon her sympathies skillfully, and in the end she gave him three. He popped two in his mouth, one in each cheek, and became silent as an apple. He held the third tightly in the hand that was not clinging to her.
    “You were afraid out there in the dark, alone,
    .pauvre petit. But now you are safe. Tomorrow you will go back in your home.”
    He wore a red jacket, bright as cherries, with tiny gold epaulettes and the red, blue, and white cockade of the Revolution upon his chest. The jacket draped long about him, with a slit in back so his tail could move freely.
    “You are looking very fine, are you not? And patriotic. I do not know what it says of our life in Paris today that the sight of a monkey wearing the symbol of the Revolution seems perfectly rational.”

    Reply
  132. Hi Chelsea —
    The funny things, the book I mentioned above —The Grand Sophie has both a monkey and a parrot. The Kleypas book Tempt Me at Twilight — Am I right about this? — does too.
    Oh. OH. I just remembered this. The Forbidden Rose has a monkey in it.
    “You have found me. You have been nimble and clever as . . . well . . . as a monkey. Wait, I will find a nut for you. Let me look. Shhh.”
    There were no nuts or raisins in her bedchamber, but there were anise comfits in a Limoges box on her bureau. Nico loved them.
    “These cannot possibly be good for you. I have told you time and time again.”
    But he played upon her sympathies skillfully, and in the end she gave him three. He popped two in his mouth, one in each cheek, and became silent as an apple. He held the third tightly in the hand that was not clinging to her.
    “You were afraid out there in the dark, alone,
    .pauvre petit. But now you are safe. Tomorrow you will go back in your home.”
    He wore a red jacket, bright as cherries, with tiny gold epaulettes and the red, blue, and white cockade of the Revolution upon his chest. The jacket draped long about him, with a slit in back so his tail could move freely.
    “You are looking very fine, are you not? And patriotic. I do not know what it says of our life in Paris today that the sight of a monkey wearing the symbol of the Revolution seems perfectly rational.”

    Reply
  133. Hi Chelsea —
    The funny things, the book I mentioned above —The Grand Sophie has both a monkey and a parrot. The Kleypas book Tempt Me at Twilight — Am I right about this? — does too.
    Oh. OH. I just remembered this. The Forbidden Rose has a monkey in it.
    “You have found me. You have been nimble and clever as . . . well . . . as a monkey. Wait, I will find a nut for you. Let me look. Shhh.”
    There were no nuts or raisins in her bedchamber, but there were anise comfits in a Limoges box on her bureau. Nico loved them.
    “These cannot possibly be good for you. I have told you time and time again.”
    But he played upon her sympathies skillfully, and in the end she gave him three. He popped two in his mouth, one in each cheek, and became silent as an apple. He held the third tightly in the hand that was not clinging to her.
    “You were afraid out there in the dark, alone,
    .pauvre petit. But now you are safe. Tomorrow you will go back in your home.”
    He wore a red jacket, bright as cherries, with tiny gold epaulettes and the red, blue, and white cockade of the Revolution upon his chest. The jacket draped long about him, with a slit in back so his tail could move freely.
    “You are looking very fine, are you not? And patriotic. I do not know what it says of our life in Paris today that the sight of a monkey wearing the symbol of the Revolution seems perfectly rational.”

    Reply
  134. Hi Chelsea —
    The funny things, the book I mentioned above —The Grand Sophie has both a monkey and a parrot. The Kleypas book Tempt Me at Twilight — Am I right about this? — does too.
    Oh. OH. I just remembered this. The Forbidden Rose has a monkey in it.
    “You have found me. You have been nimble and clever as . . . well . . . as a monkey. Wait, I will find a nut for you. Let me look. Shhh.”
    There were no nuts or raisins in her bedchamber, but there were anise comfits in a Limoges box on her bureau. Nico loved them.
    “These cannot possibly be good for you. I have told you time and time again.”
    But he played upon her sympathies skillfully, and in the end she gave him three. He popped two in his mouth, one in each cheek, and became silent as an apple. He held the third tightly in the hand that was not clinging to her.
    “You were afraid out there in the dark, alone,
    .pauvre petit. But now you are safe. Tomorrow you will go back in your home.”
    He wore a red jacket, bright as cherries, with tiny gold epaulettes and the red, blue, and white cockade of the Revolution upon his chest. The jacket draped long about him, with a slit in back so his tail could move freely.
    “You are looking very fine, are you not? And patriotic. I do not know what it says of our life in Paris today that the sight of a monkey wearing the symbol of the Revolution seems perfectly rational.”

    Reply
  135. Hi Chelsea —
    The funny things, the book I mentioned above —The Grand Sophie has both a monkey and a parrot. The Kleypas book Tempt Me at Twilight — Am I right about this? — does too.
    Oh. OH. I just remembered this. The Forbidden Rose has a monkey in it.
    “You have found me. You have been nimble and clever as . . . well . . . as a monkey. Wait, I will find a nut for you. Let me look. Shhh.”
    There were no nuts or raisins in her bedchamber, but there were anise comfits in a Limoges box on her bureau. Nico loved them.
    “These cannot possibly be good for you. I have told you time and time again.”
    But he played upon her sympathies skillfully, and in the end she gave him three. He popped two in his mouth, one in each cheek, and became silent as an apple. He held the third tightly in the hand that was not clinging to her.
    “You were afraid out there in the dark, alone,
    .pauvre petit. But now you are safe. Tomorrow you will go back in your home.”
    He wore a red jacket, bright as cherries, with tiny gold epaulettes and the red, blue, and white cockade of the Revolution upon his chest. The jacket draped long about him, with a slit in back so his tail could move freely.
    “You are looking very fine, are you not? And patriotic. I do not know what it says of our life in Paris today that the sight of a monkey wearing the symbol of the Revolution seems perfectly rational.”

    Reply
  136. Swans are big, mean animals. I wouldn’t want to mess with them.
    Do the swans on the Thames all belong to the Queen? Do they go swanning about, proud of the royal patronage?
    Geese I would also avoid. They’re famous guard birds. You will be unsurprised that geese have guarded the Ballantine Scotch warehouse since the late 50s.
    http://tiny.cc/qq4cg

    Reply
  137. Swans are big, mean animals. I wouldn’t want to mess with them.
    Do the swans on the Thames all belong to the Queen? Do they go swanning about, proud of the royal patronage?
    Geese I would also avoid. They’re famous guard birds. You will be unsurprised that geese have guarded the Ballantine Scotch warehouse since the late 50s.
    http://tiny.cc/qq4cg

    Reply
  138. Swans are big, mean animals. I wouldn’t want to mess with them.
    Do the swans on the Thames all belong to the Queen? Do they go swanning about, proud of the royal patronage?
    Geese I would also avoid. They’re famous guard birds. You will be unsurprised that geese have guarded the Ballantine Scotch warehouse since the late 50s.
    http://tiny.cc/qq4cg

