AAW — Films and TV shows

Anne here for this month's Ask A Wench, and the question of the moment is, "What movies or TV shows have you enjoyed lately?"

We start with Pat.  I record TV and never know how long the shows have been in the DVR. Looking at the list of unwatched programs, I’d say I have apparently stopped watching most regular TV. I used to love Modern Family until it got stale. Elementary has good and bad years, depending on the writers. The Good Place is still watchable, but they’re pushing their limits.

Maisel

So lately we’ve been streaming a few shows. Dietland is marvelously well-written and acted but occasionally violent. At the moment, I think The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel  is my very favorite.  Set in the early 60s, when Lenny Bruce kept getting thrown in jail for using obscenities in public (yes, kiddies, saying the F word would get you sent to jail), it’s about a young housewife with a gift for comedy. This was not a time when it was easy for a young mother to balance home and career, but the fact that her career is in sleazy nightclubs and makes little money stretches credulity a bit. The show is produced by the gifted people who created Gilmore Girls, so expect laughter, a little societal satire, and not total realism. But looking at the early 60s from our current perspective is entertaining, and the witty dialogue is laugh worthy. 

Endeavour-detective-series-751329Nicola here. With the new series of Endeavour, the Inspector Morse prequel, starting tonight, my Sunday night viewing is sorted for the next month and I’m very excited. I love this series with its flawed and fascinating characters, the period setting of 1960s Oxford and the clever plots. I’ve watched and re-watched the previous series so many times.

The other TV programme I’ve been really enjoying is a BBC series called Pubs, Ponds and Power, The Story of the Village. It looks at four very different English villages from the time they were first created through to the present, covering the archaeology, history, community and people from lots of different angles. It’s completely fascinating to see how these different places have evolved and what village life has been like there from Saxon times to the present day. It’s both engaging and informative. Queen Anne the Favourite

Movies, and I was so impressed with Peter Jackson’s They Shall Not Grow Old film about the First World War, where he restored original black and white silent film footage from the Imperial War Museum in London and colorised it, adding a soundtrack and interviews with servicemen. It was a tough watch but so poignant and emotional and it captured the conflict in a way that’s never been seen before. Next on my “must see” list is The Favourite which tells the story of Queen Anne’s relationship with two of her closest female confidantes, and another historical drama, All is True, about the later life of Wiliam Shakespeare. There’s lots of really good viewing at the moment!

Andrea says, I usually curl up with a book rather than watch TV or go to a movie. But I’ve recently been a viewing spree. On a friend’s recommendation, I started watching Endeavor, which is a British detective series set in Oxford during the 1960s, featuring a young Inspector Morse. He’s a very dark and flawed character, but fascinating, and the interplay with his mentor is lovely to see unfold. That also got me glomming the original Inspector Morse episodes. I’m conflicted about them—the mysteries are very interesting and well done. But the older Morse isn’t a very nice or likeable person. Watching him struggle with his demons is unsettling at times. I’m probably going to move on to something else.

The-favourite-rachel-weisz-emma-stone-slice-600x200I’ve also seen a spate of movies—for once I’ll be very hip for the Oscars, as I've actually seen a number of the nominees! I absolutely loved The Favourite, which is a historical film about Queen Anne and her relationshipship with two close women friends. It’s very snarky black humor and stretches some of the history, but the acting is wonderful, as are the costumes and cinematography (Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz are brilliant.) I highly recommend it. On the Basis of Sex was also terrific–a true heroine! It’s not often that moviegoers in a NYC theatre stand up and cheer—which is what happened at the very last scene (sorry, no spoilers!) The Green Room and Lady Gaga in the remake of A Star Is Born were very enjoyable too. So that’s my report . . . now it’s back to my books!

Murdoch Mysteries cast

From Mary Jo:  We have a taste for British style mystery shows–which aren't necessarily set in Britain.  A favorite is The Murdoch Mysteries, a Canadian series set in Toronto at the turn of the 20th century.  The central character, Detective William Murdoch, has a scientific bent and he's always using or inventing new technological ways to solve crimes.  There is a lively cast of characters who have grown over the years, and a satisfying long running romance.  I like that there is humor as well as clever puzzles, and I really like the way the characters have grown and changed over the seasons.  There are also sometimes "Making of Murdoch" mini features where they explain how they find the locations and other bits of Canadian history.

BrokenwoodMysteries
Another British style mystery that we really enjoy is New Zealand's The Brokenwood Mysteries, in which shaggy detective Mike Shepherd and his team deal with murder in a small North Island town.  Again, there is humor, good writing, good characters, clever puzzles, and wonderful New Zealand scenery that makes me want to visit again!

And now, Susan.  So many favorite shows to choose from! Here are two that I've been recommending to friends lately. A few months ago we discovered Bodyguard, a new BBC hit series. It's riveting, just compelling. Scotsman Richard Madden (who played Robb Stark in Game of Thrones) stars as David Budd, a young British army veteran now working in London, assigned as police protection to a demanding female Home Secretary, while he juggles a rocky marriage and two small kids. His intense character, steeped in loyalty and duty with conflicts in relationship and within himself, is fascinating–he's flawed, noble, heroic, reserved, complex. The storytelling is fast, intense, often brilliant. And Madden's Scottishness (not evident in GoT) is an added bonus. So far there's only one season, but what a powerful run of episodes! I truly hope there will be more. Bodyguard (1)

Something lighter and equally enjoyable, we caught up on the final season of The Detectorists, which has become one of my favorite series ever–an absolutely stunning little gem of a series, quiet, amusing, cerebral, heart-based, adorable, heartbreaking, tranquil, exciting, wonderful, all at once. Mackenzie Crook (Pirates of the Caribbean) is the creative mind behind this award-winning British comedy, and with Toby Jones, equally brilliant, they pursue their beloved hobby as detectorists, walking the fields of Britain with metal detectors, searching for buried treasure.

DetectoristsMostly they find pop-tops and nails, duly added to collections, and also find the occasional glimmer of something greater buried somewhere. The characters are quirky and convincing, the continuing story whimsical and beautifully paced, the setting in the English countryside and villages perfect, the film quality evocative and peaceful. The humor is gentle and intelligent, and the ensemble cast excellent (including DIana Rigg and her real-life daughter). The Detectorists is like meeting up with warm, lovely friends and being part of their lives and hopes. I'm so excited each time they discover something — even if it's just another soda can. I will watch it again and again. 

Jo Bourne says:  I feel like the odd one out. I don't have a TV and don't go to movies. I'm pretty much a watcher of what comes through the computer. That doesn't mean I don't see a good bit of video one way and another on YouTube and Netflix. It's just that I don't see much "new" TV. 

So, what am I watching lately? Tales from the Green Valley. (Click on the link for a sample)

This is a 12-part BBC series that follows a group of reenactors — archeologists and social historians — living and working on a small farm on the Welsh border in the 1620s. Each segment of the program represents one month in the agricultural year.

So we got folks, some of whom just theorized about this stuff, taking care of the horse and the pigs, plowing the fields, cooking, putting apples into storage,baking bread,  shearing sheep, and — in somewhat more enjoyable interludes — celebrating Christmas and Midsummer Day.  

