AAW—What’s Cooking!

Andrew's sourdoughWith so many of our normal activities curtailed these days, it’s no wonder that the kitchen has become a favorite refuge—food is not only sustenance, but a way to connect with our creativity and nurture our spirit of hope and resilience. So in this month’s Ask A Wench feature, we’re answering this question: By all accounts, activity in the kitchen has skyrocketed during the pandemic. Have you been busy trying recipes? And have you discovered a favorite comfort treat?

Nicola: I ate far too much at the start of Lockdown and have been spending the last few weeks trying to get myself back to healthier eating. I’m not much of a cook or baker and am totally spoiled because my husband is a very talented chef. One of his pandemic projects has been improving his sourdough bread and I have been an enthusiastic tester of the results.

My own kitchen efforts have been focused on trying out some new salad recipes. My current favourite is salmon with rocket/arugula, pink grapefruit and avocado. Sometimes I throw in some little sweet tomatoes as well. The dressing, which is oil with crushed roasted fennel seeds adds something extra-delicious to the mix.



Portuguese Egg tartIf I’m going to treat myself, friends and family to a sweet treat it will probably be Pastéis de Nata, Portuguese Egg Tarts. I first tasted these in a café in London a few years ago. They are like custard tarts but taste as though they have something special added in! Perhaps it’s the way they are made. If you’re very keen you can make your own puff pastry for the cases but I’ll confess to buying mine.

To make it, you grease a muffin tin and preheat the oven to 200C. Put one whole egg, two additional egg yolks, 115grams of brown caster sugar and 2 tablespoons of cornflour in a saucepan and mix well together, then slowly add in 400 mils of full fat milk. Place the pan on a medium heat and stir until it comes to the boil and thicken. Remove from the heat and add in two teaspoons of vanilla extract. Put the custard mix into a bowl to cool whilst you cut out your rounds of pastry to fit the tin. Once the custard is cool, spoon it into the pastry cases and bake for 20 – 25 minutes. Leave to cool for 5 minutes in the tin before moving the tarts to a cooling rack. Best eaten warm but cold is also very tasty!

BlueberryFriandsAnne: I've been watching the proliferation of baking posts on Facebook and other places, and drooling over some of the luscious photos, but though I love to cook and really enjoy baking, I usually only do special things when I have visitors or when I'm visiting and taking a little something as a gift. Otherwise for me, it's ordinary everyday cooking.

I did bake bread in the first few weeks of lockdown when I was unable to get my favorite brand of bread. Baking bread is fun and easy — especially with the no-knead method, but when the air is full of the smell of warm, fresh-baked bread, it's so hard to resist having another slice, and another. So I limit my bread baking. 

I cook most meals — I'm not one for zapping food in the microwave, or getting take-away meals, but it's fairly basic. I can't be bothered going to a lot of trouble just for me.  It's winter here, so I've been making big pots of soup — mostly some kind of veggie soup, usually what I've got in the fridge with lentils or barley and a lamb shank if I have one. Again, nothing fancy.

If I did want to bake something sweet to take to friends, it would probably be an orange almond cake, or little raspberry (or blueberry) and almond friands (aka muffins). Cakes made from almond meal (ie ground almonds) are surprisingly moist and light, and these are quick, easy and and not too sweet — perfect for gluten and/or dairy intolerant friends, of which I have quite a few. The recipe for the orange cake sounds weird, because you start by boiling a couple of whole oranges, but trust me, it's really yummy. You can top it with a glaze, or masses of flaked almonds, or simply dust with icing sugar (powdered sugar). And serve with cream as a dessert.

Soda_breadPia: Far from trying recipes and cooking delicious treats I’ve been avoiding it as much as possible! Being at home all the time makes it far too tempting to head for the fridge and I’m eating way more than I should, especially chocolate, plus I’m allergic to exercise – not a great combination. However, sometimes you’ve just got to live a little and one thing that’s hard to resist is newly baked bread. Because I’m lazy I usually only make soda bread, but my favourite is a delightfully naughty variety with lots of syrup which means it’s sweet. It’s great on its own with just butter, although it goes well with cheese too. Here’s how to make it:-
 
Put 1 ½ decilitres (0.6 of a US cup) of bran, 4 ½ dl (1.9 US cup) of normal white flour, 6 dl (2.5 US cup) of wholemeal flour, and 3 teaspoons of baking powder in a bowl and thoroughly mix these dry ingredients. Add 4 dl (1.7 US cup) of full milk and 4 extremely heaped tablespoons of golden syrup. Mix it all together and roughly split it in half. Pick up the dough with your hands and form two loaves (very sticky and messy but that’s ok). Put these on a greased baking tray and bake in the oven at 175 degrees Celsius for about 35-40 minutes. Eat while warm!

Chocolate wafersMary Jo: I can't say I'm cooking more than usual; since I work at home, I'm as busy as I usually am.  But I have a fun thing or two to mention. Firstly, my sister-in-law introduced us to her home made ice cream sandwiches.  She uses Nabisco Famous Chocolate Wafers, which I'd never heard of, but which apparently have had a long and successful career as the basis of ice box cakes.  They're quite thin, which works well for ice cream sandwiches.  Simply soften the ice cream until it's malleable but not melting, slather on a wafer, cover with another wafer and press together to spread the ice cream, then refreeze. Fun and easy! My test batch aren't as neat as hers, but they taste good.  Since we saw her on the Fourth of July, she'd made a batch with vanilla ice cream and chopped strawberries and blueberries mixed in. Hurray for the red, white and blue!

Fresh herbsThis second item isn't a recipe but an ingredient.  I grow some herbs, and the basil has really gone to town this year! (That's sage to the left of the basil.) I particularly like adding chopped fresh basil to an omelet with cheese, or tossing leaves in a salad, or mixing basil with sliced tomatoes and a bit of olive oil. (This is a traditional tomato salad in the Mayhem Consultant's family.)  
 Fresh herbs add amazingly to flavor in all kinds of foods. After basil, my favorite is rosemary.  If you have no place to grow herbs, most grocery stores have fresh packets in the produce department.  If you haven't used fresh herbs before, I think it's time you did!

BiscuitsJo: I’ve spent a little time in this Isolation Situation trying out new recipes. 
(There’s a ricotta cheesecake, for instance, that’s baked and it looks like a cake. I cannot find the exact recipe I'm trying to recreate. It makes for very tasty failures though.)

What I’ve mostly done is make old and familiar stuff I haven’t got back to for a while.

Like strawberry shortcake.