    Reply
  139. Swans are big, mean animals. I wouldn’t want to mess with them.
    Do the swans on the Thames all belong to the Queen? Do they go swanning about, proud of the royal patronage?
    Geese I would also avoid. They’re famous guard birds. You will be unsurprised that geese have guarded the Ballantine Scotch warehouse since the late 50s.
    http://tiny.cc/qq4cg

    Reply
  140. Swans are big, mean animals. I wouldn’t want to mess with them.
    Do the swans on the Thames all belong to the Queen? Do they go swanning about, proud of the royal patronage?
    Geese I would also avoid. They’re famous guard birds. You will be unsurprised that geese have guarded the Ballantine Scotch warehouse since the late 50s.
    http://tiny.cc/qq4cg

    Reply
  141. I really enjoy reading your posts Jo – all that winding and weaving through all these paths of information I’d never thought to follow; had no idea that goldfish were carp!
    For what it’s worth, my father-in-law has a koi pond in his backyard; there is a heater, and with that they manage to survive our Canadian winters…
    “I wonder if some small part of the impetus to write comes from the desire to be ‘Adamic’ and name things.”
    Now that’s interesting – I have to say I get a lot of joy out of discovering the names of all my creatures and characters and finding out which towns and villages they’ll travel to, and which streets they’ll live on…
    Does it make a difference that JK Rowling already used the name Fluffy for a Cerberus-like dog in the first Harry Potter book?
    Love your mini scene of goldfish as portents!

    Reply
  142. I really enjoy reading your posts Jo – all that winding and weaving through all these paths of information I’d never thought to follow; had no idea that goldfish were carp!
    For what it’s worth, my father-in-law has a koi pond in his backyard; there is a heater, and with that they manage to survive our Canadian winters…
    “I wonder if some small part of the impetus to write comes from the desire to be ‘Adamic’ and name things.”
    Now that’s interesting – I have to say I get a lot of joy out of discovering the names of all my creatures and characters and finding out which towns and villages they’ll travel to, and which streets they’ll live on…
    Does it make a difference that JK Rowling already used the name Fluffy for a Cerberus-like dog in the first Harry Potter book?
    Love your mini scene of goldfish as portents!

    Reply
  143. I really enjoy reading your posts Jo – all that winding and weaving through all these paths of information I’d never thought to follow; had no idea that goldfish were carp!
    For what it’s worth, my father-in-law has a koi pond in his backyard; there is a heater, and with that they manage to survive our Canadian winters…
    “I wonder if some small part of the impetus to write comes from the desire to be ‘Adamic’ and name things.”
    Now that’s interesting – I have to say I get a lot of joy out of discovering the names of all my creatures and characters and finding out which towns and villages they’ll travel to, and which streets they’ll live on…
    Does it make a difference that JK Rowling already used the name Fluffy for a Cerberus-like dog in the first Harry Potter book?
    Love your mini scene of goldfish as portents!

    Reply
  144. I really enjoy reading your posts Jo – all that winding and weaving through all these paths of information I’d never thought to follow; had no idea that goldfish were carp!
    For what it’s worth, my father-in-law has a koi pond in his backyard; there is a heater, and with that they manage to survive our Canadian winters…
    “I wonder if some small part of the impetus to write comes from the desire to be ‘Adamic’ and name things.”
    Now that’s interesting – I have to say I get a lot of joy out of discovering the names of all my creatures and characters and finding out which towns and villages they’ll travel to, and which streets they’ll live on…
    Does it make a difference that JK Rowling already used the name Fluffy for a Cerberus-like dog in the first Harry Potter book?
    Love your mini scene of goldfish as portents!

    Reply
  145. I really enjoy reading your posts Jo – all that winding and weaving through all these paths of information I’d never thought to follow; had no idea that goldfish were carp!
    For what it’s worth, my father-in-law has a koi pond in his backyard; there is a heater, and with that they manage to survive our Canadian winters…
    “I wonder if some small part of the impetus to write comes from the desire to be ‘Adamic’ and name things.”
    Now that’s interesting – I have to say I get a lot of joy out of discovering the names of all my creatures and characters and finding out which towns and villages they’ll travel to, and which streets they’ll live on…
    Does it make a difference that JK Rowling already used the name Fluffy for a Cerberus-like dog in the first Harry Potter book?
    Love your mini scene of goldfish as portents!

    Reply
  146. Hi Deniz —
    (jo waves)
    I am really annoyed at JK who has taken three tiny things I wanted to use and put them into one of her books and now I can’t use them.
    Rats.
    Ok. Not Fluffy. Maybe in December I’ll hold a contest over on my blog and let folks help me out in the naming department.
    Did you notice in that portrait above the Courtesan Kitty Fisher has a kitty fishing? So much historical pun, eh what?

    Reply
  147. Hi Deniz —
    (jo waves)
    I am really annoyed at JK who has taken three tiny things I wanted to use and put them into one of her books and now I can’t use them.
    Rats.
    Ok. Not Fluffy. Maybe in December I’ll hold a contest over on my blog and let folks help me out in the naming department.
    Did you notice in that portrait above the Courtesan Kitty Fisher has a kitty fishing? So much historical pun, eh what?

    Reply
  148. Hi Deniz —
    (jo waves)
    I am really annoyed at JK who has taken three tiny things I wanted to use and put them into one of her books and now I can’t use them.
    Rats.
    Ok. Not Fluffy. Maybe in December I’ll hold a contest over on my blog and let folks help me out in the naming department.
    Did you notice in that portrait above the Courtesan Kitty Fisher has a kitty fishing? So much historical pun, eh what?

    Reply
  149. Hi Deniz —
    (jo waves)
    I am really annoyed at JK who has taken three tiny things I wanted to use and put them into one of her books and now I can’t use them.
    Rats.
    Ok. Not Fluffy. Maybe in December I’ll hold a contest over on my blog and let folks help me out in the naming department.
    Did you notice in that portrait above the Courtesan Kitty Fisher has a kitty fishing? So much historical pun, eh what?

    Reply
  150. Hi Deniz —
    (jo waves)
    I am really annoyed at JK who has taken three tiny things I wanted to use and put them into one of her books and now I can’t use them.
    Rats.
    Ok. Not Fluffy. Maybe in December I’ll hold a contest over on my blog and let folks help me out in the naming department.
    Did you notice in that portrait above the Courtesan Kitty Fisher has a kitty fishing? So much historical pun, eh what?

