After the Empire: The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

Cat 243 Doverby Mary Jo

I was drafting a different blog when I realized it wasn't making a lot of sense, so I decided to riff on another topic altogether.

Anyone who has read my books over the years has probably noticed that I’m intrigued by the various historical connections between Britain and its empire, especially India, since there has been so much interaction over the centuries.  I also occasionally like to riff on movies: one of my favorites was Amazing Grace, a wonderfully entertaining biopic of William Wilberforce, the great anti-slavery crusader and reformer of late 18th and early 19th century Britain. 

The-best-exotic-marigold-hotel posterThe Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is more of a sweet adult tale with both comedy and drama, but it also has two major elements that struck me.  The first is—how often do we get movies that are serious about the lives and emotions of senior citizens?  Not often enough. 

The Story:

The set up of the movie has an exuberant young Indian, Sonny Kapoor, decide that he should convert his late father’s crumbling hotel into a retirement home for Britons who want to live in the sunshine, and who may not be able to afford to live as well as they’d like at home.  Played by Dev Patel of Slumdog Millionaire, Sonny is charming but not very practical.

Waiting for transportationThe movie follows seven Britons who come to India to live in Sonny’s hotel, with varying degrees of satisfaction.  Most are single, like the newly widowed Evelyn, played by the ever-wonderful Dame Judi Dench.  As she blogs about her experiences so her family and friends in Britain can stay in touch, she becomes the emotional center of the film.

Reaching the hotelSome of the Britons embrace the color and chaos of India, others hate it, and at least one of the characters adapts rather against her will. There is the racist who isn’t comfortable with all those dark skins, and the silver foxy lady who doesn’t care what race a man is if he’s attractive and has some money. 

The storylines were handled with a light touch, but the characters felt real to me.  I cared what happened to them—and I felt very satisfied at the end.

Motor scooter lifeThe other element:

I also really enjoyed the way BEMH showed modern India.  There are modern young lovers on scooters, and traditional women in graceful saris.  We see an Indian call center from the point of view of the young, intelligent graduates who work there, and the tug between tradition and a changing world.

 

Movie thoughts: 

Movies are such fun to chat about, aren't they?  My sister and I are plotting to watch The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel again over Thanksgiving.  Have you seen the movie or would you like to? 

Under the Tuscan SunCan you think of similar movies that bring together cultures in a warm and interesting way? 

Come to think of it, this is a category of story I particularly like.  Maybe it’s time to rewatch Under the Tuscan Sun, since it has a lovely intercultural story line, though without the colonial history…

Mary Jo

 

120 thoughts on “After the Empire: The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel”

  1. I saw this movie in theater a few months ago with some friends. I wanted to see it because it had so many of my favorite Brit actors all in the same movie.
    Although the audience was primarily middle aged and up, there were younger people as well. Everyone seemed to like it. There were several cheers when Dame Judi got the guy.
    I liked it particularly for the portrait of the wife (played by Penelope Wilton, whom I know as Prime Minister Harriet Jones on Doctor Who) who did not like the new life; I thought the movie would be completely unsympathetic to her, but it wasn’t.

    Reply
  2. I saw this movie in theater a few months ago with some friends. I wanted to see it because it had so many of my favorite Brit actors all in the same movie.
    Although the audience was primarily middle aged and up, there were younger people as well. Everyone seemed to like it. There were several cheers when Dame Judi got the guy.
    I liked it particularly for the portrait of the wife (played by Penelope Wilton, whom I know as Prime Minister Harriet Jones on Doctor Who) who did not like the new life; I thought the movie would be completely unsympathetic to her, but it wasn’t.

    Reply
  3. I saw this movie in theater a few months ago with some friends. I wanted to see it because it had so many of my favorite Brit actors all in the same movie.
    Although the audience was primarily middle aged and up, there were younger people as well. Everyone seemed to like it. There were several cheers when Dame Judi got the guy.
    I liked it particularly for the portrait of the wife (played by Penelope Wilton, whom I know as Prime Minister Harriet Jones on Doctor Who) who did not like the new life; I thought the movie would be completely unsympathetic to her, but it wasn’t.