Shortcake is a flaky biscuit sort of thing. Properly, it IS a biscuit. I will not dis folks who choose to make strawberry shortcake with a bit of sponge cake. They doubtless have their reasons. But I make it the right way.

I start with biscuits. My aunts used lard back in the old days. I use vegetable shortening, but you can use butter in this special case if you are, as my Aunt Doc would have put it, “made of money.” I add a good bit more sugar to these biscuits than I would if I were making some to be filled with bacon and tomato or set alongside eggs and grits. I top 'em with strawberries cut with some sugar and I decorate with cream on top if I have it handy.

Forget angelfood cake. This is what angels actually eat.

CookieAndrea: I enjoy cooking, and with the covid-19 forcing so many of us to shelter in place, I found the flood recipes appearing on online one of the silver linings. (Though I do wish that butter and sugar would announce that light of the emergency, they deemed their calorie count to be cut in half. One of my favorite features has been Melissa Clark’s entertaining (and delicious) column on pantry cooking in the New York Times, where she offers wonderfully simple recipes from humble ingredients. (The Food section of the NY Times, along with its amazing recipe section is fabulous resource!)

Bean-quinoa soupI confess that I’ve gravitated to sweets in my lock-down cooking (I am taking VERY long walks to compensate!) Along with my go-to chocolate chip and walnut blondies, my new favorite new treats are the Banana Everything cookie (no eggs and olive oil instead of butter, so a moderately healthy snack) I’ve taken the liberty of adding dried fruit—raisons, cranberries and cherries—to the mix, which I modestly announce to be an improvement on the original! I’ve also tried Clarke’s pound cake recipe . . .and to show I eat more than sugar and butter, I also adore the Quinoa and Bean soup from the pantry recipes. (I add chopped fresh spinach at the end . . .but I love to tinker!)

Now, before you all rush for your pots and pans, please share what you've been cooking lately! Have you discovered new favorites from all the recipes being showcased online? (We all have our forks and spoons ready!)

150 thoughts on “AAW—What’s Cooking!”

  1. Although I cook for one (me), I like to make a batch of something I’m willing to eat for several days. That’s usually a hearty soup or a sheet-pan dinner. Soup is a way to use up stuff deliciously. For the sheet pan, I like to use shelf-stable gnocchi or baby Yukon golds, a green veggie, other veg (onions, tomatoes), and crumbled chorizo for meat flavor. So easy to put together and clean up after, and I never tire of these.

    Reply
  2. Although I cook for one (me), I like to make a batch of something I’m willing to eat for several days. That’s usually a hearty soup or a sheet-pan dinner. Soup is a way to use up stuff deliciously. For the sheet pan, I like to use shelf-stable gnocchi or baby Yukon golds, a green veggie, other veg (onions, tomatoes), and crumbled chorizo for meat flavor. So easy to put together and clean up after, and I never tire of these.

    Reply
  3. Although I cook for one (me), I like to make a batch of something I’m willing to eat for several days. That’s usually a hearty soup or a sheet-pan dinner. Soup is a way to use up stuff deliciously. For the sheet pan, I like to use shelf-stable gnocchi or baby Yukon golds, a green veggie, other veg (onions, tomatoes), and crumbled chorizo for meat flavor. So easy to put together and clean up after, and I never tire of these.

    Reply
  4. Although I cook for one (me), I like to make a batch of something I’m willing to eat for several days. That’s usually a hearty soup or a sheet-pan dinner. Soup is a way to use up stuff deliciously. For the sheet pan, I like to use shelf-stable gnocchi or baby Yukon golds, a green veggie, other veg (onions, tomatoes), and crumbled chorizo for meat flavor. So easy to put together and clean up after, and I never tire of these.

    Reply
  5. Although I cook for one (me), I like to make a batch of something I’m willing to eat for several days. That’s usually a hearty soup or a sheet-pan dinner. Soup is a way to use up stuff deliciously. For the sheet pan, I like to use shelf-stable gnocchi or baby Yukon golds, a green veggie, other veg (onions, tomatoes), and crumbled chorizo for meat flavor. So easy to put together and clean up after, and I never tire of these.

    Reply
  6. Seasonal allergies have been VERY hard on me, so i haven’t been doing much cooking.
    What I do cook is home-prepared meals I bring up from the freezer. (Since I cooked them and placed them in the freezer, I do not count these as freezer foods!) Most of them are based on a hamburger mixture I call “Scallops”: ground beef, flavored with chopped celery, chopped onion, and chopped carrots. Brown in skillet and simmer till done. Pack in meal-sized packages and uses as needed. This mixture will work in almost any ground beef recipe you have ever seen. (The original recipe used green bell pepper instead of the carrot. If you can tolerate bell peppers, use those.)
    As to above comments: Strawberry sponge cake AND straberry pound cake are good desserts. What they are NOT is short cake. The sponge cake doesn’t even have shortening in it! And the pound cake is entirely the wrong texture for my taste. Call these alternative desserts by their correct names and I am OK with them; calling them shortcake is a LIE (allthough perhaps unintentional).

    Reply
  7. Seasonal allergies have been VERY hard on me, so i haven’t been doing much cooking.
    What I do cook is home-prepared meals I bring up from the freezer. (Since I cooked them and placed them in the freezer, I do not count these as freezer foods!) Most of them are based on a hamburger mixture I call “Scallops”: ground beef, flavored with chopped celery, chopped onion, and chopped carrots. Brown in skillet and simmer till done. Pack in meal-sized packages and uses as needed. This mixture will work in almost any ground beef recipe you have ever seen. (The original recipe used green bell pepper instead of the carrot. If you can tolerate bell peppers, use those.)
    As to above comments: Strawberry sponge cake AND straberry pound cake are good desserts. What they are NOT is short cake. The sponge cake doesn’t even have shortening in it! And the pound cake is entirely the wrong texture for my taste. Call these alternative desserts by their correct names and I am OK with them; calling them shortcake is a LIE (allthough perhaps unintentional).

    Reply
  8. Seasonal allergies have been VERY hard on me, so i haven’t been doing much cooking.
    What I do cook is home-prepared meals I bring up from the freezer. (Since I cooked them and placed them in the freezer, I do not count these as freezer foods!) Most of them are based on a hamburger mixture I call “Scallops”: ground beef, flavored with chopped celery, chopped onion, and chopped carrots. Brown in skillet and simmer till done. Pack in meal-sized packages and uses as needed. This mixture will work in almost any ground beef recipe you have ever seen. (The original recipe used green bell pepper instead of the carrot. If you can tolerate bell peppers, use those.)
    As to above comments: Strawberry sponge cake AND straberry pound cake are good desserts. What they are NOT is short cake. The sponge cake doesn’t even have shortening in it! And the pound cake is entirely the wrong texture for my taste. Call these alternative desserts by their correct names and I am OK with them; calling them shortcake is a LIE (allthough perhaps unintentional).