    Reply
  151. What a lovely post Joanna- you pulled me right into it and normally, I am not the least bit interested in any fish, unless its for my dinner (I am not being cheeky – honest!)
    I’ve always wanted to keep a Peacock as a pet, never mind their horrid screech, but just for how lovely their tail feathers are and how iridescent the male animals look. So, that’s what I would bestow upon my heroine, if I ever wrote a book 🙂

    Reply
  152. What a lovely post Joanna- you pulled me right into it and normally, I am not the least bit interested in any fish, unless its for my dinner (I am not being cheeky – honest!)
    I’ve always wanted to keep a Peacock as a pet, never mind their horrid screech, but just for how lovely their tail feathers are and how iridescent the male animals look. So, that’s what I would bestow upon my heroine, if I ever wrote a book 🙂

    Reply
  153. What a lovely post Joanna- you pulled me right into it and normally, I am not the least bit interested in any fish, unless its for my dinner (I am not being cheeky – honest!)
    I’ve always wanted to keep a Peacock as a pet, never mind their horrid screech, but just for how lovely their tail feathers are and how iridescent the male animals look. So, that’s what I would bestow upon my heroine, if I ever wrote a book 🙂

    Reply
  154. What a lovely post Joanna- you pulled me right into it and normally, I am not the least bit interested in any fish, unless its for my dinner (I am not being cheeky – honest!)
    I’ve always wanted to keep a Peacock as a pet, never mind their horrid screech, but just for how lovely their tail feathers are and how iridescent the male animals look. So, that’s what I would bestow upon my heroine, if I ever wrote a book 🙂

    Reply
  155. What a lovely post Joanna- you pulled me right into it and normally, I am not the least bit interested in any fish, unless its for my dinner (I am not being cheeky – honest!)
    I’ve always wanted to keep a Peacock as a pet, never mind their horrid screech, but just for how lovely their tail feathers are and how iridescent the male animals look. So, that’s what I would bestow upon my heroine, if I ever wrote a book 🙂

    Reply
  156. Kitty fisher, with her kitty fishing is a great image. Do you own The Face in the Corner? It’s a wonderful little book of portraits put out by The National Portrait Gallery in London that focuses on the pets in period portraits.
    A great “fluffy” breed that is period is the Newfoundland. I grew up with them, so I’m happy to provide insight and back story. My godmother’s Newf Gladstone was a a HOOT!

    Reply
  157. Kitty fisher, with her kitty fishing is a great image. Do you own The Face in the Corner? It’s a wonderful little book of portraits put out by The National Portrait Gallery in London that focuses on the pets in period portraits.
    A great “fluffy” breed that is period is the Newfoundland. I grew up with them, so I’m happy to provide insight and back story. My godmother’s Newf Gladstone was a a HOOT!

    Reply
  158. Kitty fisher, with her kitty fishing is a great image. Do you own The Face in the Corner? It’s a wonderful little book of portraits put out by The National Portrait Gallery in London that focuses on the pets in period portraits.
    A great “fluffy” breed that is period is the Newfoundland. I grew up with them, so I’m happy to provide insight and back story. My godmother’s Newf Gladstone was a a HOOT!

    Reply
  159. Kitty fisher, with her kitty fishing is a great image. Do you own The Face in the Corner? It’s a wonderful little book of portraits put out by The National Portrait Gallery in London that focuses on the pets in period portraits.
    A great “fluffy” breed that is period is the Newfoundland. I grew up with them, so I’m happy to provide insight and back story. My godmother’s Newf Gladstone was a a HOOT!

    Reply
  160. Kitty fisher, with her kitty fishing is a great image. Do you own The Face in the Corner? It’s a wonderful little book of portraits put out by The National Portrait Gallery in London that focuses on the pets in period portraits.
    A great “fluffy” breed that is period is the Newfoundland. I grew up with them, so I’m happy to provide insight and back story. My godmother’s Newf Gladstone was a a HOOT!

    Reply
  161. Isobel, I have The Face in the Corner as I became very interested in animals in portraits when I was researching a painting we have at Ashdown House. It’s a fascinating book, isn’t it.
    And Joanna, a super blog piece. Thank you!

    Reply
  162. Isobel, I have The Face in the Corner as I became very interested in animals in portraits when I was researching a painting we have at Ashdown House. It’s a fascinating book, isn’t it.
    And Joanna, a super blog piece. Thank you!

    Reply
  163. Isobel, I have The Face in the Corner as I became very interested in animals in portraits when I was researching a painting we have at Ashdown House. It’s a fascinating book, isn’t it.
    And Joanna, a super blog piece. Thank you!

    Reply
  164. Isobel, I have The Face in the Corner as I became very interested in animals in portraits when I was researching a painting we have at Ashdown House. It’s a fascinating book, isn’t it.
    And Joanna, a super blog piece. Thank you!

    Reply
  165. Isobel, I have The Face in the Corner as I became very interested in animals in portraits when I was researching a painting we have at Ashdown House. It’s a fascinating book, isn’t it.
    And Joanna, a super blog piece. Thank you!

    Reply
  166. I love to read your blog posts- the pictures are always wonderful and add so much to the points you are making.
    I have to confess I am not a big fish person, I love four feet and fur. My absolute favorite of course is “The Kedger” from My Lord and Spymaster. What a wonderful pet and very important to the story!
    The part with the monkey in “Forbidden Rose” was great too. I love when poor Maggie puts her head in her hands and discovers she no longer smells like Doyle, she smells like monkey. It felt like just the last straw for her at that point.
    I also loved that the donkeys were named Dulce and Decorum! Sweet and proper it is! And a nice “spy” joke too! Can we assume witty Doyle named them? It sounds like him :0)

    Reply
  167. I love to read your blog posts- the pictures are always wonderful and add so much to the points you are making.
    I have to confess I am not a big fish person, I love four feet and fur. My absolute favorite of course is “The Kedger” from My Lord and Spymaster. What a wonderful pet and very important to the story!
    The part with the monkey in “Forbidden Rose” was great too. I love when poor Maggie puts her head in her hands and discovers she no longer smells like Doyle, she smells like monkey. It felt like just the last straw for her at that point.
    I also loved that the donkeys were named Dulce and Decorum! Sweet and proper it is! And a nice “spy” joke too! Can we assume witty Doyle named them? It sounds like him :0)

    Reply
  168. I love to read your blog posts- the pictures are always wonderful and add so much to the points you are making.
    I have to confess I am not a big fish person, I love four feet and fur. My absolute favorite of course is “The Kedger” from My Lord and Spymaster. What a wonderful pet and very important to the story!
    The part with the monkey in “Forbidden Rose” was great too. I love when poor Maggie puts her head in her hands and discovers she no longer smells like Doyle, she smells like monkey. It felt like just the last straw for her at that point.
    I also loved that the donkeys were named Dulce and Decorum! Sweet and proper it is! And a nice “spy” joke too! Can we assume witty Doyle named them? It sounds like him :0)

    Reply
  169. I love to read your blog posts- the pictures are always wonderful and add so much to the points you are making.
    I have to confess I am not a big fish person, I love four feet and fur. My absolute favorite of course is “The Kedger” from My Lord and Spymaster. What a wonderful pet and very important to the story!
    The part with the monkey in “Forbidden Rose” was great too. I love when poor Maggie puts her head in her hands and discovers she no longer smells like Doyle, she smells like monkey. It felt like just the last straw for her at that point.
    I also loved that the donkeys were named Dulce and Decorum! Sweet and proper it is! And a nice “spy” joke too! Can we assume witty Doyle named them? It sounds like him :0)

