AAW names

Blue2Hi, Jo Beverley here, pulling together an AAW. If you dont know, AAW is Ask A Wench, and the question this time is:

How do you come up with names for characters and places that feel
right for the place and period? What about titles, familiar names, and nicknames?

 

My answers would be similar to the other Wenches, but I'll add a bit at the end.

Anne I don't have any single way to choose names or titles. Sometimes they just come to me, sometimes I note a good name down in a little notebook when I come across it. For instance, Hewitt Featherby, the butler in my current series, was the name of an ancestor of a friend of mine. I heard it years ago, thought it was a great name, and then when my butler character popped up, I knew it was his name. Tallie_



Ensuring that the title isn't current  was a lesson learned early. In my second book, Tallie's Knight, I named the hero Lord Carrington — but my English editor pointed out it was a current title and a former government minister, so I had tocome up with a new title. There is a champagne style in Australia called Carrington Blush (it's pink) so I moved to a different wine — d'Arenberg (fabulous wine), only it sounded too German, so I changed it to d'Arenville, which I hoped sounded suitably Norman English. Mostly, however,  I will trawl The Peerage site and will choose a name from there, or a title that's no longer in use. 

Nicola. Choosing names can be a very knotty problem. When it comes to locations for my stories I've found I feel more comfortable inventing place names. So I will choose a real town or village to be the inspiration and then make up a name for it.

Fortune's Folly, in my Brides of Fortune series, was a town based on Harrogate in Yorkshire. In my current WIP I am writing about a real house called Littlecote but I am calling it Middlecote. That said, House of Shadows features Ashdown Park and I kept that name the same. That seemed to confuse a lot of
people who know the place, since some of the details are real and other are fictional. HOUSE OF SHADOWS small

 For people it's even more tricky, I find. Sometimes I can be writing a book and feel that the main characters' names are wrong but I'm not sure what the right names are. I struggle on but it makes writing the book more difficult if the hero simply isn't a Gerald. Eventually the right names do pop up but it can take time. At other times they are obvious from the start. I always check them against my book of English Christian names, though, to make sure they were in use at the time. You can get away with surnames used as first names if they could convincingly be described as a family name but I could never name a heroine of a historical story Lacey, for example. That said, sometimes I have thought a name was anachronistic but when I checked it was older than I had thought.
 
On titles, I would never call a character after an existing peerage. That just feels wrong to me. But it's worth remembering that many titles are associated with place names and so the Earl of Sparrowhawk is going to sound wrong. I have fallen foul of this rule myself, though, because I like names such as Kestrel and Merlin!

Mary Jo  Names are an ever-fertile source of interest!  I use most of the same name books that  Pat does, plus maps.  I'm also one  of those writers who really can't get moving with a book until I know the name  of the protagonists.  In my first  historical, Dearly Beloved, I  thrashed about until I realized the hero's name
was Gervase—a name I'd never  really thought much about.  But  suddenly and inarguably, he was Gervase, and the book started rolling.  I came up with the name Allison for the  heroine in The Rake fairly easily, but it wasn't until I started typing  that I realized she spelled it Alyson.  Odd, that.  As I  write each book, I jot dowOnceASoldierHCLib COVERn names and descriptions of places and characters as I  go along, but I have a tendency to stall whenever I have to come up with the  name of a minor character like a butler.  I have to think about it! 

And I have a tendency to like certain  names and have been known to repeat them. For example, the hero of my upcoming  book, Once a Soldier, is Will  Masterson.  I also used Randall as  the surname for another of my heroes in the Lost Lords series.  Both men were already established with  those names when I when I realized I'd used both Randall and Masterson in one of my  contemporaries. Ooops!

Andrea/Cara: Names are hugely important to my stories—the Muse won’t talk to my characters unless she knows their names . . . oh, and did I mention that she refuses to recognize them as friends unless the names resonate with her? (Being a very proper lady, with strict drawing room manners, she never talks to strangers.) Sigh. The things we go through to please the Muse.  