    Reply
  4. I saw this movie in theater a few months ago with some friends. I wanted to see it because it had so many of my favorite Brit actors all in the same movie.
    Although the audience was primarily middle aged and up, there were younger people as well. Everyone seemed to like it. There were several cheers when Dame Judi got the guy.
    I liked it particularly for the portrait of the wife (played by Penelope Wilton, whom I know as Prime Minister Harriet Jones on Doctor Who) who did not like the new life; I thought the movie would be completely unsympathetic to her, but it wasn’t.

    Reply
  5. I saw this movie in theater a few months ago with some friends. I wanted to see it because it had so many of my favorite Brit actors all in the same movie.
    Although the audience was primarily middle aged and up, there were younger people as well. Everyone seemed to like it. There were several cheers when Dame Judi got the guy.
    I liked it particularly for the portrait of the wife (played by Penelope Wilton, whom I know as Prime Minister Harriet Jones on Doctor Who) who did not like the new life; I thought the movie would be completely unsympathetic to her, but it wasn’t.

    Reply
  6. Like your books, movies often inspire me to learn more about an era or a place. My daughter and I fell in love with Northern Italy in Letters to Juliet and since I am old and remember the original Camelot seeing Vanessa Redgrave and Franco Nero again was an added bonus.

    Reply
  7. Like your books, movies often inspire me to learn more about an era or a place. My daughter and I fell in love with Northern Italy in Letters to Juliet and since I am old and remember the original Camelot seeing Vanessa Redgrave and Franco Nero again was an added bonus.

    Reply
  8. Like your books, movies often inspire me to learn more about an era or a place. My daughter and I fell in love with Northern Italy in Letters to Juliet and since I am old and remember the original Camelot seeing Vanessa Redgrave and Franco Nero again was an added bonus.

    Reply
  9. Like your books, movies often inspire me to learn more about an era or a place. My daughter and I fell in love with Northern Italy in Letters to Juliet and since I am old and remember the original Camelot seeing Vanessa Redgrave and Franco Nero again was an added bonus.

    Reply
  10. Like your books, movies often inspire me to learn more about an era or a place. My daughter and I fell in love with Northern Italy in Letters to Juliet and since I am old and remember the original Camelot seeing Vanessa Redgrave and Franco Nero again was an added bonus.

    Reply
  11. Janice–
    I also thought the Penelope Wilton character was done well. She was just in the wrong place for her, and it was making her miserable. Not all plants can be transplanted to a new land.
    Weren’t all those British veteran actors great? Dame Maggie Smith does cranky so well that one has to wonder what she’s like in real life. *g*

    Reply
  12. Janice–
    I also thought the Penelope Wilton character was done well. She was just in the wrong place for her, and it was making her miserable. Not all plants can be transplanted to a new land.
    Weren’t all those British veteran actors great? Dame Maggie Smith does cranky so well that one has to wonder what she’s like in real life. *g*

    Reply
  13. Janice–
    I also thought the Penelope Wilton character was done well. She was just in the wrong place for her, and it was making her miserable. Not all plants can be transplanted to a new land.
    Weren’t all those British veteran actors great? Dame Maggie Smith does cranky so well that one has to wonder what she’s like in real life. *g*

    Reply
  14. Janice–
    I also thought the Penelope Wilton character was done well. She was just in the wrong place for her, and it was making her miserable. Not all plants can be transplanted to a new land.
    Weren’t all those British veteran actors great? Dame Maggie Smith does cranky so well that one has to wonder what she’s like in real life. *g*

    Reply
  15. Janice–
    I also thought the Penelope Wilton character was done well. She was just in the wrong place for her, and it was making her miserable. Not all plants can be transplanted to a new land.
    Weren’t all those British veteran actors great? Dame Maggie Smith does cranky so well that one has to wonder what she’s like in real life. *g*

    Reply
  16. Lyn S, I loved LETTERS FROM JULIET! I’ve seen some of northern Italy, but not Verona, and naturally, now I want to go there. *G* I hadn’t realized that Franco Nero was with Vanessa Redgrave in Camelot, but that’s a nice touch, and he sure has aged well!

    Reply
  17. Lyn S, I loved LETTERS FROM JULIET! I’ve seen some of northern Italy, but not Verona, and naturally, now I want to go there. *G* I hadn’t realized that Franco Nero was with Vanessa Redgrave in Camelot, but that’s a nice touch, and he sure has aged well!