    Reply
  170. I love to read your blog posts- the pictures are always wonderful and add so much to the points you are making.
    I have to confess I am not a big fish person, I love four feet and fur. My absolute favorite of course is “The Kedger” from My Lord and Spymaster. What a wonderful pet and very important to the story!
    The part with the monkey in “Forbidden Rose” was great too. I love when poor Maggie puts her head in her hands and discovers she no longer smells like Doyle, she smells like monkey. It felt like just the last straw for her at that point.
    I also loved that the donkeys were named Dulce and Decorum! Sweet and proper it is! And a nice “spy” joke too! Can we assume witty Doyle named them? It sounds like him :0)

    Reply
  171. What a delightful post! I never knew much about goldfish other than each one I got seemed to be destined to die in my bowl rather rapidly–not even a name yet– until I finally admitted defeat and gave up on the whole idea.
    My H/H would have to have a dog because no other animal can communicate their needs/wants as well. As evidence, I have a Chow/Terrier/? companion that wakes me in the morning with whines, growls, and other throaty comments. I can tell by the tenor of her voice how serious she is about getting me up.

    Reply
  172. What a delightful post! I never knew much about goldfish other than each one I got seemed to be destined to die in my bowl rather rapidly–not even a name yet– until I finally admitted defeat and gave up on the whole idea.
    My H/H would have to have a dog because no other animal can communicate their needs/wants as well. As evidence, I have a Chow/Terrier/? companion that wakes me in the morning with whines, growls, and other throaty comments. I can tell by the tenor of her voice how serious she is about getting me up.

    Reply
  173. What a delightful post! I never knew much about goldfish other than each one I got seemed to be destined to die in my bowl rather rapidly–not even a name yet– until I finally admitted defeat and gave up on the whole idea.
    My H/H would have to have a dog because no other animal can communicate their needs/wants as well. As evidence, I have a Chow/Terrier/? companion that wakes me in the morning with whines, growls, and other throaty comments. I can tell by the tenor of her voice how serious she is about getting me up.

    Reply
  174. What a delightful post! I never knew much about goldfish other than each one I got seemed to be destined to die in my bowl rather rapidly–not even a name yet– until I finally admitted defeat and gave up on the whole idea.
    My H/H would have to have a dog because no other animal can communicate their needs/wants as well. As evidence, I have a Chow/Terrier/? companion that wakes me in the morning with whines, growls, and other throaty comments. I can tell by the tenor of her voice how serious she is about getting me up.

    Reply
  175. What a delightful post! I never knew much about goldfish other than each one I got seemed to be destined to die in my bowl rather rapidly–not even a name yet– until I finally admitted defeat and gave up on the whole idea.
    My H/H would have to have a dog because no other animal can communicate their needs/wants as well. As evidence, I have a Chow/Terrier/? companion that wakes me in the morning with whines, growls, and other throaty comments. I can tell by the tenor of her voice how serious she is about getting me up.

    Reply
  176. Hi Kanchb —
    I have never thought much about owning a peacock. They seem amiable enough.
    One could have the heroine wake up one morning and find every tailfeather of her beloved pet has been plucked out. Who? How? Why?
    It turns out . . .

    Reply
  177. Hi Kanchb —
    I have never thought much about owning a peacock. They seem amiable enough.
    One could have the heroine wake up one morning and find every tailfeather of her beloved pet has been plucked out. Who? How? Why?
    It turns out . . .

    Reply
  178. Hi Kanchb —
    I have never thought much about owning a peacock. They seem amiable enough.
    One could have the heroine wake up one morning and find every tailfeather of her beloved pet has been plucked out. Who? How? Why?
    It turns out . . .

    Reply
  179. Hi Kanchb —
    I have never thought much about owning a peacock. They seem amiable enough.
    One could have the heroine wake up one morning and find every tailfeather of her beloved pet has been plucked out. Who? How? Why?
    It turns out . . .

    Reply
  180. Hi Kanchb —
    I have never thought much about owning a peacock. They seem amiable enough.
    One could have the heroine wake up one morning and find every tailfeather of her beloved pet has been plucked out. Who? How? Why?
    It turns out . . .

    Reply
  181. Hi Isobel —
    My spies in the house at Meeks Street keep a big dog on the premises. Not for ferocious attack, but to be a disincentive to anyone who might be inclined to break in.
    I think, going over this in my mind, that they generally end up with a mixed breed.
    In the 1800 time frame, ISTM, this sort of mix would be the result of two pure-bred lines, there not being many large mongrels about.
    Half Newfie sounds good. The other half . . . something else large.
    Now I have to come up with a story for my own mind how he came to exist.

    Reply
  182. Hi Isobel —
    My spies in the house at Meeks Street keep a big dog on the premises. Not for ferocious attack, but to be a disincentive to anyone who might be inclined to break in.
    I think, going over this in my mind, that they generally end up with a mixed breed.
    In the 1800 time frame, ISTM, this sort of mix would be the result of two pure-bred lines, there not being many large mongrels about.
    Half Newfie sounds good. The other half . . . something else large.
    Now I have to come up with a story for my own mind how he came to exist.

    Reply
  183. Hi Isobel —
    My spies in the house at Meeks Street keep a big dog on the premises. Not for ferocious attack, but to be a disincentive to anyone who might be inclined to break in.
    I think, going over this in my mind, that they generally end up with a mixed breed.
    In the 1800 time frame, ISTM, this sort of mix would be the result of two pure-bred lines, there not being many large mongrels about.
    Half Newfie sounds good. The other half . . . something else large.
    Now I have to come up with a story for my own mind how he came to exist.

    Reply
  184. Hi Isobel —
    My spies in the house at Meeks Street keep a big dog on the premises. Not for ferocious attack, but to be a disincentive to anyone who might be inclined to break in.
    I think, going over this in my mind, that they generally end up with a mixed breed.
    In the 1800 time frame, ISTM, this sort of mix would be the result of two pure-bred lines, there not being many large mongrels about.
    Half Newfie sounds good. The other half . . . something else large.
    Now I have to come up with a story for my own mind how he came to exist.

    Reply
  185. Hi Isobel —
    My spies in the house at Meeks Street keep a big dog on the premises. Not for ferocious attack, but to be a disincentive to anyone who might be inclined to break in.
    I think, going over this in my mind, that they generally end up with a mixed breed.
    In the 1800 time frame, ISTM, this sort of mix would be the result of two pure-bred lines, there not being many large mongrels about.
    Half Newfie sounds good. The other half . . . something else large.
    Now I have to come up with a story for my own mind how he came to exist.

    Reply
  186. Hi Christine —
    Yes. That was Doyle. His somewhat grim humor.
    Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori from the Roman poet Horace.
    I am quite fond of Kedger. That’s Rengency street slang for a beggar.