Our historians are game but maybe a bit hapless. If this were fiction we'd call it a "Fish out of water" story.

Anne: I don't have a TV set either — a temporary state of affairs; I'll buy one after my house renovations are completed. In the meantime I keep up to date with some TV shows via my computer, both on youtube and on catch-up TV. I'm also a fan of Endeavour, and recently I watched an excellent three-part British series called Mrs Wilson, (video trailer here) about a woman who, on the death of her husband of twenty years, gradually discovers almost everything she's based her life on is a lie. Lies within lies within lies— and then maybe some truths woven in and what can she believe? It's particularly fascinating because it's based on a true-life story, and the actress who plays Mrs Wilson is the grandaughter of the original woman.

GreenBook_Poster_RGBAs for films, I recently joined some other writers in a small informal film group and as a result I've seen more movies in the last few months than I have in the last ten years, some of which I probably would never have chosen, but all of which have been interesting. I also enjoyed the costumes and superb acting in The Favourite, though I didn't like the film so much. I really enjoyed Collette, and also The Green Book. You can watch a trailer clip of The Green Book here.

The most recent film we saw was On the Basis of Sex, another one we all enjoyed. It's about the life and career of Ruth Bader Ginsberg, a US lawyer, feminist, activist and member of the Supreme Court of the United States. On_the_Basis_of_Sex

At the very end, there was a lovely shot that started with the actress playing Ginsberg climbing the stairs to the Supreme Court that then merged into the real Ruth Bader Ginsberg aged 85 walking in, and I thought how wonderful to have your achievements celebrated in your lifetime. Mind you, the real Ruth Ginsberg looked a MUCH tougher cookie than the actress who played her. <g> The actress-Ruth was pretty and stubborn and brilliant etc. but the real Ruth had a weighty presence that was almost tangible. That little touch at the end, for me, added a whole other layer.

So now, over to you wenchly readers — what films or TV shows have you been enjoying lately?

 

130 thoughts on “AAW — Films and TV shows”

  1. I only VERY rarely watch movies at the theatre or DVDs at home (no cable here) though I have marked down a few titles that I think my husband will like. Things I have seen and enjoyed include The Martian (though the book was better) and Dead Like Me (a rather edgy series).
    Please remind me ~ how do we submit an Ask a Wench question?

    Reply
  2. I only VERY rarely watch movies at the theatre or DVDs at home (no cable here) though I have marked down a few titles that I think my husband will like. Things I have seen and enjoyed include The Martian (though the book was better) and Dead Like Me (a rather edgy series).
    Please remind me ~ how do we submit an Ask a Wench question?

    Reply
  3. I only VERY rarely watch movies at the theatre or DVDs at home (no cable here) though I have marked down a few titles that I think my husband will like. Things I have seen and enjoyed include The Martian (though the book was better) and Dead Like Me (a rather edgy series).
    Please remind me ~ how do we submit an Ask a Wench question?

    Reply
  4. I only VERY rarely watch movies at the theatre or DVDs at home (no cable here) though I have marked down a few titles that I think my husband will like. Things I have seen and enjoyed include The Martian (though the book was better) and Dead Like Me (a rather edgy series).
    Please remind me ~ how do we submit an Ask a Wench question?

    Reply
  5. I only VERY rarely watch movies at the theatre or DVDs at home (no cable here) though I have marked down a few titles that I think my husband will like. Things I have seen and enjoyed include The Martian (though the book was better) and Dead Like Me (a rather edgy series).
    Please remind me ~ how do we submit an Ask a Wench question?

    Reply
  6. I hardly ever watch tv — my husband uses it to watch movies he gets from the library, most of which I don’t want to see — but a year or so ago I saw the first season of a Turkish series called The Magnificent Century. It’s about Suleiman the Magnificent and was absolutely enthralling. The acting was great, and the costumes and settings were fantastic. Unfortunately, I could find any more seasons with subtitles I could read and then the video was blocked. Given current politics I don’t expect there will be any US distribution in the near future.
    Pity.

    Reply
  7. I hardly ever watch tv — my husband uses it to watch movies he gets from the library, most of which I don’t want to see — but a year or so ago I saw the first season of a Turkish series called The Magnificent Century. It’s about Suleiman the Magnificent and was absolutely enthralling. The acting was great, and the costumes and settings were fantastic. Unfortunately, I could find any more seasons with subtitles I could read and then the video was blocked. Given current politics I don’t expect there will be any US distribution in the near future.
    Pity.

    Reply
  8. I hardly ever watch tv — my husband uses it to watch movies he gets from the library, most of which I don’t want to see — but a year or so ago I saw the first season of a Turkish series called The Magnificent Century. It’s about Suleiman the Magnificent and was absolutely enthralling. The acting was great, and the costumes and settings were fantastic. Unfortunately, I could find any more seasons with subtitles I could read and then the video was blocked. Given current politics I don’t expect there will be any US distribution in the near future.
    Pity.

    Reply
  9. I hardly ever watch tv — my husband uses it to watch movies he gets from the library, most of which I don’t want to see — but a year or so ago I saw the first season of a Turkish series called The Magnificent Century. It’s about Suleiman the Magnificent and was absolutely enthralling. The acting was great, and the costumes and settings were fantastic. Unfortunately, I could find any more seasons with subtitles I could read and then the video was blocked. Given current politics I don’t expect there will be any US distribution in the near future.
    Pity.

    Reply
  10. I hardly ever watch tv — my husband uses it to watch movies he gets from the library, most of which I don’t want to see — but a year or so ago I saw the first season of a Turkish series called The Magnificent Century. It’s about Suleiman the Magnificent and was absolutely enthralling. The acting was great, and the costumes and settings were fantastic. Unfortunately, I could find any more seasons with subtitles I could read and then the video was blocked. Given current politics I don’t expect there will be any US distribution in the near future.
    Pity.

    Reply
  11. Lilian that sounds wonderful. What a shame they’re going to be hard to get. I love foreign films and Tv, so often they give us a very different view of a culture. We are fortunate here in that we have a free-to-air TV station that shows a lot of foreign TV and movies.

    Reply
  12. Lilian that sounds wonderful. What a shame they’re going to be hard to get. I love foreign films and Tv, so often they give us a very different view of a culture. We are fortunate here in that we have a free-to-air TV station that shows a lot of foreign TV and movies.

    Reply
  13. Lilian that sounds wonderful. What a shame they’re going to be hard to get. I love foreign films and Tv, so often they give us a very different view of a culture. We are fortunate here in that we have a free-to-air TV station that shows a lot of foreign TV and movies.

    Reply
  14. Lilian that sounds wonderful. What a shame they’re going to be hard to get. I love foreign films and Tv, so often they give us a very different view of a culture. We are fortunate here in that we have a free-to-air TV station that shows a lot of foreign TV and movies.

    Reply
  15. Lilian that sounds wonderful. What a shame they’re going to be hard to get. I love foreign films and Tv, so often they give us a very different view of a culture. We are fortunate here in that we have a free-to-air TV station that shows a lot of foreign TV and movies.