    Reply
  18. Lyn S, I loved LETTERS FROM JULIET! I’ve seen some of northern Italy, but not Verona, and naturally, now I want to go there. *G* I hadn’t realized that Franco Nero was with Vanessa Redgrave in Camelot, but that’s a nice touch, and he sure has aged well!

    Reply
  19. Lyn S, I loved LETTERS FROM JULIET! I’ve seen some of northern Italy, but not Verona, and naturally, now I want to go there. *G* I hadn’t realized that Franco Nero was with Vanessa Redgrave in Camelot, but that’s a nice touch, and he sure has aged well!

    Reply
  20. Lyn S, I loved LETTERS FROM JULIET! I’ve seen some of northern Italy, but not Verona, and naturally, now I want to go there. *G* I hadn’t realized that Franco Nero was with Vanessa Redgrave in Camelot, but that’s a nice touch, and he sure has aged well!

    Reply
  21. What a wonderful co-incidence! I saw The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel yesterday, and absolutely loved it. I thought the characterisation was really well done and it was poignant and full of quite a number of profound truths. I love Letters to Juliet too.

    Reply
  22. What a wonderful co-incidence! I saw The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel yesterday, and absolutely loved it. I thought the characterisation was really well done and it was poignant and full of quite a number of profound truths. I love Letters to Juliet too.

    Reply
  23. What a wonderful co-incidence! I saw The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel yesterday, and absolutely loved it. I thought the characterisation was really well done and it was poignant and full of quite a number of profound truths. I love Letters to Juliet too.

    Reply
  24. What a wonderful co-incidence! I saw The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel yesterday, and absolutely loved it. I thought the characterisation was really well done and it was poignant and full of quite a number of profound truths. I love Letters to Juliet too.

    Reply
  25. What a wonderful co-incidence! I saw The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel yesterday, and absolutely loved it. I thought the characterisation was really well done and it was poignant and full of quite a number of profound truths. I love Letters to Juliet too.

    Reply
  26. I too enjoyed all of the great British actors in this film. I hadn’t seen Penelope Wilton on Doctor Who but had seen her as Matthew’s mother on Downton Abbey, where she is also allowed to be a mix of both good and bad characteristics yet is rarely unsympathetic.
    Franco Nero and Vanessa Redgrave met during the filming of “Camelot” and had a child together. They then split but came together again much later in life, which I think is highly romantic.
    As for “Under the Tuscan Sun”, it needs to be thought of as completely separate from the book as the story is changed even more than the usual book-to-movie translation. I remember parts of it vividly because it’s the only movie I’ve ever seen where the audience periodically gave a collective sigh at the scenery (the cliffs! the water! the vineyards!). I realized that the bias against Italians that was common around the turn of the last century was probably because people from other countries were jealous of the climate, the scenery, and the food.

    Reply
  27. I too enjoyed all of the great British actors in this film. I hadn’t seen Penelope Wilton on Doctor Who but had seen her as Matthew’s mother on Downton Abbey, where she is also allowed to be a mix of both good and bad characteristics yet is rarely unsympathetic.
    Franco Nero and Vanessa Redgrave met during the filming of “Camelot” and had a child together. They then split but came together again much later in life, which I think is highly romantic.
    As for “Under the Tuscan Sun”, it needs to be thought of as completely separate from the book as the story is changed even more than the usual book-to-movie translation. I remember parts of it vividly because it’s the only movie I’ve ever seen where the audience periodically gave a collective sigh at the scenery (the cliffs! the water! the vineyards!). I realized that the bias against Italians that was common around the turn of the last century was probably because people from other countries were jealous of the climate, the scenery, and the food.

    Reply
  28. I too enjoyed all of the great British actors in this film. I hadn’t seen Penelope Wilton on Doctor Who but had seen her as Matthew’s mother on Downton Abbey, where she is also allowed to be a mix of both good and bad characteristics yet is rarely unsympathetic.
    Franco Nero and Vanessa Redgrave met during the filming of “Camelot” and had a child together. They then split but came together again much later in life, which I think is highly romantic.
    As for “Under the Tuscan Sun”, it needs to be thought of as completely separate from the book as the story is changed even more than the usual book-to-movie translation. I remember parts of it vividly because it’s the only movie I’ve ever seen where the audience periodically gave a collective sigh at the scenery (the cliffs! the water! the vineyards!). I realized that the bias against Italians that was common around the turn of the last century was probably because people from other countries were jealous of the climate, the scenery, and the food.