    Reply
  187. Hi Christine —
    Yes. That was Doyle. His somewhat grim humor.
    Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori from the Roman poet Horace.
    I am quite fond of Kedger. That’s Rengency street slang for a beggar.

    Reply
  188. Hi Christine —
    Yes. That was Doyle. His somewhat grim humor.
    Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori from the Roman poet Horace.
    I am quite fond of Kedger. That’s Rengency street slang for a beggar.

    Reply
  189. Hi Christine —
    Yes. That was Doyle. His somewhat grim humor.
    Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori from the Roman poet Horace.
    I am quite fond of Kedger. That’s Rengency street slang for a beggar.

    Reply
  190. Hi Christine —
    Yes. That was Doyle. His somewhat grim humor.
    Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori from the Roman poet Horace.
    I am quite fond of Kedger. That’s Rengency street slang for a beggar.

    Reply
  191. Hi Dee —
    I have a very sweet Collie/something mix.
    She’s so patient. When she figures it’s time for me to get up she comes and sits by my bed and stares at me and WAITS.
    Who can sleep with a dog watching them?
    If she’s really impatient she just dots me with her nose.
    Dot.

    Reply
  192. Hi Dee —
    I have a very sweet Collie/something mix.
    She’s so patient. When she figures it’s time for me to get up she comes and sits by my bed and stares at me and WAITS.
    Who can sleep with a dog watching them?
    If she’s really impatient she just dots me with her nose.
    Dot.

    Reply
  193. Hi Dee —
    I have a very sweet Collie/something mix.
    She’s so patient. When she figures it’s time for me to get up she comes and sits by my bed and stares at me and WAITS.
    Who can sleep with a dog watching them?
    If she’s really impatient she just dots me with her nose.
    Dot.

    Reply
  194. Hi Dee —
    I have a very sweet Collie/something mix.
    She’s so patient. When she figures it’s time for me to get up she comes and sits by my bed and stares at me and WAITS.
    Who can sleep with a dog watching them?
    If she’s really impatient she just dots me with her nose.
    Dot.

    Reply
  195. Hi Dee —
    I have a very sweet Collie/something mix.
    She’s so patient. When she figures it’s time for me to get up she comes and sits by my bed and stares at me and WAITS.
    Who can sleep with a dog watching them?
    If she’s really impatient she just dots me with her nose.
    Dot.

    Reply
  196. Joanna, I love the too-big-for-his-tank goldfish! I must admit, I’m a bit surprised though. Generally, goldfish as well as many other fish species emit a chemical that prohibits their growth to accommodate their surroundings. His growing so large is unique, but I’m glad you found him a good home :o)
    As for our Large Mouth Bass and such, most of the really huge fish we have live in the Great Lakes which never freeze. Those that don’t, live in larger lakes that might freeze on top, but only the first four to six inches. The problem with any kind of pond in the yard is that I could never dig it deep enough to keep it from freezing completely. So, I’d have to heat it.
    I do have a friend who brings hers in for the winter, but that’s too much for me.
    And one of the hawks that circles our yard (we haven’t had a rabbit for months!) will land and chase down his prey on foot, as if it’s a game. Makes me think a bridge wouldn’t be a deterrent to him, but it’s worth a try :o)

    Reply
  197. Joanna, I love the too-big-for-his-tank goldfish! I must admit, I’m a bit surprised though. Generally, goldfish as well as many other fish species emit a chemical that prohibits their growth to accommodate their surroundings. His growing so large is unique, but I’m glad you found him a good home :o)
    As for our Large Mouth Bass and such, most of the really huge fish we have live in the Great Lakes which never freeze. Those that don’t, live in larger lakes that might freeze on top, but only the first four to six inches. The problem with any kind of pond in the yard is that I could never dig it deep enough to keep it from freezing completely. So, I’d have to heat it.
    I do have a friend who brings hers in for the winter, but that’s too much for me.
    And one of the hawks that circles our yard (we haven’t had a rabbit for months!) will land and chase down his prey on foot, as if it’s a game. Makes me think a bridge wouldn’t be a deterrent to him, but it’s worth a try :o)

    Reply
  198. Joanna, I love the too-big-for-his-tank goldfish! I must admit, I’m a bit surprised though. Generally, goldfish as well as many other fish species emit a chemical that prohibits their growth to accommodate their surroundings. His growing so large is unique, but I’m glad you found him a good home :o)
    As for our Large Mouth Bass and such, most of the really huge fish we have live in the Great Lakes which never freeze. Those that don’t, live in larger lakes that might freeze on top, but only the first four to six inches. The problem with any kind of pond in the yard is that I could never dig it deep enough to keep it from freezing completely. So, I’d have to heat it.
    I do have a friend who brings hers in for the winter, but that’s too much for me.
    And one of the hawks that circles our yard (we haven’t had a rabbit for months!) will land and chase down his prey on foot, as if it’s a game. Makes me think a bridge wouldn’t be a deterrent to him, but it’s worth a try :o)

    Reply
  199. Joanna, I love the too-big-for-his-tank goldfish! I must admit, I’m a bit surprised though. Generally, goldfish as well as many other fish species emit a chemical that prohibits their growth to accommodate their surroundings. His growing so large is unique, but I’m glad you found him a good home :o)
    As for our Large Mouth Bass and such, most of the really huge fish we have live in the Great Lakes which never freeze. Those that don’t, live in larger lakes that might freeze on top, but only the first four to six inches. The problem with any kind of pond in the yard is that I could never dig it deep enough to keep it from freezing completely. So, I’d have to heat it.
    I do have a friend who brings hers in for the winter, but that’s too much for me.
    And one of the hawks that circles our yard (we haven’t had a rabbit for months!) will land and chase down his prey on foot, as if it’s a game. Makes me think a bridge wouldn’t be a deterrent to him, but it’s worth a try :o)

    Reply
  200. Joanna, I love the too-big-for-his-tank goldfish! I must admit, I’m a bit surprised though. Generally, goldfish as well as many other fish species emit a chemical that prohibits their growth to accommodate their surroundings. His growing so large is unique, but I’m glad you found him a good home :o)
    As for our Large Mouth Bass and such, most of the really huge fish we have live in the Great Lakes which never freeze. Those that don’t, live in larger lakes that might freeze on top, but only the first four to six inches. The problem with any kind of pond in the yard is that I could never dig it deep enough to keep it from freezing completely. So, I’d have to heat it.
    I do have a friend who brings hers in for the winter, but that’s too much for me.
    And one of the hawks that circles our yard (we haven’t had a rabbit for months!) will land and chase down his prey on foot, as if it’s a game. Makes me think a bridge wouldn’t be a deterrent to him, but it’s worth a try :o)

    Reply
  201. Pretty much everything was mixed breed or “type” in the Georgian era (for example, Springer Spaniels and Cocker Spaniels came out of the same litters, and were divided up by size and use). Often, what really made something a recognizable type/breed was that it was bred by a specific person, or in a specific location, or for a specific purpose.
    There are lots of famous Newfs, including Byron’s Boatswain (who, like all the ones of the Georgian era, is black and white). If you look at period images (maybe I’ll do a post about them over on History Hoydens to go with my Mastiff post), few if any look like a modern Newf. The closest I’ve seen is the one belonging to the Duchess of York (she was painted with her dogs in 1810). That one at least is the right size and the head is shaped right (big and blocky).

