AAW: Do you re-read?

Pat here! From our monthly reader questionnaire we pull an easy one because it’s August and we’re all drooping from heat (except me, because we’ve been shrouded by marine layer for four months Pratchettand counting, and Anne, because she’s upside-down): Kareni asks Are You a Re-Reader? (I owe Kareni a free book for her question, thank you!)

Personally, I’ve never been much of a re-reader. For a while, I re-read Pride and Prejudice regularly. It was my one comfort read, but I read it first when I was nine, so I’m thinking that needed re-reading as I grew older. Every once in a while, when I hate every book I open, I might go to my Regency shelf and pull out a favorite author. But even those old traditional Regencies are losing their comfort these days. And when the world gets really crazy, I dip into my huge Terry Pratchett collection because his satire returns humor to my perspective.

Mostly, I eye my huge stacks of To-Be-Reads and think there isn’t enough time in the world to read all the books I want to read, so why go backward? But as Anne says below, I do occasionally dip into old favorites to see how their authors pulled off particularly memorable scenes and relish the beauty of them.

Nicola here: Yes, I am, but not as much as I used to be. When I was younger I would be so carried away by some books and so lost when they had ended that sometimes I would re-read them straight away Re-reading shelfto try to capture and keep the magic. These days that doesn’t happen to me often although notable exceptions recently are Sarah Morgan’s The Summer Seekers which I read on holiday and immediately re-read when I got home again, and some of Kylie Scott’s books, which are an addiction for me, I think.

Sometimes I’ll re-read parts of a book to make sure I’ve taken it all in properly. This happens with mysteries and crime stories, or with historical fiction where I feel I’m learning something new about the people or period and want to follow it up with my own research. Then, of course, I have my comfort reads. Most of these are ancient. My Mary Stewart collection is a good example, as are the traditional Regencies of Alice Chetwynd Ley. Within those collections, all of which I will re-read at one time or another, I have particular favourites: This Rough Magic by Mary Stewart and The Beau and the Bluestocking by Alice Chetwynd Ley have probably had more re-reads than any of the others but I haven’t been keeping count. I do re-read plenty of my more recent favourites as well: Anna Campbell’s Lairds series and The Rose Garden by Susanna Kearsley are frequent re-reads. Also I find that if I re-read one book by an author I’ll probably follow up with a re-read of some of their other titles.

 There are probably lots of reasons for re-reading and equally interesting ones for not -re-reading. I never re-read my own books, for example. And then there’s the whole other question I wonder when I look at my bookshelves: Why do I keep books I have no intention of re-reading…

 Christina:  If you had asked me a year ago I would have said no, not really. The only books I ever re-read were Georgette Heyer’s, in particular Cotillion which is my all-time favourite book and comfort read, and sometimes The Toll-Gate, The Reluctant Widow, Bath Tangle and Venetia, which I also love. But then Christinascame the pandemic, and I found myself retreating into books more and more in order to shut out the reality of the world around me. And there were certain stories that I just liked so much, I began to reread them only a few weeks after the first time – no idea why! Mostly skim-reading so that I could thoroughly enjoy the best parts – the first kiss, the perfect meet-cute or the happy ending. With others I re-read the whole thing. I don’t know whether this is something I will continue to do, or if it was just a result of the extraordinary circumstances we’ve all been in recently, but I suspect I might be hooked now!

Anne here, and yes, I'm very much a re-reader. For me, re- Briggsreading a favorite book is like visiting old friends, or returning to a beloved place. The habit might have started when I was a kid, as books weren't so easily come by then, so I'd re-read the ones I had, and enjoy them just as much — sometimes even more— the second, or third time around. The anticipation of events or funny lines and favorite scenes often added to the enjoyment. They still do. 

I still re-read a lot as an adult — probably even more. When a new book by a favorite author is about to come out, I will often re-read the others in the series, just to prepare for it. I sometimes pick up a book just to re-read a beloved scene — for instance the "Nemesis" discussion in Heyer's Friday's Child, that still makes me laugh just as it did when I was a teenager and read it first. (The pic of part of my Heyer shelf shows the books I bought as a teen from second hand stores and library sales. Old friends, and I can't toss them away.) 

And these days when I'm finding it hard to find a new book or author to enjoy — when I've sighed and put a book or books aside after 3 or 4 unengaged chapters — I will often return to old favorites to remind myself that I can still get completely lost in a story, even though I've read it multiple times before. In fact most of the Heyersbooks on my "keeper" shelves are ones I will reread — and there are quite a few books that I have in paperback that I also own as e-books, for instance favorite Wench books, just for the ease of rereading at whim or when I'm away from home. 

Mary Jo weighs in on Re-reading:

 I've always, always been a re-reader.  This is partly because there are never enough good books and I'm always reading, so when there is nothing new and appealing available, I re-read old favorites.  I tend to do a lot of re-reading when I'm deep in deadline hell, and I need a dose of story to unwind, but I don't want anything that will suck me in and get in the way of my own work.  Plus during The Flowering Thornthe pandemic, I've been doing a lot of re-reading: comfort reads.

The books I re-read are always well written books by good storytellers, and I generally find new things to appreciate when re-reading as well as enjoying whatever I enjoyed the first time around. 

I love finding series I really enjoy—as a kid, it was usually horses or science fiction such as Robert Heinlein's stories.  In college I discovered Georgette Heyer and that led to years of re-reading.  I tend to prefer her older heroines, as in Venetia, Black Sheep, and Bath Tangle. I also loved Patricia Veryan's adventurous Georgian romances. 

In more recent years, I've indulged in frequent re-reads of science fiction and fantasy stories by my favorite female writers. Lois McMasters Bujold's Vorkosigan chronicles for example. Patricia Briggs' Mercedes Thompson urban fantasies.  Anything under any of Jayne Ann Krentz's three names. I'm just finishing a re-read of my favorite Sharon Shinn series, the five book Twelve Houses series.  Wonderful world building, characters and storylines.

 As a side note: A series with a beginning, a middle, and an end often works best.  Sometimes an open ended series will go in a direction one doesn't like, which is an author's right, but sad for addicted readers who don't like that direction. 

 If I crave witty humor, there are some Jennifer Cruise stories I go back to again and again and again: Bet me, Anyone But You, The Cinderella Deal. And there are some freestanding stories that never let me down:  Jeanne Ray's Step Ball Change, Margery Sharp's The Flowering Thorn.

 What all these re-reads have in common?  Good stories by good writers–and always happy endings!

Andrea: Am I a re-reader? Umm . . . yes and no. On the whole, I don’t really do a lot of re-reading. There are SO many new books out there beckoning, and I’m always coming across ones that make me think, “Ooo, that looks interesting!” (Case in point—my current reading-in-progress: I mean, who knew that I wanted to read a book about eels, but the blurb sounds really fascinating, so I just grabbed it from AustenBookBub. And it IS fascinating.)

That said, I do have a number of comfort reads for when I’m just feeling like curling up with a cup of hot chocolate and visiting with an old and dear friend. (This happened more than usual in the past year and a half.) First and foremost is Jane Austen. No matter how many times I re-read it, Pride and Prejudice never fails to make me smile all over again at Austen’s brilliant observations of human nature in all its glorious foibles. Persuasion is also a favorite for its quiet celebration of longing and love.

Mary Stewart is another go-to comfort read—especially This Rough Magic and The Moonspinners. (I fell in love with the brave, resourceful heroine trope from these book in my adolescence.) And Elizabeth Peters always make me laugh aloud—great medicine for those occasional doldrum days. I adore her Amelia Peabody series and her Vicky Bliss series (I wish she had written more of them! Trojan Gold and Night Train to Memphis are some of my all-time favorite keepers.)

Susan: Count me among the most devoted of re-readers. As a little kid devouring every book in sight, I also went back to favorites to read again and again. I absolutely tattered my copy of Pippi Longstocking—being a mouse of a thing myself, I could not get enough of that bold, boisterous goofball with her soft, sentimental heart (that copy is still in my bookshelves somewhere). My re-reading habit was fully Susan keeper shelfimprinted by the time I reached high school, when I read Gone With the Wind five times in two years. At the same time, I was plowing through novels at breakneck speed—and discovering favorites that I would come back to repeatedly. Like other Wenches—and many readers—Mary Stewart caught my reader’s (and writer’s) heart when I was still in elementary school. The first Stewart for me was The Moon Spinners–the smart, kind, resourceful heroine and the strong and beautifully understated hero were just a revelation, and I was learning to really think about the books I was reading.

There are authors I set on repeat for years—Victoria Holt, Anya Seton, Elizabeth Peters, Dorothy Sayers, Daphne Du Maurier, others. I’ve happily tracked through every one of Mary Stewart’s books countless times by now—she’s the single author I will always return to, and give me a stack of her books if I’m ever stranded on a desert island. Her books are comfort reads, the big comfy quilt and cup of hot tea sort of remedy when I’m sick or tired or stressed–or need a balm and a reminder of why I love writing. 

The impulse to read the same books again, for me, was a way to completely absorb, understand, learn storytelling, writing, the craft that I would need later in life, and still need. By going over and over the same books, I was studying how to be a writer before I even knew I wanted to do that.

I still re-read—new favorites that I’ll try again are The Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine Lowell, and Quan Barry’s delightful We Ride Upon Sticks. And of course, of course, I’m always reading new, enjoying those, and moving on to more. 

So, over to you, folks. Do you re-read? If so, what are your favorites?

 

295 thoughts on “AAW: Do you re-read?”