    Reply
  29. I too enjoyed all of the great British actors in this film. I hadn’t seen Penelope Wilton on Doctor Who but had seen her as Matthew’s mother on Downton Abbey, where she is also allowed to be a mix of both good and bad characteristics yet is rarely unsympathetic.
    Franco Nero and Vanessa Redgrave met during the filming of “Camelot” and had a child together. They then split but came together again much later in life, which I think is highly romantic.
    As for “Under the Tuscan Sun”, it needs to be thought of as completely separate from the book as the story is changed even more than the usual book-to-movie translation. I remember parts of it vividly because it’s the only movie I’ve ever seen where the audience periodically gave a collective sigh at the scenery (the cliffs! the water! the vineyards!). I realized that the bias against Italians that was common around the turn of the last century was probably because people from other countries were jealous of the climate, the scenery, and the food.

    Reply
  30. I too enjoyed all of the great British actors in this film. I hadn’t seen Penelope Wilton on Doctor Who but had seen her as Matthew’s mother on Downton Abbey, where she is also allowed to be a mix of both good and bad characteristics yet is rarely unsympathetic.
    Franco Nero and Vanessa Redgrave met during the filming of “Camelot” and had a child together. They then split but came together again much later in life, which I think is highly romantic.
    As for “Under the Tuscan Sun”, it needs to be thought of as completely separate from the book as the story is changed even more than the usual book-to-movie translation. I remember parts of it vividly because it’s the only movie I’ve ever seen where the audience periodically gave a collective sigh at the scenery (the cliffs! the water! the vineyards!). I realized that the bias against Italians that was common around the turn of the last century was probably because people from other countries were jealous of the climate, the scenery, and the food.

    Reply
  31. Nicola–
    You and I have similar tastes in movies! I liked your recommendation of ST. IVES so much that I bought the DVD after watching it from Netflix. *g* As you say, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is wise and poignant and satisfying.

    Reply
  32. Nicola–
    You and I have similar tastes in movies! I liked your recommendation of ST. IVES so much that I bought the DVD after watching it from Netflix. *g* As you say, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is wise and poignant and satisfying.

    Reply
  33. Nicola–
    You and I have similar tastes in movies! I liked your recommendation of ST. IVES so much that I bought the DVD after watching it from Netflix. *g* As you say, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is wise and poignant and satisfying.

    Reply
  34. Nicola–
    You and I have similar tastes in movies! I liked your recommendation of ST. IVES so much that I bought the DVD after watching it from Netflix. *g* As you say, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is wise and poignant and satisfying.

    Reply
  35. Nicola–
    You and I have similar tastes in movies! I liked your recommendation of ST. IVES so much that I bought the DVD after watching it from Netflix. *g* As you say, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is wise and poignant and satisfying.

    Reply
  36. Susan/DC–
    I didn’t realize that Vanessa Redgrave and Franco Nero had come together again! As you say, that’s wonderfully romantic.
    ** I realized that the bias against Italians that was common around the turn of the last century was probably because people from other countries were jealous of the climate, the scenery, and the food.**
    LOL! I haven’t heard that before, but it’s a defensible theory. *g*

    Reply
  37. Susan/DC–
    I didn’t realize that Vanessa Redgrave and Franco Nero had come together again! As you say, that’s wonderfully romantic.
    ** I realized that the bias against Italians that was common around the turn of the last century was probably because people from other countries were jealous of the climate, the scenery, and the food.**
    LOL! I haven’t heard that before, but it’s a defensible theory. *g*

    Reply
  38. Susan/DC–
    I didn’t realize that Vanessa Redgrave and Franco Nero had come together again! As you say, that’s wonderfully romantic.
    ** I realized that the bias against Italians that was common around the turn of the last century was probably because people from other countries were jealous of the climate, the scenery, and the food.**
    LOL! I haven’t heard that before, but it’s a defensible theory. *g*

    Reply
  39. Susan/DC–
    I didn’t realize that Vanessa Redgrave and Franco Nero had come together again! As you say, that’s wonderfully romantic.
    ** I realized that the bias against Italians that was common around the turn of the last century was probably because people from other countries were jealous of the climate, the scenery, and the food.**
    LOL! I haven’t heard that before, but it’s a defensible theory. *g*