    Reply
  202. Pretty much everything was mixed breed or “type” in the Georgian era (for example, Springer Spaniels and Cocker Spaniels came out of the same litters, and were divided up by size and use). Often, what really made something a recognizable type/breed was that it was bred by a specific person, or in a specific location, or for a specific purpose.
    There are lots of famous Newfs, including Byron’s Boatswain (who, like all the ones of the Georgian era, is black and white). If you look at period images (maybe I’ll do a post about them over on History Hoydens to go with my Mastiff post), few if any look like a modern Newf. The closest I’ve seen is the one belonging to the Duchess of York (she was painted with her dogs in 1810). That one at least is the right size and the head is shaped right (big and blocky).

    Reply
  203. Pretty much everything was mixed breed or “type” in the Georgian era (for example, Springer Spaniels and Cocker Spaniels came out of the same litters, and were divided up by size and use). Often, what really made something a recognizable type/breed was that it was bred by a specific person, or in a specific location, or for a specific purpose.
    There are lots of famous Newfs, including Byron’s Boatswain (who, like all the ones of the Georgian era, is black and white). If you look at period images (maybe I’ll do a post about them over on History Hoydens to go with my Mastiff post), few if any look like a modern Newf. The closest I’ve seen is the one belonging to the Duchess of York (she was painted with her dogs in 1810). That one at least is the right size and the head is shaped right (big and blocky).

    Reply
  204. Pretty much everything was mixed breed or “type” in the Georgian era (for example, Springer Spaniels and Cocker Spaniels came out of the same litters, and were divided up by size and use). Often, what really made something a recognizable type/breed was that it was bred by a specific person, or in a specific location, or for a specific purpose.
    There are lots of famous Newfs, including Byron’s Boatswain (who, like all the ones of the Georgian era, is black and white). If you look at period images (maybe I’ll do a post about them over on History Hoydens to go with my Mastiff post), few if any look like a modern Newf. The closest I’ve seen is the one belonging to the Duchess of York (she was painted with her dogs in 1810). That one at least is the right size and the head is shaped right (big and blocky).

    Reply
  205. Pretty much everything was mixed breed or “type” in the Georgian era (for example, Springer Spaniels and Cocker Spaniels came out of the same litters, and were divided up by size and use). Often, what really made something a recognizable type/breed was that it was bred by a specific person, or in a specific location, or for a specific purpose.
    There are lots of famous Newfs, including Byron’s Boatswain (who, like all the ones of the Georgian era, is black and white). If you look at period images (maybe I’ll do a post about them over on History Hoydens to go with my Mastiff post), few if any look like a modern Newf. The closest I’ve seen is the one belonging to the Duchess of York (she was painted with her dogs in 1810). That one at least is the right size and the head is shaped right (big and blocky).

    Reply
  206. Hi Theo —
    The Paris municipal parks system keeps goldfish in a lot of the ponds and pools all over the city.
    In the fall, they come and scoop them out with big nets — some of these are sizeable fish — and bring them to a site in Boulogne-Billancourt just outside the city where there is a big deep pool and let them spend the winter there.
    I know this because the wintering pond was right down the street from where I lived.
    This was a huge ‘working garden’ space with greenhouses and machinery, bedding plants in pots, compost piles and repair shops. We weren’t supposed to go in there, of course, but I’d always take the girlchild for a walk through on our general peregrinations.
    We’d stop and say hello to the teeming myriads of fish over-wintering there.

    Reply
  207. Hi Theo —
    The Paris municipal parks system keeps goldfish in a lot of the ponds and pools all over the city.
    In the fall, they come and scoop them out with big nets — some of these are sizeable fish — and bring them to a site in Boulogne-Billancourt just outside the city where there is a big deep pool and let them spend the winter there.
    I know this because the wintering pond was right down the street from where I lived.
    This was a huge ‘working garden’ space with greenhouses and machinery, bedding plants in pots, compost piles and repair shops. We weren’t supposed to go in there, of course, but I’d always take the girlchild for a walk through on our general peregrinations.
    We’d stop and say hello to the teeming myriads of fish over-wintering there.

    Reply
  208. Hi Theo —
    The Paris municipal parks system keeps goldfish in a lot of the ponds and pools all over the city.
    In the fall, they come and scoop them out with big nets — some of these are sizeable fish — and bring them to a site in Boulogne-Billancourt just outside the city where there is a big deep pool and let them spend the winter there.
    I know this because the wintering pond was right down the street from where I lived.
    This was a huge ‘working garden’ space with greenhouses and machinery, bedding plants in pots, compost piles and repair shops. We weren’t supposed to go in there, of course, but I’d always take the girlchild for a walk through on our general peregrinations.
    We’d stop and say hello to the teeming myriads of fish over-wintering there.

    Reply
  209. Hi Theo —
    The Paris municipal parks system keeps goldfish in a lot of the ponds and pools all over the city.
    In the fall, they come and scoop them out with big nets — some of these are sizeable fish — and bring them to a site in Boulogne-Billancourt just outside the city where there is a big deep pool and let them spend the winter there.
    I know this because the wintering pond was right down the street from where I lived.
    This was a huge ‘working garden’ space with greenhouses and machinery, bedding plants in pots, compost piles and repair shops. We weren’t supposed to go in there, of course, but I’d always take the girlchild for a walk through on our general peregrinations.
    We’d stop and say hello to the teeming myriads of fish over-wintering there.

    Reply
  210. Hi Theo —
    The Paris municipal parks system keeps goldfish in a lot of the ponds and pools all over the city.
    In the fall, they come and scoop them out with big nets — some of these are sizeable fish — and bring them to a site in Boulogne-Billancourt just outside the city where there is a big deep pool and let them spend the winter there.
    I know this because the wintering pond was right down the street from where I lived.
    This was a huge ‘working garden’ space with greenhouses and machinery, bedding plants in pots, compost piles and repair shops. We weren’t supposed to go in there, of course, but I’d always take the girlchild for a walk through on our general peregrinations.
    We’d stop and say hello to the teeming myriads of fish over-wintering there.

