Adventure in Breakfasting

by Mary Jo

I was doing some research reading and came across a sentence saying that in days long gone, the typical breakfast for most people was was cooked grain mixtures.  I looked at that and thought, "Hello, oatmeal!  And its cousin, corn flakes!"  Which led me into reflecting on how some things travel down through the centuries, maybe with variations but the underlying food is the same.  (Picture below is a German breakfast buffet from Wikipedia by Torsten Seiler from Cologne, Germany)

GermanBreakfas buffetBreakfast means literally to "break our fast"–eating after the hours of sleep.  In places where people do hard physical labor, breakfasts tend to be hearty.  In modern times, some people are breakfast people, some are not, and we tend to figure which sort we are fairly early in life.  Some folks can't face food until the body kicks into gear, others need the food in order to get those gears moving in the first place.

I am solidly in the pro-breakfast camp, which may be related to the fact that I am not a  morning person so I need to a solid breakfast to get moving.  When I was a kid, my mother would cook hot cereal for us, usually oatmeal or Cream of Wheat.  Amply garnished with milk and sugar, often I'd be gulping down the last of the my bowl as the school bus rumbled toward our house.  (As noted above, I'm not a morning person. <G>)

Cereal1When I moved to England years ago, I went into a little shop to buy some oatmeal and was proud of myself for asking with that fine English term, porridge.  The shopkeeper looked puzzled.  Discussion ensued.  The light dawned when she said, "Oh, Quaker Oats!" and she whipped out a box that looked just like the kind I bought at home.  <G>

The best oatmeal I've ever had was at a B&B in Ireland. Sadly, it was the Mayhem Consultant who ordered it–I almost mugged him after I got a taste.  Smooth Irish oats, interesting things added, and a milk so rich that it was halfway to being cream.  Delicious!  

I still have oatmeal for breakfast sometimes, using one of the faster cooking versions of Irish steel cut oats, topped with milk augmented with some half and half, a handful of raisins, maybe chopped walnuts or granola for texture, and honey for sweetness.  

PoachedEgg2But my basic breakfast for decades has been a poached egg on whole grain toast with orange juice (fresh squeezed if I can get it) and a cup of coffee to follow.  This is because I like the protein and can poach an egg more or less in my sleep, see "not a morning person," above. <G>  

I've had fun discovering different breakfasts 'round the world.  My first trip to Europe when I was in college and hitchhiking around with my roommate introduced me to the wonder that was the full English breakfast: There would always be cold cereal on offer (which I ignored.)  Fried eggs, fried bread, several forms of pig meat (English bacon is cured differently from American and doesn't get crisp, is more ham-like, plus sausage was usually on offer), grilled tomato, fried mushrooms, tea, toast, and marmalade.  And, baked beans, which was not something I wanted to eat for breakfast.  At that time tea was universal, but now coffee shares equal breakfast honors.

ToastRackEnglish toast is a class unto itself.  It's served in a toast rack that carefully separates each piece from its fellows, guaranteeing they'll all be cold.  I'm told that's because English homes are often chilly and stacking hot toast would cause condensation and sogginess which makes sense, but I missed hot toast.

As a corollary, years ago the Mayhem Consultant and I were traveling in the English West Country and stopped at a country inn for the night.  The room we were given was damply chilly, but the landlord turned on an oil heater and assured us that soon the room would be "warm as toast."  When we returned after a nice dinner downstairs, the room was still shiveringly cold, at which point I remember that English toast was NEVER warm!

Also on that first visit to Europe, in Paris I discovered the joy of a warm, flaky croissant Breakfast in Veniceand café au lait–strong coffee with hot milk.  My roommate and I were staying in a five story walk up student hotel, but we descended in the mornings to bliss.  The picture here is a more recent Continental breakfast in Venice, complete with a fruit filled pastry and a heart drawn by the barista on the cappuccino.  

In Northern Europe, I learned that the Dutch and Germans like sliced meats and cheeses and Scandinavians favored open faced sandwiches.  These days, a good European hotel breakfast buffet will have JamaicaInnAckee&Saltfishsome of everything, including fresh fruits and lots of breads and pastries.  In Hawaii and Down Under, there will be Asian rice based dishes and noodles and seaweed.  People eat the foods around them–in Jamaica, ackee (a kind of fruit) and saltfish are common.   Looks like scrambled eggs, but it isn't.  Tasty, though.  (Picture on the left.)

Joburg,54onBath.Given the scope of the British Empire, it's not surprising that variations of the full British breakfast are found around the world–the classic American breakfast of eggs and bacon and toast is a direct descendant, though I think we may have led the charge to add hash browns or home fries.  Here's a picture of a recent South African breakfast, with eggs, tomatoes, mushrooms, bacon, and a choice of lamb, beef, or pork sausage.  Robust!

As you might have gathered, I love breakfast in its many variations, though maybe not the seaweed. And I haven't even touched on waffles and pancakes and other cooked grain cakes, or the Mexican magnificence of huevos rancheros.  (Eggs with tomato chili sauce, tortillas, and maybe refried beans and/or guacamole.)

Are you a breakfast eater, or does the thought of so much food in the morning make you shudder?  What are your favorite breakfast dishes?  And what interesting ones have you met along the way?

Breakfast at La Auberge ProvencaleMary Jo, adding a picture of a fine B&B breakfast in Virginia with egg, ham, and a very fine crepe with orange slices.  

345 thoughts on “Adventure in Breakfasting”

  1. I am in England it is 7am; I have just finished my usual breakfast of poached egg on toast and a mug of tea. Going to get dressed now then walk the 3 miles to work.

    Reply
  2. I am in England it is 7am; I have just finished my usual breakfast of poached egg on toast and a mug of tea. Going to get dressed now then walk the 3 miles to work.

    Reply
  3. I am in England it is 7am; I have just finished my usual breakfast of poached egg on toast and a mug of tea. Going to get dressed now then walk the 3 miles to work.

    Reply
  4. I am in England it is 7am; I have just finished my usual breakfast of poached egg on toast and a mug of tea. Going to get dressed now then walk the 3 miles to work.

    Reply
  5. I am in England it is 7am; I have just finished my usual breakfast of poached egg on toast and a mug of tea. Going to get dressed now then walk the 3 miles to work.

    Reply
  6. My usual breakfast is a toasted cheese sandwich, some fresh pineapple and a lot of coffee. I don’t feel up to cooking anything in the morning and it’s probably safer that way.
    When I can get it, I have breakfast for lunch: scrambled eggs and bacon, or an egg white omelet with spinach, mushrooms and cheese.
    When I was younger and couldn’t be late to work, I just ate whatever was left over from dinner. Usually cold pizza. But I always made coffee. I miss those days.
    There are some items on those British breakfast plates that I’m not sure I can identify, and as to the tomatoes, they belong inside ketchup or burgers where they cannot be seen.

    Reply
  7. My usual breakfast is a toasted cheese sandwich, some fresh pineapple and a lot of coffee. I don’t feel up to cooking anything in the morning and it’s probably safer that way.
    When I can get it, I have breakfast for lunch: scrambled eggs and bacon, or an egg white omelet with spinach, mushrooms and cheese.
    When I was younger and couldn’t be late to work, I just ate whatever was left over from dinner. Usually cold pizza. But I always made coffee. I miss those days.
    There are some items on those British breakfast plates that I’m not sure I can identify, and as to the tomatoes, they belong inside ketchup or burgers where they cannot be seen.

    Reply
  8. My usual breakfast is a toasted cheese sandwich, some fresh pineapple and a lot of coffee. I don’t feel up to cooking anything in the morning and it’s probably safer that way.
    When I can get it, I have breakfast for lunch: scrambled eggs and bacon, or an egg white omelet with spinach, mushrooms and cheese.
    When I was younger and couldn’t be late to work, I just ate whatever was left over from dinner. Usually cold pizza. But I always made coffee. I miss those days.
    There are some items on those British breakfast plates that I’m not sure I can identify, and as to the tomatoes, they belong inside ketchup or burgers where they cannot be seen.

    Reply
  9. My usual breakfast is a toasted cheese sandwich, some fresh pineapple and a lot of coffee. I don’t feel up to cooking anything in the morning and it’s probably safer that way.
    When I can get it, I have breakfast for lunch: scrambled eggs and bacon, or an egg white omelet with spinach, mushrooms and cheese.
    When I was younger and couldn’t be late to work, I just ate whatever was left over from dinner. Usually cold pizza. But I always made coffee. I miss those days.
    There are some items on those British breakfast plates that I’m not sure I can identify, and as to the tomatoes, they belong inside ketchup or burgers where they cannot be seen.

    Reply
  10. My usual breakfast is a toasted cheese sandwich, some fresh pineapple and a lot of coffee. I don’t feel up to cooking anything in the morning and it’s probably safer that way.
    When I can get it, I have breakfast for lunch: scrambled eggs and bacon, or an egg white omelet with spinach, mushrooms and cheese.
    When I was younger and couldn’t be late to work, I just ate whatever was left over from dinner. Usually cold pizza. But I always made coffee. I miss those days.
    There are some items on those British breakfast plates that I’m not sure I can identify, and as to the tomatoes, they belong inside ketchup or burgers where they cannot be seen.

    Reply
  11. Back when it needed to be (like when I was a ballet dancer) breakfast was such a regulated part of my schedule. Now, however, I don’t tend to eat until a few hours into my day.
    I used to love Corn Flakes, but after reading the history of that creepy Kellogg man (and all the disturbing things he did to people), who invented them to stop people having any sexual desires, I haven’t been able to touch the stuff.
    I do admit, though, sometimes after spending a lot of time in a totally different culture, coming across a full English breakfast on the menu – even if I don’t eat much of it! – is sort of nice.

    Reply
  12. Back when it needed to be (like when I was a ballet dancer) breakfast was such a regulated part of my schedule. Now, however, I don’t tend to eat until a few hours into my day.
    I used to love Corn Flakes, but after reading the history of that creepy Kellogg man (and all the disturbing things he did to people), who invented them to stop people having any sexual desires, I haven’t been able to touch the stuff.
    I do admit, though, sometimes after spending a lot of time in a totally different culture, coming across a full English breakfast on the menu – even if I don’t eat much of it! – is sort of nice.

    Reply
  13. Back when it needed to be (like when I was a ballet dancer) breakfast was such a regulated part of my schedule. Now, however, I don’t tend to eat until a few hours into my day.
    I used to love Corn Flakes, but after reading the history of that creepy Kellogg man (and all the disturbing things he did to people), who invented them to stop people having any sexual desires, I haven’t been able to touch the stuff.
    I do admit, though, sometimes after spending a lot of time in a totally different culture, coming across a full English breakfast on the menu – even if I don’t eat much of it! – is sort of nice.

    Reply
  14. Back when it needed to be (like when I was a ballet dancer) breakfast was such a regulated part of my schedule. Now, however, I don’t tend to eat until a few hours into my day.
    I used to love Corn Flakes, but after reading the history of that creepy Kellogg man (and all the disturbing things he did to people), who invented them to stop people having any sexual desires, I haven’t been able to touch the stuff.
    I do admit, though, sometimes after spending a lot of time in a totally different culture, coming across a full English breakfast on the menu – even if I don’t eat much of it! – is sort of nice.

    Reply
  15. Back when it needed to be (like when I was a ballet dancer) breakfast was such a regulated part of my schedule. Now, however, I don’t tend to eat until a few hours into my day.
    I used to love Corn Flakes, but after reading the history of that creepy Kellogg man (and all the disturbing things he did to people), who invented them to stop people having any sexual desires, I haven’t been able to touch the stuff.
    I do admit, though, sometimes after spending a lot of time in a totally different culture, coming across a full English breakfast on the menu – even if I don’t eat much of it! – is sort of nice.

    Reply
  16. “I went into a little shop to buy some oatmeal and was proud of myself for asking with that fine English term, porridge.”
    Also, I never thought about that different terminology. In my mind, oatmeal was some magical food I’d never seen. Now I realise what it is. Whoops! I seem to learn a new “different word” every day…
    I love it when a country (and we all do it with one word or another) uses a brand name instead of the real name of the item. Kleenex, or Esky, or Hoover, or Texta. No matter how long I lived in England, I could never bring myself to say I was “Hoovering” the carpet.

    Reply
  17. “I went into a little shop to buy some oatmeal and was proud of myself for asking with that fine English term, porridge.”
    Also, I never thought about that different terminology. In my mind, oatmeal was some magical food I’d never seen. Now I realise what it is. Whoops! I seem to learn a new “different word” every day…
    I love it when a country (and we all do it with one word or another) uses a brand name instead of the real name of the item. Kleenex, or Esky, or Hoover, or Texta. No matter how long I lived in England, I could never bring myself to say I was “Hoovering” the carpet.

    Reply
  18. “I went into a little shop to buy some oatmeal and was proud of myself for asking with that fine English term, porridge.”
    Also, I never thought about that different terminology. In my mind, oatmeal was some magical food I’d never seen. Now I realise what it is. Whoops! I seem to learn a new “different word” every day…
    I love it when a country (and we all do it with one word or another) uses a brand name instead of the real name of the item. Kleenex, or Esky, or Hoover, or Texta. No matter how long I lived in England, I could never bring myself to say I was “Hoovering” the carpet.

    Reply
  19. “I went into a little shop to buy some oatmeal and was proud of myself for asking with that fine English term, porridge.”
    Also, I never thought about that different terminology. In my mind, oatmeal was some magical food I’d never seen. Now I realise what it is. Whoops! I seem to learn a new “different word” every day…
    I love it when a country (and we all do it with one word or another) uses a brand name instead of the real name of the item. Kleenex, or Esky, or Hoover, or Texta. No matter how long I lived in England, I could never bring myself to say I was “Hoovering” the carpet.

    Reply
  20. “I went into a little shop to buy some oatmeal and was proud of myself for asking with that fine English term, porridge.”
    Also, I never thought about that different terminology. In my mind, oatmeal was some magical food I’d never seen. Now I realise what it is. Whoops! I seem to learn a new “different word” every day…
    I love it when a country (and we all do it with one word or another) uses a brand name instead of the real name of the item. Kleenex, or Esky, or Hoover, or Texta. No matter how long I lived in England, I could never bring myself to say I was “Hoovering” the carpet.