But in all seriousness, I feel names do shape a character. A Henry will be a very different sort of fellow from a Jack or a Gryffydd. I really enjoy leafing through some old English books on heraldry and family coats of arms that I’ve collected over the years at tag sales. I find a wealth of both first names and
surnames, as well as titles. (Though like other Wenches have mentioned, it’s best to avoid real ones—naming a character the Duke of Wellington or the Duchess of Devonshire is likely to be disconcerting to readers and pull them out of a story.) I think it’s important to have first names fit the historical period. In a Regency-set story, it’s probably best to avoid Dylan or Lauren.

A Diamond In The RoughIt’s sometimes interesting to play with either last names as first names, or find an old variation of Scottish or Welsh name that might help give a background story to a hero or heroine. I also confess to having a little fun taking names from the buildings of my alma mater. There are a lot of wonderful old Gothic and Georgian structures with English names that fit the Regency very well. For example, the hero of “A Diamond In the Rough” is Adrian, Viscount Marquand . . . yes, there is a Marquand Chapel on campus! And Adrian is a very honorable, trustworthy fellow (though he does have some surprises up his sleeve.)

 

Now from me, Jo. I need the "right" name, or the character won't gel, and sometimes I have to flail around Tvnawnewsmto get it.  As first names were often not used by aristocratic men, sometimes I don 't know! I sometimes get asked for the first name of the duke of Ithorn, (from The Secret Duke) but as he was born the duke and is generally called Thorn familiarly, it never came up. I don't know. Braydon, the hero of my current book, The Viscount Needs a Wife, is Lord Dauntry, but prefers to go by Braydon. He's been known since boyhood as Beau Braydon, but as I wrote the book it became clear he didn't want anyone to know his given names. They have to come out in the marriage service.

In the back of the book is the beginning of the next book, with a heroine called Lady Barbara Boxstall, known as Babs. Alas, she's now Lady Ariana. Barbara/Babs felt right at first as it felt like a combative name, and she is. But she became too much so, so I gave her a softer name, and she lost her serrated edge. That's the thing about names!

 

After many books. nomes can become difficult, as I've used my favourites!

For titles, I usually look for place names in England , especially villages, and then play with them. As for places, I mostly make them up unless they play a major part in the story. It's hard to know what a place was like hundreds of years ago, especially if one visits. Major roads go through old parts of town, and sometimes in the process of preservation, buildings and features are moved! If it's important I can usually find old maps.

As a reader, do you care about  whether character names suit the period?

Do you have favourites or ones you dislike?

Jo

 

 

80 thoughts on “AAW names”

  1. Oh, yes. I’m a stickler about names. For instance, of course, it would be Alyson or Alison. Not Allison — that would be how the last name was spelled. Only recently have we used last name spellings for first names for women. It’s a nit-picky thing, but yeah, I’m that person.
    I’m also a stickler for the use of names. We move to using a person’s given name very quickly in our society. (I’m not that old, but I’m still taken aback by how quickly young children will use an adult’s first name.) In the past (and the fairly recent past), you simply did not use a person’s first name unless you were given permission to. It was privilege.
    Oh, and if that name is older than we thought — put it in the historical note, please. I adore historical notes.

    Reply
  2. Oh, yes. I’m a stickler about names. For instance, of course, it would be Alyson or Alison. Not Allison — that would be how the last name was spelled. Only recently have we used last name spellings for first names for women. It’s a nit-picky thing, but yeah, I’m that person.
    I’m also a stickler for the use of names. We move to using a person’s given name very quickly in our society. (I’m not that old, but I’m still taken aback by how quickly young children will use an adult’s first name.) In the past (and the fairly recent past), you simply did not use a person’s first name unless you were given permission to. It was privilege.
    Oh, and if that name is older than we thought — put it in the historical note, please. I adore historical notes.