    Reply
  211. Hi Isobel —
    I want to have a period-authentic dog. Something big and sturdy. But it’s just a walk-on part, so I’m likely to just describe him and not mention the kind of dog he is.
    Knowing is just for my own satisfaction.
    I’ve seen pictures of period Newfies. I was so surprised at how different they are from today’s.
    Regency dogs would be a lovely and useful topic. *g*

    Reply
  212. Hi Isobel —
    I want to have a period-authentic dog. Something big and sturdy. But it’s just a walk-on part, so I’m likely to just describe him and not mention the kind of dog he is.
    Knowing is just for my own satisfaction.
    I’ve seen pictures of period Newfies. I was so surprised at how different they are from today’s.
    Regency dogs would be a lovely and useful topic. *g*

    Reply
  213. Hi Isobel —
    I want to have a period-authentic dog. Something big and sturdy. But it’s just a walk-on part, so I’m likely to just describe him and not mention the kind of dog he is.
    Knowing is just for my own satisfaction.
    I’ve seen pictures of period Newfies. I was so surprised at how different they are from today’s.
    Regency dogs would be a lovely and useful topic. *g*

    Reply
  214. Hi Isobel —
    I want to have a period-authentic dog. Something big and sturdy. But it’s just a walk-on part, so I’m likely to just describe him and not mention the kind of dog he is.
    Knowing is just for my own satisfaction.
    I’ve seen pictures of period Newfies. I was so surprised at how different they are from today’s.
    Regency dogs would be a lovely and useful topic. *g*

    Reply
  215. Hi Isobel —
    I want to have a period-authentic dog. Something big and sturdy. But it’s just a walk-on part, so I’m likely to just describe him and not mention the kind of dog he is.
    Knowing is just for my own satisfaction.
    I’ve seen pictures of period Newfies. I was so surprised at how different they are from today’s.
    Regency dogs would be a lovely and useful topic. *g*

    Reply
  216. Such a fun post, as always!!
    My elementary school in Pennsylvania had a deep cistern-like pool with goldfish. I remember it freezing nearly solid one cold winter, but the shadowy fish-shapes were still moving in the bottom few unfrozen inches.
    I’d imagine insurance companies would never permit water that deep around small children these days….but I’ll never forget the strangeness of that sight.

    Reply
  217. Such a fun post, as always!!
    My elementary school in Pennsylvania had a deep cistern-like pool with goldfish. I remember it freezing nearly solid one cold winter, but the shadowy fish-shapes were still moving in the bottom few unfrozen inches.
    I’d imagine insurance companies would never permit water that deep around small children these days….but I’ll never forget the strangeness of that sight.

    Reply
  218. Such a fun post, as always!!
    My elementary school in Pennsylvania had a deep cistern-like pool with goldfish. I remember it freezing nearly solid one cold winter, but the shadowy fish-shapes were still moving in the bottom few unfrozen inches.
    I’d imagine insurance companies would never permit water that deep around small children these days….but I’ll never forget the strangeness of that sight.

    Reply
  219. Such a fun post, as always!!
    My elementary school in Pennsylvania had a deep cistern-like pool with goldfish. I remember it freezing nearly solid one cold winter, but the shadowy fish-shapes were still moving in the bottom few unfrozen inches.
    I’d imagine insurance companies would never permit water that deep around small children these days….but I’ll never forget the strangeness of that sight.

    Reply
  220. Such a fun post, as always!!
    My elementary school in Pennsylvania had a deep cistern-like pool with goldfish. I remember it freezing nearly solid one cold winter, but the shadowy fish-shapes were still moving in the bottom few unfrozen inches.
    I’d imagine insurance companies would never permit water that deep around small children these days….but I’ll never forget the strangeness of that sight.

    Reply
  221. Hi Elisa —
    It sounds both beautiful and eerie.
    How do fish get air under the ice, anyway?
    Do they just hold their breath all winter?
    Or what?
    You can see why my life is filled with that sense of one-piece-missing-from-the-jigsaw-puzzle-ness.
    I worry about these things.
    For instance . . . I have been sitting here pondering why one would have a deep cistern-like pool with goldfish. In Pennsylvania. At a school.
    An emergency water reservoir? A bit of left-over well? A pool installer who misheard ‘yards’ when someone said ‘feet’? Heffalump trap? Meteoric impact crater?

    Reply
  222. Hi Elisa —
    It sounds both beautiful and eerie.
    How do fish get air under the ice, anyway?
    Do they just hold their breath all winter?
    Or what?
    You can see why my life is filled with that sense of one-piece-missing-from-the-jigsaw-puzzle-ness.
    I worry about these things.
    For instance . . . I have been sitting here pondering why one would have a deep cistern-like pool with goldfish. In Pennsylvania. At a school.
    An emergency water reservoir? A bit of left-over well? A pool installer who misheard ‘yards’ when someone said ‘feet’? Heffalump trap? Meteoric impact crater?

    Reply
  223. Hi Elisa —
    It sounds both beautiful and eerie.
    How do fish get air under the ice, anyway?
    Do they just hold their breath all winter?
    Or what?
    You can see why my life is filled with that sense of one-piece-missing-from-the-jigsaw-puzzle-ness.
    I worry about these things.
    For instance . . . I have been sitting here pondering why one would have a deep cistern-like pool with goldfish. In Pennsylvania. At a school.
    An emergency water reservoir? A bit of left-over well? A pool installer who misheard ‘yards’ when someone said ‘feet’? Heffalump trap? Meteoric impact crater?

    Reply
  224. Hi Elisa —
    It sounds both beautiful and eerie.
    How do fish get air under the ice, anyway?
    Do they just hold their breath all winter?
    Or what?
    You can see why my life is filled with that sense of one-piece-missing-from-the-jigsaw-puzzle-ness.
    I worry about these things.
    For instance . . . I have been sitting here pondering why one would have a deep cistern-like pool with goldfish. In Pennsylvania. At a school.
    An emergency water reservoir? A bit of left-over well? A pool installer who misheard ‘yards’ when someone said ‘feet’? Heffalump trap? Meteoric impact crater?

    Reply
  225. Hi Elisa —
    It sounds both beautiful and eerie.
    How do fish get air under the ice, anyway?
    Do they just hold their breath all winter?
    Or what?
    You can see why my life is filled with that sense of one-piece-missing-from-the-jigsaw-puzzle-ness.
    I worry about these things.
    For instance . . . I have been sitting here pondering why one would have a deep cistern-like pool with goldfish. In Pennsylvania. At a school.
    An emergency water reservoir? A bit of left-over well? A pool installer who misheard ‘yards’ when someone said ‘feet’? Heffalump trap? Meteoric impact crater?

    Reply
  226. I wonder far too much about such things as well. But The Curse of The Fish? I may have snorted.
    (I pretended to sneeze.)
    Now I want to install a fish pond (the HOA will Not Approve) and tell people I’m raising birds.

    Reply
  227. I wonder far too much about such things as well. But The Curse of The Fish? I may have snorted.
    (I pretended to sneeze.)
    Now I want to install a fish pond (the HOA will Not Approve) and tell people I’m raising birds.

    Reply
  228. I wonder far too much about such things as well. But The Curse of The Fish? I may have snorted.
    (I pretended to sneeze.)
    Now I want to install a fish pond (the HOA will Not Approve) and tell people I’m raising birds.

    Reply
  229. I wonder far too much about such things as well. But The Curse of The Fish? I may have snorted.
    (I pretended to sneeze.)
    Now I want to install a fish pond (the HOA will Not Approve) and tell people I’m raising birds.