    Reply
  21. I’m not very hungry in the morning, and for many years my breakfast consisted of a cup of coffee and a sweet roll which I would eat at my desk at work. In my mid fifties I started to work in a building that had a fine cafeteria that would cook an omelet with whatever I wanted in it. So I got used to eating some protein in the morning. Didn’t miss the sweet roll at all.
    Now that I’m 72 and pre-diabetic, it’s even more important that I eat properly. Most mornings I have a ham and egg sandwich on whole wheat bread. Every now and then I’ll have something different like a cold piece of pizza. Sounds terrible – doesn’t it? I’ve also grown to like turkey sausage – which isn’t bad if you don’t have the “real thing” around to compare it with.

    Reply
  22. I’m not very hungry in the morning, and for many years my breakfast consisted of a cup of coffee and a sweet roll which I would eat at my desk at work. In my mid fifties I started to work in a building that had a fine cafeteria that would cook an omelet with whatever I wanted in it. So I got used to eating some protein in the morning. Didn’t miss the sweet roll at all.
    Now that I’m 72 and pre-diabetic, it’s even more important that I eat properly. Most mornings I have a ham and egg sandwich on whole wheat bread. Every now and then I’ll have something different like a cold piece of pizza. Sounds terrible – doesn’t it? I’ve also grown to like turkey sausage – which isn’t bad if you don’t have the “real thing” around to compare it with.

    Reply
  23. I’m not very hungry in the morning, and for many years my breakfast consisted of a cup of coffee and a sweet roll which I would eat at my desk at work. In my mid fifties I started to work in a building that had a fine cafeteria that would cook an omelet with whatever I wanted in it. So I got used to eating some protein in the morning. Didn’t miss the sweet roll at all.
    Now that I’m 72 and pre-diabetic, it’s even more important that I eat properly. Most mornings I have a ham and egg sandwich on whole wheat bread. Every now and then I’ll have something different like a cold piece of pizza. Sounds terrible – doesn’t it? I’ve also grown to like turkey sausage – which isn’t bad if you don’t have the “real thing” around to compare it with.

    Reply
  24. I’m not very hungry in the morning, and for many years my breakfast consisted of a cup of coffee and a sweet roll which I would eat at my desk at work. In my mid fifties I started to work in a building that had a fine cafeteria that would cook an omelet with whatever I wanted in it. So I got used to eating some protein in the morning. Didn’t miss the sweet roll at all.
    Now that I’m 72 and pre-diabetic, it’s even more important that I eat properly. Most mornings I have a ham and egg sandwich on whole wheat bread. Every now and then I’ll have something different like a cold piece of pizza. Sounds terrible – doesn’t it? I’ve also grown to like turkey sausage – which isn’t bad if you don’t have the “real thing” around to compare it with.

    Reply
  25. I’m not very hungry in the morning, and for many years my breakfast consisted of a cup of coffee and a sweet roll which I would eat at my desk at work. In my mid fifties I started to work in a building that had a fine cafeteria that would cook an omelet with whatever I wanted in it. So I got used to eating some protein in the morning. Didn’t miss the sweet roll at all.
    Now that I’m 72 and pre-diabetic, it’s even more important that I eat properly. Most mornings I have a ham and egg sandwich on whole wheat bread. Every now and then I’ll have something different like a cold piece of pizza. Sounds terrible – doesn’t it? I’ve also grown to like turkey sausage – which isn’t bad if you don’t have the “real thing” around to compare it with.

    Reply
  26. This whole post made me hungry, but I’m much too lazy and ham-handed to cook in the kitchen in the morning. My husband usually brings me breakfast at my desk–a flavored coffee with too much sugar and cream or tea with lemon and sugar, and some sort of toast/pastry/doughnut which I really shouldn’t be eating.
    When we travel and there is a breakfast buffet bounty,I love oatmeal, fruit, croissants but have a rule about no meat in the morning unless it’s super-crisp bacon, and it never is.My daughters eat leftover dinner stuff for breakfast, which I find appalling, just as they find my Dunkin Donut the devil. 🙂

    Reply
  27. This whole post made me hungry, but I’m much too lazy and ham-handed to cook in the kitchen in the morning. My husband usually brings me breakfast at my desk–a flavored coffee with too much sugar and cream or tea with lemon and sugar, and some sort of toast/pastry/doughnut which I really shouldn’t be eating.
    When we travel and there is a breakfast buffet bounty,I love oatmeal, fruit, croissants but have a rule about no meat in the morning unless it’s super-crisp bacon, and it never is.My daughters eat leftover dinner stuff for breakfast, which I find appalling, just as they find my Dunkin Donut the devil. 🙂

    Reply
  28. This whole post made me hungry, but I’m much too lazy and ham-handed to cook in the kitchen in the morning. My husband usually brings me breakfast at my desk–a flavored coffee with too much sugar and cream or tea with lemon and sugar, and some sort of toast/pastry/doughnut which I really shouldn’t be eating.
    When we travel and there is a breakfast buffet bounty,I love oatmeal, fruit, croissants but have a rule about no meat in the morning unless it’s super-crisp bacon, and it never is.My daughters eat leftover dinner stuff for breakfast, which I find appalling, just as they find my Dunkin Donut the devil. 🙂

    Reply
  29. This whole post made me hungry, but I’m much too lazy and ham-handed to cook in the kitchen in the morning. My husband usually brings me breakfast at my desk–a flavored coffee with too much sugar and cream or tea with lemon and sugar, and some sort of toast/pastry/doughnut which I really shouldn’t be eating.
    When we travel and there is a breakfast buffet bounty,I love oatmeal, fruit, croissants but have a rule about no meat in the morning unless it’s super-crisp bacon, and it never is.My daughters eat leftover dinner stuff for breakfast, which I find appalling, just as they find my Dunkin Donut the devil. 🙂

    Reply
  30. This whole post made me hungry, but I’m much too lazy and ham-handed to cook in the kitchen in the morning. My husband usually brings me breakfast at my desk–a flavored coffee with too much sugar and cream or tea with lemon and sugar, and some sort of toast/pastry/doughnut which I really shouldn’t be eating.
    When we travel and there is a breakfast buffet bounty,I love oatmeal, fruit, croissants but have a rule about no meat in the morning unless it’s super-crisp bacon, and it never is.My daughters eat leftover dinner stuff for breakfast, which I find appalling, just as they find my Dunkin Donut the devil. 🙂

    Reply
  31. “I’ve also grown to like turkey sausage – which isn’t bad if you don’t have the “real thing” around to compare it with.”
    Ha! I went onto a gluten-free diet a few weeks ago, and I’m still mourning the loss of pretty much every food I love.

    Reply
  32. “I’ve also grown to like turkey sausage – which isn’t bad if you don’t have the “real thing” around to compare it with.”
    Ha! I went onto a gluten-free diet a few weeks ago, and I’m still mourning the loss of pretty much every food I love.

    Reply
  33. “I’ve also grown to like turkey sausage – which isn’t bad if you don’t have the “real thing” around to compare it with.”
    Ha! I went onto a gluten-free diet a few weeks ago, and I’m still mourning the loss of pretty much every food I love.

    Reply
  34. “I’ve also grown to like turkey sausage – which isn’t bad if you don’t have the “real thing” around to compare it with.”
    Ha! I went onto a gluten-free diet a few weeks ago, and I’m still mourning the loss of pretty much every food I love.

    Reply
  35. “I’ve also grown to like turkey sausage – which isn’t bad if you don’t have the “real thing” around to compare it with.”
    Ha! I went onto a gluten-free diet a few weeks ago, and I’m still mourning the loss of pretty much every food I love.

    Reply
  36. My DH and I eat steel cut oatmeal every morning, with a bit of brown sugar and cinnamon. He’s found a way to get around the long cooking time, so I’ll pass this on. Toast 1 cup oats in about a tablespoon of butter until fragrant, then add 3 cups of boiling water. Cover and let sit all night. In the morning add 1 cup of milk, stir and microwave to desired temperature. It’s really good and it “sticks to your ribs” longer than cold cereal.

    Reply
  37. My DH and I eat steel cut oatmeal every morning, with a bit of brown sugar and cinnamon. He’s found a way to get around the long cooking time, so I’ll pass this on. Toast 1 cup oats in about a tablespoon of butter until fragrant, then add 3 cups of boiling water. Cover and let sit all night. In the morning add 1 cup of milk, stir and microwave to desired temperature. It’s really good and it “sticks to your ribs” longer than cold cereal.

    Reply
  38. My DH and I eat steel cut oatmeal every morning, with a bit of brown sugar and cinnamon. He’s found a way to get around the long cooking time, so I’ll pass this on. Toast 1 cup oats in about a tablespoon of butter until fragrant, then add 3 cups of boiling water. Cover and let sit all night. In the morning add 1 cup of milk, stir and microwave to desired temperature. It’s really good and it “sticks to your ribs” longer than cold cereal.

    Reply
  39. My DH and I eat steel cut oatmeal every morning, with a bit of brown sugar and cinnamon. He’s found a way to get around the long cooking time, so I’ll pass this on. Toast 1 cup oats in about a tablespoon of butter until fragrant, then add 3 cups of boiling water. Cover and let sit all night. In the morning add 1 cup of milk, stir and microwave to desired temperature. It’s really good and it “sticks to your ribs” longer than cold cereal.

    Reply
  40. My DH and I eat steel cut oatmeal every morning, with a bit of brown sugar and cinnamon. He’s found a way to get around the long cooking time, so I’ll pass this on. Toast 1 cup oats in about a tablespoon of butter until fragrant, then add 3 cups of boiling water. Cover and let sit all night. In the morning add 1 cup of milk, stir and microwave to desired temperature. It’s really good and it “sticks to your ribs” longer than cold cereal.

    Reply
  41. I was never a morning person, but I had oatmeal in the morning before walking the short three blocks to school. I HATED IT!
    Many years later I discovered that I am sensitive to grains and extremely sensitive to oatmeal (approaching a “hard” allergy. I am also sensitive to eggs. Explanation as to why traditional breakfasts never worked for me. When we traveled in Britain I had a choice at kedgeree on several occasions. I loved it! And I love biscuits with sausage gravy.
    Otherwise I have dinner for breakfast. Sometimes leftovers, more frequently frozen entries. Balanced nutrition, grains at a minimum, and no eggs! I can enjoy this breakfast without getting ill later.

    Reply
  42. I was never a morning person, but I had oatmeal in the morning before walking the short three blocks to school. I HATED IT!
    Many years later I discovered that I am sensitive to grains and extremely sensitive to oatmeal (approaching a “hard” allergy. I am also sensitive to eggs. Explanation as to why traditional breakfasts never worked for me. When we traveled in Britain I had a choice at kedgeree on several occasions. I loved it! And I love biscuits with sausage gravy.
    Otherwise I have dinner for breakfast. Sometimes leftovers, more frequently frozen entries. Balanced nutrition, grains at a minimum, and no eggs! I can enjoy this breakfast without getting ill later.

    Reply
  43. I was never a morning person, but I had oatmeal in the morning before walking the short three blocks to school. I HATED IT!
    Many years later I discovered that I am sensitive to grains and extremely sensitive to oatmeal (approaching a “hard” allergy. I am also sensitive to eggs. Explanation as to why traditional breakfasts never worked for me. When we traveled in Britain I had a choice at kedgeree on several occasions. I loved it! And I love biscuits with sausage gravy.
    Otherwise I have dinner for breakfast. Sometimes leftovers, more frequently frozen entries. Balanced nutrition, grains at a minimum, and no eggs! I can enjoy this breakfast without getting ill later.

    Reply
  44. I was never a morning person, but I had oatmeal in the morning before walking the short three blocks to school. I HATED IT!
    Many years later I discovered that I am sensitive to grains and extremely sensitive to oatmeal (approaching a “hard” allergy. I am also sensitive to eggs. Explanation as to why traditional breakfasts never worked for me. When we traveled in Britain I had a choice at kedgeree on several occasions. I loved it! And I love biscuits with sausage gravy.
    Otherwise I have dinner for breakfast. Sometimes leftovers, more frequently frozen entries. Balanced nutrition, grains at a minimum, and no eggs! I can enjoy this breakfast without getting ill later.

    Reply
  45. I was never a morning person, but I had oatmeal in the morning before walking the short three blocks to school. I HATED IT!
    Many years later I discovered that I am sensitive to grains and extremely sensitive to oatmeal (approaching a “hard” allergy. I am also sensitive to eggs. Explanation as to why traditional breakfasts never worked for me. When we traveled in Britain I had a choice at kedgeree on several occasions. I loved it! And I love biscuits with sausage gravy.
    Otherwise I have dinner for breakfast. Sometimes leftovers, more frequently frozen entries. Balanced nutrition, grains at a minimum, and no eggs! I can enjoy this breakfast without getting ill later.

    Reply
  46. The best “full English” breakfast we ever had was in Cambridge. Everything you mentioned plus yogurt and lots of jams. We stuffed ourselves, but didn’t need to eat until 3-4 in the afternoon. The full Irish was pretty great, too. Some kind of dark or light pudding was with it.

    Reply
  47. The best “full English” breakfast we ever had was in Cambridge. Everything you mentioned plus yogurt and lots of jams. We stuffed ourselves, but didn’t need to eat until 3-4 in the afternoon. The full Irish was pretty great, too. Some kind of dark or light pudding was with it.

    Reply
  48. The best “full English” breakfast we ever had was in Cambridge. Everything you mentioned plus yogurt and lots of jams. We stuffed ourselves, but didn’t need to eat until 3-4 in the afternoon. The full Irish was pretty great, too. Some kind of dark or light pudding was with it.

    Reply
  49. The best “full English” breakfast we ever had was in Cambridge. Everything you mentioned plus yogurt and lots of jams. We stuffed ourselves, but didn’t need to eat until 3-4 in the afternoon. The full Irish was pretty great, too. Some kind of dark or light pudding was with it.