    Reply
  16. I split my TV watching between purchased dvds (including many UK imports), Netflix dvd, Netflix and amazon prime streaming and regular old school cable TV. I haven’t been out to a movie in a couple of years, for a couple of reasons: I pay more for the one time movie experience than I would for two dvds I could buy; and I don’t think crowds in the dark are fun anymore. I find I enjoy film more when I can watch it by myself, without interruption or distraction — and I can push the pause button whenever I want.
    Of recent films, I have recently enjoyed Hard Sun with Agyness Dean, The Split with Nicola Walker, River with Stellan Skarsgaard and Nicola Walker; Strangers with John Simm (White Dragon in the US); Dark Heart; Love, Lies and Records; Bodyguard, and have just started A Discovery of Witches (Matthew Goode of the intensely blue eyes).
    I watched Dead Like Me, the series Kareni mentioned,when it was first on and liked it a lot; the first few episodes, done by the creator, were the best, but it was always watchable.

    Reply
  17. I split my TV watching between purchased dvds (including many UK imports), Netflix dvd, Netflix and amazon prime streaming and regular old school cable TV. I haven’t been out to a movie in a couple of years, for a couple of reasons: I pay more for the one time movie experience than I would for two dvds I could buy; and I don’t think crowds in the dark are fun anymore. I find I enjoy film more when I can watch it by myself, without interruption or distraction — and I can push the pause button whenever I want.
    Of recent films, I have recently enjoyed Hard Sun with Agyness Dean, The Split with Nicola Walker, River with Stellan Skarsgaard and Nicola Walker; Strangers with John Simm (White Dragon in the US); Dark Heart; Love, Lies and Records; Bodyguard, and have just started A Discovery of Witches (Matthew Goode of the intensely blue eyes).
    I watched Dead Like Me, the series Kareni mentioned,when it was first on and liked it a lot; the first few episodes, done by the creator, were the best, but it was always watchable.

    Reply
  18. I split my TV watching between purchased dvds (including many UK imports), Netflix dvd, Netflix and amazon prime streaming and regular old school cable TV. I haven’t been out to a movie in a couple of years, for a couple of reasons: I pay more for the one time movie experience than I would for two dvds I could buy; and I don’t think crowds in the dark are fun anymore. I find I enjoy film more when I can watch it by myself, without interruption or distraction — and I can push the pause button whenever I want.
    Of recent films, I have recently enjoyed Hard Sun with Agyness Dean, The Split with Nicola Walker, River with Stellan Skarsgaard and Nicola Walker; Strangers with John Simm (White Dragon in the US); Dark Heart; Love, Lies and Records; Bodyguard, and have just started A Discovery of Witches (Matthew Goode of the intensely blue eyes).
    I watched Dead Like Me, the series Kareni mentioned,when it was first on and liked it a lot; the first few episodes, done by the creator, were the best, but it was always watchable.

    Reply
  19. I split my TV watching between purchased dvds (including many UK imports), Netflix dvd, Netflix and amazon prime streaming and regular old school cable TV. I haven’t been out to a movie in a couple of years, for a couple of reasons: I pay more for the one time movie experience than I would for two dvds I could buy; and I don’t think crowds in the dark are fun anymore. I find I enjoy film more when I can watch it by myself, without interruption or distraction — and I can push the pause button whenever I want.
    Of recent films, I have recently enjoyed Hard Sun with Agyness Dean, The Split with Nicola Walker, River with Stellan Skarsgaard and Nicola Walker; Strangers with John Simm (White Dragon in the US); Dark Heart; Love, Lies and Records; Bodyguard, and have just started A Discovery of Witches (Matthew Goode of the intensely blue eyes).
    I watched Dead Like Me, the series Kareni mentioned,when it was first on and liked it a lot; the first few episodes, done by the creator, were the best, but it was always watchable.

    Reply
  20. I split my TV watching between purchased dvds (including many UK imports), Netflix dvd, Netflix and amazon prime streaming and regular old school cable TV. I haven’t been out to a movie in a couple of years, for a couple of reasons: I pay more for the one time movie experience than I would for two dvds I could buy; and I don’t think crowds in the dark are fun anymore. I find I enjoy film more when I can watch it by myself, without interruption or distraction — and I can push the pause button whenever I want.
    Of recent films, I have recently enjoyed Hard Sun with Agyness Dean, The Split with Nicola Walker, River with Stellan Skarsgaard and Nicola Walker; Strangers with John Simm (White Dragon in the US); Dark Heart; Love, Lies and Records; Bodyguard, and have just started A Discovery of Witches (Matthew Goode of the intensely blue eyes).
    I watched Dead Like Me, the series Kareni mentioned,when it was first on and liked it a lot; the first few episodes, done by the creator, were the best, but it was always watchable.

    Reply
  21. I don’t watch much. I am responding in gratitude because you have named some things I’m passing on to my husband (who is already a fan of Endeavor and the original Morse series.) Thank your for the suggestions.

    Reply
  22. I don’t watch much. I am responding in gratitude because you have named some things I’m passing on to my husband (who is already a fan of Endeavor and the original Morse series.) Thank your for the suggestions.

    Reply
  23. I don’t watch much. I am responding in gratitude because you have named some things I’m passing on to my husband (who is already a fan of Endeavor and the original Morse series.) Thank your for the suggestions.

    Reply
  24. I don’t watch much. I am responding in gratitude because you have named some things I’m passing on to my husband (who is already a fan of Endeavor and the original Morse series.) Thank your for the suggestions.

    Reply
  25. I don’t watch much. I am responding in gratitude because you have named some things I’m passing on to my husband (who is already a fan of Endeavor and the original Morse series.) Thank your for the suggestions.

    Reply
  26. I used to love Midsomer Murders.I also liked the Miss Fisher series. I’m waiting for the next incarnation of Grantchester. I also like the Dr. Blake mysteries. Yes, I’ll admit, I’m into TV crime. It’s in my genes, I reckon, because from the time I was a child, I knew that my gentle grandfather who wouldn’t hurt a flea loved to watch “murders.” I don’t have cable, so I only watch what’s on broadcast TV. I’ve enjoyed re-runs of The Closer, Major Crimes, and Rizzoli and Isles. Currently, I enjoy NCIS (and descendants) Criminal Minds, Seal Team, Swat, Madame Secretary FBI, Blue Bloods and Bull. I guess crime on TV helps to get me in the mood for reading romance, both contemporary and historical. And I love romantic suspense, which may be because of my love of crime on TV.

    Reply
  27. I used to love Midsomer Murders.I also liked the Miss Fisher series. I’m waiting for the next incarnation of Grantchester. I also like the Dr. Blake mysteries. Yes, I’ll admit, I’m into TV crime. It’s in my genes, I reckon, because from the time I was a child, I knew that my gentle grandfather who wouldn’t hurt a flea loved to watch “murders.” I don’t have cable, so I only watch what’s on broadcast TV. I’ve enjoyed re-runs of The Closer, Major Crimes, and Rizzoli and Isles. Currently, I enjoy NCIS (and descendants) Criminal Minds, Seal Team, Swat, Madame Secretary FBI, Blue Bloods and Bull. I guess crime on TV helps to get me in the mood for reading romance, both contemporary and historical. And I love romantic suspense, which may be because of my love of crime on TV.