    Reply
  40. Susan/DC–
    I didn’t realize that Vanessa Redgrave and Franco Nero had come together again! As you say, that’s wonderfully romantic.
    ** I realized that the bias against Italians that was common around the turn of the last century was probably because people from other countries were jealous of the climate, the scenery, and the food.**
    LOL! I haven’t heard that before, but it’s a defensible theory. *g*

    Reply
  41. You’ve named a couple of my favorite movies and a favorite genre also! I’m delighted to be in such august company. In addition to the two you named, I’d add:
    A Good Year with Russell Crowe, similar to A Year In Tuscany
    Bride and Prejudice – the Bollywood modern version of Pride and Prejudice (fun and wonderful!)
    Mamma Mia – beautiful Greek islands and Abba music!
    The White Countess – Natasha Richardson, Vanessa & Lynn Redgrave with Ralph Fiennes set in ’30’s Shanghai
    Enchanted April and Room With a View – the British do Italy in both

    Reply
  42. You’ve named a couple of my favorite movies and a favorite genre also! I’m delighted to be in such august company. In addition to the two you named, I’d add:
    A Good Year with Russell Crowe, similar to A Year In Tuscany
    Bride and Prejudice – the Bollywood modern version of Pride and Prejudice (fun and wonderful!)
    Mamma Mia – beautiful Greek islands and Abba music!
    The White Countess – Natasha Richardson, Vanessa & Lynn Redgrave with Ralph Fiennes set in ’30’s Shanghai
    Enchanted April and Room With a View – the British do Italy in both

    Reply
  43. You’ve named a couple of my favorite movies and a favorite genre also! I’m delighted to be in such august company. In addition to the two you named, I’d add:
    A Good Year with Russell Crowe, similar to A Year In Tuscany
    Bride and Prejudice – the Bollywood modern version of Pride and Prejudice (fun and wonderful!)
    Mamma Mia – beautiful Greek islands and Abba music!
    The White Countess – Natasha Richardson, Vanessa & Lynn Redgrave with Ralph Fiennes set in ’30’s Shanghai
    Enchanted April and Room With a View – the British do Italy in both

    Reply
  44. You’ve named a couple of my favorite movies and a favorite genre also! I’m delighted to be in such august company. In addition to the two you named, I’d add:
    A Good Year with Russell Crowe, similar to A Year In Tuscany
    Bride and Prejudice – the Bollywood modern version of Pride and Prejudice (fun and wonderful!)
    Mamma Mia – beautiful Greek islands and Abba music!
    The White Countess – Natasha Richardson, Vanessa & Lynn Redgrave with Ralph Fiennes set in ’30’s Shanghai
    Enchanted April and Room With a View – the British do Italy in both

    Reply
  45. You’ve named a couple of my favorite movies and a favorite genre also! I’m delighted to be in such august company. In addition to the two you named, I’d add:
    A Good Year with Russell Crowe, similar to A Year In Tuscany
    Bride and Prejudice – the Bollywood modern version of Pride and Prejudice (fun and wonderful!)
    Mamma Mia – beautiful Greek islands and Abba music!
    The White Countess – Natasha Richardson, Vanessa & Lynn Redgrave with Ralph Fiennes set in ’30’s Shanghai
    Enchanted April and Room With a View – the British do Italy in both

    Reply
  46. Donna–
    I love Mamma Mia and Enchanted April, and now you’ve given me more movies for my Netflix queue. *G* I also love Cold Comfort Farm, but that doesn’t have the cross cultural aspect.

    Reply
  47. Donna–
    I love Mamma Mia and Enchanted April, and now you’ve given me more movies for my Netflix queue. *G* I also love Cold Comfort Farm, but that doesn’t have the cross cultural aspect.

    Reply
  48. Donna–
    I love Mamma Mia and Enchanted April, and now you’ve given me more movies for my Netflix queue. *G* I also love Cold Comfort Farm, but that doesn’t have the cross cultural aspect.

    Reply
  49. Donna–
    I love Mamma Mia and Enchanted April, and now you’ve given me more movies for my Netflix queue. *G* I also love Cold Comfort Farm, but that doesn’t have the cross cultural aspect.