    Reply
  50. The best “full English” breakfast we ever had was in Cambridge. Everything you mentioned plus yogurt and lots of jams. We stuffed ourselves, but didn’t need to eat until 3-4 in the afternoon. The full Irish was pretty great, too. Some kind of dark or light pudding was with it.

    Reply
  51. When you were in New Mexico perhaps you tried huevos rancheros? Popular for lunch as well as breakfast, and always accompanied by our official State Question: “Red or Green?” (To which the proper answer is “Christmas.”)

    Reply
  52. When you were in New Mexico perhaps you tried huevos rancheros? Popular for lunch as well as breakfast, and always accompanied by our official State Question: “Red or Green?” (To which the proper answer is “Christmas.”)

    Reply
  53. When you were in New Mexico perhaps you tried huevos rancheros? Popular for lunch as well as breakfast, and always accompanied by our official State Question: “Red or Green?” (To which the proper answer is “Christmas.”)

    Reply
  54. When you were in New Mexico perhaps you tried huevos rancheros? Popular for lunch as well as breakfast, and always accompanied by our official State Question: “Red or Green?” (To which the proper answer is “Christmas.”)

    Reply
  55. When you were in New Mexico perhaps you tried huevos rancheros? Popular for lunch as well as breakfast, and always accompanied by our official State Question: “Red or Green?” (To which the proper answer is “Christmas.”)

    Reply
  56. I was in the Arabian gulf (several countries) and was staying at four and five stars hotels because work was paying for it. The hotels (more than one) had three breakfast buffets: America, British, and Asian. There was also a menu you can order off of. I had been gone from home for several weeks. I asked if they could make me blueberry pancakes. (I knew they had blue berries because of the fruit bowl.) Maybe I remember it wrong, but I think they brought it out to me with a smiley face in whip cream.
    I’m trying to work myself up to having kippers for breakfast while I’m in the UK. I have to say the English breakfasts are so good, that I keep going back to it. The best one I substituted small tomatoes grilled on a skewer. The UK has begun to serve American bacon, typically called streaky bacon.
    I’ve kept to the Middle Eastern Breakfast–yogurt and cheese with olives if I can get the–for every day.

    Reply
  57. I was in the Arabian gulf (several countries) and was staying at four and five stars hotels because work was paying for it. The hotels (more than one) had three breakfast buffets: America, British, and Asian. There was also a menu you can order off of. I had been gone from home for several weeks. I asked if they could make me blueberry pancakes. (I knew they had blue berries because of the fruit bowl.) Maybe I remember it wrong, but I think they brought it out to me with a smiley face in whip cream.
    I’m trying to work myself up to having kippers for breakfast while I’m in the UK. I have to say the English breakfasts are so good, that I keep going back to it. The best one I substituted small tomatoes grilled on a skewer. The UK has begun to serve American bacon, typically called streaky bacon.
    I’ve kept to the Middle Eastern Breakfast–yogurt and cheese with olives if I can get the–for every day.

    Reply
  58. I was in the Arabian gulf (several countries) and was staying at four and five stars hotels because work was paying for it. The hotels (more than one) had three breakfast buffets: America, British, and Asian. There was also a menu you can order off of. I had been gone from home for several weeks. I asked if they could make me blueberry pancakes. (I knew they had blue berries because of the fruit bowl.) Maybe I remember it wrong, but I think they brought it out to me with a smiley face in whip cream.
    I’m trying to work myself up to having kippers for breakfast while I’m in the UK. I have to say the English breakfasts are so good, that I keep going back to it. The best one I substituted small tomatoes grilled on a skewer. The UK has begun to serve American bacon, typically called streaky bacon.
    I’ve kept to the Middle Eastern Breakfast–yogurt and cheese with olives if I can get the–for every day.

    Reply
  59. I was in the Arabian gulf (several countries) and was staying at four and five stars hotels because work was paying for it. The hotels (more than one) had three breakfast buffets: America, British, and Asian. There was also a menu you can order off of. I had been gone from home for several weeks. I asked if they could make me blueberry pancakes. (I knew they had blue berries because of the fruit bowl.) Maybe I remember it wrong, but I think they brought it out to me with a smiley face in whip cream.
    I’m trying to work myself up to having kippers for breakfast while I’m in the UK. I have to say the English breakfasts are so good, that I keep going back to it. The best one I substituted small tomatoes grilled on a skewer. The UK has begun to serve American bacon, typically called streaky bacon.
    I’ve kept to the Middle Eastern Breakfast–yogurt and cheese with olives if I can get the–for every day.

    Reply
  60. I was in the Arabian gulf (several countries) and was staying at four and five stars hotels because work was paying for it. The hotels (more than one) had three breakfast buffets: America, British, and Asian. There was also a menu you can order off of. I had been gone from home for several weeks. I asked if they could make me blueberry pancakes. (I knew they had blue berries because of the fruit bowl.) Maybe I remember it wrong, but I think they brought it out to me with a smiley face in whip cream.
    I’m trying to work myself up to having kippers for breakfast while I’m in the UK. I have to say the English breakfasts are so good, that I keep going back to it. The best one I substituted small tomatoes grilled on a skewer. The UK has begun to serve American bacon, typically called streaky bacon.
    I’ve kept to the Middle Eastern Breakfast–yogurt and cheese with olives if I can get the–for every day.

    Reply
  61. I used to do the full breakfast thing. Now unless I’m really feeling it, breakfast is Quaker Oats with raisins, some brown sugar, and milk. If I get a craving for pancakes or eggs that is a different story. Then all the pots come out and my kitchen which is small becomes a disaster. But I still have fond memories of my posting to Germany in 1979 – 81, when breakfast was a delight to the taste buds. That picture brings back all the smells of fresh brochen(sp) and cheeses, fruit, juices and lovely tea in a glass cup in a metal holder. I am a brekky person.

    Reply
  62. I used to do the full breakfast thing. Now unless I’m really feeling it, breakfast is Quaker Oats with raisins, some brown sugar, and milk. If I get a craving for pancakes or eggs that is a different story. Then all the pots come out and my kitchen which is small becomes a disaster. But I still have fond memories of my posting to Germany in 1979 – 81, when breakfast was a delight to the taste buds. That picture brings back all the smells of fresh brochen(sp) and cheeses, fruit, juices and lovely tea in a glass cup in a metal holder. I am a brekky person.

    Reply
  63. I used to do the full breakfast thing. Now unless I’m really feeling it, breakfast is Quaker Oats with raisins, some brown sugar, and milk. If I get a craving for pancakes or eggs that is a different story. Then all the pots come out and my kitchen which is small becomes a disaster. But I still have fond memories of my posting to Germany in 1979 – 81, when breakfast was a delight to the taste buds. That picture brings back all the smells of fresh brochen(sp) and cheeses, fruit, juices and lovely tea in a glass cup in a metal holder. I am a brekky person.

    Reply
  64. I used to do the full breakfast thing. Now unless I’m really feeling it, breakfast is Quaker Oats with raisins, some brown sugar, and milk. If I get a craving for pancakes or eggs that is a different story. Then all the pots come out and my kitchen which is small becomes a disaster. But I still have fond memories of my posting to Germany in 1979 – 81, when breakfast was a delight to the taste buds. That picture brings back all the smells of fresh brochen(sp) and cheeses, fruit, juices and lovely tea in a glass cup in a metal holder. I am a brekky person.

    Reply
  65. I used to do the full breakfast thing. Now unless I’m really feeling it, breakfast is Quaker Oats with raisins, some brown sugar, and milk. If I get a craving for pancakes or eggs that is a different story. Then all the pots come out and my kitchen which is small becomes a disaster. But I still have fond memories of my posting to Germany in 1979 – 81, when breakfast was a delight to the taste buds. That picture brings back all the smells of fresh brochen(sp) and cheeses, fruit, juices and lovely tea in a glass cup in a metal holder. I am a brekky person.

    Reply
  66. Breakfast is my favorite meal. It may be because my father used to work the night shift (there was a pay differential which came in handy) and would arrive home in time to make us breakfast before we left for school. Breakfast was usually hot cereal such as oatmeal or cream of wheat, and the memories of eating breakfast with my father may explain why I am so fond of hot cereal today. I also love many of the other foods one finds on brunch menus: French toast, omelets, cinnamon toast, sausage, simit and haloumi cheese (in Turkey), yogurt, etc. The full Irish or English is delicious but makes my stomach a bit queasy since it contains so much fat. My family traveled around Ireland a few years ago, and by the end of the trip I did not want to look at meat products for breakfast for several years.
    As with MJ and others, perhaps I like breakfast so much because I am not a morning person, and to sit and read the paper while eating a good breakfast is a way to delay having to be organized and up and about.

    Reply
  67. Breakfast is my favorite meal. It may be because my father used to work the night shift (there was a pay differential which came in handy) and would arrive home in time to make us breakfast before we left for school. Breakfast was usually hot cereal such as oatmeal or cream of wheat, and the memories of eating breakfast with my father may explain why I am so fond of hot cereal today. I also love many of the other foods one finds on brunch menus: French toast, omelets, cinnamon toast, sausage, simit and haloumi cheese (in Turkey), yogurt, etc. The full Irish or English is delicious but makes my stomach a bit queasy since it contains so much fat. My family traveled around Ireland a few years ago, and by the end of the trip I did not want to look at meat products for breakfast for several years.
    As with MJ and others, perhaps I like breakfast so much because I am not a morning person, and to sit and read the paper while eating a good breakfast is a way to delay having to be organized and up and about.

    Reply
  68. Breakfast is my favorite meal. It may be because my father used to work the night shift (there was a pay differential which came in handy) and would arrive home in time to make us breakfast before we left for school. Breakfast was usually hot cereal such as oatmeal or cream of wheat, and the memories of eating breakfast with my father may explain why I am so fond of hot cereal today. I also love many of the other foods one finds on brunch menus: French toast, omelets, cinnamon toast, sausage, simit and haloumi cheese (in Turkey), yogurt, etc. The full Irish or English is delicious but makes my stomach a bit queasy since it contains so much fat. My family traveled around Ireland a few years ago, and by the end of the trip I did not want to look at meat products for breakfast for several years.
    As with MJ and others, perhaps I like breakfast so much because I am not a morning person, and to sit and read the paper while eating a good breakfast is a way to delay having to be organized and up and about.

    Reply
  69. Breakfast is my favorite meal. It may be because my father used to work the night shift (there was a pay differential which came in handy) and would arrive home in time to make us breakfast before we left for school. Breakfast was usually hot cereal such as oatmeal or cream of wheat, and the memories of eating breakfast with my father may explain why I am so fond of hot cereal today. I also love many of the other foods one finds on brunch menus: French toast, omelets, cinnamon toast, sausage, simit and haloumi cheese (in Turkey), yogurt, etc. The full Irish or English is delicious but makes my stomach a bit queasy since it contains so much fat. My family traveled around Ireland a few years ago, and by the end of the trip I did not want to look at meat products for breakfast for several years.
    As with MJ and others, perhaps I like breakfast so much because I am not a morning person, and to sit and read the paper while eating a good breakfast is a way to delay having to be organized and up and about.

    Reply
  70. Breakfast is my favorite meal. It may be because my father used to work the night shift (there was a pay differential which came in handy) and would arrive home in time to make us breakfast before we left for school. Breakfast was usually hot cereal such as oatmeal or cream of wheat, and the memories of eating breakfast with my father may explain why I am so fond of hot cereal today. I also love many of the other foods one finds on brunch menus: French toast, omelets, cinnamon toast, sausage, simit and haloumi cheese (in Turkey), yogurt, etc. The full Irish or English is delicious but makes my stomach a bit queasy since it contains so much fat. My family traveled around Ireland a few years ago, and by the end of the trip I did not want to look at meat products for breakfast for several years.
    As with MJ and others, perhaps I like breakfast so much because I am not a morning person, and to sit and read the paper while eating a good breakfast is a way to delay having to be organized and up and about.

    Reply
  71. Joanna, I see you’re close to my breakfast, but my commute is a flight of steps rather than a healthy three mile walk! I find a poached egg on toast to be an easy, tasty breakfast. And healthy.

    Reply
  72. Joanna, I see you’re close to my breakfast, but my commute is a flight of steps rather than a healthy three mile walk! I find a poached egg on toast to be an easy, tasty breakfast. And healthy.

    Reply
  73. Joanna, I see you’re close to my breakfast, but my commute is a flight of steps rather than a healthy three mile walk! I find a poached egg on toast to be an easy, tasty breakfast. And healthy.

    Reply
  74. Joanna, I see you’re close to my breakfast, but my commute is a flight of steps rather than a healthy three mile walk! I find a poached egg on toast to be an easy, tasty breakfast. And healthy.

    Reply
  75. Joanna, I see you’re close to my breakfast, but my commute is a flight of steps rather than a healthy three mile walk! I find a poached egg on toast to be an easy, tasty breakfast. And healthy.

    Reply
  76. Janice, that toasted cheese sandwich and fresh pineapple sounds lovely! I’d be happy to eat that. I’ll join you for breakfast-for-lunch, too. The tomatoes can be surprisingly good, though. On our honeymoon in Bermuda, roast grape tomatoes were a lovely accompaniment to my morning eggs.

    Reply
  77. Janice, that toasted cheese sandwich and fresh pineapple sounds lovely! I’d be happy to eat that. I’ll join you for breakfast-for-lunch, too. The tomatoes can be surprisingly good, though. On our honeymoon in Bermuda, roast grape tomatoes were a lovely accompaniment to my morning eggs.

    Reply
  78. Janice, that toasted cheese sandwich and fresh pineapple sounds lovely! I’d be happy to eat that. I’ll join you for breakfast-for-lunch, too. The tomatoes can be surprisingly good, though. On our honeymoon in Bermuda, roast grape tomatoes were a lovely accompaniment to my morning eggs.

    Reply
  79. Janice, that toasted cheese sandwich and fresh pineapple sounds lovely! I’d be happy to eat that. I’ll join you for breakfast-for-lunch, too. The tomatoes can be surprisingly good, though. On our honeymoon in Bermuda, roast grape tomatoes were a lovely accompaniment to my morning eggs.