    Reply
  230. I wonder far too much about such things as well. But The Curse of The Fish? I may have snorted.
    (I pretended to sneeze.)
    Now I want to install a fish pond (the HOA will Not Approve) and tell people I’m raising birds.

    Reply
  231. Hi Jo,
    I, too, am puzzled that goldfish never show up in the parlours of Regency heroines.
    But, they’re quiet, y’know. Maybe they’ve been there all along and I just didn’t notice them.
    I’m told goldfish get brighter colours if they are kept in the sun. Maybe all the heroines have to do is move the bowls closer to the window.

    Reply
  232. Hi Jo,
    I, too, am puzzled that goldfish never show up in the parlours of Regency heroines.
    But, they’re quiet, y’know. Maybe they’ve been there all along and I just didn’t notice them.
    I’m told goldfish get brighter colours if they are kept in the sun. Maybe all the heroines have to do is move the bowls closer to the window.

    Reply
  233. Hi Jo,
    I, too, am puzzled that goldfish never show up in the parlours of Regency heroines.
    But, they’re quiet, y’know. Maybe they’ve been there all along and I just didn’t notice them.
    I’m told goldfish get brighter colours if they are kept in the sun. Maybe all the heroines have to do is move the bowls closer to the window.

    Reply
  234. Hi Jo,
    I, too, am puzzled that goldfish never show up in the parlours of Regency heroines.
    But, they’re quiet, y’know. Maybe they’ve been there all along and I just didn’t notice them.
    I’m told goldfish get brighter colours if they are kept in the sun. Maybe all the heroines have to do is move the bowls closer to the window.

    Reply
  235. Hi Jo,
    I, too, am puzzled that goldfish never show up in the parlours of Regency heroines.
    But, they’re quiet, y’know. Maybe they’ve been there all along and I just didn’t notice them.
    I’m told goldfish get brighter colours if they are kept in the sun. Maybe all the heroines have to do is move the bowls closer to the window.

    Reply
  236. Hi Jo
    Actually peacocks are the most amiable of birds, if they are left alone. I spent my childhood in India and have lovely memories of chasing them and collecting the tail feathers but then my mum wouldnt let me bring the feathers into the house ’cause it would represent bringing the evil eye inside.
    I loved the image you brought to my minds’ eye of the heroine waking up and discovering the tail-feathers gone..and I am indeed wracking my brains to figure out the why behind it (the milliner – too obvious, the local witch – too unlikely.. but then who?)

    Reply
  237. Hi Jo
    Actually peacocks are the most amiable of birds, if they are left alone. I spent my childhood in India and have lovely memories of chasing them and collecting the tail feathers but then my mum wouldnt let me bring the feathers into the house ’cause it would represent bringing the evil eye inside.
    I loved the image you brought to my minds’ eye of the heroine waking up and discovering the tail-feathers gone..and I am indeed wracking my brains to figure out the why behind it (the milliner – too obvious, the local witch – too unlikely.. but then who?)

    Reply
  238. Hi Jo
    Actually peacocks are the most amiable of birds, if they are left alone. I spent my childhood in India and have lovely memories of chasing them and collecting the tail feathers but then my mum wouldnt let me bring the feathers into the house ’cause it would represent bringing the evil eye inside.
    I loved the image you brought to my minds’ eye of the heroine waking up and discovering the tail-feathers gone..and I am indeed wracking my brains to figure out the why behind it (the milliner – too obvious, the local witch – too unlikely.. but then who?)

    Reply
  239. Hi Jo
    Actually peacocks are the most amiable of birds, if they are left alone. I spent my childhood in India and have lovely memories of chasing them and collecting the tail feathers but then my mum wouldnt let me bring the feathers into the house ’cause it would represent bringing the evil eye inside.
    I loved the image you brought to my minds’ eye of the heroine waking up and discovering the tail-feathers gone..and I am indeed wracking my brains to figure out the why behind it (the milliner – too obvious, the local witch – too unlikely.. but then who?)

    Reply
  240. Hi Jo
    Actually peacocks are the most amiable of birds, if they are left alone. I spent my childhood in India and have lovely memories of chasing them and collecting the tail feathers but then my mum wouldnt let me bring the feathers into the house ’cause it would represent bringing the evil eye inside.
    I loved the image you brought to my minds’ eye of the heroine waking up and discovering the tail-feathers gone..and I am indeed wracking my brains to figure out the why behind it (the milliner – too obvious, the local witch – too unlikely.. but then who?)

    Reply
  241. You are so lucky to have two cultures within you. Two ways of seeing the world.
    If I were plotting a peacock-feather snatch, I would be looking for something that created conflict between the male and female protagonist. If I could, I’d want to make the heist in some way symbolic of the underlying conflict.
    Is our heroine too protective of the ‘outer show’ of wealth? Of her vanity? Does the loss of this showy tail parallel some other loss that she must deal with?
    I didn’t know peacock feathers might represent something unlucky. How interesting.

    Reply
  242. You are so lucky to have two cultures within you. Two ways of seeing the world.
    If I were plotting a peacock-feather snatch, I would be looking for something that created conflict between the male and female protagonist. If I could, I’d want to make the heist in some way symbolic of the underlying conflict.
    Is our heroine too protective of the ‘outer show’ of wealth? Of her vanity? Does the loss of this showy tail parallel some other loss that she must deal with?
    I didn’t know peacock feathers might represent something unlucky. How interesting.

    Reply
  243. You are so lucky to have two cultures within you. Two ways of seeing the world.
    If I were plotting a peacock-feather snatch, I would be looking for something that created conflict between the male and female protagonist. If I could, I’d want to make the heist in some way symbolic of the underlying conflict.
    Is our heroine too protective of the ‘outer show’ of wealth? Of her vanity? Does the loss of this showy tail parallel some other loss that she must deal with?
    I didn’t know peacock feathers might represent something unlucky. How interesting.

    Reply
  244. You are so lucky to have two cultures within you. Two ways of seeing the world.
    If I were plotting a peacock-feather snatch, I would be looking for something that created conflict between the male and female protagonist. If I could, I’d want to make the heist in some way symbolic of the underlying conflict.
    Is our heroine too protective of the ‘outer show’ of wealth? Of her vanity? Does the loss of this showy tail parallel some other loss that she must deal with?
    I didn’t know peacock feathers might represent something unlucky. How interesting.

    Reply
  245. You are so lucky to have two cultures within you. Two ways of seeing the world.
    If I were plotting a peacock-feather snatch, I would be looking for something that created conflict between the male and female protagonist. If I could, I’d want to make the heist in some way symbolic of the underlying conflict.
    Is our heroine too protective of the ‘outer show’ of wealth? Of her vanity? Does the loss of this showy tail parallel some other loss that she must deal with?
    I didn’t know peacock feathers might represent something unlucky. How interesting.

    Reply

Leave a Comment