    Reply
  3. Oh, yes. I’m a stickler about names. For instance, of course, it would be Alyson or Alison. Not Allison — that would be how the last name was spelled. Only recently have we used last name spellings for first names for women. It’s a nit-picky thing, but yeah, I’m that person.
    I’m also a stickler for the use of names. We move to using a person’s given name very quickly in our society. (I’m not that old, but I’m still taken aback by how quickly young children will use an adult’s first name.) In the past (and the fairly recent past), you simply did not use a person’s first name unless you were given permission to. It was privilege.
    Oh, and if that name is older than we thought — put it in the historical note, please. I adore historical notes.

    Reply
  4. Oh, yes. I’m a stickler about names. For instance, of course, it would be Alyson or Alison. Not Allison — that would be how the last name was spelled. Only recently have we used last name spellings for first names for women. It’s a nit-picky thing, but yeah, I’m that person.
    I’m also a stickler for the use of names. We move to using a person’s given name very quickly in our society. (I’m not that old, but I’m still taken aback by how quickly young children will use an adult’s first name.) In the past (and the fairly recent past), you simply did not use a person’s first name unless you were given permission to. It was privilege.
    Oh, and if that name is older than we thought — put it in the historical note, please. I adore historical notes.

    Reply
  5. Oh, yes. I’m a stickler about names. For instance, of course, it would be Alyson or Alison. Not Allison — that would be how the last name was spelled. Only recently have we used last name spellings for first names for women. It’s a nit-picky thing, but yeah, I’m that person.
    I’m also a stickler for the use of names. We move to using a person’s given name very quickly in our society. (I’m not that old, but I’m still taken aback by how quickly young children will use an adult’s first name.) In the past (and the fairly recent past), you simply did not use a person’s first name unless you were given permission to. It was privilege.
    Oh, and if that name is older than we thought — put it in the historical note, please. I adore historical notes.

    Reply
  6. Names are really important to me. I’m not a big fan of using male names for female characters and vice versa; I like women to have feminine names and males to have masculine names. Having said that, if I want to read a book, I will not turn it away if I dislike the characters names, but it will affect my enjoyment of the book.
    In regard to historical location names, I put my faith in the author to address that issue.

    Reply
  7. Names are really important to me. I’m not a big fan of using male names for female characters and vice versa; I like women to have feminine names and males to have masculine names. Having said that, if I want to read a book, I will not turn it away if I dislike the characters names, but it will affect my enjoyment of the book.
    In regard to historical location names, I put my faith in the author to address that issue.

    Reply
  8. Names are really important to me. I’m not a big fan of using male names for female characters and vice versa; I like women to have feminine names and males to have masculine names. Having said that, if I want to read a book, I will not turn it away if I dislike the characters names, but it will affect my enjoyment of the book.
    In regard to historical location names, I put my faith in the author to address that issue.

    Reply
  9. Names are really important to me. I’m not a big fan of using male names for female characters and vice versa; I like women to have feminine names and males to have masculine names. Having said that, if I want to read a book, I will not turn it away if I dislike the characters names, but it will affect my enjoyment of the book.
    In regard to historical location names, I put my faith in the author to address that issue.

    Reply
  10. Names are really important to me. I’m not a big fan of using male names for female characters and vice versa; I like women to have feminine names and males to have masculine names. Having said that, if I want to read a book, I will not turn it away if I dislike the characters names, but it will affect my enjoyment of the book.
    In regard to historical location names, I put my faith in the author to address that issue.

    Reply
  11. I like names to sound period .I also like names to tell me which character is a male and which is a female. I read a blurb about a contemporary book where I couldn’t tell which person was male and which female from what was given. I dislike people using real titles that still are in use.. One book had the Earl and Countess Spencer as imaginary characters rather than real people in imaginary situations and putting words into their mouths.
    I am trying to write and so have to come up with names of characters. I have one who just isn’t satisfied with his name. He is a male who has to have a first name unlike some who can make do with a title and a nickname for the book.
    I have taken a man’s title from a street and once from an apartment complex. I wish writing the rest of the story were as easy as naming that character was.