    Reply
  80. Janice, that toasted cheese sandwich and fresh pineapple sounds lovely! I’d be happy to eat that. I’ll join you for breakfast-for-lunch, too. The tomatoes can be surprisingly good, though. On our honeymoon in Bermuda, roast grape tomatoes were a lovely accompaniment to my morning eggs.

    Reply
  81. Sonya, I’ve never been fond of corn flakes even before I learned how creepy Kellogg was. *G* As you say, when traveling to exotic places, there is something very comforting about returning home to familiar breakfast food.

    Reply
  82. Sonya, I’ve never been fond of corn flakes even before I learned how creepy Kellogg was. *G* As you say, when traveling to exotic places, there is something very comforting about returning home to familiar breakfast food.

    Reply
  83. Sonya, I’ve never been fond of corn flakes even before I learned how creepy Kellogg was. *G* As you say, when traveling to exotic places, there is something very comforting about returning home to familiar breakfast food.

    Reply
  84. Sonya, I’ve never been fond of corn flakes even before I learned how creepy Kellogg was. *G* As you say, when traveling to exotic places, there is something very comforting about returning home to familiar breakfast food.

    Reply
  85. Sonya, I’ve never been fond of corn flakes even before I learned how creepy Kellogg was. *G* As you say, when traveling to exotic places, there is something very comforting about returning home to familiar breakfast food.

    Reply
  86. Mary T, though I didn’t mention it above, one reason I almost always have protein (specifically eggs) for breakfast is that there is a lot of diabetes in my family, and I want to keep it well away from me. I love restaurants with omelets stations. Turkey sausage, not so much. *G*

    Reply
  87. Mary T, though I didn’t mention it above, one reason I almost always have protein (specifically eggs) for breakfast is that there is a lot of diabetes in my family, and I want to keep it well away from me. I love restaurants with omelets stations. Turkey sausage, not so much. *G*

    Reply
  88. Mary T, though I didn’t mention it above, one reason I almost always have protein (specifically eggs) for breakfast is that there is a lot of diabetes in my family, and I want to keep it well away from me. I love restaurants with omelets stations. Turkey sausage, not so much. *G*

    Reply
  89. Mary T, though I didn’t mention it above, one reason I almost always have protein (specifically eggs) for breakfast is that there is a lot of diabetes in my family, and I want to keep it well away from me. I love restaurants with omelets stations. Turkey sausage, not so much. *G*

    Reply
  90. Mary T, though I didn’t mention it above, one reason I almost always have protein (specifically eggs) for breakfast is that there is a lot of diabetes in my family, and I want to keep it well away from me. I love restaurants with omelets stations. Turkey sausage, not so much. *G*

    Reply
  91. Cindy A, I’m guessing that the black and white pudding you mentioned in Ireland were a form of sausage? A landlord at an Irish B&B said he didn’t usually serve black pudding, which is made with blood, because only the Irish would eat it. *G*
    You’re right that the Full British Breakfasts, whether English, Irish, or Scottish, are VERY filling–but good for starting a day of sightseeing.

    Reply
  92. Cindy A, I’m guessing that the black and white pudding you mentioned in Ireland were a form of sausage? A landlord at an Irish B&B said he didn’t usually serve black pudding, which is made with blood, because only the Irish would eat it. *G*
    You’re right that the Full British Breakfasts, whether English, Irish, or Scottish, are VERY filling–but good for starting a day of sightseeing.

    Reply
  93. Cindy A, I’m guessing that the black and white pudding you mentioned in Ireland were a form of sausage? A landlord at an Irish B&B said he didn’t usually serve black pudding, which is made with blood, because only the Irish would eat it. *G*
    You’re right that the Full British Breakfasts, whether English, Irish, or Scottish, are VERY filling–but good for starting a day of sightseeing.

    Reply
  94. Cindy A, I’m guessing that the black and white pudding you mentioned in Ireland were a form of sausage? A landlord at an Irish B&B said he didn’t usually serve black pudding, which is made with blood, because only the Irish would eat it. *G*
    You’re right that the Full British Breakfasts, whether English, Irish, or Scottish, are VERY filling–but good for starting a day of sightseeing.

    Reply
  95. Cindy A, I’m guessing that the black and white pudding you mentioned in Ireland were a form of sausage? A landlord at an Irish B&B said he didn’t usually serve black pudding, which is made with blood, because only the Irish would eat it. *G*
    You’re right that the Full British Breakfasts, whether English, Irish, or Scottish, are VERY filling–but good for starting a day of sightseeing.

    Reply
  96. You nailed it, Pati! My first experience of huevos rancheros was in Santa Fe. I was slightly wary, but swiftly found that it was a great combination. I’ll remember about Christmas, which I’m guessing is both red and green sauce?

    Reply
  97. You nailed it, Pati! My first experience of huevos rancheros was in Santa Fe. I was slightly wary, but swiftly found that it was a great combination. I’ll remember about Christmas, which I’m guessing is both red and green sauce?

    Reply
  98. You nailed it, Pati! My first experience of huevos rancheros was in Santa Fe. I was slightly wary, but swiftly found that it was a great combination. I’ll remember about Christmas, which I’m guessing is both red and green sauce?

    Reply
  99. You nailed it, Pati! My first experience of huevos rancheros was in Santa Fe. I was slightly wary, but swiftly found that it was a great combination. I’ll remember about Christmas, which I’m guessing is both red and green sauce?

    Reply
  100. You nailed it, Pati! My first experience of huevos rancheros was in Santa Fe. I was slightly wary, but swiftly found that it was a great combination. I’ll remember about Christmas, which I’m guessing is both red and green sauce?

    Reply
  101. Shannon, you’re making me hungry! I have not trouble believing in a whipped cream smiley face–the kitchen staff are entitled to some fun. *G* I have found the streaky bacon sneaking into British derived breakfasts, and I approve since I like it better than English bacon.
    I’m curious the difference between the American and British breakfast buffets–they wouldn’t be identical, but I’d think there were fairly similar.

    Reply
  102. Shannon, you’re making me hungry! I have not trouble believing in a whipped cream smiley face–the kitchen staff are entitled to some fun. *G* I have found the streaky bacon sneaking into British derived breakfasts, and I approve since I like it better than English bacon.
    I’m curious the difference between the American and British breakfast buffets–they wouldn’t be identical, but I’d think there were fairly similar.

    Reply
  103. Shannon, you’re making me hungry! I have not trouble believing in a whipped cream smiley face–the kitchen staff are entitled to some fun. *G* I have found the streaky bacon sneaking into British derived breakfasts, and I approve since I like it better than English bacon.
    I’m curious the difference between the American and British breakfast buffets–they wouldn’t be identical, but I’d think there were fairly similar.

    Reply
  104. Shannon, you’re making me hungry! I have not trouble believing in a whipped cream smiley face–the kitchen staff are entitled to some fun. *G* I have found the streaky bacon sneaking into British derived breakfasts, and I approve since I like it better than English bacon.
    I’m curious the difference between the American and British breakfast buffets–they wouldn’t be identical, but I’d think there were fairly similar.

    Reply
  105. Shannon, you’re making me hungry! I have not trouble believing in a whipped cream smiley face–the kitchen staff are entitled to some fun. *G* I have found the streaky bacon sneaking into British derived breakfasts, and I approve since I like it better than English bacon.
    I’m curious the difference between the American and British breakfast buffets–they wouldn’t be identical, but I’d think there were fairly similar.

    Reply
  106. I’m probably a very boring person because I have Porridge every morning. It’s Flahavans which is a famous porridge here in Ireland and made in the village near where I grew up. I have it with a handful of blueberries and a soya yogurt mixed in. I also make it with coconut milk.
    After being reared on cow’s milk, now in my early fifties I’ve developed an intolerance to it. I missed it a lot at first but am now quite used to it. And the porridge is very tasty this way.
    At the weekend I’ll have a boiled duck egg and spelt and honey bread. (Wow I know how to live)!!!!!

    Reply
  107. I’m probably a very boring person because I have Porridge every morning. It’s Flahavans which is a famous porridge here in Ireland and made in the village near where I grew up. I have it with a handful of blueberries and a soya yogurt mixed in. I also make it with coconut milk.
    After being reared on cow’s milk, now in my early fifties I’ve developed an intolerance to it. I missed it a lot at first but am now quite used to it. And the porridge is very tasty this way.
    At the weekend I’ll have a boiled duck egg and spelt and honey bread. (Wow I know how to live)!!!!!

    Reply
  108. I’m probably a very boring person because I have Porridge every morning. It’s Flahavans which is a famous porridge here in Ireland and made in the village near where I grew up. I have it with a handful of blueberries and a soya yogurt mixed in. I also make it with coconut milk.
    After being reared on cow’s milk, now in my early fifties I’ve developed an intolerance to it. I missed it a lot at first but am now quite used to it. And the porridge is very tasty this way.
    At the weekend I’ll have a boiled duck egg and spelt and honey bread. (Wow I know how to live)!!!!!

    Reply
  109. I’m probably a very boring person because I have Porridge every morning. It’s Flahavans which is a famous porridge here in Ireland and made in the village near where I grew up. I have it with a handful of blueberries and a soya yogurt mixed in. I also make it with coconut milk.
    After being reared on cow’s milk, now in my early fifties I’ve developed an intolerance to it. I missed it a lot at first but am now quite used to it. And the porridge is very tasty this way.
    At the weekend I’ll have a boiled duck egg and spelt and honey bread. (Wow I know how to live)!!!!!

    Reply
  110. I’m probably a very boring person because I have Porridge every morning. It’s Flahavans which is a famous porridge here in Ireland and made in the village near where I grew up. I have it with a handful of blueberries and a soya yogurt mixed in. I also make it with coconut milk.
    After being reared on cow’s milk, now in my early fifties I’ve developed an intolerance to it. I missed it a lot at first but am now quite used to it. And the porridge is very tasty this way.
    At the weekend I’ll have a boiled duck egg and spelt and honey bread. (Wow I know how to live)!!!!!

    Reply
  111. I am chiming in late here, but was so happy that someone finally mentioned kippers! Thank you, Shannon! When we are in England or Scotland, I will order kippers any time they are on the menu, and if we are house-swapping, I’ll buy them and cook them. With kippers, I want only dry toast and very strong tea, while I am usually no-toast and creamed coffee in the morning. Please try kippers, Shannon — you owe it to yourself!
    My husband loves fried bread, which he calls “grease toast”. Enough said.
    My favorite breakfast story is of an Italian breakfast: my husband works for an Italian company, and several years ago, we were invited to go over to attend the company Christmas party, and they made reservations for us at a gorgeous villa-now-hotel in a village near Pordenone. We had a very early morning flight back to the US on December 20. The evening before, we were asked if we wanted breakfast and said that something light would be appreciated as we would be traveling all day. What we did not know was that we were the only guests in the hotel that evening, and that the hotel was closing the following day for the holiday. We came down at 4am to find a table for two set in front of a blazing fire, in the very large, beautifully decorated dining room. Fresh juice, cold meats and cheeses, warm breads, cereals and fresh fruit were all set out on a sideboard. And on the table was a lovely gift-wrapped small box, with a note in Italian saying “for the journey”, containing exquisite glaceed fruits. On any day, it would have been a truly magical breakfast, but on a day that ended up being a 26-hour trip, it kept us smiling all the way home!

    Reply
  112. I am chiming in late here, but was so happy that someone finally mentioned kippers! Thank you, Shannon! When we are in England or Scotland, I will order kippers any time they are on the menu, and if we are house-swapping, I’ll buy them and cook them. With kippers, I want only dry toast and very strong tea, while I am usually no-toast and creamed coffee in the morning. Please try kippers, Shannon — you owe it to yourself!
    My husband loves fried bread, which he calls “grease toast”. Enough said.
    My favorite breakfast story is of an Italian breakfast: my husband works for an Italian company, and several years ago, we were invited to go over to attend the company Christmas party, and they made reservations for us at a gorgeous villa-now-hotel in a village near Pordenone. We had a very early morning flight back to the US on December 20. The evening before, we were asked if we wanted breakfast and said that something light would be appreciated as we would be traveling all day. What we did not know was that we were the only guests in the hotel that evening, and that the hotel was closing the following day for the holiday. We came down at 4am to find a table for two set in front of a blazing fire, in the very large, beautifully decorated dining room. Fresh juice, cold meats and cheeses, warm breads, cereals and fresh fruit were all set out on a sideboard. And on the table was a lovely gift-wrapped small box, with a note in Italian saying “for the journey”, containing exquisite glaceed fruits. On any day, it would have been a truly magical breakfast, but on a day that ended up being a 26-hour trip, it kept us smiling all the way home!

    Reply
  113. I am chiming in late here, but was so happy that someone finally mentioned kippers! Thank you, Shannon! When we are in England or Scotland, I will order kippers any time they are on the menu, and if we are house-swapping, I’ll buy them and cook them. With kippers, I want only dry toast and very strong tea, while I am usually no-toast and creamed coffee in the morning. Please try kippers, Shannon — you owe it to yourself!
    My husband loves fried bread, which he calls “grease toast”. Enough said.
    My favorite breakfast story is of an Italian breakfast: my husband works for an Italian company, and several years ago, we were invited to go over to attend the company Christmas party, and they made reservations for us at a gorgeous villa-now-hotel in a village near Pordenone. We had a very early morning flight back to the US on December 20. The evening before, we were asked if we wanted breakfast and said that something light would be appreciated as we would be traveling all day. What we did not know was that we were the only guests in the hotel that evening, and that the hotel was closing the following day for the holiday. We came down at 4am to find a table for two set in front of a blazing fire, in the very large, beautifully decorated dining room. Fresh juice, cold meats and cheeses, warm breads, cereals and fresh fruit were all set out on a sideboard. And on the table was a lovely gift-wrapped small box, with a note in Italian saying “for the journey”, containing exquisite glaceed fruits. On any day, it would have been a truly magical breakfast, but on a day that ended up being a 26-hour trip, it kept us smiling all the way home!