    Reply
  28. I used to love Midsomer Murders.I also liked the Miss Fisher series. I’m waiting for the next incarnation of Grantchester. I also like the Dr. Blake mysteries. Yes, I’ll admit, I’m into TV crime. It’s in my genes, I reckon, because from the time I was a child, I knew that my gentle grandfather who wouldn’t hurt a flea loved to watch “murders.” I don’t have cable, so I only watch what’s on broadcast TV. I’ve enjoyed re-runs of The Closer, Major Crimes, and Rizzoli and Isles. Currently, I enjoy NCIS (and descendants) Criminal Minds, Seal Team, Swat, Madame Secretary FBI, Blue Bloods and Bull. I guess crime on TV helps to get me in the mood for reading romance, both contemporary and historical. And I love romantic suspense, which may be because of my love of crime on TV.

    Reply
  29. I used to love Midsomer Murders.I also liked the Miss Fisher series. I’m waiting for the next incarnation of Grantchester. I also like the Dr. Blake mysteries. Yes, I’ll admit, I’m into TV crime. It’s in my genes, I reckon, because from the time I was a child, I knew that my gentle grandfather who wouldn’t hurt a flea loved to watch “murders.” I don’t have cable, so I only watch what’s on broadcast TV. I’ve enjoyed re-runs of The Closer, Major Crimes, and Rizzoli and Isles. Currently, I enjoy NCIS (and descendants) Criminal Minds, Seal Team, Swat, Madame Secretary FBI, Blue Bloods and Bull. I guess crime on TV helps to get me in the mood for reading romance, both contemporary and historical. And I love romantic suspense, which may be because of my love of crime on TV.

    Reply
  30. I used to love Midsomer Murders.I also liked the Miss Fisher series. I’m waiting for the next incarnation of Grantchester. I also like the Dr. Blake mysteries. Yes, I’ll admit, I’m into TV crime. It’s in my genes, I reckon, because from the time I was a child, I knew that my gentle grandfather who wouldn’t hurt a flea loved to watch “murders.” I don’t have cable, so I only watch what’s on broadcast TV. I’ve enjoyed re-runs of The Closer, Major Crimes, and Rizzoli and Isles. Currently, I enjoy NCIS (and descendants) Criminal Minds, Seal Team, Swat, Madame Secretary FBI, Blue Bloods and Bull. I guess crime on TV helps to get me in the mood for reading romance, both contemporary and historical. And I love romantic suspense, which may be because of my love of crime on TV.

    Reply
  31. I am pretty much housebound anymore. I have my TV on most of the time although I’m seldom actually focused on it. I am someone who finds laughing to be healing if I am feeling down. There are lots of shows that are in re-run that will still make me laugh. Although I’ve seem them a million times there are episodes of MODERN FAMILY, SEINFELD, and THE OFFICE that would still have me rolling on the floor if I thought I could get back up (smile).
    However, I have been following VICTORIA. It is a BBC production, but is showing on our local PBS station. Loving it.

    Reply
  32. I am pretty much housebound anymore. I have my TV on most of the time although I’m seldom actually focused on it. I am someone who finds laughing to be healing if I am feeling down. There are lots of shows that are in re-run that will still make me laugh. Although I’ve seem them a million times there are episodes of MODERN FAMILY, SEINFELD, and THE OFFICE that would still have me rolling on the floor if I thought I could get back up (smile).
    However, I have been following VICTORIA. It is a BBC production, but is showing on our local PBS station. Loving it.

    Reply
  33. I am pretty much housebound anymore. I have my TV on most of the time although I’m seldom actually focused on it. I am someone who finds laughing to be healing if I am feeling down. There are lots of shows that are in re-run that will still make me laugh. Although I’ve seem them a million times there are episodes of MODERN FAMILY, SEINFELD, and THE OFFICE that would still have me rolling on the floor if I thought I could get back up (smile).
    However, I have been following VICTORIA. It is a BBC production, but is showing on our local PBS station. Loving it.

    Reply
  34. I am pretty much housebound anymore. I have my TV on most of the time although I’m seldom actually focused on it. I am someone who finds laughing to be healing if I am feeling down. There are lots of shows that are in re-run that will still make me laugh. Although I’ve seem them a million times there are episodes of MODERN FAMILY, SEINFELD, and THE OFFICE that would still have me rolling on the floor if I thought I could get back up (smile).
    However, I have been following VICTORIA. It is a BBC production, but is showing on our local PBS station. Loving it.

    Reply
  35. I am pretty much housebound anymore. I have my TV on most of the time although I’m seldom actually focused on it. I am someone who finds laughing to be healing if I am feeling down. There are lots of shows that are in re-run that will still make me laugh. Although I’ve seem them a million times there are episodes of MODERN FAMILY, SEINFELD, and THE OFFICE that would still have me rolling on the floor if I thought I could get back up (smile).
    However, I have been following VICTORIA. It is a BBC production, but is showing on our local PBS station. Loving it.

    Reply
  36. I’m watching quite a few of the ones mentioned here. I like Endeavour even though he annoys me at times. Can be very self righteous and everything is black and white.
    Murder Mysteries is great fun and my son is a huge fan of it. I love Call The Midwife. It’s all about midwives and nuns who are in charge of health in the East End of London. It was based .on books to start but now is just written for tv. A brilliant series.
    Enjoyed this post.

    Reply
  37. I’m watching quite a few of the ones mentioned here. I like Endeavour even though he annoys me at times. Can be very self righteous and everything is black and white.
    Murder Mysteries is great fun and my son is a huge fan of it. I love Call The Midwife. It’s all about midwives and nuns who are in charge of health in the East End of London. It was based .on books to start but now is just written for tv. A brilliant series.
    Enjoyed this post.

    Reply
  38. I’m watching quite a few of the ones mentioned here. I like Endeavour even though he annoys me at times. Can be very self righteous and everything is black and white.
    Murder Mysteries is great fun and my son is a huge fan of it. I love Call The Midwife. It’s all about midwives and nuns who are in charge of health in the East End of London. It was based .on books to start but now is just written for tv. A brilliant series.
    Enjoyed this post.

    Reply
  39. I’m watching quite a few of the ones mentioned here. I like Endeavour even though he annoys me at times. Can be very self righteous and everything is black and white.
    Murder Mysteries is great fun and my son is a huge fan of it. I love Call The Midwife. It’s all about midwives and nuns who are in charge of health in the East End of London. It was based .on books to start but now is just written for tv. A brilliant series.
    Enjoyed this post.

    Reply
  40. I’m watching quite a few of the ones mentioned here. I like Endeavour even though he annoys me at times. Can be very self righteous and everything is black and white.
    Murder Mysteries is great fun and my son is a huge fan of it. I love Call The Midwife. It’s all about midwives and nuns who are in charge of health in the East End of London. It was based .on books to start but now is just written for tv. A brilliant series.
    Enjoyed this post.