  1. Yes, continually, maybe on a one new vs one old basis. I count books I read 30 years ago and don’t remember as “new reads.”
    When I reread (which I often do as audiobooks), I pay more attention to the quality of the prose, since I already know the story. I’m looking for the music in the words.
    My favorite rereads are Jane Austen, most of Georgette Heyer (never really cared for the mysteries and once was enough for her early contemporaries), Murder Must Advertise and the Harriet Vane sequence by Dorothy Sayers, JRR Tolkien (I never tire of The Hobbit or The Lord of the Rings), Robert Heinlein’s juvies and short stories (his best work, I think) and Alan Furst (I love his WW2 milieu).
    Sometimes I read from a print copy, sometimes I listen to an audiobook on cd, other times I reread from my Kindle or the Kindle app on my phone because that’s always with me. I can pick up any of these books at any point and enjoy them without feeling that I’m missing something or that I can’t wait to find out what happens next. Part of the pleasure is that I do know what happens next.
    The current audiobook reread is Black Sheep, which has a terrible screechy performance, but only in parts.

    Reply
  2. Yes, continually, maybe on a one new vs one old basis. I count books I read 30 years ago and don’t remember as “new reads.”
    When I reread (which I often do as audiobooks), I pay more attention to the quality of the prose, since I already know the story. I’m looking for the music in the words.
    My favorite rereads are Jane Austen, most of Georgette Heyer (never really cared for the mysteries and once was enough for her early contemporaries), Murder Must Advertise and the Harriet Vane sequence by Dorothy Sayers, JRR Tolkien (I never tire of The Hobbit or The Lord of the Rings), Robert Heinlein’s juvies and short stories (his best work, I think) and Alan Furst (I love his WW2 milieu).
    Sometimes I read from a print copy, sometimes I listen to an audiobook on cd, other times I reread from my Kindle or the Kindle app on my phone because that’s always with me. I can pick up any of these books at any point and enjoy them without feeling that I’m missing something or that I can’t wait to find out what happens next. Part of the pleasure is that I do know what happens next.
    The current audiobook reread is Black Sheep, which has a terrible screechy performance, but only in parts.

    Reply
  3. Yes, continually, maybe on a one new vs one old basis. I count books I read 30 years ago and don’t remember as “new reads.”
    When I reread (which I often do as audiobooks), I pay more attention to the quality of the prose, since I already know the story. I’m looking for the music in the words.
    My favorite rereads are Jane Austen, most of Georgette Heyer (never really cared for the mysteries and once was enough for her early contemporaries), Murder Must Advertise and the Harriet Vane sequence by Dorothy Sayers, JRR Tolkien (I never tire of The Hobbit or The Lord of the Rings), Robert Heinlein’s juvies and short stories (his best work, I think) and Alan Furst (I love his WW2 milieu).
    Sometimes I read from a print copy, sometimes I listen to an audiobook on cd, other times I reread from my Kindle or the Kindle app on my phone because that’s always with me. I can pick up any of these books at any point and enjoy them without feeling that I’m missing something or that I can’t wait to find out what happens next. Part of the pleasure is that I do know what happens next.
    The current audiobook reread is Black Sheep, which has a terrible screechy performance, but only in parts.

    Reply
  4. Yes, continually, maybe on a one new vs one old basis. I count books I read 30 years ago and don’t remember as “new reads.”
    When I reread (which I often do as audiobooks), I pay more attention to the quality of the prose, since I already know the story. I’m looking for the music in the words.
    My favorite rereads are Jane Austen, most of Georgette Heyer (never really cared for the mysteries and once was enough for her early contemporaries), Murder Must Advertise and the Harriet Vane sequence by Dorothy Sayers, JRR Tolkien (I never tire of The Hobbit or The Lord of the Rings), Robert Heinlein’s juvies and short stories (his best work, I think) and Alan Furst (I love his WW2 milieu).
    Sometimes I read from a print copy, sometimes I listen to an audiobook on cd, other times I reread from my Kindle or the Kindle app on my phone because that’s always with me. I can pick up any of these books at any point and enjoy them without feeling that I’m missing something or that I can’t wait to find out what happens next. Part of the pleasure is that I do know what happens next.
    The current audiobook reread is Black Sheep, which has a terrible screechy performance, but only in parts.

    Reply
  5. Yes, continually, maybe on a one new vs one old basis. I count books I read 30 years ago and don’t remember as “new reads.”
    When I reread (which I often do as audiobooks), I pay more attention to the quality of the prose, since I already know the story. I’m looking for the music in the words.
    My favorite rereads are Jane Austen, most of Georgette Heyer (never really cared for the mysteries and once was enough for her early contemporaries), Murder Must Advertise and the Harriet Vane sequence by Dorothy Sayers, JRR Tolkien (I never tire of The Hobbit or The Lord of the Rings), Robert Heinlein’s juvies and short stories (his best work, I think) and Alan Furst (I love his WW2 milieu).
    Sometimes I read from a print copy, sometimes I listen to an audiobook on cd, other times I reread from my Kindle or the Kindle app on my phone because that’s always with me. I can pick up any of these books at any point and enjoy them without feeling that I’m missing something or that I can’t wait to find out what happens next. Part of the pleasure is that I do know what happens next.
    The current audiobook reread is Black Sheep, which has a terrible screechy performance, but only in parts.

    Reply
  6. I’m sometimes an accidental rereader. Just last night, I went to Amazon to review Jade Dragon Mountain by Elsa Hart, which I’d just finished and enjoyed a lot, and found I’d already written a cogent review of it sometime in the cloudy past!

    Reply
  7. I’m sometimes an accidental rereader. Just last night, I went to Amazon to review Jade Dragon Mountain by Elsa Hart, which I’d just finished and enjoyed a lot, and found I’d already written a cogent review of it sometime in the cloudy past!

    Reply
  8. I’m sometimes an accidental rereader. Just last night, I went to Amazon to review Jade Dragon Mountain by Elsa Hart, which I’d just finished and enjoyed a lot, and found I’d already written a cogent review of it sometime in the cloudy past!

    Reply
  9. I’m sometimes an accidental rereader. Just last night, I went to Amazon to review Jade Dragon Mountain by Elsa Hart, which I’d just finished and enjoyed a lot, and found I’d already written a cogent review of it sometime in the cloudy past!

    Reply
  10. I’m sometimes an accidental rereader. Just last night, I went to Amazon to review Jade Dragon Mountain by Elsa Hart, which I’d just finished and enjoyed a lot, and found I’d already written a cogent review of it sometime in the cloudy past!

    Reply
  11. I’ve been a re-reader all my life. My first re-read was little Women. My all-time fave is Mary Stewart’s Madam, Will You Talk? I re-read it so many times that I wore out my paperback copy. I now have another a copy at the ready, just in case. Other re-reads are Mary Jo’s Loving a Lost Lord, and One Perfect Rose. And I just re-read Dearly Beloved. Other favorite re-reads are Patricia Briggs, romantic suspense by Nora Roberts, especially The Search, The Liar, High Noon, The Obsession, Under Currents. J. D. Robb’s In Death series. Also on the list – all of Karen Rose, Jayne Ann Krentz’s River Road, Linda Howard’s Troublemaker. Also Anne Gracie’s Chance Sisters and Convenient Marriages, Lisa Kleypas’s Wallflowers and Ravenels series, and Grace Burrowes’ The Heir, The Soldier and The Duke’s Disaster. I have to say…one of the fun things about re-reading is discovering things I’d missed the first – or second- time around. When do I ever manage to read new books? All the time!

    Reply
  12. I’ve been a re-reader all my life. My first re-read was little Women. My all-time fave is Mary Stewart’s Madam, Will You Talk? I re-read it so many times that I wore out my paperback copy. I now have another a copy at the ready, just in case. Other re-reads are Mary Jo’s Loving a Lost Lord, and One Perfect Rose. And I just re-read Dearly Beloved. Other favorite re-reads are Patricia Briggs, romantic suspense by Nora Roberts, especially The Search, The Liar, High Noon, The Obsession, Under Currents. J. D. Robb’s In Death series. Also on the list – all of Karen Rose, Jayne Ann Krentz’s River Road, Linda Howard’s Troublemaker. Also Anne Gracie’s Chance Sisters and Convenient Marriages, Lisa Kleypas’s Wallflowers and Ravenels series, and Grace Burrowes’ The Heir, The Soldier and The Duke’s Disaster. I have to say…one of the fun things about re-reading is discovering things I’d missed the first – or second- time around. When do I ever manage to read new books? All the time!

    Reply
  13. I’ve been a re-reader all my life. My first re-read was little Women. My all-time fave is Mary Stewart’s Madam, Will You Talk? I re-read it so many times that I wore out my paperback copy. I now have another a copy at the ready, just in case. Other re-reads are Mary Jo’s Loving a Lost Lord, and One Perfect Rose. And I just re-read Dearly Beloved. Other favorite re-reads are Patricia Briggs, romantic suspense by Nora Roberts, especially The Search, The Liar, High Noon, The Obsession, Under Currents. J. D. Robb’s In Death series. Also on the list – all of Karen Rose, Jayne Ann Krentz’s River Road, Linda Howard’s Troublemaker. Also Anne Gracie’s Chance Sisters and Convenient Marriages, Lisa Kleypas’s Wallflowers and Ravenels series, and Grace Burrowes’ The Heir, The Soldier and The Duke’s Disaster. I have to say…one of the fun things about re-reading is discovering things I’d missed the first – or second- time around. When do I ever manage to read new books? All the time!

    Reply
  14. I’ve been a re-reader all my life. My first re-read was little Women. My all-time fave is Mary Stewart’s Madam, Will You Talk? I re-read it so many times that I wore out my paperback copy. I now have another a copy at the ready, just in case. Other re-reads are Mary Jo’s Loving a Lost Lord, and One Perfect Rose. And I just re-read Dearly Beloved. Other favorite re-reads are Patricia Briggs, romantic suspense by Nora Roberts, especially The Search, The Liar, High Noon, The Obsession, Under Currents. J. D. Robb’s In Death series. Also on the list – all of Karen Rose, Jayne Ann Krentz’s River Road, Linda Howard’s Troublemaker. Also Anne Gracie’s Chance Sisters and Convenient Marriages, Lisa Kleypas’s Wallflowers and Ravenels series, and Grace Burrowes’ The Heir, The Soldier and The Duke’s Disaster. I have to say…one of the fun things about re-reading is discovering things I’d missed the first – or second- time around. When do I ever manage to read new books? All the time!