    Reply
  114. I am chiming in late here, but was so happy that someone finally mentioned kippers! Thank you, Shannon! When we are in England or Scotland, I will order kippers any time they are on the menu, and if we are house-swapping, I’ll buy them and cook them. With kippers, I want only dry toast and very strong tea, while I am usually no-toast and creamed coffee in the morning. Please try kippers, Shannon — you owe it to yourself!
    My husband loves fried bread, which he calls “grease toast”. Enough said.
    My favorite breakfast story is of an Italian breakfast: my husband works for an Italian company, and several years ago, we were invited to go over to attend the company Christmas party, and they made reservations for us at a gorgeous villa-now-hotel in a village near Pordenone. We had a very early morning flight back to the US on December 20. The evening before, we were asked if we wanted breakfast and said that something light would be appreciated as we would be traveling all day. What we did not know was that we were the only guests in the hotel that evening, and that the hotel was closing the following day for the holiday. We came down at 4am to find a table for two set in front of a blazing fire, in the very large, beautifully decorated dining room. Fresh juice, cold meats and cheeses, warm breads, cereals and fresh fruit were all set out on a sideboard. And on the table was a lovely gift-wrapped small box, with a note in Italian saying “for the journey”, containing exquisite glaceed fruits. On any day, it would have been a truly magical breakfast, but on a day that ended up being a 26-hour trip, it kept us smiling all the way home!

    Reply
  115. I am chiming in late here, but was so happy that someone finally mentioned kippers! Thank you, Shannon! When we are in England or Scotland, I will order kippers any time they are on the menu, and if we are house-swapping, I’ll buy them and cook them. With kippers, I want only dry toast and very strong tea, while I am usually no-toast and creamed coffee in the morning. Please try kippers, Shannon — you owe it to yourself!
    My husband loves fried bread, which he calls “grease toast”. Enough said.
    My favorite breakfast story is of an Italian breakfast: my husband works for an Italian company, and several years ago, we were invited to go over to attend the company Christmas party, and they made reservations for us at a gorgeous villa-now-hotel in a village near Pordenone. We had a very early morning flight back to the US on December 20. The evening before, we were asked if we wanted breakfast and said that something light would be appreciated as we would be traveling all day. What we did not know was that we were the only guests in the hotel that evening, and that the hotel was closing the following day for the holiday. We came down at 4am to find a table for two set in front of a blazing fire, in the very large, beautifully decorated dining room. Fresh juice, cold meats and cheeses, warm breads, cereals and fresh fruit were all set out on a sideboard. And on the table was a lovely gift-wrapped small box, with a note in Italian saying “for the journey”, containing exquisite glaceed fruits. On any day, it would have been a truly magical breakfast, but on a day that ended up being a 26-hour trip, it kept us smiling all the way home!

    Reply
  116. When we were in Israel in 1999 we had buffets for most meals. We found it amusing that they included “peas and carrots” in every meal.

    Reply
  117. When we were in Israel in 1999 we had buffets for most meals. We found it amusing that they included “peas and carrots” in every meal.

    Reply
  118. When we were in Israel in 1999 we had buffets for most meals. We found it amusing that they included “peas and carrots” in every meal.

    Reply
  119. When we were in Israel in 1999 we had buffets for most meals. We found it amusing that they included “peas and carrots” in every meal.

    Reply
  120. When we were in Israel in 1999 we had buffets for most meals. We found it amusing that they included “peas and carrots” in every meal.

    Reply
  121. When I make steel cut oats for my husband, I do the overnight soak method but make enough for 3 or 4 days. It keeps very well in the refrigerator. He just dishes up what he wants when he wants it.

    Reply
  122. When I make steel cut oats for my husband, I do the overnight soak method but make enough for 3 or 4 days. It keeps very well in the refrigerator. He just dishes up what he wants when he wants it.

    Reply
  123. When I make steel cut oats for my husband, I do the overnight soak method but make enough for 3 or 4 days. It keeps very well in the refrigerator. He just dishes up what he wants when he wants it.

    Reply
  124. When I make steel cut oats for my husband, I do the overnight soak method but make enough for 3 or 4 days. It keeps very well in the refrigerator. He just dishes up what he wants when he wants it.

    Reply
  125. When I make steel cut oats for my husband, I do the overnight soak method but make enough for 3 or 4 days. It keeps very well in the refrigerator. He just dishes up what he wants when he wants it.

    Reply
  126. All of these sound lovely….for lunch or even dinner! I’m a toast and tea girl, if anything for breakfast. A slice of toast, with peanut butter is about all I need in the morning, and a BIG cut of tea with milk and sugar. A breakfast person I am not, unless it’s a “breakfast for dinner” situation. Then I’m your gal!

    Reply
  127. All of these sound lovely….for lunch or even dinner! I’m a toast and tea girl, if anything for breakfast. A slice of toast, with peanut butter is about all I need in the morning, and a BIG cut of tea with milk and sugar. A breakfast person I am not, unless it’s a “breakfast for dinner” situation. Then I’m your gal!

    Reply
  128. All of these sound lovely….for lunch or even dinner! I’m a toast and tea girl, if anything for breakfast. A slice of toast, with peanut butter is about all I need in the morning, and a BIG cut of tea with milk and sugar. A breakfast person I am not, unless it’s a “breakfast for dinner” situation. Then I’m your gal!

    Reply
  129. All of these sound lovely….for lunch or even dinner! I’m a toast and tea girl, if anything for breakfast. A slice of toast, with peanut butter is about all I need in the morning, and a BIG cut of tea with milk and sugar. A breakfast person I am not, unless it’s a “breakfast for dinner” situation. Then I’m your gal!

    Reply
  130. All of these sound lovely….for lunch or even dinner! I’m a toast and tea girl, if anything for breakfast. A slice of toast, with peanut butter is about all I need in the morning, and a BIG cut of tea with milk and sugar. A breakfast person I am not, unless it’s a “breakfast for dinner” situation. Then I’m your gal!

    Reply
  131. LOL! It all sounds good, Teresa Broderick. How nice to have a fine local brand of oatmeal. The duck egg and spelt and honey bread sound very nice. I’m not sure I’ve ever had a duck egg. I’m guessing it’s similar to a chicken egg, but maybe a bit larger?

    Reply
  132. LOL! It all sounds good, Teresa Broderick. How nice to have a fine local brand of oatmeal. The duck egg and spelt and honey bread sound very nice. I’m not sure I’ve ever had a duck egg. I’m guessing it’s similar to a chicken egg, but maybe a bit larger?

    Reply
  133. LOL! It all sounds good, Teresa Broderick. How nice to have a fine local brand of oatmeal. The duck egg and spelt and honey bread sound very nice. I’m not sure I’ve ever had a duck egg. I’m guessing it’s similar to a chicken egg, but maybe a bit larger?

    Reply
  134. LOL! It all sounds good, Teresa Broderick. How nice to have a fine local brand of oatmeal. The duck egg and spelt and honey bread sound very nice. I’m not sure I’ve ever had a duck egg. I’m guessing it’s similar to a chicken egg, but maybe a bit larger?

    Reply
  135. LOL! It all sounds good, Teresa Broderick. How nice to have a fine local brand of oatmeal. The duck egg and spelt and honey bread sound very nice. I’m not sure I’ve ever had a duck egg. I’m guessing it’s similar to a chicken egg, but maybe a bit larger?

    Reply
  136. Jana, for some reason your other comment isn’t showing up here, though I received in in email. An “Esky”is a cooler for carrying beer or soda or whatever to the beach of some such. We were on Green Island and saw “No Eskies” signs at the entrance to the beaches. Translation was required. *G*

    Reply
  137. Jana, for some reason your other comment isn’t showing up here, though I received in in email. An “Esky”is a cooler for carrying beer or soda or whatever to the beach of some such. We were on Green Island and saw “No Eskies” signs at the entrance to the beaches. Translation was required. *G*

    Reply
  138. Jana, for some reason your other comment isn’t showing up here, though I received in in email. An “Esky”is a cooler for carrying beer or soda or whatever to the beach of some such. We were on Green Island and saw “No Eskies” signs at the entrance to the beaches. Translation was required. *G*

    Reply
  139. Jana, for some reason your other comment isn’t showing up here, though I received in in email. An “Esky”is a cooler for carrying beer or soda or whatever to the beach of some such. We were on Green Island and saw “No Eskies” signs at the entrance to the beaches. Translation was required. *G*

    Reply
  140. Jana, for some reason your other comment isn’t showing up here, though I received in in email. An “Esky”is a cooler for carrying beer or soda or whatever to the beach of some such. We were on Green Island and saw “No Eskies” signs at the entrance to the beaches. Translation was required. *G*

    Reply
  141. Had to look that one up myself. Esky: cooler in Australia. Now, does that mean frig, refrigerator, a wine drink, or portable ice chest?

    Reply
  142. Had to look that one up myself. Esky: cooler in Australia. Now, does that mean frig, refrigerator, a wine drink, or portable ice chest?

    Reply
  143. Had to look that one up myself. Esky: cooler in Australia. Now, does that mean frig, refrigerator, a wine drink, or portable ice chest?

    Reply
  144. Had to look that one up myself. Esky: cooler in Australia. Now, does that mean frig, refrigerator, a wine drink, or portable ice chest?

    Reply
  145. Had to look that one up myself. Esky: cooler in Australia. Now, does that mean frig, refrigerator, a wine drink, or portable ice chest?

    Reply
  146. We’re having pie for breakfast as we do every once in awhile. This time it will be cherry-berry (American two-crust). Well, it’s fruit and cereal, isn’t it? What a fun topic today. I love breakfast foods and have been known to have them at lunch or supper as well. As a kid, my favorite was shredded wheat – baled hay, as I called it then, to my sister’s dismay when that was what I reported to the teacher of our one-room country school during a “chart your breakfast” lesson. It’s about a 2 in. by 3 in. by 1 1/2 in. “bale” of spun wheat threads. It disappeared from the grocery shelves for quite awhile, as in years, but this past week I was delighted to find it again. We don’t get up as early as we used to and breakfast is later yet. Sometimes a protein shake mixed with some kind of fruit – fresh or frozen mango, banana, blueberries, or raspberries. Other times it’s a mix of three or four cold cereals and more rarely now, a cooked breakfast – eggs, sausage, pancakes, waffles, or oatmeal. Coffee. Lots of coffee. Years ago, we had friends from England staying with us for the first time with their three sons. I was proudly preparing tea “the proper way” by boiling water, warming the teapot, etc. planning to serve it with an entire cooked breakfast, when the oldest teenage son appeared, grumpily wondering why tea wasn’t ready yet and not wanting “minty tea” having brushed his teeth already. I learned, to my chagrin, that tea bags had crossed the ocean going one way or the other, and his mum would have had tea ready with a bag in a cup. LOL

    Reply
  147. We’re having pie for breakfast as we do every once in awhile. This time it will be cherry-berry (American two-crust). Well, it’s fruit and cereal, isn’t it? What a fun topic today. I love breakfast foods and have been known to have them at lunch or supper as well. As a kid, my favorite was shredded wheat – baled hay, as I called it then, to my sister’s dismay when that was what I reported to the teacher of our one-room country school during a “chart your breakfast” lesson. It’s about a 2 in. by 3 in. by 1 1/2 in. “bale” of spun wheat threads. It disappeared from the grocery shelves for quite awhile, as in years, but this past week I was delighted to find it again. We don’t get up as early as we used to and breakfast is later yet. Sometimes a protein shake mixed with some kind of fruit – fresh or frozen mango, banana, blueberries, or raspberries. Other times it’s a mix of three or four cold cereals and more rarely now, a cooked breakfast – eggs, sausage, pancakes, waffles, or oatmeal. Coffee. Lots of coffee. Years ago, we had friends from England staying with us for the first time with their three sons. I was proudly preparing tea “the proper way” by boiling water, warming the teapot, etc. planning to serve it with an entire cooked breakfast, when the oldest teenage son appeared, grumpily wondering why tea wasn’t ready yet and not wanting “minty tea” having brushed his teeth already. I learned, to my chagrin, that tea bags had crossed the ocean going one way or the other, and his mum would have had tea ready with a bag in a cup. LOL

    Reply
  148. We’re having pie for breakfast as we do every once in awhile. This time it will be cherry-berry (American two-crust). Well, it’s fruit and cereal, isn’t it? What a fun topic today. I love breakfast foods and have been known to have them at lunch or supper as well. As a kid, my favorite was shredded wheat – baled hay, as I called it then, to my sister’s dismay when that was what I reported to the teacher of our one-room country school during a “chart your breakfast” lesson. It’s about a 2 in. by 3 in. by 1 1/2 in. “bale” of spun wheat threads. It disappeared from the grocery shelves for quite awhile, as in years, but this past week I was delighted to find it again. We don’t get up as early as we used to and breakfast is later yet. Sometimes a protein shake mixed with some kind of fruit – fresh or frozen mango, banana, blueberries, or raspberries. Other times it’s a mix of three or four cold cereals and more rarely now, a cooked breakfast – eggs, sausage, pancakes, waffles, or oatmeal. Coffee. Lots of coffee. Years ago, we had friends from England staying with us for the first time with their three sons. I was proudly preparing tea “the proper way” by boiling water, warming the teapot, etc. planning to serve it with an entire cooked breakfast, when the oldest teenage son appeared, grumpily wondering why tea wasn’t ready yet and not wanting “minty tea” having brushed his teeth already. I learned, to my chagrin, that tea bags had crossed the ocean going one way or the other, and his mum would have had tea ready with a bag in a cup. LOL