    Reply
  41. Does anyone else have Acorn TV? I have been a subscriber for quite a few years and they bring me wonderful entertainment.
    I love Brokenwood. I saw a terrific mini-series with Christopher Timothy and Peter Davison called Vintage Roads. Non-fiction – they travel through Britain in an elderly car and share their journey with us. On actual TV – I have found The Rookie to be interesting – a little mix of crime and soap opera but interesting.

    Reply
  42. Does anyone else have Acorn TV? I have been a subscriber for quite a few years and they bring me wonderful entertainment.
    I love Brokenwood. I saw a terrific mini-series with Christopher Timothy and Peter Davison called Vintage Roads. Non-fiction – they travel through Britain in an elderly car and share their journey with us. On actual TV – I have found The Rookie to be interesting – a little mix of crime and soap opera but interesting.

    Reply
  43. Does anyone else have Acorn TV? I have been a subscriber for quite a few years and they bring me wonderful entertainment.
    I love Brokenwood. I saw a terrific mini-series with Christopher Timothy and Peter Davison called Vintage Roads. Non-fiction – they travel through Britain in an elderly car and share their journey with us. On actual TV – I have found The Rookie to be interesting – a little mix of crime and soap opera but interesting.

    Reply
  44. Does anyone else have Acorn TV? I have been a subscriber for quite a few years and they bring me wonderful entertainment.
    I love Brokenwood. I saw a terrific mini-series with Christopher Timothy and Peter Davison called Vintage Roads. Non-fiction – they travel through Britain in an elderly car and share their journey with us. On actual TV – I have found The Rookie to be interesting – a little mix of crime and soap opera but interesting.

    Reply
  45. Does anyone else have Acorn TV? I have been a subscriber for quite a few years and they bring me wonderful entertainment.
    I love Brokenwood. I saw a terrific mini-series with Christopher Timothy and Peter Davison called Vintage Roads. Non-fiction – they travel through Britain in an elderly car and share their journey with us. On actual TV – I have found The Rookie to be interesting – a little mix of crime and soap opera but interesting.

    Reply
  46. Thanks for the suggestions, Janice. My little film group usually has a meal together after the movie, so it’s a nicely social occasion, and the discussion is always interesting, as we’re all writers and have Opinions.

    Reply
  47. Thanks for the suggestions, Janice. My little film group usually has a meal together after the movie, so it’s a nicely social occasion, and the discussion is always interesting, as we’re all writers and have Opinions.

    Reply
  48. Thanks for the suggestions, Janice. My little film group usually has a meal together after the movie, so it’s a nicely social occasion, and the discussion is always interesting, as we’re all writers and have Opinions.

    Reply
  49. Thanks for the suggestions, Janice. My little film group usually has a meal together after the movie, so it’s a nicely social occasion, and the discussion is always interesting, as we’re all writers and have Opinions.

    Reply
  50. Thanks for the suggestions, Janice. My little film group usually has a meal together after the movie, so it’s a nicely social occasion, and the discussion is always interesting, as we’re all writers and have Opinions.

    Reply
  51. You certainly do love your crime shows, Binnie. Thanks for all those suggestions. The Dr. Blake mysteries frustrate me a little — noy because of the content or the acting, but because of the sepia tone that prevails. It’s filmed in Ballarat, in my state, and it’s such a pretty city, but in the series it always looks a bit gloomy.

    Reply
  52. You certainly do love your crime shows, Binnie. Thanks for all those suggestions. The Dr. Blake mysteries frustrate me a little — noy because of the content or the acting, but because of the sepia tone that prevails. It’s filmed in Ballarat, in my state, and it’s such a pretty city, but in the series it always looks a bit gloomy.

    Reply
  53. You certainly do love your crime shows, Binnie. Thanks for all those suggestions. The Dr. Blake mysteries frustrate me a little — noy because of the content or the acting, but because of the sepia tone that prevails. It’s filmed in Ballarat, in my state, and it’s such a pretty city, but in the series it always looks a bit gloomy.

    Reply
  54. You certainly do love your crime shows, Binnie. Thanks for all those suggestions. The Dr. Blake mysteries frustrate me a little — noy because of the content or the acting, but because of the sepia tone that prevails. It’s filmed in Ballarat, in my state, and it’s such a pretty city, but in the series it always looks a bit gloomy.

    Reply
  55. You certainly do love your crime shows, Binnie. Thanks for all those suggestions. The Dr. Blake mysteries frustrate me a little — noy because of the content or the acting, but because of the sepia tone that prevails. It’s filmed in Ballarat, in my state, and it’s such a pretty city, but in the series it always looks a bit gloomy.

    Reply
  56. Mary, a good comedy is a joy forever. I have a particular fondness for British comedies like Black Books and others. And Seinfeld is always fun. I haven’t seen Modern Family, so will have to chase it down.

    Reply
  57. Mary, a good comedy is a joy forever. I have a particular fondness for British comedies like Black Books and others. And Seinfeld is always fun. I haven’t seen Modern Family, so will have to chase it down.

    Reply
  58. Mary, a good comedy is a joy forever. I have a particular fondness for British comedies like Black Books and others. And Seinfeld is always fun. I haven’t seen Modern Family, so will have to chase it down.

    Reply
  59. Mary, a good comedy is a joy forever. I have a particular fondness for British comedies like Black Books and others. And Seinfeld is always fun. I haven’t seen Modern Family, so will have to chase it down.

    Reply
  60. Mary, a good comedy is a joy forever. I have a particular fondness for British comedies like Black Books and others. And Seinfeld is always fun. I haven’t seen Modern Family, so will have to chase it down.

    Reply
  61. Teresa, yes, Endeavour can be a bit of a prig, but I found Inspector Morse that way too. As I said above, my fave of the More spinoffs is Inspector Lewis, with Lewis and Hathaway.
    And call the Midwife is wonderful, I agree.

    Reply
  62. Teresa, yes, Endeavour can be a bit of a prig, but I found Inspector Morse that way too. As I said above, my fave of the More spinoffs is Inspector Lewis, with Lewis and Hathaway.
    And call the Midwife is wonderful, I agree.

    Reply
  63. Teresa, yes, Endeavour can be a bit of a prig, but I found Inspector Morse that way too. As I said above, my fave of the More spinoffs is Inspector Lewis, with Lewis and Hathaway.
    And call the Midwife is wonderful, I agree.

    Reply
  64. Teresa, yes, Endeavour can be a bit of a prig, but I found Inspector Morse that way too. As I said above, my fave of the More spinoffs is Inspector Lewis, with Lewis and Hathaway.
    And call the Midwife is wonderful, I agree.

    Reply
  65. Teresa, yes, Endeavour can be a bit of a prig, but I found Inspector Morse that way too. As I said above, my fave of the More spinoffs is Inspector Lewis, with Lewis and Hathaway.
    And call the Midwife is wonderful, I agree.