    Reply
  15. I’ve been a re-reader all my life. My first re-read was little Women. My all-time fave is Mary Stewart’s Madam, Will You Talk? I re-read it so many times that I wore out my paperback copy. I now have another a copy at the ready, just in case. Other re-reads are Mary Jo’s Loving a Lost Lord, and One Perfect Rose. And I just re-read Dearly Beloved. Other favorite re-reads are Patricia Briggs, romantic suspense by Nora Roberts, especially The Search, The Liar, High Noon, The Obsession, Under Currents. J. D. Robb’s In Death series. Also on the list – all of Karen Rose, Jayne Ann Krentz’s River Road, Linda Howard’s Troublemaker. Also Anne Gracie’s Chance Sisters and Convenient Marriages, Lisa Kleypas’s Wallflowers and Ravenels series, and Grace Burrowes’ The Heir, The Soldier and The Duke’s Disaster. I have to say…one of the fun things about re-reading is discovering things I’d missed the first – or second- time around. When do I ever manage to read new books? All the time!

    Reply
  16. YES: I have always been a fast reader; my years as a copy editor increased that habit/skill. Even the large group of currently active authors I buy on automatic cannot keep me supplied fast enough.
    And, as Anne said, I love to go back and visit old friends. I reread Mary Jo’s “Wedding of the Century” in order to savor the public set down of the mother-in-law at the first dinner, and the later scene that .removes her from the house.
    All the books (and long-shorts) that I reread have similar attractions. And when not rereading, there are quotes. My daughters will look up at the dinner table and say “The fox got into the chickens last night.” or some similar quote, and then return to the table conversation. They reread also; as does my husband, who has his favorite quotes also.

    Reply
  17. YES: I have always been a fast reader; my years as a copy editor increased that habit/skill. Even the large group of currently active authors I buy on automatic cannot keep me supplied fast enough.
    And, as Anne said, I love to go back and visit old friends. I reread Mary Jo’s “Wedding of the Century” in order to savor the public set down of the mother-in-law at the first dinner, and the later scene that .removes her from the house.
    All the books (and long-shorts) that I reread have similar attractions. And when not rereading, there are quotes. My daughters will look up at the dinner table and say “The fox got into the chickens last night.” or some similar quote, and then return to the table conversation. They reread also; as does my husband, who has his favorite quotes also.

    Reply
  18. YES: I have always been a fast reader; my years as a copy editor increased that habit/skill. Even the large group of currently active authors I buy on automatic cannot keep me supplied fast enough.
    And, as Anne said, I love to go back and visit old friends. I reread Mary Jo’s “Wedding of the Century” in order to savor the public set down of the mother-in-law at the first dinner, and the later scene that .removes her from the house.
    All the books (and long-shorts) that I reread have similar attractions. And when not rereading, there are quotes. My daughters will look up at the dinner table and say “The fox got into the chickens last night.” or some similar quote, and then return to the table conversation. They reread also; as does my husband, who has his favorite quotes also.

    Reply
  19. YES: I have always been a fast reader; my years as a copy editor increased that habit/skill. Even the large group of currently active authors I buy on automatic cannot keep me supplied fast enough.
    And, as Anne said, I love to go back and visit old friends. I reread Mary Jo’s “Wedding of the Century” in order to savor the public set down of the mother-in-law at the first dinner, and the later scene that .removes her from the house.
    All the books (and long-shorts) that I reread have similar attractions. And when not rereading, there are quotes. My daughters will look up at the dinner table and say “The fox got into the chickens last night.” or some similar quote, and then return to the table conversation. They reread also; as does my husband, who has his favorite quotes also.

    Reply
  20. YES: I have always been a fast reader; my years as a copy editor increased that habit/skill. Even the large group of currently active authors I buy on automatic cannot keep me supplied fast enough.
    And, as Anne said, I love to go back and visit old friends. I reread Mary Jo’s “Wedding of the Century” in order to savor the public set down of the mother-in-law at the first dinner, and the later scene that .removes her from the house.
    All the books (and long-shorts) that I reread have similar attractions. And when not rereading, there are quotes. My daughters will look up at the dinner table and say “The fox got into the chickens last night.” or some similar quote, and then return to the table conversation. They reread also; as does my husband, who has his favorite quotes also.

    Reply
  21. I am absolutely a re-reader, quite often of favorite Wench books. But it started when I was a child, with Charlotte’s Web and has continued right along. Oddly enough however, while I do have a small group of favorites from my childhood, I find myself with my adult favorites, re-reading romance with a bit of Wimsey or Marple thrown in. Other than that, out of all of the thousands of books I’ve read, none of the other genres have grabbed me enough to revisit them. What does that say about me? 😉

    Reply
  22. I am absolutely a re-reader, quite often of favorite Wench books. But it started when I was a child, with Charlotte’s Web and has continued right along. Oddly enough however, while I do have a small group of favorites from my childhood, I find myself with my adult favorites, re-reading romance with a bit of Wimsey or Marple thrown in. Other than that, out of all of the thousands of books I’ve read, none of the other genres have grabbed me enough to revisit them. What does that say about me? 😉

    Reply
  23. I am absolutely a re-reader, quite often of favorite Wench books. But it started when I was a child, with Charlotte’s Web and has continued right along. Oddly enough however, while I do have a small group of favorites from my childhood, I find myself with my adult favorites, re-reading romance with a bit of Wimsey or Marple thrown in. Other than that, out of all of the thousands of books I’ve read, none of the other genres have grabbed me enough to revisit them. What does that say about me? 😉

    Reply
  24. I am absolutely a re-reader, quite often of favorite Wench books. But it started when I was a child, with Charlotte’s Web and has continued right along. Oddly enough however, while I do have a small group of favorites from my childhood, I find myself with my adult favorites, re-reading romance with a bit of Wimsey or Marple thrown in. Other than that, out of all of the thousands of books I’ve read, none of the other genres have grabbed me enough to revisit them. What does that say about me? 😉

    Reply
  25. I am absolutely a re-reader, quite often of favorite Wench books. But it started when I was a child, with Charlotte’s Web and has continued right along. Oddly enough however, while I do have a small group of favorites from my childhood, I find myself with my adult favorites, re-reading romance with a bit of Wimsey or Marple thrown in. Other than that, out of all of the thousands of books I’ve read, none of the other genres have grabbed me enough to revisit them. What does that say about me? 😉

    Reply
  26. I do a lot of re-reading. I too, think of them as comfort reads – they are safe, happy places. It was usually a winter time thing – when I got the winter blues. But during the past year and a half, I have gone to them more and more. They are important therapy for me – especially the ones that make me laugh. When I am sitting there with a new book (a good book mind you) and just not being able to get into it, I know it is time to pickup one of my old favorites.
    Mary Balogh’s Slightly and Simply series are my all time favorites, but there are so many, many more. As for laughing, which makes me feel so much better when I am down, my go to authors are Joan Smith and Barbara Metzger.

    Reply
  27. I do a lot of re-reading. I too, think of them as comfort reads – they are safe, happy places. It was usually a winter time thing – when I got the winter blues. But during the past year and a half, I have gone to them more and more. They are important therapy for me – especially the ones that make me laugh. When I am sitting there with a new book (a good book mind you) and just not being able to get into it, I know it is time to pickup one of my old favorites.
    Mary Balogh’s Slightly and Simply series are my all time favorites, but there are so many, many more. As for laughing, which makes me feel so much better when I am down, my go to authors are Joan Smith and Barbara Metzger.

    Reply
  28. I do a lot of re-reading. I too, think of them as comfort reads – they are safe, happy places. It was usually a winter time thing – when I got the winter blues. But during the past year and a half, I have gone to them more and more. They are important therapy for me – especially the ones that make me laugh. When I am sitting there with a new book (a good book mind you) and just not being able to get into it, I know it is time to pickup one of my old favorites.
    Mary Balogh’s Slightly and Simply series are my all time favorites, but there are so many, many more. As for laughing, which makes me feel so much better when I am down, my go to authors are Joan Smith and Barbara Metzger.

    Reply
  29. I do a lot of re-reading. I too, think of them as comfort reads – they are safe, happy places. It was usually a winter time thing – when I got the winter blues. But during the past year and a half, I have gone to them more and more. They are important therapy for me – especially the ones that make me laugh. When I am sitting there with a new book (a good book mind you) and just not being able to get into it, I know it is time to pickup one of my old favorites.
    Mary Balogh’s Slightly and Simply series are my all time favorites, but there are so many, many more. As for laughing, which makes me feel so much better when I am down, my go to authors are Joan Smith and Barbara Metzger.

    Reply
  30. I do a lot of re-reading. I too, think of them as comfort reads – they are safe, happy places. It was usually a winter time thing – when I got the winter blues. But during the past year and a half, I have gone to them more and more. They are important therapy for me – especially the ones that make me laugh. When I am sitting there with a new book (a good book mind you) and just not being able to get into it, I know it is time to pickup one of my old favorites.
    Mary Balogh’s Slightly and Simply series are my all time favorites, but there are so many, many more. As for laughing, which makes me feel so much better when I am down, my go to authors are Joan Smith and Barbara Metzger.