    Reply
  50. Donna–
    I love Mamma Mia and Enchanted April, and now you’ve given me more movies for my Netflix queue. *G* I also love Cold Comfort Farm, but that doesn’t have the cross cultural aspect.

    Reply
  51. Julie and Julia ~ and Enchanted April ~ and Shirley Valentine spring to mind.
    Such a fun blog, Mary Jo. I loved The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, too.
    Some fun clashing of cultures happen within one country! … some not-so-fun ones, too.
    A movie that was visually one of the most beautiful I’d seen and showed two cultures within one country (not necessarily in clash, though) was Monsoon Wedding.
    Happy movie watching and Thanksgiving 😀

    Reply
  52. Julie and Julia ~ and Enchanted April ~ and Shirley Valentine spring to mind.
    Such a fun blog, Mary Jo. I loved The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, too.
    Some fun clashing of cultures happen within one country! … some not-so-fun ones, too.
    A movie that was visually one of the most beautiful I’d seen and showed two cultures within one country (not necessarily in clash, though) was Monsoon Wedding.
    Happy movie watching and Thanksgiving 😀

    Reply
  53. Julie and Julia ~ and Enchanted April ~ and Shirley Valentine spring to mind.
    Such a fun blog, Mary Jo. I loved The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, too.
    Some fun clashing of cultures happen within one country! … some not-so-fun ones, too.
    A movie that was visually one of the most beautiful I’d seen and showed two cultures within one country (not necessarily in clash, though) was Monsoon Wedding.
    Happy movie watching and Thanksgiving 😀

    Reply
  54. Julie and Julia ~ and Enchanted April ~ and Shirley Valentine spring to mind.
    Such a fun blog, Mary Jo. I loved The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, too.
    Some fun clashing of cultures happen within one country! … some not-so-fun ones, too.
    A movie that was visually one of the most beautiful I’d seen and showed two cultures within one country (not necessarily in clash, though) was Monsoon Wedding.
    Happy movie watching and Thanksgiving 😀

    Reply
  55. Julie and Julia ~ and Enchanted April ~ and Shirley Valentine spring to mind.
    Such a fun blog, Mary Jo. I loved The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, too.
    Some fun clashing of cultures happen within one country! … some not-so-fun ones, too.
    A movie that was visually one of the most beautiful I’d seen and showed two cultures within one country (not necessarily in clash, though) was Monsoon Wedding.
    Happy movie watching and Thanksgiving 😀

    Reply
  56. Donna–
    COLD COMFORT FARM is an English classic, in with an orphaned and very efficient young woman goes to live with strange rural relatives, and sorts out everyone’d lives. *g* Very funny!

    Reply
  57. Donna–
    COLD COMFORT FARM is an English classic, in with an orphaned and very efficient young woman goes to live with strange rural relatives, and sorts out everyone’d lives. *g* Very funny!

    Reply
  58. Donna–
    COLD COMFORT FARM is an English classic, in with an orphaned and very efficient young woman goes to live with strange rural relatives, and sorts out everyone’d lives. *g* Very funny!

    Reply
  59. Donna–
    COLD COMFORT FARM is an English classic, in with an orphaned and very efficient young woman goes to live with strange rural relatives, and sorts out everyone’d lives. *g* Very funny!

    Reply
  60. Donna–
    COLD COMFORT FARM is an English classic, in with an orphaned and very efficient young woman goes to live with strange rural relatives, and sorts out everyone’d lives. *g* Very funny!

    Reply
  61. Mary Jo, I watch Region 2 disks on my 17 inch laptop. Close up it fills my field of vision just as well as a bigscreen TV across the room.
    But it really doesn’t matter much what the film looks like, though great art direction and cinematography are always appreciated. It’s the story that matters, and if the story sucks, then who cares how well it was filmed?
    I would imagine Pride and Prejudice would be just as engrossing on a Dick Tracy 2-way Radio Wristwatch 😉

    Reply
  62. Mary Jo, I watch Region 2 disks on my 17 inch laptop. Close up it fills my field of vision just as well as a bigscreen TV across the room.
    But it really doesn’t matter much what the film looks like, though great art direction and cinematography are always appreciated. It’s the story that matters, and if the story sucks, then who cares how well it was filmed?
    I would imagine Pride and Prejudice would be just as engrossing on a Dick Tracy 2-way Radio Wristwatch 😉