    Reply
  9. Seasonal allergies have been VERY hard on me, so i haven’t been doing much cooking.
    What I do cook is home-prepared meals I bring up from the freezer. (Since I cooked them and placed them in the freezer, I do not count these as freezer foods!) Most of them are based on a hamburger mixture I call “Scallops”: ground beef, flavored with chopped celery, chopped onion, and chopped carrots. Brown in skillet and simmer till done. Pack in meal-sized packages and uses as needed. This mixture will work in almost any ground beef recipe you have ever seen. (The original recipe used green bell pepper instead of the carrot. If you can tolerate bell peppers, use those.)
    As to above comments: Strawberry sponge cake AND straberry pound cake are good desserts. What they are NOT is short cake. The sponge cake doesn’t even have shortening in it! And the pound cake is entirely the wrong texture for my taste. Call these alternative desserts by their correct names and I am OK with them; calling them shortcake is a LIE (allthough perhaps unintentional).

    Reply
  10. Seasonal allergies have been VERY hard on me, so i haven’t been doing much cooking.
    What I do cook is home-prepared meals I bring up from the freezer. (Since I cooked them and placed them in the freezer, I do not count these as freezer foods!) Most of them are based on a hamburger mixture I call “Scallops”: ground beef, flavored with chopped celery, chopped onion, and chopped carrots. Brown in skillet and simmer till done. Pack in meal-sized packages and uses as needed. This mixture will work in almost any ground beef recipe you have ever seen. (The original recipe used green bell pepper instead of the carrot. If you can tolerate bell peppers, use those.)
    As to above comments: Strawberry sponge cake AND straberry pound cake are good desserts. What they are NOT is short cake. The sponge cake doesn’t even have shortening in it! And the pound cake is entirely the wrong texture for my taste. Call these alternative desserts by their correct names and I am OK with them; calling them shortcake is a LIE (allthough perhaps unintentional).

    Reply
  11. I am very good at grilling food. Since I’m not working my arena gigs, I’ve been attempting different techniques and meats other that steak, burgers, chicken breasts, and pork chops. I’m not a fan of barbeque sauces so I’m experimenting with marinades. Soaking the meat in salad dressings like Newman’s Own does wonders for chicken (15-30 depending on how much you like garlic)! I’m also playing with how I do my sides. My hubby is a better cook, but he loves my grilling.

    Reply
  12. I am very good at grilling food. Since I’m not working my arena gigs, I’ve been attempting different techniques and meats other that steak, burgers, chicken breasts, and pork chops. I’m not a fan of barbeque sauces so I’m experimenting with marinades. Soaking the meat in salad dressings like Newman’s Own does wonders for chicken (15-30 depending on how much you like garlic)! I’m also playing with how I do my sides. My hubby is a better cook, but he loves my grilling.

    Reply
  13. I am very good at grilling food. Since I’m not working my arena gigs, I’ve been attempting different techniques and meats other that steak, burgers, chicken breasts, and pork chops. I’m not a fan of barbeque sauces so I’m experimenting with marinades. Soaking the meat in salad dressings like Newman’s Own does wonders for chicken (15-30 depending on how much you like garlic)! I’m also playing with how I do my sides. My hubby is a better cook, but he loves my grilling.

    Reply
  14. I am very good at grilling food. Since I’m not working my arena gigs, I’ve been attempting different techniques and meats other that steak, burgers, chicken breasts, and pork chops. I’m not a fan of barbeque sauces so I’m experimenting with marinades. Soaking the meat in salad dressings like Newman’s Own does wonders for chicken (15-30 depending on how much you like garlic)! I’m also playing with how I do my sides. My hubby is a better cook, but he loves my grilling.

    Reply
  15. I am very good at grilling food. Since I’m not working my arena gigs, I’ve been attempting different techniques and meats other that steak, burgers, chicken breasts, and pork chops. I’m not a fan of barbeque sauces so I’m experimenting with marinades. Soaking the meat in salad dressings like Newman’s Own does wonders for chicken (15-30 depending on how much you like garlic)! I’m also playing with how I do my sides. My hubby is a better cook, but he loves my grilling.

    Reply
  16. I have cooked practically nothing – with Machiavellian cunning, I offered to do all the washing up for my furloughed kids, as long as I didn’t have to cook. And my eldest daughter and her husband love to cook, and seldom have the time IRL. So we’ve eaten like kings (and washed up like scullery maids.)
    For the most part, I don’t really know what recipes they used – and my daughter tends not to follow recipes strictly anyway, but the Dishoom ruby chicken was fabulous – properly fabulous, although when you read the list of ingredients I can’t imagine many home cooks could be bothered. https://www.theguardian.com/food/2019/sep/07/four-classic-indian-recipes-dishoom-chaat-dal-salad-jackfruit-biyani-chicken-makhani-curry
    For a simpler recipe, we taught youngest daughter’s boyfriend how to make fifteens, which made him very happy, and he kept us well stocked up for the duration.
    http://www.fromplatetopen.com/2016/04/northern-irish-no-bake-traybake-fifteens-recipe.html

    Reply
  17. I have cooked practically nothing – with Machiavellian cunning, I offered to do all the washing up for my furloughed kids, as long as I didn’t have to cook. And my eldest daughter and her husband love to cook, and seldom have the time IRL. So we’ve eaten like kings (and washed up like scullery maids.)
    For the most part, I don’t really know what recipes they used – and my daughter tends not to follow recipes strictly anyway, but the Dishoom ruby chicken was fabulous – properly fabulous, although when you read the list of ingredients I can’t imagine many home cooks could be bothered. https://www.theguardian.com/food/2019/sep/07/four-classic-indian-recipes-dishoom-chaat-dal-salad-jackfruit-biyani-chicken-makhani-curry
    For a simpler recipe, we taught youngest daughter’s boyfriend how to make fifteens, which made him very happy, and he kept us well stocked up for the duration.
    http://www.fromplatetopen.com/2016/04/northern-irish-no-bake-traybake-fifteens-recipe.html