    Reply
  66. I don’t know if I’ve missed other recommendations for TV shows here, but I am pleased to get some new ideas (and I love the posts about what you are reading). Thank you. If I repeat anyone’s choices here, please forgive. I’ll start with my absolute favorite, which is Foyle’s War. That show is closely followed by The Bridge, Dicte, Scott and Bailey, Dr. Blake Mysteries and a new American show, Bosch. I favor British and Scandinavian mysteries, obviously. Right now I am waiting for new seasons or slowly doling out to myself, episodes of New Tricks, Blue Smoke, Above Suspicion, Shetland, Silent Witness, and Garrow’s Law. (Also Endeavour, but you all have covered that one.) I’ve also finished Janet King, both versions of Wallander, Annika Bengtzon: Crime Reporter (a single season), Rake (Australia not US), Grantchester, Broadchurch, Ripper Street, and a couple of French series and one Spanish one for which I can’t remember the titles.

    Reply
  67. I don’t know if I’ve missed other recommendations for TV shows here, but I am pleased to get some new ideas (and I love the posts about what you are reading). Thank you. If I repeat anyone’s choices here, please forgive. I’ll start with my absolute favorite, which is Foyle’s War. That show is closely followed by The Bridge, Dicte, Scott and Bailey, Dr. Blake Mysteries and a new American show, Bosch. I favor British and Scandinavian mysteries, obviously. Right now I am waiting for new seasons or slowly doling out to myself, episodes of New Tricks, Blue Smoke, Above Suspicion, Shetland, Silent Witness, and Garrow’s Law. (Also Endeavour, but you all have covered that one.) I’ve also finished Janet King, both versions of Wallander, Annika Bengtzon: Crime Reporter (a single season), Rake (Australia not US), Grantchester, Broadchurch, Ripper Street, and a couple of French series and one Spanish one for which I can’t remember the titles.

    Reply
  68. I don’t know if I’ve missed other recommendations for TV shows here, but I am pleased to get some new ideas (and I love the posts about what you are reading). Thank you. If I repeat anyone’s choices here, please forgive. I’ll start with my absolute favorite, which is Foyle’s War. That show is closely followed by The Bridge, Dicte, Scott and Bailey, Dr. Blake Mysteries and a new American show, Bosch. I favor British and Scandinavian mysteries, obviously. Right now I am waiting for new seasons or slowly doling out to myself, episodes of New Tricks, Blue Smoke, Above Suspicion, Shetland, Silent Witness, and Garrow’s Law. (Also Endeavour, but you all have covered that one.) I’ve also finished Janet King, both versions of Wallander, Annika Bengtzon: Crime Reporter (a single season), Rake (Australia not US), Grantchester, Broadchurch, Ripper Street, and a couple of French series and one Spanish one for which I can’t remember the titles.

    Reply
  69. I don’t know if I’ve missed other recommendations for TV shows here, but I am pleased to get some new ideas (and I love the posts about what you are reading). Thank you. If I repeat anyone’s choices here, please forgive. I’ll start with my absolute favorite, which is Foyle’s War. That show is closely followed by The Bridge, Dicte, Scott and Bailey, Dr. Blake Mysteries and a new American show, Bosch. I favor British and Scandinavian mysteries, obviously. Right now I am waiting for new seasons or slowly doling out to myself, episodes of New Tricks, Blue Smoke, Above Suspicion, Shetland, Silent Witness, and Garrow’s Law. (Also Endeavour, but you all have covered that one.) I’ve also finished Janet King, both versions of Wallander, Annika Bengtzon: Crime Reporter (a single season), Rake (Australia not US), Grantchester, Broadchurch, Ripper Street, and a couple of French series and one Spanish one for which I can’t remember the titles.

    Reply
  70. I don’t know if I’ve missed other recommendations for TV shows here, but I am pleased to get some new ideas (and I love the posts about what you are reading). Thank you. If I repeat anyone’s choices here, please forgive. I’ll start with my absolute favorite, which is Foyle’s War. That show is closely followed by The Bridge, Dicte, Scott and Bailey, Dr. Blake Mysteries and a new American show, Bosch. I favor British and Scandinavian mysteries, obviously. Right now I am waiting for new seasons or slowly doling out to myself, episodes of New Tricks, Blue Smoke, Above Suspicion, Shetland, Silent Witness, and Garrow’s Law. (Also Endeavour, but you all have covered that one.) I’ve also finished Janet King, both versions of Wallander, Annika Bengtzon: Crime Reporter (a single season), Rake (Australia not US), Grantchester, Broadchurch, Ripper Street, and a couple of French series and one Spanish one for which I can’t remember the titles.

    Reply
  71. “Shetland” is a wonderful series, even though it’s moved far away from the also-wonderful book series on which it’s based. And I’m with you, Anne, and much preferred Lewis and Hathaway to Morse and Endeavour. Currently very much enjoying watching Hathaway/Laurence Fox play Lord Palmerston in the series “Victoria”. And I think Ballarat looks beautiful in Dr. Blake; I especially love the styles of the houses and wonder if that bungalow-type is common there? Would love to see more of Miss Fisher, but can’t seem to find out if more is coming. Also have far too many recorded episodes of “The Great British Baking Show” which I can watch repeatedly without becoming bored – or putting on an apron!

    Reply
  72. “Shetland” is a wonderful series, even though it’s moved far away from the also-wonderful book series on which it’s based. And I’m with you, Anne, and much preferred Lewis and Hathaway to Morse and Endeavour. Currently very much enjoying watching Hathaway/Laurence Fox play Lord Palmerston in the series “Victoria”. And I think Ballarat looks beautiful in Dr. Blake; I especially love the styles of the houses and wonder if that bungalow-type is common there? Would love to see more of Miss Fisher, but can’t seem to find out if more is coming. Also have far too many recorded episodes of “The Great British Baking Show” which I can watch repeatedly without becoming bored – or putting on an apron!

    Reply
  73. “Shetland” is a wonderful series, even though it’s moved far away from the also-wonderful book series on which it’s based. And I’m with you, Anne, and much preferred Lewis and Hathaway to Morse and Endeavour. Currently very much enjoying watching Hathaway/Laurence Fox play Lord Palmerston in the series “Victoria”. And I think Ballarat looks beautiful in Dr. Blake; I especially love the styles of the houses and wonder if that bungalow-type is common there? Would love to see more of Miss Fisher, but can’t seem to find out if more is coming. Also have far too many recorded episodes of “The Great British Baking Show” which I can watch repeatedly without becoming bored – or putting on an apron!

    Reply
  74. “Shetland” is a wonderful series, even though it’s moved far away from the also-wonderful book series on which it’s based. And I’m with you, Anne, and much preferred Lewis and Hathaway to Morse and Endeavour. Currently very much enjoying watching Hathaway/Laurence Fox play Lord Palmerston in the series “Victoria”. And I think Ballarat looks beautiful in Dr. Blake; I especially love the styles of the houses and wonder if that bungalow-type is common there? Would love to see more of Miss Fisher, but can’t seem to find out if more is coming. Also have far too many recorded episodes of “The Great British Baking Show” which I can watch repeatedly without becoming bored – or putting on an apron!