    Reply
  31. I don’t reread as much as I used to. In pre-internet/Kindle days, I would sometimes run out of books, and didn’t have the resources to find the books I wanted to read. Nowadays, it’ll probably take the rest of my lifetime just to finish all the unread books in my Kindle library!
    Yet I still take comfort in occasionally rereading some favorites. Heyer’s The Toll-Gate and Devil’s Cub, the Dorothy Sayers books where Harriet Vane appears; Mary Jo’s Angel Rogue, probably the most fun and lighthearted of the Fallen Angels series; Edith Layton’s The Chance, several old Regencies by Charlotte Louise Dolan, Gallant Waif and The Perfect Rake by Anne Gracie(I still have the original paperbacks); and several favorite Patricia Wentworth mysteries. I don’t generally reread literary fiction. The rare exception is A Far Cry From Kensington by Muriel Spark, her writing is such a delight.

    Reply
  32. I don’t reread as much as I used to. In pre-internet/Kindle days, I would sometimes run out of books, and didn’t have the resources to find the books I wanted to read. Nowadays, it’ll probably take the rest of my lifetime just to finish all the unread books in my Kindle library!
    Yet I still take comfort in occasionally rereading some favorites. Heyer’s The Toll-Gate and Devil’s Cub, the Dorothy Sayers books where Harriet Vane appears; Mary Jo’s Angel Rogue, probably the most fun and lighthearted of the Fallen Angels series; Edith Layton’s The Chance, several old Regencies by Charlotte Louise Dolan, Gallant Waif and The Perfect Rake by Anne Gracie(I still have the original paperbacks); and several favorite Patricia Wentworth mysteries. I don’t generally reread literary fiction. The rare exception is A Far Cry From Kensington by Muriel Spark, her writing is such a delight.

    Reply
  33. I don’t reread as much as I used to. In pre-internet/Kindle days, I would sometimes run out of books, and didn’t have the resources to find the books I wanted to read. Nowadays, it’ll probably take the rest of my lifetime just to finish all the unread books in my Kindle library!
    Yet I still take comfort in occasionally rereading some favorites. Heyer’s The Toll-Gate and Devil’s Cub, the Dorothy Sayers books where Harriet Vane appears; Mary Jo’s Angel Rogue, probably the most fun and lighthearted of the Fallen Angels series; Edith Layton’s The Chance, several old Regencies by Charlotte Louise Dolan, Gallant Waif and The Perfect Rake by Anne Gracie(I still have the original paperbacks); and several favorite Patricia Wentworth mysteries. I don’t generally reread literary fiction. The rare exception is A Far Cry From Kensington by Muriel Spark, her writing is such a delight.

    Reply
  34. I don’t reread as much as I used to. In pre-internet/Kindle days, I would sometimes run out of books, and didn’t have the resources to find the books I wanted to read. Nowadays, it’ll probably take the rest of my lifetime just to finish all the unread books in my Kindle library!
    Yet I still take comfort in occasionally rereading some favorites. Heyer’s The Toll-Gate and Devil’s Cub, the Dorothy Sayers books where Harriet Vane appears; Mary Jo’s Angel Rogue, probably the most fun and lighthearted of the Fallen Angels series; Edith Layton’s The Chance, several old Regencies by Charlotte Louise Dolan, Gallant Waif and The Perfect Rake by Anne Gracie(I still have the original paperbacks); and several favorite Patricia Wentworth mysteries. I don’t generally reread literary fiction. The rare exception is A Far Cry From Kensington by Muriel Spark, her writing is such a delight.

    Reply
  35. I don’t reread as much as I used to. In pre-internet/Kindle days, I would sometimes run out of books, and didn’t have the resources to find the books I wanted to read. Nowadays, it’ll probably take the rest of my lifetime just to finish all the unread books in my Kindle library!
    Yet I still take comfort in occasionally rereading some favorites. Heyer’s The Toll-Gate and Devil’s Cub, the Dorothy Sayers books where Harriet Vane appears; Mary Jo’s Angel Rogue, probably the most fun and lighthearted of the Fallen Angels series; Edith Layton’s The Chance, several old Regencies by Charlotte Louise Dolan, Gallant Waif and The Perfect Rake by Anne Gracie(I still have the original paperbacks); and several favorite Patricia Wentworth mysteries. I don’t generally reread literary fiction. The rare exception is A Far Cry From Kensington by Muriel Spark, her writing is such a delight.

    Reply
  36. Yes, I reread! Georgette Heyer is a favorite, although once was enough for My Lord John. I have also reread Roberta Gellis’s medieval Rosalynde series more than once. I agree that Mary Stewart is well by worth rereading for contemporaries, and Dorothy Sayers’ Lord Peter mysteries for pre WWII. I do hear Stephen Fry in my head whenever Bunter speaks.

    Reply
  37. Yes, I reread! Georgette Heyer is a favorite, although once was enough for My Lord John. I have also reread Roberta Gellis’s medieval Rosalynde series more than once. I agree that Mary Stewart is well by worth rereading for contemporaries, and Dorothy Sayers’ Lord Peter mysteries for pre WWII. I do hear Stephen Fry in my head whenever Bunter speaks.

    Reply
  38. Yes, I reread! Georgette Heyer is a favorite, although once was enough for My Lord John. I have also reread Roberta Gellis’s medieval Rosalynde series more than once. I agree that Mary Stewart is well by worth rereading for contemporaries, and Dorothy Sayers’ Lord Peter mysteries for pre WWII. I do hear Stephen Fry in my head whenever Bunter speaks.

    Reply
  39. Yes, I reread! Georgette Heyer is a favorite, although once was enough for My Lord John. I have also reread Roberta Gellis’s medieval Rosalynde series more than once. I agree that Mary Stewart is well by worth rereading for contemporaries, and Dorothy Sayers’ Lord Peter mysteries for pre WWII. I do hear Stephen Fry in my head whenever Bunter speaks.

    Reply
  40. Yes, I reread! Georgette Heyer is a favorite, although once was enough for My Lord John. I have also reread Roberta Gellis’s medieval Rosalynde series more than once. I agree that Mary Stewart is well by worth rereading for contemporaries, and Dorothy Sayers’ Lord Peter mysteries for pre WWII. I do hear Stephen Fry in my head whenever Bunter speaks.

    Reply
  41. Funny you should ask Last night I stayed up late re-reading a Susan Elizabeth Phillips book – What I did for Love.
    I had just finished a dark book. I do not do dark at all generally. But, the author is one I really like.
    So, I needed to laugh, and Julie Garwood and Susan Elizabeth Phillips are the authors who always make me laugh. This is a book I had read only once and it was a long time ago….so, I got to laugh out loud at times.
    On my keeper shelves, I have several series by authors who give me joy.
    I really need the laughter and I know who can provide it for me.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and taking care.

    Reply
  42. Funny you should ask Last night I stayed up late re-reading a Susan Elizabeth Phillips book – What I did for Love.
    I had just finished a dark book. I do not do dark at all generally. But, the author is one I really like.
    So, I needed to laugh, and Julie Garwood and Susan Elizabeth Phillips are the authors who always make me laugh. This is a book I had read only once and it was a long time ago….so, I got to laugh out loud at times.
    On my keeper shelves, I have several series by authors who give me joy.
    I really need the laughter and I know who can provide it for me.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and taking care.

    Reply
  43. Funny you should ask Last night I stayed up late re-reading a Susan Elizabeth Phillips book – What I did for Love.
    I had just finished a dark book. I do not do dark at all generally. But, the author is one I really like.
    So, I needed to laugh, and Julie Garwood and Susan Elizabeth Phillips are the authors who always make me laugh. This is a book I had read only once and it was a long time ago….so, I got to laugh out loud at times.
    On my keeper shelves, I have several series by authors who give me joy.
    I really need the laughter and I know who can provide it for me.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and taking care.

    Reply
  44. Funny you should ask Last night I stayed up late re-reading a Susan Elizabeth Phillips book – What I did for Love.
    I had just finished a dark book. I do not do dark at all generally. But, the author is one I really like.
    So, I needed to laugh, and Julie Garwood and Susan Elizabeth Phillips are the authors who always make me laugh. This is a book I had read only once and it was a long time ago….so, I got to laugh out loud at times.
    On my keeper shelves, I have several series by authors who give me joy.
    I really need the laughter and I know who can provide it for me.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and taking care.

    Reply
  45. Funny you should ask Last night I stayed up late re-reading a Susan Elizabeth Phillips book – What I did for Love.
    I had just finished a dark book. I do not do dark at all generally. But, the author is one I really like.
    So, I needed to laugh, and Julie Garwood and Susan Elizabeth Phillips are the authors who always make me laugh. This is a book I had read only once and it was a long time ago….so, I got to laugh out loud at times.
    On my keeper shelves, I have several series by authors who give me joy.
    I really need the laughter and I know who can provide it for me.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and taking care.

    Reply
  46. The best re-read is when a fan writes and tells you she re-reading your books. There can be no greater compliment. I usually re-read one classic book a summer. This is to counter my addiction to English mysteries, which I read all summer. I was browsing through my bookcase the other day, though, and I pulled out James, The Golden Bowl, which I love and have re-read several times, and I have also been thinking of re-reading Dorothy Dunnet’s Lymond series. I loved loved loved those books.
    Joan

    Reply
  47. The best re-read is when a fan writes and tells you she re-reading your books. There can be no greater compliment. I usually re-read one classic book a summer. This is to counter my addiction to English mysteries, which I read all summer. I was browsing through my bookcase the other day, though, and I pulled out James, The Golden Bowl, which I love and have re-read several times, and I have also been thinking of re-reading Dorothy Dunnet’s Lymond series. I loved loved loved those books.
    Joan

    Reply
  48. The best re-read is when a fan writes and tells you she re-reading your books. There can be no greater compliment. I usually re-read one classic book a summer. This is to counter my addiction to English mysteries, which I read all summer. I was browsing through my bookcase the other day, though, and I pulled out James, The Golden Bowl, which I love and have re-read several times, and I have also been thinking of re-reading Dorothy Dunnet’s Lymond series. I loved loved loved those books.
    Joan

    Reply
  49. The best re-read is when a fan writes and tells you she re-reading your books. There can be no greater compliment. I usually re-read one classic book a summer. This is to counter my addiction to English mysteries, which I read all summer. I was browsing through my bookcase the other day, though, and I pulled out James, The Golden Bowl, which I love and have re-read several times, and I have also been thinking of re-reading Dorothy Dunnet’s Lymond series. I loved loved loved those books.
    Joan

    Reply
  50. The best re-read is when a fan writes and tells you she re-reading your books. There can be no greater compliment. I usually re-read one classic book a summer. This is to counter my addiction to English mysteries, which I read all summer. I was browsing through my bookcase the other day, though, and I pulled out James, The Golden Bowl, which I love and have re-read several times, and I have also been thinking of re-reading Dorothy Dunnet’s Lymond series. I loved loved loved those books.
    Joan

    Reply
  51. Like Anne, rereading a favorite book (or listening to an audiobook I once read) is like visiting with old friends. I especially enjoy listening to audiobooks more than once.