    Reply
  149. We’re having pie for breakfast as we do every once in awhile. This time it will be cherry-berry (American two-crust). Well, it’s fruit and cereal, isn’t it? What a fun topic today. I love breakfast foods and have been known to have them at lunch or supper as well. As a kid, my favorite was shredded wheat – baled hay, as I called it then, to my sister’s dismay when that was what I reported to the teacher of our one-room country school during a “chart your breakfast” lesson. It’s about a 2 in. by 3 in. by 1 1/2 in. “bale” of spun wheat threads. It disappeared from the grocery shelves for quite awhile, as in years, but this past week I was delighted to find it again. We don’t get up as early as we used to and breakfast is later yet. Sometimes a protein shake mixed with some kind of fruit – fresh or frozen mango, banana, blueberries, or raspberries. Other times it’s a mix of three or four cold cereals and more rarely now, a cooked breakfast – eggs, sausage, pancakes, waffles, or oatmeal. Coffee. Lots of coffee. Years ago, we had friends from England staying with us for the first time with their three sons. I was proudly preparing tea “the proper way” by boiling water, warming the teapot, etc. planning to serve it with an entire cooked breakfast, when the oldest teenage son appeared, grumpily wondering why tea wasn’t ready yet and not wanting “minty tea” having brushed his teeth already. I learned, to my chagrin, that tea bags had crossed the ocean going one way or the other, and his mum would have had tea ready with a bag in a cup. LOL

    Reply
  150. We’re having pie for breakfast as we do every once in awhile. This time it will be cherry-berry (American two-crust). Well, it’s fruit and cereal, isn’t it? What a fun topic today. I love breakfast foods and have been known to have them at lunch or supper as well. As a kid, my favorite was shredded wheat – baled hay, as I called it then, to my sister’s dismay when that was what I reported to the teacher of our one-room country school during a “chart your breakfast” lesson. It’s about a 2 in. by 3 in. by 1 1/2 in. “bale” of spun wheat threads. It disappeared from the grocery shelves for quite awhile, as in years, but this past week I was delighted to find it again. We don’t get up as early as we used to and breakfast is later yet. Sometimes a protein shake mixed with some kind of fruit – fresh or frozen mango, banana, blueberries, or raspberries. Other times it’s a mix of three or four cold cereals and more rarely now, a cooked breakfast – eggs, sausage, pancakes, waffles, or oatmeal. Coffee. Lots of coffee. Years ago, we had friends from England staying with us for the first time with their three sons. I was proudly preparing tea “the proper way” by boiling water, warming the teapot, etc. planning to serve it with an entire cooked breakfast, when the oldest teenage son appeared, grumpily wondering why tea wasn’t ready yet and not wanting “minty tea” having brushed his teeth already. I learned, to my chagrin, that tea bags had crossed the ocean going one way or the other, and his mum would have had tea ready with a bag in a cup. LOL

    Reply
  151. Jeanette, an esky is a portable cooler — a sort of insulated box you might take on a picnic or to the beach to keep drinks and food cool.

    Reply
  152. Jeanette, an esky is a portable cooler — a sort of insulated box you might take on a picnic or to the beach to keep drinks and food cool.

    Reply
  153. Jeanette, an esky is a portable cooler — a sort of insulated box you might take on a picnic or to the beach to keep drinks and food cool.

    Reply
  154. Jeanette, an esky is a portable cooler — a sort of insulated box you might take on a picnic or to the beach to keep drinks and food cool.

    Reply
  155. Jeanette, an esky is a portable cooler — a sort of insulated box you might take on a picnic or to the beach to keep drinks and food cool.

    Reply
  156. Mary T, many people don’t go for cold pizza, but I love it almost as much as hot pizza. It’s a great occasional “treat” breakfast for me.

    Reply
  157. Mary T, many people don’t go for cold pizza, but I love it almost as much as hot pizza. It’s a great occasional “treat” breakfast for me.

    Reply
  158. Mary T, many people don’t go for cold pizza, but I love it almost as much as hot pizza. It’s a great occasional “treat” breakfast for me.

    Reply
  159. Mary T, many people don’t go for cold pizza, but I love it almost as much as hot pizza. It’s a great occasional “treat” breakfast for me.

    Reply
  160. Mary T, many people don’t go for cold pizza, but I love it almost as much as hot pizza. It’s a great occasional “treat” breakfast for me.

    Reply
  161. And despite going to the USA this year, I *still* haven’t had huevos rancheros — I keep forgetting to find a place that serves it. Next time.
    I was brought up on porridge — the scots style. Mum soaked rolled oats over night, and in the morning dad cooked it up — only water and a bit of salt added — porridge is awful with no salt — and then a bit of milk to go with it, or a drizzle of treacle or golden syrup (like molasses) for a tear.
    These days I like eggs, either a poached egg on toast, or two whipped into a quick and easy omelet. And coffee, lots of coffee.

    Reply
  162. And despite going to the USA this year, I *still* haven’t had huevos rancheros — I keep forgetting to find a place that serves it. Next time.
    I was brought up on porridge — the scots style. Mum soaked rolled oats over night, and in the morning dad cooked it up — only water and a bit of salt added — porridge is awful with no salt — and then a bit of milk to go with it, or a drizzle of treacle or golden syrup (like molasses) for a tear.
    These days I like eggs, either a poached egg on toast, or two whipped into a quick and easy omelet. And coffee, lots of coffee.

    Reply
  163. And despite going to the USA this year, I *still* haven’t had huevos rancheros — I keep forgetting to find a place that serves it. Next time.
    I was brought up on porridge — the scots style. Mum soaked rolled oats over night, and in the morning dad cooked it up — only water and a bit of salt added — porridge is awful with no salt — and then a bit of milk to go with it, or a drizzle of treacle or golden syrup (like molasses) for a tear.
    These days I like eggs, either a poached egg on toast, or two whipped into a quick and easy omelet. And coffee, lots of coffee.

    Reply
  164. And despite going to the USA this year, I *still* haven’t had huevos rancheros — I keep forgetting to find a place that serves it. Next time.
    I was brought up on porridge — the scots style. Mum soaked rolled oats over night, and in the morning dad cooked it up — only water and a bit of salt added — porridge is awful with no salt — and then a bit of milk to go with it, or a drizzle of treacle or golden syrup (like molasses) for a tear.
    These days I like eggs, either a poached egg on toast, or two whipped into a quick and easy omelet. And coffee, lots of coffee.

    Reply
  165. And despite going to the USA this year, I *still* haven’t had huevos rancheros — I keep forgetting to find a place that serves it. Next time.
    I was brought up on porridge — the scots style. Mum soaked rolled oats over night, and in the morning dad cooked it up — only water and a bit of salt added — porridge is awful with no salt — and then a bit of milk to go with it, or a drizzle of treacle or golden syrup (like molasses) for a tear.
    These days I like eggs, either a poached egg on toast, or two whipped into a quick and easy omelet. And coffee, lots of coffee.

    Reply
  166. I’ll eat just about anything for breakfast, but I need to drink coffee and wake up for at least an hour before I have an appetite. On an ordinary weekday, it’s usually a mix of cold cereals, like granola, shredded wheat, or raisin bran and lowfat milk. On cold days, oatmeal or another hot cereal. On weekends, I’ll make pancakes. My mother used to make palatschinken for Sunday breakfasts, a thin pancake that is rolled up with jam filling. I’ve discovered all kinds of new breakfast foods while traveling. I enjoyed the Scandinavian habit of eating open face cheese sandwiches with jam;Jarlsberg goes surprisingly well with orange marmalade. In Colombia I discovered arepas, a sort of thick corn cake made with cheese. In the southern U.S., I’ll happily eat grits and biscuits. In France, cafe au lait and pain au chocolat. In the southwest, huevos rancheros with tortillas are delicious! In Greece, yogurt and honey with fresh fruit, and in the Middle East, pita with labneh(a yogurt cheese) and foul(fava beans). So I’m quite flexible and easy to feed!

    Reply
  167. I’ll eat just about anything for breakfast, but I need to drink coffee and wake up for at least an hour before I have an appetite. On an ordinary weekday, it’s usually a mix of cold cereals, like granola, shredded wheat, or raisin bran and lowfat milk. On cold days, oatmeal or another hot cereal. On weekends, I’ll make pancakes. My mother used to make palatschinken for Sunday breakfasts, a thin pancake that is rolled up with jam filling. I’ve discovered all kinds of new breakfast foods while traveling. I enjoyed the Scandinavian habit of eating open face cheese sandwiches with jam;Jarlsberg goes surprisingly well with orange marmalade. In Colombia I discovered arepas, a sort of thick corn cake made with cheese. In the southern U.S., I’ll happily eat grits and biscuits. In France, cafe au lait and pain au chocolat. In the southwest, huevos rancheros with tortillas are delicious! In Greece, yogurt and honey with fresh fruit, and in the Middle East, pita with labneh(a yogurt cheese) and foul(fava beans). So I’m quite flexible and easy to feed!

    Reply
  168. I’ll eat just about anything for breakfast, but I need to drink coffee and wake up for at least an hour before I have an appetite. On an ordinary weekday, it’s usually a mix of cold cereals, like granola, shredded wheat, or raisin bran and lowfat milk. On cold days, oatmeal or another hot cereal. On weekends, I’ll make pancakes. My mother used to make palatschinken for Sunday breakfasts, a thin pancake that is rolled up with jam filling. I’ve discovered all kinds of new breakfast foods while traveling. I enjoyed the Scandinavian habit of eating open face cheese sandwiches with jam;Jarlsberg goes surprisingly well with orange marmalade. In Colombia I discovered arepas, a sort of thick corn cake made with cheese. In the southern U.S., I’ll happily eat grits and biscuits. In France, cafe au lait and pain au chocolat. In the southwest, huevos rancheros with tortillas are delicious! In Greece, yogurt and honey with fresh fruit, and in the Middle East, pita with labneh(a yogurt cheese) and foul(fava beans). So I’m quite flexible and easy to feed!

    Reply
  169. I’ll eat just about anything for breakfast, but I need to drink coffee and wake up for at least an hour before I have an appetite. On an ordinary weekday, it’s usually a mix of cold cereals, like granola, shredded wheat, or raisin bran and lowfat milk. On cold days, oatmeal or another hot cereal. On weekends, I’ll make pancakes. My mother used to make palatschinken for Sunday breakfasts, a thin pancake that is rolled up with jam filling. I’ve discovered all kinds of new breakfast foods while traveling. I enjoyed the Scandinavian habit of eating open face cheese sandwiches with jam;Jarlsberg goes surprisingly well with orange marmalade. In Colombia I discovered arepas, a sort of thick corn cake made with cheese. In the southern U.S., I’ll happily eat grits and biscuits. In France, cafe au lait and pain au chocolat. In the southwest, huevos rancheros with tortillas are delicious! In Greece, yogurt and honey with fresh fruit, and in the Middle East, pita with labneh(a yogurt cheese) and foul(fava beans). So I’m quite flexible and easy to feed!

    Reply
  170. I’ll eat just about anything for breakfast, but I need to drink coffee and wake up for at least an hour before I have an appetite. On an ordinary weekday, it’s usually a mix of cold cereals, like granola, shredded wheat, or raisin bran and lowfat milk. On cold days, oatmeal or another hot cereal. On weekends, I’ll make pancakes. My mother used to make palatschinken for Sunday breakfasts, a thin pancake that is rolled up with jam filling. I’ve discovered all kinds of new breakfast foods while traveling. I enjoyed the Scandinavian habit of eating open face cheese sandwiches with jam;Jarlsberg goes surprisingly well with orange marmalade. In Colombia I discovered arepas, a sort of thick corn cake made with cheese. In the southern U.S., I’ll happily eat grits and biscuits. In France, cafe au lait and pain au chocolat. In the southwest, huevos rancheros with tortillas are delicious! In Greece, yogurt and honey with fresh fruit, and in the Middle East, pita with labneh(a yogurt cheese) and foul(fava beans). So I’m quite flexible and easy to feed!

    Reply
  171. Jeanette, once upon a time eating pie for breakfast was a definition of a New England Yankee–and indeed, I’ve eaten and enjoyed pie for breakfast on occasion. *G*
    I remember those shredded wheat hay bales. I’ve never been over-fond of cold cereal, but shredded wheat was one of the ones I rather liked. Nice that it’s back again. It seems like it ought to be full of fiber.

    Reply
  172. Jeanette, once upon a time eating pie for breakfast was a definition of a New England Yankee–and indeed, I’ve eaten and enjoyed pie for breakfast on occasion. *G*
    I remember those shredded wheat hay bales. I’ve never been over-fond of cold cereal, but shredded wheat was one of the ones I rather liked. Nice that it’s back again. It seems like it ought to be full of fiber.

    Reply
  173. Jeanette, once upon a time eating pie for breakfast was a definition of a New England Yankee–and indeed, I’ve eaten and enjoyed pie for breakfast on occasion. *G*
    I remember those shredded wheat hay bales. I’ve never been over-fond of cold cereal, but shredded wheat was one of the ones I rather liked. Nice that it’s back again. It seems like it ought to be full of fiber.

    Reply
  174. Jeanette, once upon a time eating pie for breakfast was a definition of a New England Yankee–and indeed, I’ve eaten and enjoyed pie for breakfast on occasion. *G*
    I remember those shredded wheat hay bales. I’ve never been over-fond of cold cereal, but shredded wheat was one of the ones I rather liked. Nice that it’s back again. It seems like it ought to be full of fiber.

    Reply
  175. Jeanette, once upon a time eating pie for breakfast was a definition of a New England Yankee–and indeed, I’ve eaten and enjoyed pie for breakfast on occasion. *G*
    I remember those shredded wheat hay bales. I’ve never been over-fond of cold cereal, but shredded wheat was one of the ones I rather liked. Nice that it’s back again. It seems like it ought to be full of fiber.

    Reply
  176. I never miss breakfast because I need it to start the day. I used to have to eat as SOON as I got up but now I can wait an hour or so.
    My go to breakfast is oatmeal. Not instant, just old fashioned rolled oats. The best oatmeal I ever ate was on vacation in Dahlonega GA at a place that has since closed. It was so good I got it 2 days in a row even though it was a HUGE bowl. And ate every bite.
    It took me months to figure out how to get my oatmeal to be close to the way they fixed it. I too soak mine overnight in the refrigerator.
    My oatmeal always has add ins. Have you ever tried chocolate chips on top of oatmeal? Yum. Or a boiled egg mixed in. Blueberries and banana or just banana. A peach or a nectarine.
    One memorable breakfast I’ve had was pancakes at a campground. They had a pancake breakfast on Sat mornings and they were totally delicious complimented by sitting outside looking at the Colorado mountains.