    Reply
  18. I have cooked practically nothing – with Machiavellian cunning, I offered to do all the washing up for my furloughed kids, as long as I didn’t have to cook. And my eldest daughter and her husband love to cook, and seldom have the time IRL. So we’ve eaten like kings (and washed up like scullery maids.)
    For the most part, I don’t really know what recipes they used – and my daughter tends not to follow recipes strictly anyway, but the Dishoom ruby chicken was fabulous – properly fabulous, although when you read the list of ingredients I can’t imagine many home cooks could be bothered. https://www.theguardian.com/food/2019/sep/07/four-classic-indian-recipes-dishoom-chaat-dal-salad-jackfruit-biyani-chicken-makhani-curry
    For a simpler recipe, we taught youngest daughter’s boyfriend how to make fifteens, which made him very happy, and he kept us well stocked up for the duration.
    http://www.fromplatetopen.com/2016/04/northern-irish-no-bake-traybake-fifteens-recipe.html

    Reply
  19. I have cooked practically nothing – with Machiavellian cunning, I offered to do all the washing up for my furloughed kids, as long as I didn’t have to cook. And my eldest daughter and her husband love to cook, and seldom have the time IRL. So we’ve eaten like kings (and washed up like scullery maids.)
    For the most part, I don’t really know what recipes they used – and my daughter tends not to follow recipes strictly anyway, but the Dishoom ruby chicken was fabulous – properly fabulous, although when you read the list of ingredients I can’t imagine many home cooks could be bothered. https://www.theguardian.com/food/2019/sep/07/four-classic-indian-recipes-dishoom-chaat-dal-salad-jackfruit-biyani-chicken-makhani-curry
    For a simpler recipe, we taught youngest daughter’s boyfriend how to make fifteens, which made him very happy, and he kept us well stocked up for the duration.
    http://www.fromplatetopen.com/2016/04/northern-irish-no-bake-traybake-fifteens-recipe.html

    Reply
  20. I have cooked practically nothing – with Machiavellian cunning, I offered to do all the washing up for my furloughed kids, as long as I didn’t have to cook. And my eldest daughter and her husband love to cook, and seldom have the time IRL. So we’ve eaten like kings (and washed up like scullery maids.)
    For the most part, I don’t really know what recipes they used – and my daughter tends not to follow recipes strictly anyway, but the Dishoom ruby chicken was fabulous – properly fabulous, although when you read the list of ingredients I can’t imagine many home cooks could be bothered. https://www.theguardian.com/food/2019/sep/07/four-classic-indian-recipes-dishoom-chaat-dal-salad-jackfruit-biyani-chicken-makhani-curry
    For a simpler recipe, we taught youngest daughter’s boyfriend how to make fifteens, which made him very happy, and he kept us well stocked up for the duration.
    http://www.fromplatetopen.com/2016/04/northern-irish-no-bake-traybake-fifteens-recipe.html

    Reply
  21. My husband claims to like cooking and prepares about ninety-five percent of our meals. He detests washing dishes which I am happy to do in exchange for delicious food. Needless to say, I’ve no recipes to share, but I am drooling. Bon appétit!

    Reply
  22. My husband claims to like cooking and prepares about ninety-five percent of our meals. He detests washing dishes which I am happy to do in exchange for delicious food. Needless to say, I’ve no recipes to share, but I am drooling. Bon appétit!

    Reply
  23. My husband claims to like cooking and prepares about ninety-five percent of our meals. He detests washing dishes which I am happy to do in exchange for delicious food. Needless to say, I’ve no recipes to share, but I am drooling. Bon appétit!

    Reply
  24. My husband claims to like cooking and prepares about ninety-five percent of our meals. He detests washing dishes which I am happy to do in exchange for delicious food. Needless to say, I’ve no recipes to share, but I am drooling. Bon appétit!

    Reply
  25. My husband claims to like cooking and prepares about ninety-five percent of our meals. He detests washing dishes which I am happy to do in exchange for delicious food. Needless to say, I’ve no recipes to share, but I am drooling. Bon appétit!

    Reply
  26. Sue, the “scallops” sound delicious—so much more tasty than plain ground beef. I don’t buy much commerically frozen food, as I like fresh stuff. But when the pandemic first started I did make some homemade spaghetti sauce with hmaburger and fresh fresh and veggies, which I froze. It is nice to have some ready-made wholesome stuff when you don’t feel like cooking from scratch.
    So sorry your seasonal allergies have been so bad. Sending hugs! I hope you’re feeling better!

    Reply
  27. Sue, the “scallops” sound delicious—so much more tasty than plain ground beef. I don’t buy much commerically frozen food, as I like fresh stuff. But when the pandemic first started I did make some homemade spaghetti sauce with hmaburger and fresh fresh and veggies, which I froze. It is nice to have some ready-made wholesome stuff when you don’t feel like cooking from scratch.
    So sorry your seasonal allergies have been so bad. Sending hugs! I hope you’re feeling better!

    Reply
  28. Sue, the “scallops” sound delicious—so much more tasty than plain ground beef. I don’t buy much commerically frozen food, as I like fresh stuff. But when the pandemic first started I did make some homemade spaghetti sauce with hmaburger and fresh fresh and veggies, which I froze. It is nice to have some ready-made wholesome stuff when you don’t feel like cooking from scratch.
    So sorry your seasonal allergies have been so bad. Sending hugs! I hope you’re feeling better!

    Reply
  29. Sue, the “scallops” sound delicious—so much more tasty than plain ground beef. I don’t buy much commerically frozen food, as I like fresh stuff. But when the pandemic first started I did make some homemade spaghetti sauce with hmaburger and fresh fresh and veggies, which I froze. It is nice to have some ready-made wholesome stuff when you don’t feel like cooking from scratch.
    So sorry your seasonal allergies have been so bad. Sending hugs! I hope you’re feeling better!

    Reply
  30. Sue, the “scallops” sound delicious—so much more tasty than plain ground beef. I don’t buy much commerically frozen food, as I like fresh stuff. But when the pandemic first started I did make some homemade spaghetti sauce with hmaburger and fresh fresh and veggies, which I froze. It is nice to have some ready-made wholesome stuff when you don’t feel like cooking from scratch.
    So sorry your seasonal allergies have been so bad. Sending hugs! I hope you’re feeling better!