    Reply
  52. Like Anne, rereading a favorite book (or listening to an audiobook I once read) is like visiting with old friends. I especially enjoy listening to audiobooks more than once.

    Reply
  53. Like Anne, rereading a favorite book (or listening to an audiobook I once read) is like visiting with old friends. I especially enjoy listening to audiobooks more than once.

    Reply
  54. Like Anne, rereading a favorite book (or listening to an audiobook I once read) is like visiting with old friends. I especially enjoy listening to audiobooks more than once.

    Reply
  55. Like Anne, rereading a favorite book (or listening to an audiobook I once read) is like visiting with old friends. I especially enjoy listening to audiobooks more than once.

    Reply
  56. A big thank you to Pat and all the Wenches for answering my question!
    I am a frequent re-reader. This likely began when I was a child who was both an avid reader and someone who frequently moved; there were only so many books to be found. When I read for pleasure, I read quickly, so a re-read will sometimes reveal something I missed on that first (second, or third) read.
    My re-reads are for pleasure or comfort or both. When only paper books were available, my husband once commented that he could gauge my mood by which book I was re-reading. Once in a while, I do re-read to see whether I missed a clue or to see just how an author led me to a conclusion…the first seventy or so pages of Joanna Bourne’s The Spymaster’s Lady is a good example of the latter! (And how is Jo?)
    Re-reads over time have included LaVyrle Spencer’s Morning Glory; several Star Trek novels; books by Nora Roberts, JAK, and Elizabeth Lowell; Mary Balogh’s Slightly Dangerous; books by Patricia Briggs; Anne Cleeland’s Acton and Doyle mysteries; and SK Dunstall’s Linesman series to name just a few.
    Happy reading and re-reading!

    Reply
  57. A big thank you to Pat and all the Wenches for answering my question!
    I am a frequent re-reader. This likely began when I was a child who was both an avid reader and someone who frequently moved; there were only so many books to be found. When I read for pleasure, I read quickly, so a re-read will sometimes reveal something I missed on that first (second, or third) read.
    My re-reads are for pleasure or comfort or both. When only paper books were available, my husband once commented that he could gauge my mood by which book I was re-reading. Once in a while, I do re-read to see whether I missed a clue or to see just how an author led me to a conclusion…the first seventy or so pages of Joanna Bourne’s The Spymaster’s Lady is a good example of the latter! (And how is Jo?)
    Re-reads over time have included LaVyrle Spencer’s Morning Glory; several Star Trek novels; books by Nora Roberts, JAK, and Elizabeth Lowell; Mary Balogh’s Slightly Dangerous; books by Patricia Briggs; Anne Cleeland’s Acton and Doyle mysteries; and SK Dunstall’s Linesman series to name just a few.
    Happy reading and re-reading!

    Reply
  58. A big thank you to Pat and all the Wenches for answering my question!
    I am a frequent re-reader. This likely began when I was a child who was both an avid reader and someone who frequently moved; there were only so many books to be found. When I read for pleasure, I read quickly, so a re-read will sometimes reveal something I missed on that first (second, or third) read.
    My re-reads are for pleasure or comfort or both. When only paper books were available, my husband once commented that he could gauge my mood by which book I was re-reading. Once in a while, I do re-read to see whether I missed a clue or to see just how an author led me to a conclusion…the first seventy or so pages of Joanna Bourne’s The Spymaster’s Lady is a good example of the latter! (And how is Jo?)
    Re-reads over time have included LaVyrle Spencer’s Morning Glory; several Star Trek novels; books by Nora Roberts, JAK, and Elizabeth Lowell; Mary Balogh’s Slightly Dangerous; books by Patricia Briggs; Anne Cleeland’s Acton and Doyle mysteries; and SK Dunstall’s Linesman series to name just a few.
    Happy reading and re-reading!

    Reply
  59. A big thank you to Pat and all the Wenches for answering my question!
    I am a frequent re-reader. This likely began when I was a child who was both an avid reader and someone who frequently moved; there were only so many books to be found. When I read for pleasure, I read quickly, so a re-read will sometimes reveal something I missed on that first (second, or third) read.
    My re-reads are for pleasure or comfort or both. When only paper books were available, my husband once commented that he could gauge my mood by which book I was re-reading. Once in a while, I do re-read to see whether I missed a clue or to see just how an author led me to a conclusion…the first seventy or so pages of Joanna Bourne’s The Spymaster’s Lady is a good example of the latter! (And how is Jo?)
    Re-reads over time have included LaVyrle Spencer’s Morning Glory; several Star Trek novels; books by Nora Roberts, JAK, and Elizabeth Lowell; Mary Balogh’s Slightly Dangerous; books by Patricia Briggs; Anne Cleeland’s Acton and Doyle mysteries; and SK Dunstall’s Linesman series to name just a few.
    Happy reading and re-reading!

    Reply
  60. A big thank you to Pat and all the Wenches for answering my question!
    I am a frequent re-reader. This likely began when I was a child who was both an avid reader and someone who frequently moved; there were only so many books to be found. When I read for pleasure, I read quickly, so a re-read will sometimes reveal something I missed on that first (second, or third) read.
    My re-reads are for pleasure or comfort or both. When only paper books were available, my husband once commented that he could gauge my mood by which book I was re-reading. Once in a while, I do re-read to see whether I missed a clue or to see just how an author led me to a conclusion…the first seventy or so pages of Joanna Bourne’s The Spymaster’s Lady is a good example of the latter! (And how is Jo?)
    Re-reads over time have included LaVyrle Spencer’s Morning Glory; several Star Trek novels; books by Nora Roberts, JAK, and Elizabeth Lowell; Mary Balogh’s Slightly Dangerous; books by Patricia Briggs; Anne Cleeland’s Acton and Doyle mysteries; and SK Dunstall’s Linesman series to name just a few.
    Happy reading and re-reading!

    Reply
  61. I was delighted to see that both Andrea and Susan remember the Moon Spinners. I read it when I was probably just starting middle school. My mother had enrolled she and I in a book club. I can’t say, due to my youth I probably began to understand it but then re read it when I was older. After I finish a complex book such as, Code name: Lise by Larry Loftis or “In the Country of Women” by Susan Straight, I need a bit of lighter reading to re orient my mind. So I usually select what I call a bit of fluff. That’s not to say it’s not a good book or story but it just isn’t as heavy and thought provoking. That’s when I will choose a re read or a book that I know will have a happy ending.

    Reply
  62. I was delighted to see that both Andrea and Susan remember the Moon Spinners. I read it when I was probably just starting middle school. My mother had enrolled she and I in a book club. I can’t say, due to my youth I probably began to understand it but then re read it when I was older. After I finish a complex book such as, Code name: Lise by Larry Loftis or “In the Country of Women” by Susan Straight, I need a bit of lighter reading to re orient my mind. So I usually select what I call a bit of fluff. That’s not to say it’s not a good book or story but it just isn’t as heavy and thought provoking. That’s when I will choose a re read or a book that I know will have a happy ending.

    Reply
  63. I was delighted to see that both Andrea and Susan remember the Moon Spinners. I read it when I was probably just starting middle school. My mother had enrolled she and I in a book club. I can’t say, due to my youth I probably began to understand it but then re read it when I was older. After I finish a complex book such as, Code name: Lise by Larry Loftis or “In the Country of Women” by Susan Straight, I need a bit of lighter reading to re orient my mind. So I usually select what I call a bit of fluff. That’s not to say it’s not a good book or story but it just isn’t as heavy and thought provoking. That’s when I will choose a re read or a book that I know will have a happy ending.

    Reply
  64. I was delighted to see that both Andrea and Susan remember the Moon Spinners. I read it when I was probably just starting middle school. My mother had enrolled she and I in a book club. I can’t say, due to my youth I probably began to understand it but then re read it when I was older. After I finish a complex book such as, Code name: Lise by Larry Loftis or “In the Country of Women” by Susan Straight, I need a bit of lighter reading to re orient my mind. So I usually select what I call a bit of fluff. That’s not to say it’s not a good book or story but it just isn’t as heavy and thought provoking. That’s when I will choose a re read or a book that I know will have a happy ending.

    Reply
  65. I was delighted to see that both Andrea and Susan remember the Moon Spinners. I read it when I was probably just starting middle school. My mother had enrolled she and I in a book club. I can’t say, due to my youth I probably began to understand it but then re read it when I was older. After I finish a complex book such as, Code name: Lise by Larry Loftis or “In the Country of Women” by Susan Straight, I need a bit of lighter reading to re orient my mind. So I usually select what I call a bit of fluff. That’s not to say it’s not a good book or story but it just isn’t as heavy and thought provoking. That’s when I will choose a re read or a book that I know will have a happy ending.