    Reply
  12. I like names to sound period .I also like names to tell me which character is a male and which is a female. I read a blurb about a contemporary book where I couldn’t tell which person was male and which female from what was given. I dislike people using real titles that still are in use.. One book had the Earl and Countess Spencer as imaginary characters rather than real people in imaginary situations and putting words into their mouths.
    I am trying to write and so have to come up with names of characters. I have one who just isn’t satisfied with his name. He is a male who has to have a first name unlike some who can make do with a title and a nickname for the book.
    I have taken a man’s title from a street and once from an apartment complex. I wish writing the rest of the story were as easy as naming that character was.

    Reply
  13. I like names to sound period .I also like names to tell me which character is a male and which is a female. I read a blurb about a contemporary book where I couldn’t tell which person was male and which female from what was given. I dislike people using real titles that still are in use.. One book had the Earl and Countess Spencer as imaginary characters rather than real people in imaginary situations and putting words into their mouths.
    I am trying to write and so have to come up with names of characters. I have one who just isn’t satisfied with his name. He is a male who has to have a first name unlike some who can make do with a title and a nickname for the book.
    I have taken a man’s title from a street and once from an apartment complex. I wish writing the rest of the story were as easy as naming that character was.

    Reply
  14. I like names to sound period .I also like names to tell me which character is a male and which is a female. I read a blurb about a contemporary book where I couldn’t tell which person was male and which female from what was given. I dislike people using real titles that still are in use.. One book had the Earl and Countess Spencer as imaginary characters rather than real people in imaginary situations and putting words into their mouths.
    I am trying to write and so have to come up with names of characters. I have one who just isn’t satisfied with his name. He is a male who has to have a first name unlike some who can make do with a title and a nickname for the book.
    I have taken a man’s title from a street and once from an apartment complex. I wish writing the rest of the story were as easy as naming that character was.

    Reply
  15. I like names to sound period .I also like names to tell me which character is a male and which is a female. I read a blurb about a contemporary book where I couldn’t tell which person was male and which female from what was given. I dislike people using real titles that still are in use.. One book had the Earl and Countess Spencer as imaginary characters rather than real people in imaginary situations and putting words into their mouths.
    I am trying to write and so have to come up with names of characters. I have one who just isn’t satisfied with his name. He is a male who has to have a first name unlike some who can make do with a title and a nickname for the book.
    I have taken a man’s title from a street and once from an apartment complex. I wish writing the rest of the story were as easy as naming that character was.

    Reply
  16. “Only recently have we used last name spellings for first names for women. It’s a nit-picky thing, but yeah, I’m that person.”
    So true, Tempest, and girls usually got conventional names, but it wasn’t uncommon for men to be given a parental surname — usually the mother’s — in the Gorgian range.

    Reply
  17. “Only recently have we used last name spellings for first names for women. It’s a nit-picky thing, but yeah, I’m that person.”
    So true, Tempest, and girls usually got conventional names, but it wasn’t uncommon for men to be given a parental surname — usually the mother’s — in the Gorgian range.

    Reply
  18. “Only recently have we used last name spellings for first names for women. It’s a nit-picky thing, but yeah, I’m that person.”
    So true, Tempest, and girls usually got conventional names, but it wasn’t uncommon for men to be given a parental surname — usually the mother’s — in the Gorgian range.

    Reply
  19. “Only recently have we used last name spellings for first names for women. It’s a nit-picky thing, but yeah, I’m that person.”
    So true, Tempest, and girls usually got conventional names, but it wasn’t uncommon for men to be given a parental surname — usually the mother’s — in the Gorgian range.

    Reply
  20. “Only recently have we used last name spellings for first names for women. It’s a nit-picky thing, but yeah, I’m that person.”
    So true, Tempest, and girls usually got conventional names, but it wasn’t uncommon for men to be given a parental surname — usually the mother’s — in the Gorgian range.

    Reply
  21. I want to feel that the name is “in tune” with the period, but I am well aware that we can be surprised.
    I am pretty sure that Charlotte Bronte is responsible for Shirley as a feminine first name — I believe that it became popular for women only after her publication of the book by that name. Her heroine was “Shirley” from a family last name. So using family names for women was at least conceivable by the mid nineteenth century.
    I’ve never looked up the background on this — it is purely assumption on my part. And, remembering that I referring to a Bronte (all of whom liked to shock), I may be way out of bounds in my assumptions.