    Reply
  75. “Shetland” is a wonderful series, even though it’s moved far away from the also-wonderful book series on which it’s based. And I’m with you, Anne, and much preferred Lewis and Hathaway to Morse and Endeavour. Currently very much enjoying watching Hathaway/Laurence Fox play Lord Palmerston in the series “Victoria”. And I think Ballarat looks beautiful in Dr. Blake; I especially love the styles of the houses and wonder if that bungalow-type is common there? Would love to see more of Miss Fisher, but can’t seem to find out if more is coming. Also have far too many recorded episodes of “The Great British Baking Show” which I can watch repeatedly without becoming bored – or putting on an apron!

    Reply
  76. Cynthia, I’m also a huge fan of Foyle’s War, as are several other wenches. Scott and Bailey is another show I really enjoy and I used to enjoy New Tricks before it got silly, after the original actors left. I particularly loved Amanda Redmond in that show. If you enjoyed Rake, you might keep an eye out for Jack Irish, an Australian crime series.
    A few you mentioned are new to me, so thanks for the recommendations.

    Reply
  77. Cynthia, I’m also a huge fan of Foyle’s War, as are several other wenches. Scott and Bailey is another show I really enjoy and I used to enjoy New Tricks before it got silly, after the original actors left. I particularly loved Amanda Redmond in that show. If you enjoyed Rake, you might keep an eye out for Jack Irish, an Australian crime series.
    A few you mentioned are new to me, so thanks for the recommendations.

    Reply
  78. Cynthia, I’m also a huge fan of Foyle’s War, as are several other wenches. Scott and Bailey is another show I really enjoy and I used to enjoy New Tricks before it got silly, after the original actors left. I particularly loved Amanda Redmond in that show. If you enjoyed Rake, you might keep an eye out for Jack Irish, an Australian crime series.
    A few you mentioned are new to me, so thanks for the recommendations.

    Reply
  79. Cynthia, I’m also a huge fan of Foyle’s War, as are several other wenches. Scott and Bailey is another show I really enjoy and I used to enjoy New Tricks before it got silly, after the original actors left. I particularly loved Amanda Redmond in that show. If you enjoyed Rake, you might keep an eye out for Jack Irish, an Australian crime series.
    A few you mentioned are new to me, so thanks for the recommendations.

    Reply
  80. Cynthia, I’m also a huge fan of Foyle’s War, as are several other wenches. Scott and Bailey is another show I really enjoy and I used to enjoy New Tricks before it got silly, after the original actors left. I particularly loved Amanda Redmond in that show. If you enjoyed Rake, you might keep an eye out for Jack Irish, an Australian crime series.
    A few you mentioned are new to me, so thanks for the recommendations.

    Reply
  81. Constance, I haven’t read the “Shetland” books, but will hunt them down. And Victoria is showing here at the moment, but I haven’t watched it yet.
    ” I think Ballarat looks beautiful in Dr. Blake; I especially love the styles of the houses and wonder if that bungalow-type is common there? ”
    Yes, the majority of houses in Australia are single story and what you’d probably call bungalows. We don’t describe one story houses as “bungalows” — for me a ‘bungalow” was a cheaply constructed small structure out the back of a house that was extra living space or used for storage, perhaps — sometimes also called a “sleep-out” and used in the hot summer weather, because they cooled down quickly at night.
    I remember a very funny conversation years ago with some English friends, who asked me about the sort of house I lived in. I described it, and they nodded and said “Oh, a bungalow.” “No.” I said (feeling quite indignant) “It’s a proper house!” LOL
    Partly it’s because we have lots of space here — suburban house blocks were traditionally a quarter of an acre, and also the climate — heating is not such a big issue, but cooling can be, so houses with verandas and hallways through which cool air could flow were common. In Queensland, houses were built on stilts to assist the air circulation — called “Queenslanders” they’re beautiful houses. If you do a google image search for “queenslander houses” you’ll see that although they’re raised quite high off the ground, they’re still pretty much one story houses.
    Two (or more) story houses have become more common in the last few decades but before that, you really only found them in the inner city — and they were usually Victorian-era terrace houses. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terraced_houses_in_Australia

    Reply
  82. Constance, I haven’t read the “Shetland” books, but will hunt them down. And Victoria is showing here at the moment, but I haven’t watched it yet.
    ” I think Ballarat looks beautiful in Dr. Blake; I especially love the styles of the houses and wonder if that bungalow-type is common there? ”
    Yes, the majority of houses in Australia are single story and what you’d probably call bungalows. We don’t describe one story houses as “bungalows” — for me a ‘bungalow” was a cheaply constructed small structure out the back of a house that was extra living space or used for storage, perhaps — sometimes also called a “sleep-out” and used in the hot summer weather, because they cooled down quickly at night.
    I remember a very funny conversation years ago with some English friends, who asked me about the sort of house I lived in. I described it, and they nodded and said “Oh, a bungalow.” “No.” I said (feeling quite indignant) “It’s a proper house!” LOL
    Partly it’s because we have lots of space here — suburban house blocks were traditionally a quarter of an acre, and also the climate — heating is not such a big issue, but cooling can be, so houses with verandas and hallways through which cool air could flow were common. In Queensland, houses were built on stilts to assist the air circulation — called “Queenslanders” they’re beautiful houses. If you do a google image search for “queenslander houses” you’ll see that although they’re raised quite high off the ground, they’re still pretty much one story houses.
    Two (or more) story houses have become more common in the last few decades but before that, you really only found them in the inner city — and they were usually Victorian-era terrace houses. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terraced_houses_in_Australia

    Reply
  83. Constance, I haven’t read the “Shetland” books, but will hunt them down. And Victoria is showing here at the moment, but I haven’t watched it yet.
    ” I think Ballarat looks beautiful in Dr. Blake; I especially love the styles of the houses and wonder if that bungalow-type is common there? ”
    Yes, the majority of houses in Australia are single story and what you’d probably call bungalows. We don’t describe one story houses as “bungalows” — for me a ‘bungalow” was a cheaply constructed small structure out the back of a house that was extra living space or used for storage, perhaps — sometimes also called a “sleep-out” and used in the hot summer weather, because they cooled down quickly at night.
    I remember a very funny conversation years ago with some English friends, who asked me about the sort of house I lived in. I described it, and they nodded and said “Oh, a bungalow.” “No.” I said (feeling quite indignant) “It’s a proper house!” LOL
    Partly it’s because we have lots of space here — suburban house blocks were traditionally a quarter of an acre, and also the climate — heating is not such a big issue, but cooling can be, so houses with verandas and hallways through which cool air could flow were common. In Queensland, houses were built on stilts to assist the air circulation — called “Queenslanders” they’re beautiful houses. If you do a google image search for “queenslander houses” you’ll see that although they’re raised quite high off the ground, they’re still pretty much one story houses.
    Two (or more) story houses have become more common in the last few decades but before that, you really only found them in the inner city — and they were usually Victorian-era terrace houses. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terraced_houses_in_Australia