    Reply
  31. In pre-Covid times, I was out many evenings running events or meetings. My husband loves dining out alone – sitting at a bar, having a beer and hopefully something quite spicy. Now there are no events and dining out is not exactly a good idea. I’ve always loved to cook, but must admit that doing it every night was getting old pretty fast. Melissa Clark and Sam Sifton, both with the NYTimes cooking pages, have been lifesavers. In addition to the Pantry series Andrea mentioned, Melissa Clark was my intro to sheet pan dinners, a true boon for someone who loves to cook but hates to cleanup! But the real adventure has been making a sweet each weekend to, with luck, last the week. I think the Egg Tarts are definitely this weekend’s adventure! I’m also a huge fan of Delia Smith and her simple but sensational cake recipes. And while I’m definitely with Jo on biscuits for shortcakes, I recently made my first ever Victoria Sponge with strawberries and cream – and the family called it strawberry shortcake! And it certainly didn’t last a week!

    Reply
  32. In pre-Covid times, I was out many evenings running events or meetings. My husband loves dining out alone – sitting at a bar, having a beer and hopefully something quite spicy. Now there are no events and dining out is not exactly a good idea. I’ve always loved to cook, but must admit that doing it every night was getting old pretty fast. Melissa Clark and Sam Sifton, both with the NYTimes cooking pages, have been lifesavers. In addition to the Pantry series Andrea mentioned, Melissa Clark was my intro to sheet pan dinners, a true boon for someone who loves to cook but hates to cleanup! But the real adventure has been making a sweet each weekend to, with luck, last the week. I think the Egg Tarts are definitely this weekend’s adventure! I’m also a huge fan of Delia Smith and her simple but sensational cake recipes. And while I’m definitely with Jo on biscuits for shortcakes, I recently made my first ever Victoria Sponge with strawberries and cream – and the family called it strawberry shortcake! And it certainly didn’t last a week!

    Reply
  33. In pre-Covid times, I was out many evenings running events or meetings. My husband loves dining out alone – sitting at a bar, having a beer and hopefully something quite spicy. Now there are no events and dining out is not exactly a good idea. I’ve always loved to cook, but must admit that doing it every night was getting old pretty fast. Melissa Clark and Sam Sifton, both with the NYTimes cooking pages, have been lifesavers. In addition to the Pantry series Andrea mentioned, Melissa Clark was my intro to sheet pan dinners, a true boon for someone who loves to cook but hates to cleanup! But the real adventure has been making a sweet each weekend to, with luck, last the week. I think the Egg Tarts are definitely this weekend’s adventure! I’m also a huge fan of Delia Smith and her simple but sensational cake recipes. And while I’m definitely with Jo on biscuits for shortcakes, I recently made my first ever Victoria Sponge with strawberries and cream – and the family called it strawberry shortcake! And it certainly didn’t last a week!

    Reply
  34. In pre-Covid times, I was out many evenings running events or meetings. My husband loves dining out alone – sitting at a bar, having a beer and hopefully something quite spicy. Now there are no events and dining out is not exactly a good idea. I’ve always loved to cook, but must admit that doing it every night was getting old pretty fast. Melissa Clark and Sam Sifton, both with the NYTimes cooking pages, have been lifesavers. In addition to the Pantry series Andrea mentioned, Melissa Clark was my intro to sheet pan dinners, a true boon for someone who loves to cook but hates to cleanup! But the real adventure has been making a sweet each weekend to, with luck, last the week. I think the Egg Tarts are definitely this weekend’s adventure! I’m also a huge fan of Delia Smith and her simple but sensational cake recipes. And while I’m definitely with Jo on biscuits for shortcakes, I recently made my first ever Victoria Sponge with strawberries and cream – and the family called it strawberry shortcake! And it certainly didn’t last a week!

    Reply
  35. In pre-Covid times, I was out many evenings running events or meetings. My husband loves dining out alone – sitting at a bar, having a beer and hopefully something quite spicy. Now there are no events and dining out is not exactly a good idea. I’ve always loved to cook, but must admit that doing it every night was getting old pretty fast. Melissa Clark and Sam Sifton, both with the NYTimes cooking pages, have been lifesavers. In addition to the Pantry series Andrea mentioned, Melissa Clark was my intro to sheet pan dinners, a true boon for someone who loves to cook but hates to cleanup! But the real adventure has been making a sweet each weekend to, with luck, last the week. I think the Egg Tarts are definitely this weekend’s adventure! I’m also a huge fan of Delia Smith and her simple but sensational cake recipes. And while I’m definitely with Jo on biscuits for shortcakes, I recently made my first ever Victoria Sponge with strawberries and cream – and the family called it strawberry shortcake! And it certainly didn’t last a week!

    Reply
  36. After cooking for a family of six for decades, I hung up my apron when my husband got sucked into the Food Network and I started to write with serious intent. That does not mean I’ve stopped eating, however. He does most of the day-to-day stuff and I do holidays, but I have gone into the kitchen more during the pandemic. I made really delicious Eggs Benedict with leftover ham, Hollandaise, and asparagus the other day, and managed to poach the eggs perfectly for a change. I’ve made meatloaf that John says he would like for his Last Meal, and nice crispy home fries. Everything is highly caloric and unhealthy, but at least I’m not baking!

    Reply
  37. After cooking for a family of six for decades, I hung up my apron when my husband got sucked into the Food Network and I started to write with serious intent. That does not mean I’ve stopped eating, however. He does most of the day-to-day stuff and I do holidays, but I have gone into the kitchen more during the pandemic. I made really delicious Eggs Benedict with leftover ham, Hollandaise, and asparagus the other day, and managed to poach the eggs perfectly for a change. I’ve made meatloaf that John says he would like for his Last Meal, and nice crispy home fries. Everything is highly caloric and unhealthy, but at least I’m not baking!

    Reply
  38. After cooking for a family of six for decades, I hung up my apron when my husband got sucked into the Food Network and I started to write with serious intent. That does not mean I’ve stopped eating, however. He does most of the day-to-day stuff and I do holidays, but I have gone into the kitchen more during the pandemic. I made really delicious Eggs Benedict with leftover ham, Hollandaise, and asparagus the other day, and managed to poach the eggs perfectly for a change. I’ve made meatloaf that John says he would like for his Last Meal, and nice crispy home fries. Everything is highly caloric and unhealthy, but at least I’m not baking!

    Reply
  39. After cooking for a family of six for decades, I hung up my apron when my husband got sucked into the Food Network and I started to write with serious intent. That does not mean I’ve stopped eating, however. He does most of the day-to-day stuff and I do holidays, but I have gone into the kitchen more during the pandemic. I made really delicious Eggs Benedict with leftover ham, Hollandaise, and asparagus the other day, and managed to poach the eggs perfectly for a change. I’ve made meatloaf that John says he would like for his Last Meal, and nice crispy home fries. Everything is highly caloric and unhealthy, but at least I’m not baking!