    Reply
  22. I want to feel that the name is “in tune” with the period, but I am well aware that we can be surprised.
    I am pretty sure that Charlotte Bronte is responsible for Shirley as a feminine first name — I believe that it became popular for women only after her publication of the book by that name. Her heroine was “Shirley” from a family last name. So using family names for women was at least conceivable by the mid nineteenth century.
    I’ve never looked up the background on this — it is purely assumption on my part. And, remembering that I referring to a Bronte (all of whom liked to shock), I may be way out of bounds in my assumptions.

    Reply
  23. I want to feel that the name is “in tune” with the period, but I am well aware that we can be surprised.
    I am pretty sure that Charlotte Bronte is responsible for Shirley as a feminine first name — I believe that it became popular for women only after her publication of the book by that name. Her heroine was “Shirley” from a family last name. So using family names for women was at least conceivable by the mid nineteenth century.
    I’ve never looked up the background on this — it is purely assumption on my part. And, remembering that I referring to a Bronte (all of whom liked to shock), I may be way out of bounds in my assumptions.

    Reply
  24. I want to feel that the name is “in tune” with the period, but I am well aware that we can be surprised.
    I am pretty sure that Charlotte Bronte is responsible for Shirley as a feminine first name — I believe that it became popular for women only after her publication of the book by that name. Her heroine was “Shirley” from a family last name. So using family names for women was at least conceivable by the mid nineteenth century.
    I’ve never looked up the background on this — it is purely assumption on my part. And, remembering that I referring to a Bronte (all of whom liked to shock), I may be way out of bounds in my assumptions.

    Reply
  25. I want to feel that the name is “in tune” with the period, but I am well aware that we can be surprised.
    I am pretty sure that Charlotte Bronte is responsible for Shirley as a feminine first name — I believe that it became popular for women only after her publication of the book by that name. Her heroine was “Shirley” from a family last name. So using family names for women was at least conceivable by the mid nineteenth century.
    I’ve never looked up the background on this — it is purely assumption on my part. And, remembering that I referring to a Bronte (all of whom liked to shock), I may be way out of bounds in my assumptions.

    Reply
  26. In the book I’m writing I have used names from my own family tree for some of my characters, but the two main characters have had their names since I first started writing this story when I was 15. I did, however, have to Germanicize one last name because his father was a German immigrant who somehow got through Ellis Island without it being changed.
    I invented the town name in my story and only discovered much later that there had really been a village of that name in approximately that location for a brief period of time. It was a couple of businesses and a ferry across a river, but it died away when the railroad was put in a couple of miles upstream from it, so everyone moved there.
    Do you ever use the name of a character from another author’s work in homage to that author?

    Reply
  27. In the book I’m writing I have used names from my own family tree for some of my characters, but the two main characters have had their names since I first started writing this story when I was 15. I did, however, have to Germanicize one last name because his father was a German immigrant who somehow got through Ellis Island without it being changed.
    I invented the town name in my story and only discovered much later that there had really been a village of that name in approximately that location for a brief period of time. It was a couple of businesses and a ferry across a river, but it died away when the railroad was put in a couple of miles upstream from it, so everyone moved there.
    Do you ever use the name of a character from another author’s work in homage to that author?

    Reply
  28. In the book I’m writing I have used names from my own family tree for some of my characters, but the two main characters have had their names since I first started writing this story when I was 15. I did, however, have to Germanicize one last name because his father was a German immigrant who somehow got through Ellis Island without it being changed.
    I invented the town name in my story and only discovered much later that there had really been a village of that name in approximately that location for a brief period of time. It was a couple of businesses and a ferry across a river, but it died away when the railroad was put in a couple of miles upstream from it, so everyone moved there.
    Do you ever use the name of a character from another author’s work in homage to that author?