    Reply
  84. Constance, I haven’t read the “Shetland” books, but will hunt them down. And Victoria is showing here at the moment, but I haven’t watched it yet.
    ” I think Ballarat looks beautiful in Dr. Blake; I especially love the styles of the houses and wonder if that bungalow-type is common there? ”
    Yes, the majority of houses in Australia are single story and what you’d probably call bungalows. We don’t describe one story houses as “bungalows” — for me a ‘bungalow” was a cheaply constructed small structure out the back of a house that was extra living space or used for storage, perhaps — sometimes also called a “sleep-out” and used in the hot summer weather, because they cooled down quickly at night.
    I remember a very funny conversation years ago with some English friends, who asked me about the sort of house I lived in. I described it, and they nodded and said “Oh, a bungalow.” “No.” I said (feeling quite indignant) “It’s a proper house!” LOL
    Partly it’s because we have lots of space here — suburban house blocks were traditionally a quarter of an acre, and also the climate — heating is not such a big issue, but cooling can be, so houses with verandas and hallways through which cool air could flow were common. In Queensland, houses were built on stilts to assist the air circulation — called “Queenslanders” they’re beautiful houses. If you do a google image search for “queenslander houses” you’ll see that although they’re raised quite high off the ground, they’re still pretty much one story houses.
    Two (or more) story houses have become more common in the last few decades but before that, you really only found them in the inner city — and they were usually Victorian-era terrace houses. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terraced_houses_in_Australia

    Reply
  85. Constance, I haven’t read the “Shetland” books, but will hunt them down. And Victoria is showing here at the moment, but I haven’t watched it yet.
    ” I think Ballarat looks beautiful in Dr. Blake; I especially love the styles of the houses and wonder if that bungalow-type is common there? ”
    Yes, the majority of houses in Australia are single story and what you’d probably call bungalows. We don’t describe one story houses as “bungalows” — for me a ‘bungalow” was a cheaply constructed small structure out the back of a house that was extra living space or used for storage, perhaps — sometimes also called a “sleep-out” and used in the hot summer weather, because they cooled down quickly at night.
    I remember a very funny conversation years ago with some English friends, who asked me about the sort of house I lived in. I described it, and they nodded and said “Oh, a bungalow.” “No.” I said (feeling quite indignant) “It’s a proper house!” LOL
    Partly it’s because we have lots of space here — suburban house blocks were traditionally a quarter of an acre, and also the climate — heating is not such a big issue, but cooling can be, so houses with verandas and hallways through which cool air could flow were common. In Queensland, houses were built on stilts to assist the air circulation — called “Queenslanders” they’re beautiful houses. If you do a google image search for “queenslander houses” you’ll see that although they’re raised quite high off the ground, they’re still pretty much one story houses.
    Two (or more) story houses have become more common in the last few decades but before that, you really only found them in the inner city — and they were usually Victorian-era terrace houses. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terraced_houses_in_Australia

    Reply
  86. As someone who is very interested in all the various meanings a word can have, I thank you for the “bungalow” description – and the story of your indignation! 🙂 I grew up in the American South, so am very familiar with houses built, if not on stilts, at least several feet off the ground to allow air under, and having halls that ran through the center of the house to catch whatever breeze might wander in. My grandmother and great aunts used to put down what they called pallets in the hall and nap there on summer afternoons. Now, I live in New England, where a “pallet” is a wooden structure used as a platform on which to ship various sorts of things from bags of cement to windows — but no elderly ladies!

    Reply
  87. As someone who is very interested in all the various meanings a word can have, I thank you for the “bungalow” description – and the story of your indignation! 🙂 I grew up in the American South, so am very familiar with houses built, if not on stilts, at least several feet off the ground to allow air under, and having halls that ran through the center of the house to catch whatever breeze might wander in. My grandmother and great aunts used to put down what they called pallets in the hall and nap there on summer afternoons. Now, I live in New England, where a “pallet” is a wooden structure used as a platform on which to ship various sorts of things from bags of cement to windows — but no elderly ladies!

    Reply
  88. As someone who is very interested in all the various meanings a word can have, I thank you for the “bungalow” description – and the story of your indignation! 🙂 I grew up in the American South, so am very familiar with houses built, if not on stilts, at least several feet off the ground to allow air under, and having halls that ran through the center of the house to catch whatever breeze might wander in. My grandmother and great aunts used to put down what they called pallets in the hall and nap there on summer afternoons. Now, I live in New England, where a “pallet” is a wooden structure used as a platform on which to ship various sorts of things from bags of cement to windows — but no elderly ladies!

    Reply
  89. As someone who is very interested in all the various meanings a word can have, I thank you for the “bungalow” description – and the story of your indignation! 🙂 I grew up in the American South, so am very familiar with houses built, if not on stilts, at least several feet off the ground to allow air under, and having halls that ran through the center of the house to catch whatever breeze might wander in. My grandmother and great aunts used to put down what they called pallets in the hall and nap there on summer afternoons. Now, I live in New England, where a “pallet” is a wooden structure used as a platform on which to ship various sorts of things from bags of cement to windows — but no elderly ladies!

    Reply
  90. As someone who is very interested in all the various meanings a word can have, I thank you for the “bungalow” description – and the story of your indignation! 🙂 I grew up in the American South, so am very familiar with houses built, if not on stilts, at least several feet off the ground to allow air under, and having halls that ran through the center of the house to catch whatever breeze might wander in. My grandmother and great aunts used to put down what they called pallets in the hall and nap there on summer afternoons. Now, I live in New England, where a “pallet” is a wooden structure used as a platform on which to ship various sorts of things from bags of cement to windows — but no elderly ladies!

    Reply
  91. Constance, it used to be very common for people — the kids, at least — to sleep out on the veranda in the summer. I slept under mosquito netting, but some little fiend always used to get in somehow and drive me mad with its high-pitched whine. *g* These days a lot of our verandas have mosquito netting to cover them, or a section of them, at least.

    Reply
  92. Constance, it used to be very common for people — the kids, at least — to sleep out on the veranda in the summer. I slept under mosquito netting, but some little fiend always used to get in somehow and drive me mad with its high-pitched whine. *g* These days a lot of our verandas have mosquito netting to cover them, or a section of them, at least.

    Reply
  93. Constance, it used to be very common for people — the kids, at least — to sleep out on the veranda in the summer. I slept under mosquito netting, but some little fiend always used to get in somehow and drive me mad with its high-pitched whine. *g* These days a lot of our verandas have mosquito netting to cover them, or a section of them, at least.

    Reply
  94. Constance, it used to be very common for people — the kids, at least — to sleep out on the veranda in the summer. I slept under mosquito netting, but some little fiend always used to get in somehow and drive me mad with its high-pitched whine. *g* These days a lot of our verandas have mosquito netting to cover them, or a section of them, at least.

    Reply
  95. Constance, it used to be very common for people — the kids, at least — to sleep out on the veranda in the summer. I slept under mosquito netting, but some little fiend always used to get in somehow and drive me mad with its high-pitched whine. *g* These days a lot of our verandas have mosquito netting to cover them, or a section of them, at least.

    Reply

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