    Reply
  40. After cooking for a family of six for decades, I hung up my apron when my husband got sucked into the Food Network and I started to write with serious intent. That does not mean I’ve stopped eating, however. He does most of the day-to-day stuff and I do holidays, but I have gone into the kitchen more during the pandemic. I made really delicious Eggs Benedict with leftover ham, Hollandaise, and asparagus the other day, and managed to poach the eggs perfectly for a change. I’ve made meatloaf that John says he would like for his Last Meal, and nice crispy home fries. Everything is highly caloric and unhealthy, but at least I’m not baking!

    Reply
  41. Yes, I’ve been cooking. I made cornbread for the first time. From scratch, not from a mix. Not great – but I’ll try again. I bought myself the gift of a chef’s knife and learned how to butterfly and bread chicken breast cutlets. Major yum! I eat ’em with a splash of lemon juice. I’ve also been munching on skinless/boneless sardines with onion and lemon. Best of all, I’ve resurrected my all-time favorite recipe: Broccoli Marinade. For the marinade: 1 TBSP each sugar, dried dill; 1 tsp each garlic salt, coarse ground black pepper. 1 cup apple cider vinegar, 3/4 cup neutral vegetable oil. Mix marinade ingredients in a 2 cup measuring cup. Veggies (choose at least 3): broccoli florets, cauliflower florets, quartered artichoke hearts or bottoms, whole canned button mushrooms, cherry or grape tomatoes. Put the selected veggies in a freezer zip bag. Pour marinade over veggies. Swish everything together. Put the freezer bag in a dish or bowl (in case bag leaks!) and refrigerate for at least 4 hours. Serve cold as a side dish or as an appetizer. When serving, remove veggies from marinade with a slotted spoon. If there is leftover liquid, feel free to add more veggies. Enjoy! I certainly did! My next project is to try to roast a butternut squash and to do something with a bunch of beets.

    Reply
  42. Yes, I’ve been cooking. I made cornbread for the first time. From scratch, not from a mix. Not great – but I’ll try again. I bought myself the gift of a chef’s knife and learned how to butterfly and bread chicken breast cutlets. Major yum! I eat ’em with a splash of lemon juice. I’ve also been munching on skinless/boneless sardines with onion and lemon. Best of all, I’ve resurrected my all-time favorite recipe: Broccoli Marinade. For the marinade: 1 TBSP each sugar, dried dill; 1 tsp each garlic salt, coarse ground black pepper. 1 cup apple cider vinegar, 3/4 cup neutral vegetable oil. Mix marinade ingredients in a 2 cup measuring cup. Veggies (choose at least 3): broccoli florets, cauliflower florets, quartered artichoke hearts or bottoms, whole canned button mushrooms, cherry or grape tomatoes. Put the selected veggies in a freezer zip bag. Pour marinade over veggies. Swish everything together. Put the freezer bag in a dish or bowl (in case bag leaks!) and refrigerate for at least 4 hours. Serve cold as a side dish or as an appetizer. When serving, remove veggies from marinade with a slotted spoon. If there is leftover liquid, feel free to add more veggies. Enjoy! I certainly did! My next project is to try to roast a butternut squash and to do something with a bunch of beets.

    Reply
  43. Yes, I’ve been cooking. I made cornbread for the first time. From scratch, not from a mix. Not great – but I’ll try again. I bought myself the gift of a chef’s knife and learned how to butterfly and bread chicken breast cutlets. Major yum! I eat ’em with a splash of lemon juice. I’ve also been munching on skinless/boneless sardines with onion and lemon. Best of all, I’ve resurrected my all-time favorite recipe: Broccoli Marinade. For the marinade: 1 TBSP each sugar, dried dill; 1 tsp each garlic salt, coarse ground black pepper. 1 cup apple cider vinegar, 3/4 cup neutral vegetable oil. Mix marinade ingredients in a 2 cup measuring cup. Veggies (choose at least 3): broccoli florets, cauliflower florets, quartered artichoke hearts or bottoms, whole canned button mushrooms, cherry or grape tomatoes. Put the selected veggies in a freezer zip bag. Pour marinade over veggies. Swish everything together. Put the freezer bag in a dish or bowl (in case bag leaks!) and refrigerate for at least 4 hours. Serve cold as a side dish or as an appetizer. When serving, remove veggies from marinade with a slotted spoon. If there is leftover liquid, feel free to add more veggies. Enjoy! I certainly did! My next project is to try to roast a butternut squash and to do something with a bunch of beets.

    Reply
  44. Yes, I’ve been cooking. I made cornbread for the first time. From scratch, not from a mix. Not great – but I’ll try again. I bought myself the gift of a chef’s knife and learned how to butterfly and bread chicken breast cutlets. Major yum! I eat ’em with a splash of lemon juice. I’ve also been munching on skinless/boneless sardines with onion and lemon. Best of all, I’ve resurrected my all-time favorite recipe: Broccoli Marinade. For the marinade: 1 TBSP each sugar, dried dill; 1 tsp each garlic salt, coarse ground black pepper. 1 cup apple cider vinegar, 3/4 cup neutral vegetable oil. Mix marinade ingredients in a 2 cup measuring cup. Veggies (choose at least 3): broccoli florets, cauliflower florets, quartered artichoke hearts or bottoms, whole canned button mushrooms, cherry or grape tomatoes. Put the selected veggies in a freezer zip bag. Pour marinade over veggies. Swish everything together. Put the freezer bag in a dish or bowl (in case bag leaks!) and refrigerate for at least 4 hours. Serve cold as a side dish or as an appetizer. When serving, remove veggies from marinade with a slotted spoon. If there is leftover liquid, feel free to add more veggies. Enjoy! I certainly did! My next project is to try to roast a butternut squash and to do something with a bunch of beets.

    Reply
  45. Yes, I’ve been cooking. I made cornbread for the first time. From scratch, not from a mix. Not great – but I’ll try again. I bought myself the gift of a chef’s knife and learned how to butterfly and bread chicken breast cutlets. Major yum! I eat ’em with a splash of lemon juice. I’ve also been munching on skinless/boneless sardines with onion and lemon. Best of all, I’ve resurrected my all-time favorite recipe: Broccoli Marinade. For the marinade: 1 TBSP each sugar, dried dill; 1 tsp each garlic salt, coarse ground black pepper. 1 cup apple cider vinegar, 3/4 cup neutral vegetable oil. Mix marinade ingredients in a 2 cup measuring cup. Veggies (choose at least 3): broccoli florets, cauliflower florets, quartered artichoke hearts or bottoms, whole canned button mushrooms, cherry or grape tomatoes. Put the selected veggies in a freezer zip bag. Pour marinade over veggies. Swish everything together. Put the freezer bag in a dish or bowl (in case bag leaks!) and refrigerate for at least 4 hours. Serve cold as a side dish or as an appetizer. When serving, remove veggies from marinade with a slotted spoon. If there is leftover liquid, feel free to add more veggies. Enjoy! I certainly did! My next project is to try to roast a butternut squash and to do something with a bunch of beets.