    Reply
  63. Mary Jo, I watch Region 2 disks on my 17 inch laptop. Close up it fills my field of vision just as well as a bigscreen TV across the room.
    But it really doesn’t matter much what the film looks like, though great art direction and cinematography are always appreciated. It’s the story that matters, and if the story sucks, then who cares how well it was filmed?
    I would imagine Pride and Prejudice would be just as engrossing on a Dick Tracy 2-way Radio Wristwatch 😉

    Reply
  64. Mary Jo, I watch Region 2 disks on my 17 inch laptop. Close up it fills my field of vision just as well as a bigscreen TV across the room.
    But it really doesn’t matter much what the film looks like, though great art direction and cinematography are always appreciated. It’s the story that matters, and if the story sucks, then who cares how well it was filmed?
    I would imagine Pride and Prejudice would be just as engrossing on a Dick Tracy 2-way Radio Wristwatch 😉

    Reply
  65. Mary Jo, I watch Region 2 disks on my 17 inch laptop. Close up it fills my field of vision just as well as a bigscreen TV across the room.
    But it really doesn’t matter much what the film looks like, though great art direction and cinematography are always appreciated. It’s the story that matters, and if the story sucks, then who cares how well it was filmed?
    I would imagine Pride and Prejudice would be just as engrossing on a Dick Tracy 2-way Radio Wristwatch 😉

    Reply
  66. Janice, you’re very right. When I think back on a movie I’ve seen, mostly I remember the story. Not if it is was in black and white or color, or anything else technical. ALways it’s the story.
    That said, there are some movies that are so intensely visual that I prefer to see them on a large screen. It must be the old designer in me. *G*

    Reply
  67. Janice, you’re very right. When I think back on a movie I’ve seen, mostly I remember the story. Not if it is was in black and white or color, or anything else technical. ALways it’s the story.
    That said, there are some movies that are so intensely visual that I prefer to see them on a large screen. It must be the old designer in me. *G*

    Reply
  68. Janice, you’re very right. When I think back on a movie I’ve seen, mostly I remember the story. Not if it is was in black and white or color, or anything else technical. ALways it’s the story.
    That said, there are some movies that are so intensely visual that I prefer to see them on a large screen. It must be the old designer in me. *G*

    Reply
  69. Janice, you’re very right. When I think back on a movie I’ve seen, mostly I remember the story. Not if it is was in black and white or color, or anything else technical. ALways it’s the story.
    That said, there are some movies that are so intensely visual that I prefer to see them on a large screen. It must be the old designer in me. *G*

    Reply
  70. Janice, you’re very right. When I think back on a movie I’ve seen, mostly I remember the story. Not if it is was in black and white or color, or anything else technical. ALways it’s the story.
    That said, there are some movies that are so intensely visual that I prefer to see them on a large screen. It must be the old designer in me. *G*

    Reply
  71. Ella–
    Since you’re a romance writer, I think you’d enjoy the movie. Good character studies, poignance, and romance is not only for the young. If you do watch it, I hope you like the movie as much as I did!

    Reply
  72. Ella–
    Since you’re a romance writer, I think you’d enjoy the movie. Good character studies, poignance, and romance is not only for the young. If you do watch it, I hope you like the movie as much as I did!

    Reply
  73. Ella–
    Since you’re a romance writer, I think you’d enjoy the movie. Good character studies, poignance, and romance is not only for the young. If you do watch it, I hope you like the movie as much as I did!

    Reply
  74. Ella–
    Since you’re a romance writer, I think you’d enjoy the movie. Good character studies, poignance, and romance is not only for the young. If you do watch it, I hope you like the movie as much as I did!

    Reply
  75. Ella–
    Since you’re a romance writer, I think you’d enjoy the movie. Good character studies, poignance, and romance is not only for the young. If you do watch it, I hope you like the movie as much as I did!