    Reply
  177. I never miss breakfast because I need it to start the day. I used to have to eat as SOON as I got up but now I can wait an hour or so.
    My go to breakfast is oatmeal. Not instant, just old fashioned rolled oats. The best oatmeal I ever ate was on vacation in Dahlonega GA at a place that has since closed. It was so good I got it 2 days in a row even though it was a HUGE bowl. And ate every bite.
    It took me months to figure out how to get my oatmeal to be close to the way they fixed it. I too soak mine overnight in the refrigerator.
    My oatmeal always has add ins. Have you ever tried chocolate chips on top of oatmeal? Yum. Or a boiled egg mixed in. Blueberries and banana or just banana. A peach or a nectarine.
    One memorable breakfast I’ve had was pancakes at a campground. They had a pancake breakfast on Sat mornings and they were totally delicious complimented by sitting outside looking at the Colorado mountains.

    Reply
  178. I never miss breakfast because I need it to start the day. I used to have to eat as SOON as I got up but now I can wait an hour or so.
    My go to breakfast is oatmeal. Not instant, just old fashioned rolled oats. The best oatmeal I ever ate was on vacation in Dahlonega GA at a place that has since closed. It was so good I got it 2 days in a row even though it was a HUGE bowl. And ate every bite.
    It took me months to figure out how to get my oatmeal to be close to the way they fixed it. I too soak mine overnight in the refrigerator.
    My oatmeal always has add ins. Have you ever tried chocolate chips on top of oatmeal? Yum. Or a boiled egg mixed in. Blueberries and banana or just banana. A peach or a nectarine.
    One memorable breakfast I’ve had was pancakes at a campground. They had a pancake breakfast on Sat mornings and they were totally delicious complimented by sitting outside looking at the Colorado mountains.

    Reply
  179. I never miss breakfast because I need it to start the day. I used to have to eat as SOON as I got up but now I can wait an hour or so.
    My go to breakfast is oatmeal. Not instant, just old fashioned rolled oats. The best oatmeal I ever ate was on vacation in Dahlonega GA at a place that has since closed. It was so good I got it 2 days in a row even though it was a HUGE bowl. And ate every bite.
    It took me months to figure out how to get my oatmeal to be close to the way they fixed it. I too soak mine overnight in the refrigerator.
    My oatmeal always has add ins. Have you ever tried chocolate chips on top of oatmeal? Yum. Or a boiled egg mixed in. Blueberries and banana or just banana. A peach or a nectarine.
    One memorable breakfast I’ve had was pancakes at a campground. They had a pancake breakfast on Sat mornings and they were totally delicious complimented by sitting outside looking at the Colorado mountains.

    Reply
  180. I never miss breakfast because I need it to start the day. I used to have to eat as SOON as I got up but now I can wait an hour or so.
    My go to breakfast is oatmeal. Not instant, just old fashioned rolled oats. The best oatmeal I ever ate was on vacation in Dahlonega GA at a place that has since closed. It was so good I got it 2 days in a row even though it was a HUGE bowl. And ate every bite.
    It took me months to figure out how to get my oatmeal to be close to the way they fixed it. I too soak mine overnight in the refrigerator.
    My oatmeal always has add ins. Have you ever tried chocolate chips on top of oatmeal? Yum. Or a boiled egg mixed in. Blueberries and banana or just banana. A peach or a nectarine.
    One memorable breakfast I’ve had was pancakes at a campground. They had a pancake breakfast on Sat mornings and they were totally delicious complimented by sitting outside looking at the Colorado mountains.

    Reply
  181. My daughter is currently living and working in South Korea. Last year she lived in a boarding house with four other young women and their hosts, an elderly Korean couple who provided breakfast and dinner. Breakfast generally included fish, rice, and kimchi.
    Growing up with a vegetarian European mother, I often had muesli for breakfast. In graduate school, I ate more than my fair share of cold pizza for breakfast. If the pizza was good hot, it can be excellent cold. Now I often eat cold cereal for breakfast on weekdays unless my husband has time to cook in which case we might have oatmeal with brown sugar or pancakes. He always cooks an elaborate breakfast on Saturdays — for some unknown reason, we call it ‘ummy breakfast’ — which typically includes fried eggs, bacon or sausage, fried potatoes, and biscuits or toast with jam.

    Reply
  182. My daughter is currently living and working in South Korea. Last year she lived in a boarding house with four other young women and their hosts, an elderly Korean couple who provided breakfast and dinner. Breakfast generally included fish, rice, and kimchi.
    Growing up with a vegetarian European mother, I often had muesli for breakfast. In graduate school, I ate more than my fair share of cold pizza for breakfast. If the pizza was good hot, it can be excellent cold. Now I often eat cold cereal for breakfast on weekdays unless my husband has time to cook in which case we might have oatmeal with brown sugar or pancakes. He always cooks an elaborate breakfast on Saturdays — for some unknown reason, we call it ‘ummy breakfast’ — which typically includes fried eggs, bacon or sausage, fried potatoes, and biscuits or toast with jam.

    Reply
  183. My daughter is currently living and working in South Korea. Last year she lived in a boarding house with four other young women and their hosts, an elderly Korean couple who provided breakfast and dinner. Breakfast generally included fish, rice, and kimchi.
    Growing up with a vegetarian European mother, I often had muesli for breakfast. In graduate school, I ate more than my fair share of cold pizza for breakfast. If the pizza was good hot, it can be excellent cold. Now I often eat cold cereal for breakfast on weekdays unless my husband has time to cook in which case we might have oatmeal with brown sugar or pancakes. He always cooks an elaborate breakfast on Saturdays — for some unknown reason, we call it ‘ummy breakfast’ — which typically includes fried eggs, bacon or sausage, fried potatoes, and biscuits or toast with jam.

    Reply
  184. My daughter is currently living and working in South Korea. Last year she lived in a boarding house with four other young women and their hosts, an elderly Korean couple who provided breakfast and dinner. Breakfast generally included fish, rice, and kimchi.
    Growing up with a vegetarian European mother, I often had muesli for breakfast. In graduate school, I ate more than my fair share of cold pizza for breakfast. If the pizza was good hot, it can be excellent cold. Now I often eat cold cereal for breakfast on weekdays unless my husband has time to cook in which case we might have oatmeal with brown sugar or pancakes. He always cooks an elaborate breakfast on Saturdays — for some unknown reason, we call it ‘ummy breakfast’ — which typically includes fried eggs, bacon or sausage, fried potatoes, and biscuits or toast with jam.

    Reply
  185. My daughter is currently living and working in South Korea. Last year she lived in a boarding house with four other young women and their hosts, an elderly Korean couple who provided breakfast and dinner. Breakfast generally included fish, rice, and kimchi.
    Growing up with a vegetarian European mother, I often had muesli for breakfast. In graduate school, I ate more than my fair share of cold pizza for breakfast. If the pizza was good hot, it can be excellent cold. Now I often eat cold cereal for breakfast on weekdays unless my husband has time to cook in which case we might have oatmeal with brown sugar or pancakes. He always cooks an elaborate breakfast on Saturdays — for some unknown reason, we call it ‘ummy breakfast’ — which typically includes fried eggs, bacon or sausage, fried potatoes, and biscuits or toast with jam.

    Reply
  186. The American was scrambled eggs, American bacon, little sausages, fruit, yogurt, American cereals, omelet station with all kinds of veg, waffle station with various fruit toppings, and brewed coffee. Oh, an pastries.
    The British was usually boiled or poached eggs, black pudding, beans, tomatoes, mushrooms, toast, kippers, large sausages, British bacon, and someone to bring you tea. Sometimes there was a nod to French cuisine with croissants. And there was porridge.
    I didn’t venture to the Asian except to try some variation of eggs. Seaweed just doesn’t do it for me.

    Reply
  187. The American was scrambled eggs, American bacon, little sausages, fruit, yogurt, American cereals, omelet station with all kinds of veg, waffle station with various fruit toppings, and brewed coffee. Oh, an pastries.
    The British was usually boiled or poached eggs, black pudding, beans, tomatoes, mushrooms, toast, kippers, large sausages, British bacon, and someone to bring you tea. Sometimes there was a nod to French cuisine with croissants. And there was porridge.
    I didn’t venture to the Asian except to try some variation of eggs. Seaweed just doesn’t do it for me.

    Reply
  188. The American was scrambled eggs, American bacon, little sausages, fruit, yogurt, American cereals, omelet station with all kinds of veg, waffle station with various fruit toppings, and brewed coffee. Oh, an pastries.
    The British was usually boiled or poached eggs, black pudding, beans, tomatoes, mushrooms, toast, kippers, large sausages, British bacon, and someone to bring you tea. Sometimes there was a nod to French cuisine with croissants. And there was porridge.
    I didn’t venture to the Asian except to try some variation of eggs. Seaweed just doesn’t do it for me.

    Reply
  189. The American was scrambled eggs, American bacon, little sausages, fruit, yogurt, American cereals, omelet station with all kinds of veg, waffle station with various fruit toppings, and brewed coffee. Oh, an pastries.
    The British was usually boiled or poached eggs, black pudding, beans, tomatoes, mushrooms, toast, kippers, large sausages, British bacon, and someone to bring you tea. Sometimes there was a nod to French cuisine with croissants. And there was porridge.
    I didn’t venture to the Asian except to try some variation of eggs. Seaweed just doesn’t do it for me.

    Reply
  190. The American was scrambled eggs, American bacon, little sausages, fruit, yogurt, American cereals, omelet station with all kinds of veg, waffle station with various fruit toppings, and brewed coffee. Oh, an pastries.
    The British was usually boiled or poached eggs, black pudding, beans, tomatoes, mushrooms, toast, kippers, large sausages, British bacon, and someone to bring you tea. Sometimes there was a nod to French cuisine with croissants. And there was porridge.
    I didn’t venture to the Asian except to try some variation of eggs. Seaweed just doesn’t do it for me.

    Reply
  191. It is Mary Jo and more filling. A lot of people don’t like them because they say they taste too strong but I don’t get that at all. I’d never eat a hen egg if there’s a duck egg to be had.
    I heard lately that Flahavans are hoping to get into the Canadian market so who knows what the next stop will be!!

    Reply
  192. It is Mary Jo and more filling. A lot of people don’t like them because they say they taste too strong but I don’t get that at all. I’d never eat a hen egg if there’s a duck egg to be had.
    I heard lately that Flahavans are hoping to get into the Canadian market so who knows what the next stop will be!!

    Reply
  193. It is Mary Jo and more filling. A lot of people don’t like them because they say they taste too strong but I don’t get that at all. I’d never eat a hen egg if there’s a duck egg to be had.
    I heard lately that Flahavans are hoping to get into the Canadian market so who knows what the next stop will be!!

    Reply
  194. It is Mary Jo and more filling. A lot of people don’t like them because they say they taste too strong but I don’t get that at all. I’d never eat a hen egg if there’s a duck egg to be had.
    I heard lately that Flahavans are hoping to get into the Canadian market so who knows what the next stop will be!!

    Reply
  195. It is Mary Jo and more filling. A lot of people don’t like them because they say they taste too strong but I don’t get that at all. I’d never eat a hen egg if there’s a duck egg to be had.
    I heard lately that Flahavans are hoping to get into the Canadian market so who knows what the next stop will be!!

    Reply
  196. Shannon, thanks for the description. It sounds like the American buffet got most of the good stuff, with the British buffet getting the more specialized British favorites, like the black pudding, beans, kippers, British bacon, etc. One might need to be raised with seaweed to really appreciate it.

    Reply
  197. Shannon, thanks for the description. It sounds like the American buffet got most of the good stuff, with the British buffet getting the more specialized British favorites, like the black pudding, beans, kippers, British bacon, etc. One might need to be raised with seaweed to really appreciate it.

    Reply
  198. Shannon, thanks for the description. It sounds like the American buffet got most of the good stuff, with the British buffet getting the more specialized British favorites, like the black pudding, beans, kippers, British bacon, etc. One might need to be raised with seaweed to really appreciate it.

    Reply
  199. Shannon, thanks for the description. It sounds like the American buffet got most of the good stuff, with the British buffet getting the more specialized British favorites, like the black pudding, beans, kippers, British bacon, etc. One might need to be raised with seaweed to really appreciate it.

    Reply
  200. Shannon, thanks for the description. It sounds like the American buffet got most of the good stuff, with the British buffet getting the more specialized British favorites, like the black pudding, beans, kippers, British bacon, etc. One might need to be raised with seaweed to really appreciate it.

    Reply
  201. Teresa Broderick, it sounds as if I should try a duck egg if one comes my way, but they’re not very available in the US. Good luck to the Flahavans expansion! The world can use more first rate Irish oatmeal.

    Reply
  202. Teresa Broderick, it sounds as if I should try a duck egg if one comes my way, but they’re not very available in the US. Good luck to the Flahavans expansion! The world can use more first rate Irish oatmeal.

    Reply
  203. Teresa Broderick, it sounds as if I should try a duck egg if one comes my way, but they’re not very available in the US. Good luck to the Flahavans expansion! The world can use more first rate Irish oatmeal.

    Reply
  204. Teresa Broderick, it sounds as if I should try a duck egg if one comes my way, but they’re not very available in the US. Good luck to the Flahavans expansion! The world can use more first rate Irish oatmeal.

    Reply
  205. Teresa Broderick, it sounds as if I should try a duck egg if one comes my way, but they’re not very available in the US. Good luck to the Flahavans expansion! The world can use more first rate Irish oatmeal.

    Reply
  206. Kareni, for busy people, weekends are generally the only time for ‘ummy breakfasts.” *G* I usually do one for us on Sundays.
    Cold pizza is a student specialty, I know, but I never got into it. Piping hot with melty cheese is the way for me to go!

    Reply
  207. Kareni, for busy people, weekends are generally the only time for ‘ummy breakfasts.” *G* I usually do one for us on Sundays.
    Cold pizza is a student specialty, I know, but I never got into it. Piping hot with melty cheese is the way for me to go!

    Reply
  208. Kareni, for busy people, weekends are generally the only time for ‘ummy breakfasts.” *G* I usually do one for us on Sundays.
    Cold pizza is a student specialty, I know, but I never got into it. Piping hot with melty cheese is the way for me to go!