    Reply
  46. I’m not baking as much as I was during the height of the pandemic in the NY metro area. Back then I was making pumpkin muffins, quiche, tea cakes, no-knead foccacia, pound cake, and cauliflower cake(I highly recommend this recipe, it looks gorgeous and tastes wonderful,https://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-cauliflower-cake-recipes-from-the-kitchn-217980)
    Right now I am just trying to keep up with the veggies in my garden, I am picking lettuce, string beans and Swiss chard almost daily, and I just got my first few cherry tomatoes.

    Reply
  47. I’m not baking as much as I was during the height of the pandemic in the NY metro area. Back then I was making pumpkin muffins, quiche, tea cakes, no-knead foccacia, pound cake, and cauliflower cake(I highly recommend this recipe, it looks gorgeous and tastes wonderful,https://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-cauliflower-cake-recipes-from-the-kitchn-217980)
    Right now I am just trying to keep up with the veggies in my garden, I am picking lettuce, string beans and Swiss chard almost daily, and I just got my first few cherry tomatoes.

    Reply
  48. I’m not baking as much as I was during the height of the pandemic in the NY metro area. Back then I was making pumpkin muffins, quiche, tea cakes, no-knead foccacia, pound cake, and cauliflower cake(I highly recommend this recipe, it looks gorgeous and tastes wonderful,https://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-cauliflower-cake-recipes-from-the-kitchn-217980)
    Right now I am just trying to keep up with the veggies in my garden, I am picking lettuce, string beans and Swiss chard almost daily, and I just got my first few cherry tomatoes.

    Reply
  49. I’m not baking as much as I was during the height of the pandemic in the NY metro area. Back then I was making pumpkin muffins, quiche, tea cakes, no-knead foccacia, pound cake, and cauliflower cake(I highly recommend this recipe, it looks gorgeous and tastes wonderful,https://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-cauliflower-cake-recipes-from-the-kitchn-217980)
    Right now I am just trying to keep up with the veggies in my garden, I am picking lettuce, string beans and Swiss chard almost daily, and I just got my first few cherry tomatoes.

    Reply
  50. I’m not baking as much as I was during the height of the pandemic in the NY metro area. Back then I was making pumpkin muffins, quiche, tea cakes, no-knead foccacia, pound cake, and cauliflower cake(I highly recommend this recipe, it looks gorgeous and tastes wonderful,https://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-cauliflower-cake-recipes-from-the-kitchn-217980)
    Right now I am just trying to keep up with the veggies in my garden, I am picking lettuce, string beans and Swiss chard almost daily, and I just got my first few cherry tomatoes.

    Reply
  51. Binnie Syril, I love this. How often have I let veggies rot in the fridge bin because I didn’t feel like cooking them! So simple, and easy to change the flavor profile by using different vinegars, oils, and spices/herbs. Five stars!

    Reply
  52. Binnie Syril, I love this. How often have I let veggies rot in the fridge bin because I didn’t feel like cooking them! So simple, and easy to change the flavor profile by using different vinegars, oils, and spices/herbs. Five stars!

    Reply
  53. Binnie Syril, I love this. How often have I let veggies rot in the fridge bin because I didn’t feel like cooking them! So simple, and easy to change the flavor profile by using different vinegars, oils, and spices/herbs. Five stars!

    Reply
  54. Binnie Syril, I love this. How often have I let veggies rot in the fridge bin because I didn’t feel like cooking them! So simple, and easy to change the flavor profile by using different vinegars, oils, and spices/herbs. Five stars!

    Reply
  55. Binnie Syril, I love this. How often have I let veggies rot in the fridge bin because I didn’t feel like cooking them! So simple, and easy to change the flavor profile by using different vinegars, oils, and spices/herbs. Five stars!

    Reply
  56. When my kids were young I was always baking. As they got older my daughter took over the baking and I was happy to let her. To be honest I’m more of a savory than a sweet person and I’ve picked up a few lovely recipes here that I want to try. When I was baking I used to make an apple cake that the kids loved. It came from an old cook book my mother had for years so was a very old recipe. I enjoyed it myself. Unfortunately, in my early fifties I developed an intolerance to cows milk so I more or less gave up eating anything that contained it.
    On a side note, I’ve seen these answers to ‘ask a wench a question’ but I still don’t know where to post these questions. Can anyone help?

    Reply
  57. When my kids were young I was always baking. As they got older my daughter took over the baking and I was happy to let her. To be honest I’m more of a savory than a sweet person and I’ve picked up a few lovely recipes here that I want to try. When I was baking I used to make an apple cake that the kids loved. It came from an old cook book my mother had for years so was a very old recipe. I enjoyed it myself. Unfortunately, in my early fifties I developed an intolerance to cows milk so I more or less gave up eating anything that contained it.
    On a side note, I’ve seen these answers to ‘ask a wench a question’ but I still don’t know where to post these questions. Can anyone help?

    Reply
  58. When my kids were young I was always baking. As they got older my daughter took over the baking and I was happy to let her. To be honest I’m more of a savory than a sweet person and I’ve picked up a few lovely recipes here that I want to try. When I was baking I used to make an apple cake that the kids loved. It came from an old cook book my mother had for years so was a very old recipe. I enjoyed it myself. Unfortunately, in my early fifties I developed an intolerance to cows milk so I more or less gave up eating anything that contained it.
    On a side note, I’ve seen these answers to ‘ask a wench a question’ but I still don’t know where to post these questions. Can anyone help?

    Reply
  59. When my kids were young I was always baking. As they got older my daughter took over the baking and I was happy to let her. To be honest I’m more of a savory than a sweet person and I’ve picked up a few lovely recipes here that I want to try. When I was baking I used to make an apple cake that the kids loved. It came from an old cook book my mother had for years so was a very old recipe. I enjoyed it myself. Unfortunately, in my early fifties I developed an intolerance to cows milk so I more or less gave up eating anything that contained it.
    On a side note, I’ve seen these answers to ‘ask a wench a question’ but I still don’t know where to post these questions. Can anyone help?