    Reply
  66. I used to re-read more, because I ran out of new things I wanted to read. That is why have 7 large bookcases. Now I am downsizing to make room to move my computer downstairs, and realizing I will NEVER re-read most of the books. The library is getting all the hardbacked ones and Trade Paper in good condition. I guess I will just keep the battered ones in my remaining cases. So many old friends! Paperbacks under all my beds.

    Reply
  67. I used to re-read more, because I ran out of new things I wanted to read. That is why have 7 large bookcases. Now I am downsizing to make room to move my computer downstairs, and realizing I will NEVER re-read most of the books. The library is getting all the hardbacked ones and Trade Paper in good condition. I guess I will just keep the battered ones in my remaining cases. So many old friends! Paperbacks under all my beds.

    Reply
  68. I used to re-read more, because I ran out of new things I wanted to read. That is why have 7 large bookcases. Now I am downsizing to make room to move my computer downstairs, and realizing I will NEVER re-read most of the books. The library is getting all the hardbacked ones and Trade Paper in good condition. I guess I will just keep the battered ones in my remaining cases. So many old friends! Paperbacks under all my beds.

    Reply
  69. I used to re-read more, because I ran out of new things I wanted to read. That is why have 7 large bookcases. Now I am downsizing to make room to move my computer downstairs, and realizing I will NEVER re-read most of the books. The library is getting all the hardbacked ones and Trade Paper in good condition. I guess I will just keep the battered ones in my remaining cases. So many old friends! Paperbacks under all my beds.

    Reply
  70. I used to re-read more, because I ran out of new things I wanted to read. That is why have 7 large bookcases. Now I am downsizing to make room to move my computer downstairs, and realizing I will NEVER re-read most of the books. The library is getting all the hardbacked ones and Trade Paper in good condition. I guess I will just keep the battered ones in my remaining cases. So many old friends! Paperbacks under all my beds.

    Reply
  71. I do reread your books! Golden Girl, The American Duchess, and A Double Deception are in my “keepers” box, but most often No Dark Place and The Poisoned Serpent, 2 books I adore.

    Reply
  72. I do reread your books! Golden Girl, The American Duchess, and A Double Deception are in my “keepers” box, but most often No Dark Place and The Poisoned Serpent, 2 books I adore.

    Reply
  73. I do reread your books! Golden Girl, The American Duchess, and A Double Deception are in my “keepers” box, but most often No Dark Place and The Poisoned Serpent, 2 books I adore.

    Reply
  74. I do reread your books! Golden Girl, The American Duchess, and A Double Deception are in my “keepers” box, but most often No Dark Place and The Poisoned Serpent, 2 books I adore.

    Reply
  75. I do reread your books! Golden Girl, The American Duchess, and A Double Deception are in my “keepers” box, but most often No Dark Place and The Poisoned Serpent, 2 books I adore.

    Reply
  76. Often I go to a favorite re-read when I’ve finished a new read but am not quite ready for something else new. If the new read was sad or serious, Jennifer Crusie’ s Bet Me will always bring me back. Persuasion replaced Pride and Prejudice as my favorite Austen re-read when I hit my 50s, and is the ultimate comfort read. Busman’s Honeymoon must be re-read as soon as a re-read of Gaudy Night ends, which is at least annually. My husband tells everyone that I got through his recent health scare by depending on Anne’s “seasonal brides” (his term) – and he now remembers which cover is which, he saw them so often. And I am now re-reading Rosamunde Pilcher’s September, which happens about this time every year, when I begin yearning for Scotland. But my real soft spot must be the Christmas Regencies I re-read every year: The Last Chance Christmas Ball tops that list, followed closely by The Heart of Christmas and Christmas in the Duke’s Arms, and Jo Beverley’s Winter’s Fire, and the entire Christmas Revels series. I could continue, as there are many more, but I must go find out if there’s a new Lady Osbaldstone Christmas story coming out this year, before I re-reading the prior ones….

    Reply
  77. Often I go to a favorite re-read when I’ve finished a new read but am not quite ready for something else new. If the new read was sad or serious, Jennifer Crusie’ s Bet Me will always bring me back. Persuasion replaced Pride and Prejudice as my favorite Austen re-read when I hit my 50s, and is the ultimate comfort read. Busman’s Honeymoon must be re-read as soon as a re-read of Gaudy Night ends, which is at least annually. My husband tells everyone that I got through his recent health scare by depending on Anne’s “seasonal brides” (his term) – and he now remembers which cover is which, he saw them so often. And I am now re-reading Rosamunde Pilcher’s September, which happens about this time every year, when I begin yearning for Scotland. But my real soft spot must be the Christmas Regencies I re-read every year: The Last Chance Christmas Ball tops that list, followed closely by The Heart of Christmas and Christmas in the Duke’s Arms, and Jo Beverley’s Winter’s Fire, and the entire Christmas Revels series. I could continue, as there are many more, but I must go find out if there’s a new Lady Osbaldstone Christmas story coming out this year, before I re-reading the prior ones….

    Reply
  78. Often I go to a favorite re-read when I’ve finished a new read but am not quite ready for something else new. If the new read was sad or serious, Jennifer Crusie’ s Bet Me will always bring me back. Persuasion replaced Pride and Prejudice as my favorite Austen re-read when I hit my 50s, and is the ultimate comfort read. Busman’s Honeymoon must be re-read as soon as a re-read of Gaudy Night ends, which is at least annually. My husband tells everyone that I got through his recent health scare by depending on Anne’s “seasonal brides” (his term) – and he now remembers which cover is which, he saw them so often. And I am now re-reading Rosamunde Pilcher’s September, which happens about this time every year, when I begin yearning for Scotland. But my real soft spot must be the Christmas Regencies I re-read every year: The Last Chance Christmas Ball tops that list, followed closely by The Heart of Christmas and Christmas in the Duke’s Arms, and Jo Beverley’s Winter’s Fire, and the entire Christmas Revels series. I could continue, as there are many more, but I must go find out if there’s a new Lady Osbaldstone Christmas story coming out this year, before I re-reading the prior ones….

    Reply
  79. Often I go to a favorite re-read when I’ve finished a new read but am not quite ready for something else new. If the new read was sad or serious, Jennifer Crusie’ s Bet Me will always bring me back. Persuasion replaced Pride and Prejudice as my favorite Austen re-read when I hit my 50s, and is the ultimate comfort read. Busman’s Honeymoon must be re-read as soon as a re-read of Gaudy Night ends, which is at least annually. My husband tells everyone that I got through his recent health scare by depending on Anne’s “seasonal brides” (his term) – and he now remembers which cover is which, he saw them so often. And I am now re-reading Rosamunde Pilcher’s September, which happens about this time every year, when I begin yearning for Scotland. But my real soft spot must be the Christmas Regencies I re-read every year: The Last Chance Christmas Ball tops that list, followed closely by The Heart of Christmas and Christmas in the Duke’s Arms, and Jo Beverley’s Winter’s Fire, and the entire Christmas Revels series. I could continue, as there are many more, but I must go find out if there’s a new Lady Osbaldstone Christmas story coming out this year, before I re-reading the prior ones….

    Reply
  80. Often I go to a favorite re-read when I’ve finished a new read but am not quite ready for something else new. If the new read was sad or serious, Jennifer Crusie’ s Bet Me will always bring me back. Persuasion replaced Pride and Prejudice as my favorite Austen re-read when I hit my 50s, and is the ultimate comfort read. Busman’s Honeymoon must be re-read as soon as a re-read of Gaudy Night ends, which is at least annually. My husband tells everyone that I got through his recent health scare by depending on Anne’s “seasonal brides” (his term) – and he now remembers which cover is which, he saw them so often. And I am now re-reading Rosamunde Pilcher’s September, which happens about this time every year, when I begin yearning for Scotland. But my real soft spot must be the Christmas Regencies I re-read every year: The Last Chance Christmas Ball tops that list, followed closely by The Heart of Christmas and Christmas in the Duke’s Arms, and Jo Beverley’s Winter’s Fire, and the entire Christmas Revels series. I could continue, as there are many more, but I must go find out if there’s a new Lady Osbaldstone Christmas story coming out this year, before I re-reading the prior ones….

    Reply
  81. I’m definitely a re-reader. Right now I have 3 or 4 books that I re-read every 2-4 months. Then I have books that I re-read every year. Or every 18 months to a year. Other’s are on a longer re-read cycle.
    There are my comfort reads. The hmm, a new book in the series is coming out and I need to re-read the last book or two (which sometimes leads to re-reading the whole series) Then, there is always the DANG…nothing is working so let me re-read something that I know I enjoy reason.
    Other’s I read because they pop into my head and after a couple of pops they are demanding to be re-read.
    Or I start to rearrange books on the shelves and go, huh, I should re-read this again…..
    I read rather quickly and luckily don’t work so I have lots of time to read..new and “old” books..
    As to my re-read authors…so many authors have been mentioned that I have on my keeper shelves. Others are Anne McCaffrey, DE Stevenson, Trisha Ashley, James H Schmitz, Anna Jacobs (some of her series), MM Kaye, Lori Foster (especially Say No to Joe), Janet Chapman, Sharon Sala (Blessings and Gamblers daughter series), Jo Goodman, Carolyn Brown, Stephanie Laurens, Joan Wolf (all her Signet Regencies), Jennifer Ashley (Mackenzie series – especially The Madness of Lord Ian).
    Plus of course I have a number of individual, one off books that I love.
    Mostly I have paper copies because I love being able to pick the book up and find the part I was thinking about. Yes I’ll go back and read the whole thing but the particular part I was thinking of I read first. Kindle books…I haven’t a clue where in the book that spot is.
    I do read on kindle but not as much. A few books I’ve gotten on kindle and on paper.
    This was a really fun topic and thank you Kareni for asking the question.