    Reply
  29. In the book I’m writing I have used names from my own family tree for some of my characters, but the two main characters have had their names since I first started writing this story when I was 15. I did, however, have to Germanicize one last name because his father was a German immigrant who somehow got through Ellis Island without it being changed.
    I invented the town name in my story and only discovered much later that there had really been a village of that name in approximately that location for a brief period of time. It was a couple of businesses and a ferry across a river, but it died away when the railroad was put in a couple of miles upstream from it, so everyone moved there.
    Do you ever use the name of a character from another author’s work in homage to that author?

    Reply
  30. In the book I’m writing I have used names from my own family tree for some of my characters, but the two main characters have had their names since I first started writing this story when I was 15. I did, however, have to Germanicize one last name because his father was a German immigrant who somehow got through Ellis Island without it being changed.
    I invented the town name in my story and only discovered much later that there had really been a village of that name in approximately that location for a brief period of time. It was a couple of businesses and a ferry across a river, but it died away when the railroad was put in a couple of miles upstream from it, so everyone moved there.
    Do you ever use the name of a character from another author’s work in homage to that author?

    Reply
  31. Yes, I do care about the characters’ names being true to the period. It pulls me right out of the story when even a secondary character appears with a very modern name.

    Reply
  32. Yes, I do care about the characters’ names being true to the period. It pulls me right out of the story when even a secondary character appears with a very modern name.

    Reply
  33. Yes, I do care about the characters’ names being true to the period. It pulls me right out of the story when even a secondary character appears with a very modern name.

    Reply
  34. Yes, I do care about the characters’ names being true to the period. It pulls me right out of the story when even a secondary character appears with a very modern name.

    Reply
  35. Yes, I do care about the characters’ names being true to the period. It pulls me right out of the story when even a secondary character appears with a very modern name.

    Reply
  36. I have a 4th great-grandfather named Mungo Murray. He was Scottish and late 18th-century. Wouldn’t that be a great name for a character? Maybe not the hero, but a secondary character perhaps?

    Reply
  37. I have a 4th great-grandfather named Mungo Murray. He was Scottish and late 18th-century. Wouldn’t that be a great name for a character? Maybe not the hero, but a secondary character perhaps?

    Reply
  38. I have a 4th great-grandfather named Mungo Murray. He was Scottish and late 18th-century. Wouldn’t that be a great name for a character? Maybe not the hero, but a secondary character perhaps?

    Reply
  39. I have a 4th great-grandfather named Mungo Murray. He was Scottish and late 18th-century. Wouldn’t that be a great name for a character? Maybe not the hero, but a secondary character perhaps?

    Reply
  40. I have a 4th great-grandfather named Mungo Murray. He was Scottish and late 18th-century. Wouldn’t that be a great name for a character? Maybe not the hero, but a secondary character perhaps?

    Reply
  41. I wouldn’t use another author’s name, no.
    But with reference to the town that existed, we authors often find that what we make up was real. It’s because we’re tuned in to the time.

    Reply
  42. I wouldn’t use another author’s name, no.
    But with reference to the town that existed, we authors often find that what we make up was real. It’s because we’re tuned in to the time.

    Reply
  43. I wouldn’t use another author’s name, no.
    But with reference to the town that existed, we authors often find that what we make up was real. It’s because we’re tuned in to the time.

    Reply
  44. I wouldn’t use another author’s name, no.
    But with reference to the town that existed, we authors often find that what we make up was real. It’s because we’re tuned in to the time.

    Reply
  45. I wouldn’t use another author’s name, no.
    But with reference to the town that existed, we authors often find that what we make up was real. It’s because we’re tuned in to the time.

    Reply
  46. Names really do have a “feel” to them. Sometimes I like a name for years (say 50) until I meet someone who turns out to be a very unpleasant person. So unpleasant that it “ruins” the name for me everafter that.
    Totally agree, no current titles unless you are using the title/character as they were (Lady Cowper, Lady Devonshire, Caroline Lamb, Wellington, etc. ) If you didn’t use the correct title for those people, it would be wrong.
    I can see a character totally not cooperating until you get the correct name for them! They would feel you don’t really know them so how can you write about what motivates them or how they feel about anything.