    Reply
  60. When my kids were young I was always baking. As they got older my daughter took over the baking and I was happy to let her. To be honest I’m more of a savory than a sweet person and I’ve picked up a few lovely recipes here that I want to try. When I was baking I used to make an apple cake that the kids loved. It came from an old cook book my mother had for years so was a very old recipe. I enjoyed it myself. Unfortunately, in my early fifties I developed an intolerance to cows milk so I more or less gave up eating anything that contained it.
    On a side note, I’ve seen these answers to ‘ask a wench a question’ but I still don’t know where to post these questions. Can anyone help?

    Reply
  61. Sorry to hear about the seasonal allergies, Sue. Hope they pass soon. Your “scallops” sound a bit like a dish my mother used to make that we called “scrumfus” – which was apparently how I pronounced scrumptious, when I was three. Since lockdown I’ve made it a few times adding tomato paste and other vegies — it’s a great way to use leftover vegies, and is a change from soup, which I make lots of.
    Re strawberry shortcake, I agree. I’ve made it a few times, but I’ve also seen a quick version recipe that uses bought shortbread as a base, and it’s surprisingly good. If I find it, I’ll post a link.

    Reply
  62. Sorry to hear about the seasonal allergies, Sue. Hope they pass soon. Your “scallops” sound a bit like a dish my mother used to make that we called “scrumfus” – which was apparently how I pronounced scrumptious, when I was three. Since lockdown I’ve made it a few times adding tomato paste and other vegies — it’s a great way to use leftover vegies, and is a change from soup, which I make lots of.
    Re strawberry shortcake, I agree. I’ve made it a few times, but I’ve also seen a quick version recipe that uses bought shortbread as a base, and it’s surprisingly good. If I find it, I’ll post a link.

    Reply
  63. Sorry to hear about the seasonal allergies, Sue. Hope they pass soon. Your “scallops” sound a bit like a dish my mother used to make that we called “scrumfus” – which was apparently how I pronounced scrumptious, when I was three. Since lockdown I’ve made it a few times adding tomato paste and other vegies — it’s a great way to use leftover vegies, and is a change from soup, which I make lots of.
    Re strawberry shortcake, I agree. I’ve made it a few times, but I’ve also seen a quick version recipe that uses bought shortbread as a base, and it’s surprisingly good. If I find it, I’ll post a link.

    Reply
  64. Sorry to hear about the seasonal allergies, Sue. Hope they pass soon. Your “scallops” sound a bit like a dish my mother used to make that we called “scrumfus” – which was apparently how I pronounced scrumptious, when I was three. Since lockdown I’ve made it a few times adding tomato paste and other vegies — it’s a great way to use leftover vegies, and is a change from soup, which I make lots of.
    Re strawberry shortcake, I agree. I’ve made it a few times, but I’ve also seen a quick version recipe that uses bought shortbread as a base, and it’s surprisingly good. If I find it, I’ll post a link.

    Reply
  65. Sorry to hear about the seasonal allergies, Sue. Hope they pass soon. Your “scallops” sound a bit like a dish my mother used to make that we called “scrumfus” – which was apparently how I pronounced scrumptious, when I was three. Since lockdown I’ve made it a few times adding tomato paste and other vegies — it’s a great way to use leftover vegies, and is a change from soup, which I make lots of.
    Re strawberry shortcake, I agree. I’ve made it a few times, but I’ve also seen a quick version recipe that uses bought shortbread as a base, and it’s surprisingly good. If I find it, I’ll post a link.

    Reply
  66. Another great source of cake recipes is Nigella Lawson, particularly her “How to be a Domestic Goddess” book – Coca-Cola cake, Iced Gingerbread and Clementine cake are all staples here.
    I am very intrigued by roasted gnocchi – we’ve been experimenting with new dinner recipes, now that I don’t have a 100 minute commute and have more time, so I’m going to give that a whirl.
    Thanks for the inspiration, on top of all of the reading pleasure, ladies.

    Reply
  67. Another great source of cake recipes is Nigella Lawson, particularly her “How to be a Domestic Goddess” book – Coca-Cola cake, Iced Gingerbread and Clementine cake are all staples here.
    I am very intrigued by roasted gnocchi – we’ve been experimenting with new dinner recipes, now that I don’t have a 100 minute commute and have more time, so I’m going to give that a whirl.
    Thanks for the inspiration, on top of all of the reading pleasure, ladies.

    Reply
  68. Another great source of cake recipes is Nigella Lawson, particularly her “How to be a Domestic Goddess” book – Coca-Cola cake, Iced Gingerbread and Clementine cake are all staples here.
    I am very intrigued by roasted gnocchi – we’ve been experimenting with new dinner recipes, now that I don’t have a 100 minute commute and have more time, so I’m going to give that a whirl.
    Thanks for the inspiration, on top of all of the reading pleasure, ladies.

    Reply
  69. Another great source of cake recipes is Nigella Lawson, particularly her “How to be a Domestic Goddess” book – Coca-Cola cake, Iced Gingerbread and Clementine cake are all staples here.
    I am very intrigued by roasted gnocchi – we’ve been experimenting with new dinner recipes, now that I don’t have a 100 minute commute and have more time, so I’m going to give that a whirl.
    Thanks for the inspiration, on top of all of the reading pleasure, ladies.

    Reply
  70. Another great source of cake recipes is Nigella Lawson, particularly her “How to be a Domestic Goddess” book – Coca-Cola cake, Iced Gingerbread and Clementine cake are all staples here.
    I am very intrigued by roasted gnocchi – we’ve been experimenting with new dinner recipes, now that I don’t have a 100 minute commute and have more time, so I’m going to give that a whirl.
    Thanks for the inspiration, on top of all of the reading pleasure, ladies.

    Reply
  71. Andrea it nearly killed me to give up cheese. I love it. The stronger the better. Sometimes I’m naughty and have a little bit:)

    Reply
  72. Andrea it nearly killed me to give up cheese. I love it. The stronger the better. Sometimes I’m naughty and have a little bit:)

    Reply
  73. Andrea it nearly killed me to give up cheese. I love it. The stronger the better. Sometimes I’m naughty and have a little bit:)

    Reply
  74. Andrea it nearly killed me to give up cheese. I love it. The stronger the better. Sometimes I’m naughty and have a little bit:)

    Reply
  75. Andrea it nearly killed me to give up cheese. I love it. The stronger the better. Sometimes I’m naughty and have a little bit:)

    Reply

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