    Reply
  82. I’m definitely a re-reader. Right now I have 3 or 4 books that I re-read every 2-4 months. Then I have books that I re-read every year. Or every 18 months to a year. Other’s are on a longer re-read cycle.
    There are my comfort reads. The hmm, a new book in the series is coming out and I need to re-read the last book or two (which sometimes leads to re-reading the whole series) Then, there is always the DANG…nothing is working so let me re-read something that I know I enjoy reason.
    Other’s I read because they pop into my head and after a couple of pops they are demanding to be re-read.
    Or I start to rearrange books on the shelves and go, huh, I should re-read this again…..
    I read rather quickly and luckily don’t work so I have lots of time to read..new and “old” books..
    As to my re-read authors…so many authors have been mentioned that I have on my keeper shelves. Others are Anne McCaffrey, DE Stevenson, Trisha Ashley, James H Schmitz, Anna Jacobs (some of her series), MM Kaye, Lori Foster (especially Say No to Joe), Janet Chapman, Sharon Sala (Blessings and Gamblers daughter series), Jo Goodman, Carolyn Brown, Stephanie Laurens, Joan Wolf (all her Signet Regencies), Jennifer Ashley (Mackenzie series – especially The Madness of Lord Ian).
    Plus of course I have a number of individual, one off books that I love.
    Mostly I have paper copies because I love being able to pick the book up and find the part I was thinking about. Yes I’ll go back and read the whole thing but the particular part I was thinking of I read first. Kindle books…I haven’t a clue where in the book that spot is.
    I do read on kindle but not as much. A few books I’ve gotten on kindle and on paper.
    This was a really fun topic and thank you Kareni for asking the question.

    Reply
  83. I’m definitely a re-reader. Right now I have 3 or 4 books that I re-read every 2-4 months. Then I have books that I re-read every year. Or every 18 months to a year. Other’s are on a longer re-read cycle.
    There are my comfort reads. The hmm, a new book in the series is coming out and I need to re-read the last book or two (which sometimes leads to re-reading the whole series) Then, there is always the DANG…nothing is working so let me re-read something that I know I enjoy reason.
    Other’s I read because they pop into my head and after a couple of pops they are demanding to be re-read.
    Or I start to rearrange books on the shelves and go, huh, I should re-read this again…..
    I read rather quickly and luckily don’t work so I have lots of time to read..new and “old” books..
    As to my re-read authors…so many authors have been mentioned that I have on my keeper shelves. Others are Anne McCaffrey, DE Stevenson, Trisha Ashley, James H Schmitz, Anna Jacobs (some of her series), MM Kaye, Lori Foster (especially Say No to Joe), Janet Chapman, Sharon Sala (Blessings and Gamblers daughter series), Jo Goodman, Carolyn Brown, Stephanie Laurens, Joan Wolf (all her Signet Regencies), Jennifer Ashley (Mackenzie series – especially The Madness of Lord Ian).
    Plus of course I have a number of individual, one off books that I love.
    Mostly I have paper copies because I love being able to pick the book up and find the part I was thinking about. Yes I’ll go back and read the whole thing but the particular part I was thinking of I read first. Kindle books…I haven’t a clue where in the book that spot is.
    I do read on kindle but not as much. A few books I’ve gotten on kindle and on paper.
    This was a really fun topic and thank you Kareni for asking the question.

    Reply
  84. I’m definitely a re-reader. Right now I have 3 or 4 books that I re-read every 2-4 months. Then I have books that I re-read every year. Or every 18 months to a year. Other’s are on a longer re-read cycle.
    There are my comfort reads. The hmm, a new book in the series is coming out and I need to re-read the last book or two (which sometimes leads to re-reading the whole series) Then, there is always the DANG…nothing is working so let me re-read something that I know I enjoy reason.
    Other’s I read because they pop into my head and after a couple of pops they are demanding to be re-read.
    Or I start to rearrange books on the shelves and go, huh, I should re-read this again…..
    I read rather quickly and luckily don’t work so I have lots of time to read..new and “old” books..
    As to my re-read authors…so many authors have been mentioned that I have on my keeper shelves. Others are Anne McCaffrey, DE Stevenson, Trisha Ashley, James H Schmitz, Anna Jacobs (some of her series), MM Kaye, Lori Foster (especially Say No to Joe), Janet Chapman, Sharon Sala (Blessings and Gamblers daughter series), Jo Goodman, Carolyn Brown, Stephanie Laurens, Joan Wolf (all her Signet Regencies), Jennifer Ashley (Mackenzie series – especially The Madness of Lord Ian).
    Plus of course I have a number of individual, one off books that I love.
    Mostly I have paper copies because I love being able to pick the book up and find the part I was thinking about. Yes I’ll go back and read the whole thing but the particular part I was thinking of I read first. Kindle books…I haven’t a clue where in the book that spot is.
    I do read on kindle but not as much. A few books I’ve gotten on kindle and on paper.
    This was a really fun topic and thank you Kareni for asking the question.

    Reply
  85. I’m definitely a re-reader. Right now I have 3 or 4 books that I re-read every 2-4 months. Then I have books that I re-read every year. Or every 18 months to a year. Other’s are on a longer re-read cycle.
    There are my comfort reads. The hmm, a new book in the series is coming out and I need to re-read the last book or two (which sometimes leads to re-reading the whole series) Then, there is always the DANG…nothing is working so let me re-read something that I know I enjoy reason.
    Other’s I read because they pop into my head and after a couple of pops they are demanding to be re-read.
    Or I start to rearrange books on the shelves and go, huh, I should re-read this again…..
    I read rather quickly and luckily don’t work so I have lots of time to read..new and “old” books..
    As to my re-read authors…so many authors have been mentioned that I have on my keeper shelves. Others are Anne McCaffrey, DE Stevenson, Trisha Ashley, James H Schmitz, Anna Jacobs (some of her series), MM Kaye, Lori Foster (especially Say No to Joe), Janet Chapman, Sharon Sala (Blessings and Gamblers daughter series), Jo Goodman, Carolyn Brown, Stephanie Laurens, Joan Wolf (all her Signet Regencies), Jennifer Ashley (Mackenzie series – especially The Madness of Lord Ian).
    Plus of course I have a number of individual, one off books that I love.
    Mostly I have paper copies because I love being able to pick the book up and find the part I was thinking about. Yes I’ll go back and read the whole thing but the particular part I was thinking of I read first. Kindle books…I haven’t a clue where in the book that spot is.
    I do read on kindle but not as much. A few books I’ve gotten on kindle and on paper.
    This was a really fun topic and thank you Kareni for asking the question.

    Reply
  86. I’m most definitely a re reader. Like Anne books were hard to come by when I was young and so I was constantly re reading all the Enid Blyton books that I had. Those books kept me sane. I still re read those books and just went through a run of them. I have also re read Bluebirds by Margaret Mayhew numerous times and Sophia’s Secret by Susanna Kearsley. Books that make me feel good when life is not running smoothly.
    This was a great post and thanks to it I’ve discovered Patricia Veryan.

    Reply
  87. I’m most definitely a re reader. Like Anne books were hard to come by when I was young and so I was constantly re reading all the Enid Blyton books that I had. Those books kept me sane. I still re read those books and just went through a run of them. I have also re read Bluebirds by Margaret Mayhew numerous times and Sophia’s Secret by Susanna Kearsley. Books that make me feel good when life is not running smoothly.
    This was a great post and thanks to it I’ve discovered Patricia Veryan.

    Reply
  88. I’m most definitely a re reader. Like Anne books were hard to come by when I was young and so I was constantly re reading all the Enid Blyton books that I had. Those books kept me sane. I still re read those books and just went through a run of them. I have also re read Bluebirds by Margaret Mayhew numerous times and Sophia’s Secret by Susanna Kearsley. Books that make me feel good when life is not running smoothly.
    This was a great post and thanks to it I’ve discovered Patricia Veryan.

    Reply
  89. I’m most definitely a re reader. Like Anne books were hard to come by when I was young and so I was constantly re reading all the Enid Blyton books that I had. Those books kept me sane. I still re read those books and just went through a run of them. I have also re read Bluebirds by Margaret Mayhew numerous times and Sophia’s Secret by Susanna Kearsley. Books that make me feel good when life is not running smoothly.
    This was a great post and thanks to it I’ve discovered Patricia Veryan.

    Reply
  90. I’m most definitely a re reader. Like Anne books were hard to come by when I was young and so I was constantly re reading all the Enid Blyton books that I had. Those books kept me sane. I still re read those books and just went through a run of them. I have also re read Bluebirds by Margaret Mayhew numerous times and Sophia’s Secret by Susanna Kearsley. Books that make me feel good when life is not running smoothly.
    This was a great post and thanks to it I’ve discovered Patricia Veryan.