    Reply
  209. Kareni, for busy people, weekends are generally the only time for ‘ummy breakfasts.” *G* I usually do one for us on Sundays.
    Cold pizza is a student specialty, I know, but I never got into it. Piping hot with melty cheese is the way for me to go!

    Reply
  210. Kareni, for busy people, weekends are generally the only time for ‘ummy breakfasts.” *G* I usually do one for us on Sundays.
    Cold pizza is a student specialty, I know, but I never got into it. Piping hot with melty cheese is the way for me to go!

    Reply
  211. Wish I could send you a half dozen Mary Jo but I’d say they’d be fairly scrambled by the time you’d get them :):):)

    Reply
  212. Wish I could send you a half dozen Mary Jo but I’d say they’d be fairly scrambled by the time you’d get them :):):)

    Reply
  213. Wish I could send you a half dozen Mary Jo but I’d say they’d be fairly scrambled by the time you’d get them :):):)

    Reply
  214. Wish I could send you a half dozen Mary Jo but I’d say they’d be fairly scrambled by the time you’d get them :):):)

    Reply
  215. Wish I could send you a half dozen Mary Jo but I’d say they’d be fairly scrambled by the time you’d get them :):):)

    Reply
  216. I’ve always had to have breakfast because of hypoglycemia…used to be an egg and tomato sandwich and coffee/tea. Every single day. LOL Then I got bit by a tick and I’m now vegan by allergy so my breakfasts have changed to oatmeal or almond butter toast and coffee/tea. My mother LOVES cold pizza for breakfast but I’ve never been able to handle that. Blech. LOL I adore weekend breakfasts with biscuits and gravy and homefries, preferably with scoops of fruit and copious amounts of coffee. 😉

    Reply
  217. I’ve always had to have breakfast because of hypoglycemia…used to be an egg and tomato sandwich and coffee/tea. Every single day. LOL Then I got bit by a tick and I’m now vegan by allergy so my breakfasts have changed to oatmeal or almond butter toast and coffee/tea. My mother LOVES cold pizza for breakfast but I’ve never been able to handle that. Blech. LOL I adore weekend breakfasts with biscuits and gravy and homefries, preferably with scoops of fruit and copious amounts of coffee. 😉

    Reply
  218. I’ve always had to have breakfast because of hypoglycemia…used to be an egg and tomato sandwich and coffee/tea. Every single day. LOL Then I got bit by a tick and I’m now vegan by allergy so my breakfasts have changed to oatmeal or almond butter toast and coffee/tea. My mother LOVES cold pizza for breakfast but I’ve never been able to handle that. Blech. LOL I adore weekend breakfasts with biscuits and gravy and homefries, preferably with scoops of fruit and copious amounts of coffee. 😉

    Reply
  219. I’ve always had to have breakfast because of hypoglycemia…used to be an egg and tomato sandwich and coffee/tea. Every single day. LOL Then I got bit by a tick and I’m now vegan by allergy so my breakfasts have changed to oatmeal or almond butter toast and coffee/tea. My mother LOVES cold pizza for breakfast but I’ve never been able to handle that. Blech. LOL I adore weekend breakfasts with biscuits and gravy and homefries, preferably with scoops of fruit and copious amounts of coffee. 😉

    Reply
  220. I’ve always had to have breakfast because of hypoglycemia…used to be an egg and tomato sandwich and coffee/tea. Every single day. LOL Then I got bit by a tick and I’m now vegan by allergy so my breakfasts have changed to oatmeal or almond butter toast and coffee/tea. My mother LOVES cold pizza for breakfast but I’ve never been able to handle that. Blech. LOL I adore weekend breakfasts with biscuits and gravy and homefries, preferably with scoops of fruit and copious amounts of coffee. 😉

    Reply
  221. It’s so cheerfully fascinating which subjects will get a storm of comments. And talking about food experiences must be everyone’s favorite way to share and connect with people friends and new acquaintances alike. I could relate to so many of these shares from you all.
    I definitely related to the oatmeal/cream of wheat memories. And everything in between cold pizza days–low carb/high protein–shredded wheat–yogurt and fruit–trying gluten free–and lastly, no breakfast to breakfast is a must!
    Been out of the loop here for such a long time, and this one was a fun and lively way to come back. So thank you ladies. And thank you Mary Jo. 🙂

    Reply
  222. It’s so cheerfully fascinating which subjects will get a storm of comments. And talking about food experiences must be everyone’s favorite way to share and connect with people friends and new acquaintances alike. I could relate to so many of these shares from you all.
    I definitely related to the oatmeal/cream of wheat memories. And everything in between cold pizza days–low carb/high protein–shredded wheat–yogurt and fruit–trying gluten free–and lastly, no breakfast to breakfast is a must!
    Been out of the loop here for such a long time, and this one was a fun and lively way to come back. So thank you ladies. And thank you Mary Jo. 🙂

    Reply
  223. It’s so cheerfully fascinating which subjects will get a storm of comments. And talking about food experiences must be everyone’s favorite way to share and connect with people friends and new acquaintances alike. I could relate to so many of these shares from you all.
    I definitely related to the oatmeal/cream of wheat memories. And everything in between cold pizza days–low carb/high protein–shredded wheat–yogurt and fruit–trying gluten free–and lastly, no breakfast to breakfast is a must!
    Been out of the loop here for such a long time, and this one was a fun and lively way to come back. So thank you ladies. And thank you Mary Jo. 🙂

    Reply
  224. It’s so cheerfully fascinating which subjects will get a storm of comments. And talking about food experiences must be everyone’s favorite way to share and connect with people friends and new acquaintances alike. I could relate to so many of these shares from you all.
    I definitely related to the oatmeal/cream of wheat memories. And everything in between cold pizza days–low carb/high protein–shredded wheat–yogurt and fruit–trying gluten free–and lastly, no breakfast to breakfast is a must!
    Been out of the loop here for such a long time, and this one was a fun and lively way to come back. So thank you ladies. And thank you Mary Jo. 🙂

    Reply
  225. It’s so cheerfully fascinating which subjects will get a storm of comments. And talking about food experiences must be everyone’s favorite way to share and connect with people friends and new acquaintances alike. I could relate to so many of these shares from you all.
    I definitely related to the oatmeal/cream of wheat memories. And everything in between cold pizza days–low carb/high protein–shredded wheat–yogurt and fruit–trying gluten free–and lastly, no breakfast to breakfast is a must!
    Been out of the loop here for such a long time, and this one was a fun and lively way to come back. So thank you ladies. And thank you Mary Jo. 🙂

    Reply
  226. Stephanie, I’ve had the hypoglycemia thing, which has much to to with my protein breakfasts, but my sympathies about the tick bite making you have to go vegan. Are you still allowed the occasional breakfast of gravy biscuits and home fries? I hope so!

    Reply
  227. Stephanie, I’ve had the hypoglycemia thing, which has much to to with my protein breakfasts, but my sympathies about the tick bite making you have to go vegan. Are you still allowed the occasional breakfast of gravy biscuits and home fries? I hope so!

    Reply
  228. Stephanie, I’ve had the hypoglycemia thing, which has much to to with my protein breakfasts, but my sympathies about the tick bite making you have to go vegan. Are you still allowed the occasional breakfast of gravy biscuits and home fries? I hope so!

    Reply
  229. Stephanie, I’ve had the hypoglycemia thing, which has much to to with my protein breakfasts, but my sympathies about the tick bite making you have to go vegan. Are you still allowed the occasional breakfast of gravy biscuits and home fries? I hope so!

    Reply
  230. Stephanie, I’ve had the hypoglycemia thing, which has much to to with my protein breakfasts, but my sympathies about the tick bite making you have to go vegan. Are you still allowed the occasional breakfast of gravy biscuits and home fries? I hope so!

    Reply
  231. You’re welcome, Michelle. I think it’s fair to say that food is a subject of great and wide ranging interest, and the range of what we eat is pretty intriguing! Talking about food with friends is almost as good as sharing it food with friends. But only “almost as good.” *G*

    Reply
  232. You’re welcome, Michelle. I think it’s fair to say that food is a subject of great and wide ranging interest, and the range of what we eat is pretty intriguing! Talking about food with friends is almost as good as sharing it food with friends. But only “almost as good.” *G*

    Reply
  233. You’re welcome, Michelle. I think it’s fair to say that food is a subject of great and wide ranging interest, and the range of what we eat is pretty intriguing! Talking about food with friends is almost as good as sharing it food with friends. But only “almost as good.” *G*

    Reply
  234. You’re welcome, Michelle. I think it’s fair to say that food is a subject of great and wide ranging interest, and the range of what we eat is pretty intriguing! Talking about food with friends is almost as good as sharing it food with friends. But only “almost as good.” *G*

    Reply
  235. You’re welcome, Michelle. I think it’s fair to say that food is a subject of great and wide ranging interest, and the range of what we eat is pretty intriguing! Talking about food with friends is almost as good as sharing it food with friends. But only “almost as good.” *G*

    Reply
  236. Yes! I’ve learned to make gravy with unsweetened cashew milk and vegan sausage. Biscuits made with vegetable shortening and same cashew milk. Even hubby thinks it’s delicious and he can have the original version. LOL 😉

    Reply
  237. Yes! I’ve learned to make gravy with unsweetened cashew milk and vegan sausage. Biscuits made with vegetable shortening and same cashew milk. Even hubby thinks it’s delicious and he can have the original version. LOL 😉

    Reply
  238. Yes! I’ve learned to make gravy with unsweetened cashew milk and vegan sausage. Biscuits made with vegetable shortening and same cashew milk. Even hubby thinks it’s delicious and he can have the original version. LOL 😉

    Reply
  239. Yes! I’ve learned to make gravy with unsweetened cashew milk and vegan sausage. Biscuits made with vegetable shortening and same cashew milk. Even hubby thinks it’s delicious and he can have the original version. LOL 😉

    Reply
  240. Yes! I’ve learned to make gravy with unsweetened cashew milk and vegan sausage. Biscuits made with vegetable shortening and same cashew milk. Even hubby thinks it’s delicious and he can have the original version. LOL 😉

    Reply
  241. Stephanie, how wonderful that you’ve come up with a great tasting vegan alternative to gravy biscuits! I wouldn’t have thought it could be done. *G* Clearly you’re a very inventive cook. Enjoy!

    Reply
  242. Stephanie, how wonderful that you’ve come up with a great tasting vegan alternative to gravy biscuits! I wouldn’t have thought it could be done. *G* Clearly you’re a very inventive cook. Enjoy!

    Reply
  243. Stephanie, how wonderful that you’ve come up with a great tasting vegan alternative to gravy biscuits! I wouldn’t have thought it could be done. *G* Clearly you’re a very inventive cook. Enjoy!

    Reply
  244. Stephanie, how wonderful that you’ve come up with a great tasting vegan alternative to gravy biscuits! I wouldn’t have thought it could be done. *G* Clearly you’re a very inventive cook. Enjoy!

    Reply
  245. Stephanie, how wonderful that you’ve come up with a great tasting vegan alternative to gravy biscuits! I wouldn’t have thought it could be done. *G* Clearly you’re a very inventive cook. Enjoy!

    Reply
  246. All your great photos and yummy descriptions have me hungry! I usually do a mix of oatmeal-oat bran-ground flax seed with berries and yogurt for breakfast, but love it when I can splurge and have eggs and English muffins. I’ve been told I’m the only person on earth who doesn’t particularly like bacon, but I like sausage in most of its many forms. Thank you for a fun read!

    Reply
  247. All your great photos and yummy descriptions have me hungry! I usually do a mix of oatmeal-oat bran-ground flax seed with berries and yogurt for breakfast, but love it when I can splurge and have eggs and English muffins. I’ve been told I’m the only person on earth who doesn’t particularly like bacon, but I like sausage in most of its many forms. Thank you for a fun read!

    Reply
  248. All your great photos and yummy descriptions have me hungry! I usually do a mix of oatmeal-oat bran-ground flax seed with berries and yogurt for breakfast, but love it when I can splurge and have eggs and English muffins. I’ve been told I’m the only person on earth who doesn’t particularly like bacon, but I like sausage in most of its many forms. Thank you for a fun read!

    Reply
  249. All your great photos and yummy descriptions have me hungry! I usually do a mix of oatmeal-oat bran-ground flax seed with berries and yogurt for breakfast, but love it when I can splurge and have eggs and English muffins. I’ve been told I’m the only person on earth who doesn’t particularly like bacon, but I like sausage in most of its many forms. Thank you for a fun read!

    Reply
  250. All your great photos and yummy descriptions have me hungry! I usually do a mix of oatmeal-oat bran-ground flax seed with berries and yogurt for breakfast, but love it when I can splurge and have eggs and English muffins. I’ve been told I’m the only person on earth who doesn’t particularly like bacon, but I like sausage in most of its many forms. Thank you for a fun read!

    Reply
  251. Laura, YOU DON’T LIKE BACON?!!! Urk. Don’t worry, I won’t tell anyone, except the internet. *G* I also enjoy most forms of sausage. A really good British breakfast can include 3 forms of pig meat. *G*

    Reply
  252. Laura, YOU DON’T LIKE BACON?!!! Urk. Don’t worry, I won’t tell anyone, except the internet. *G* I also enjoy most forms of sausage. A really good British breakfast can include 3 forms of pig meat. *G*

    Reply
  253. Laura, YOU DON’T LIKE BACON?!!! Urk. Don’t worry, I won’t tell anyone, except the internet. *G* I also enjoy most forms of sausage. A really good British breakfast can include 3 forms of pig meat. *G*

    Reply
  254. Laura, YOU DON’T LIKE BACON?!!! Urk. Don’t worry, I won’t tell anyone, except the internet. *G* I also enjoy most forms of sausage. A really good British breakfast can include 3 forms of pig meat. *G*

    Reply
  255. Laura, YOU DON’T LIKE BACON?!!! Urk. Don’t worry, I won’t tell anyone, except the internet. *G* I also enjoy most forms of sausage. A really good British breakfast can include 3 forms of pig meat. *G*

    Reply

Leave a Comment