    Reply
  47. Names really do have a “feel” to them. Sometimes I like a name for years (say 50) until I meet someone who turns out to be a very unpleasant person. So unpleasant that it “ruins” the name for me everafter that.
    Totally agree, no current titles unless you are using the title/character as they were (Lady Cowper, Lady Devonshire, Caroline Lamb, Wellington, etc. ) If you didn’t use the correct title for those people, it would be wrong.
    I can see a character totally not cooperating until you get the correct name for them! They would feel you don’t really know them so how can you write about what motivates them or how they feel about anything.

    Reply
  48. Names really do have a “feel” to them. Sometimes I like a name for years (say 50) until I meet someone who turns out to be a very unpleasant person. So unpleasant that it “ruins” the name for me everafter that.
    Totally agree, no current titles unless you are using the title/character as they were (Lady Cowper, Lady Devonshire, Caroline Lamb, Wellington, etc. ) If you didn’t use the correct title for those people, it would be wrong.
    I can see a character totally not cooperating until you get the correct name for them! They would feel you don’t really know them so how can you write about what motivates them or how they feel about anything.

    Reply
  49. Names really do have a “feel” to them. Sometimes I like a name for years (say 50) until I meet someone who turns out to be a very unpleasant person. So unpleasant that it “ruins” the name for me everafter that.
    Totally agree, no current titles unless you are using the title/character as they were (Lady Cowper, Lady Devonshire, Caroline Lamb, Wellington, etc. ) If you didn’t use the correct title for those people, it would be wrong.
    I can see a character totally not cooperating until you get the correct name for them! They would feel you don’t really know them so how can you write about what motivates them or how they feel about anything.

    Reply
  50. Names really do have a “feel” to them. Sometimes I like a name for years (say 50) until I meet someone who turns out to be a very unpleasant person. So unpleasant that it “ruins” the name for me everafter that.
    Totally agree, no current titles unless you are using the title/character as they were (Lady Cowper, Lady Devonshire, Caroline Lamb, Wellington, etc. ) If you didn’t use the correct title for those people, it would be wrong.
    I can see a character totally not cooperating until you get the correct name for them! They would feel you don’t really know them so how can you write about what motivates them or how they feel about anything.

    Reply
  51. Maybe one of you learned people can answer this for me: would the wife of a lord call him privately by his first name or by his title? I know that when men assumed their title, their friends called them by it. Did their wives, too, in private? With her friends, would she have referred to him by his title or by his first name? And before a man assumed the title, when he went to Eaton or Oxford, for example, did his friends call him by his last name–or first?

    Reply
  52. Maybe one of you learned people can answer this for me: would the wife of a lord call him privately by his first name or by his title? I know that when men assumed their title, their friends called them by it. Did their wives, too, in private? With her friends, would she have referred to him by his title or by his first name? And before a man assumed the title, when he went to Eaton or Oxford, for example, did his friends call him by his last name–or first?

    Reply
  53. Maybe one of you learned people can answer this for me: would the wife of a lord call him privately by his first name or by his title? I know that when men assumed their title, their friends called them by it. Did their wives, too, in private? With her friends, would she have referred to him by his title or by his first name? And before a man assumed the title, when he went to Eaton or Oxford, for example, did his friends call him by his last name–or first?

    Reply
  54. Maybe one of you learned people can answer this for me: would the wife of a lord call him privately by his first name or by his title? I know that when men assumed their title, their friends called them by it. Did their wives, too, in private? With her friends, would she have referred to him by his title or by his first name? And before a man assumed the title, when he went to Eaton or Oxford, for example, did his friends call him by his last name–or first?

    Reply
  55. Maybe one of you learned people can answer this for me: would the wife of a lord call him privately by his first name or by his title? I know that when men assumed their title, their friends called them by it. Did their wives, too, in private? With her friends, would she have referred to him by his title or by his first name? And before a man assumed the title, when he went to Eaton or Oxford, for example, did his friends call him by his last name–or first?

    Reply

Leave a Comment