    Reply
  76. Sherrie, here, chiming in late. I loved this movie to bits! Being of a certain age, I found many of the “senior” in-jokes and comments hilarious. There were mostly senior citizens in the audience, and they laughed so loud at some of the “senior” bits that you couldn’t hear the next line. This was a charming movie that spoke to some very real truths about the elderly.
    Another movie I saw at the same time as Marigold was Beasts of the Southern Wild. (My sister and I saw both at a local art film cinema) Beasts was a visual and emotional shock to the system, a comment about the value of community and facing one’s fears. Most of the actors, including the stunning main character (a 6-year-old black child whose performance was stellar) were not professional actors, and that lent a unique honesty to the film. I highly recommend Beasts and Marigold.

    Reply
  77. Sherrie, here, chiming in late. I loved this movie to bits! Being of a certain age, I found many of the “senior” in-jokes and comments hilarious. There were mostly senior citizens in the audience, and they laughed so loud at some of the “senior” bits that you couldn’t hear the next line. This was a charming movie that spoke to some very real truths about the elderly.
    Another movie I saw at the same time as Marigold was Beasts of the Southern Wild. (My sister and I saw both at a local art film cinema) Beasts was a visual and emotional shock to the system, a comment about the value of community and facing one’s fears. Most of the actors, including the stunning main character (a 6-year-old black child whose performance was stellar) were not professional actors, and that lent a unique honesty to the film. I highly recommend Beasts and Marigold.

    Reply
  78. Sherrie, here, chiming in late. I loved this movie to bits! Being of a certain age, I found many of the “senior” in-jokes and comments hilarious. There were mostly senior citizens in the audience, and they laughed so loud at some of the “senior” bits that you couldn’t hear the next line. This was a charming movie that spoke to some very real truths about the elderly.
    Another movie I saw at the same time as Marigold was Beasts of the Southern Wild. (My sister and I saw both at a local art film cinema) Beasts was a visual and emotional shock to the system, a comment about the value of community and facing one’s fears. Most of the actors, including the stunning main character (a 6-year-old black child whose performance was stellar) were not professional actors, and that lent a unique honesty to the film. I highly recommend Beasts and Marigold.

    Reply
  79. Sherrie, here, chiming in late. I loved this movie to bits! Being of a certain age, I found many of the “senior” in-jokes and comments hilarious. There were mostly senior citizens in the audience, and they laughed so loud at some of the “senior” bits that you couldn’t hear the next line. This was a charming movie that spoke to some very real truths about the elderly.
    Another movie I saw at the same time as Marigold was Beasts of the Southern Wild. (My sister and I saw both at a local art film cinema) Beasts was a visual and emotional shock to the system, a comment about the value of community and facing one’s fears. Most of the actors, including the stunning main character (a 6-year-old black child whose performance was stellar) were not professional actors, and that lent a unique honesty to the film. I highly recommend Beasts and Marigold.

    Reply
  80. Sherrie, here, chiming in late. I loved this movie to bits! Being of a certain age, I found many of the “senior” in-jokes and comments hilarious. There were mostly senior citizens in the audience, and they laughed so loud at some of the “senior” bits that you couldn’t hear the next line. This was a charming movie that spoke to some very real truths about the elderly.
    Another movie I saw at the same time as Marigold was Beasts of the Southern Wild. (My sister and I saw both at a local art film cinema) Beasts was a visual and emotional shock to the system, a comment about the value of community and facing one’s fears. Most of the actors, including the stunning main character (a 6-year-old black child whose performance was stellar) were not professional actors, and that lent a unique honesty to the film. I highly recommend Beasts and Marigold.

    Reply
  81. I loved this movie, too, Mary Jo. And I also love the way Judi Dench clearly hasn’t had any operations to make her look artificially younger — and yet IMO she’s growing more beautiful each year.

    Reply
  82. I loved this movie, too, Mary Jo. And I also love the way Judi Dench clearly hasn’t had any operations to make her look artificially younger — and yet IMO she’s growing more beautiful each year.

    Reply
  83. I loved this movie, too, Mary Jo. And I also love the way Judi Dench clearly hasn’t had any operations to make her look artificially younger — and yet IMO she’s growing more beautiful each year.

    Reply
  84. I loved this movie, too, Mary Jo. And I also love the way Judi Dench clearly hasn’t had any operations to make her look artificially younger — and yet IMO she’s growing more beautiful each year.

    Reply
  85. I loved this movie, too, Mary Jo. And I also love the way Judi Dench clearly hasn’t had any operations to make her look artificially younger — and yet IMO she’s growing more beautiful each year.

    Reply

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