    Reply
  91. That’s hard to answer. I would say rather that I find much current writing does not satisfy; it lacks the complexity that I enjoy, and seems to have less attention to the way words sound – as if the author were fighting to scramble down facts for an exam, rather than attempting to arouse deep feeling and empathy in the reader. I find it flat and uninteresting much of the time. So I do return to my shelf of “classics” – and have done for a long time. I have an eye out for new authors of interest to me and once in a while I find one 🙂

    Reply
  92. That’s hard to answer. I would say rather that I find much current writing does not satisfy; it lacks the complexity that I enjoy, and seems to have less attention to the way words sound – as if the author were fighting to scramble down facts for an exam, rather than attempting to arouse deep feeling and empathy in the reader. I find it flat and uninteresting much of the time. So I do return to my shelf of “classics” – and have done for a long time. I have an eye out for new authors of interest to me and once in a while I find one 🙂

    Reply
  93. That’s hard to answer. I would say rather that I find much current writing does not satisfy; it lacks the complexity that I enjoy, and seems to have less attention to the way words sound – as if the author were fighting to scramble down facts for an exam, rather than attempting to arouse deep feeling and empathy in the reader. I find it flat and uninteresting much of the time. So I do return to my shelf of “classics” – and have done for a long time. I have an eye out for new authors of interest to me and once in a while I find one 🙂

    Reply
  94. That’s hard to answer. I would say rather that I find much current writing does not satisfy; it lacks the complexity that I enjoy, and seems to have less attention to the way words sound – as if the author were fighting to scramble down facts for an exam, rather than attempting to arouse deep feeling and empathy in the reader. I find it flat and uninteresting much of the time. So I do return to my shelf of “classics” – and have done for a long time. I have an eye out for new authors of interest to me and once in a while I find one 🙂

    Reply
  95. That’s hard to answer. I would say rather that I find much current writing does not satisfy; it lacks the complexity that I enjoy, and seems to have less attention to the way words sound – as if the author were fighting to scramble down facts for an exam, rather than attempting to arouse deep feeling and empathy in the reader. I find it flat and uninteresting much of the time. So I do return to my shelf of “classics” – and have done for a long time. I have an eye out for new authors of interest to me and once in a while I find one 🙂

    Reply
  96. I LOVE re-listening to the Mrs. Pollifax, Southern Sisters, Dick Francis, Rosamunde Pilcher books on audiobooks. Most audiobooks are not ones I’d relisten to but those…yep. Every winter I listen to Winter Solstice.

    Reply
  97. I LOVE re-listening to the Mrs. Pollifax, Southern Sisters, Dick Francis, Rosamunde Pilcher books on audiobooks. Most audiobooks are not ones I’d relisten to but those…yep. Every winter I listen to Winter Solstice.

    Reply
  98. I LOVE re-listening to the Mrs. Pollifax, Southern Sisters, Dick Francis, Rosamunde Pilcher books on audiobooks. Most audiobooks are not ones I’d relisten to but those…yep. Every winter I listen to Winter Solstice.

    Reply
  99. I LOVE re-listening to the Mrs. Pollifax, Southern Sisters, Dick Francis, Rosamunde Pilcher books on audiobooks. Most audiobooks are not ones I’d relisten to but those…yep. Every winter I listen to Winter Solstice.

    Reply
  100. I LOVE re-listening to the Mrs. Pollifax, Southern Sisters, Dick Francis, Rosamunde Pilcher books on audiobooks. Most audiobooks are not ones I’d relisten to but those…yep. Every winter I listen to Winter Solstice.

    Reply
  101. Re reader all the way! There are shelves in my bookcase devoted to books I have read multiple times – Blue Castle (Montgomery), Getting Rid of Bradley (Crusie), HeartMate (Owens), my favourite historicals (Anne’s), all of Ibbotson’s I’ve been able to find, vampires, steampunk, werewolves , I love to reread and get that giddy feeling of anticipation that comes with knowing the good things that are about to happen. I talk out loud to the characters! “You think that now but just you wait”!!!! Love this topic as you can probably tell!!

    Reply
  102. Re reader all the way! There are shelves in my bookcase devoted to books I have read multiple times – Blue Castle (Montgomery), Getting Rid of Bradley (Crusie), HeartMate (Owens), my favourite historicals (Anne’s), all of Ibbotson’s I’ve been able to find, vampires, steampunk, werewolves , I love to reread and get that giddy feeling of anticipation that comes with knowing the good things that are about to happen. I talk out loud to the characters! “You think that now but just you wait”!!!! Love this topic as you can probably tell!!

    Reply
  103. Re reader all the way! There are shelves in my bookcase devoted to books I have read multiple times – Blue Castle (Montgomery), Getting Rid of Bradley (Crusie), HeartMate (Owens), my favourite historicals (Anne’s), all of Ibbotson’s I’ve been able to find, vampires, steampunk, werewolves , I love to reread and get that giddy feeling of anticipation that comes with knowing the good things that are about to happen. I talk out loud to the characters! “You think that now but just you wait”!!!! Love this topic as you can probably tell!!

    Reply
  104. Re reader all the way! There are shelves in my bookcase devoted to books I have read multiple times – Blue Castle (Montgomery), Getting Rid of Bradley (Crusie), HeartMate (Owens), my favourite historicals (Anne’s), all of Ibbotson’s I’ve been able to find, vampires, steampunk, werewolves , I love to reread and get that giddy feeling of anticipation that comes with knowing the good things that are about to happen. I talk out loud to the characters! “You think that now but just you wait”!!!! Love this topic as you can probably tell!!

    Reply
  105. Re reader all the way! There are shelves in my bookcase devoted to books I have read multiple times – Blue Castle (Montgomery), Getting Rid of Bradley (Crusie), HeartMate (Owens), my favourite historicals (Anne’s), all of Ibbotson’s I’ve been able to find, vampires, steampunk, werewolves , I love to reread and get that giddy feeling of anticipation that comes with knowing the good things that are about to happen. I talk out loud to the characters! “You think that now but just you wait”!!!! Love this topic as you can probably tell!!

    Reply
  106. Once upon a time, I figured there were too many unread books out there for me to waste time rereading. But this past year (it’s more than a year by now, isn’t it?) I’ve wanted a guaranteed good feeling read to help me get to sleep and have pleasant dreams, so I’ve been doing a lot of rereading. Sometimes I feel up to a bit of angst or a tug at the heartstrings, as long as I know how it comes out, but sometimes I want FLUFF! PURE FLUFF!

    Reply
  107. Once upon a time, I figured there were too many unread books out there for me to waste time rereading. But this past year (it’s more than a year by now, isn’t it?) I’ve wanted a guaranteed good feeling read to help me get to sleep and have pleasant dreams, so I’ve been doing a lot of rereading. Sometimes I feel up to a bit of angst or a tug at the heartstrings, as long as I know how it comes out, but sometimes I want FLUFF! PURE FLUFF!

    Reply
  108. Once upon a time, I figured there were too many unread books out there for me to waste time rereading. But this past year (it’s more than a year by now, isn’t it?) I’ve wanted a guaranteed good feeling read to help me get to sleep and have pleasant dreams, so I’ve been doing a lot of rereading. Sometimes I feel up to a bit of angst or a tug at the heartstrings, as long as I know how it comes out, but sometimes I want FLUFF! PURE FLUFF!

    Reply
  109. Once upon a time, I figured there were too many unread books out there for me to waste time rereading. But this past year (it’s more than a year by now, isn’t it?) I’ve wanted a guaranteed good feeling read to help me get to sleep and have pleasant dreams, so I’ve been doing a lot of rereading. Sometimes I feel up to a bit of angst or a tug at the heartstrings, as long as I know how it comes out, but sometimes I want FLUFF! PURE FLUFF!

    Reply
  110. Once upon a time, I figured there were too many unread books out there for me to waste time rereading. But this past year (it’s more than a year by now, isn’t it?) I’ve wanted a guaranteed good feeling read to help me get to sleep and have pleasant dreams, so I’ve been doing a lot of rereading. Sometimes I feel up to a bit of angst or a tug at the heartstrings, as long as I know how it comes out, but sometimes I want FLUFF! PURE FLUFF!

    Reply
  111. “…a guaranteed good feeling read” really says it all, Lil. While I love discovering a new wonderful book, sometimes I want a guarantee that I WILL get a good read.

    Reply
  112. “…a guaranteed good feeling read” really says it all, Lil. While I love discovering a new wonderful book, sometimes I want a guarantee that I WILL get a good read.

    Reply
  113. “…a guaranteed good feeling read” really says it all, Lil. While I love discovering a new wonderful book, sometimes I want a guarantee that I WILL get a good read.

    Reply
  114. “…a guaranteed good feeling read” really says it all, Lil. While I love discovering a new wonderful book, sometimes I want a guarantee that I WILL get a good read.

    Reply
  115. “…a guaranteed good feeling read” really says it all, Lil. While I love discovering a new wonderful book, sometimes I want a guarantee that I WILL get a good read.

    Reply
  116. I always have been a re-reader. I get something new each time. When I first get a new book from a beloved Author I almost gulp the story down. Re-reading lets me savor the story more.
    When a new book in a series is coming out, I re-read the whole series before starting the new book. I love it because some series feel like a really long book with different chapters. And each time I add aother “chapter” the book gets longer! 😀

    Reply
  117. I always have been a re-reader. I get something new each time. When I first get a new book from a beloved Author I almost gulp the story down. Re-reading lets me savor the story more.
    When a new book in a series is coming out, I re-read the whole series before starting the new book. I love it because some series feel like a really long book with different chapters. And each time I add aother “chapter” the book gets longer! 😀

    Reply
  118. I always have been a re-reader. I get something new each time. When I first get a new book from a beloved Author I almost gulp the story down. Re-reading lets me savor the story more.
    When a new book in a series is coming out, I re-read the whole series before starting the new book. I love it because some series feel like a really long book with different chapters. And each time I add aother “chapter” the book gets longer! 😀

    Reply
  119. I always have been a re-reader. I get something new each time. When I first get a new book from a beloved Author I almost gulp the story down. Re-reading lets me savor the story more.
    When a new book in a series is coming out, I re-read the whole series before starting the new book. I love it because some series feel like a really long book with different chapters. And each time I add aother “chapter” the book gets longer! 😀

    Reply
  120. I always have been a re-reader. I get something new each time. When I first get a new book from a beloved Author I almost gulp the story down. Re-reading lets me savor the story more.
    When a new book in a series is coming out, I re-read the whole series before starting the new book. I love it because some series feel like a really long book with different chapters. And each time I add aother “chapter” the book gets longer! 😀

    Reply
  121. I rarely re-read. There are so many new authors and books to explore, that treading old ground seems rather boring. An exception is when a print book that I DNF’d comes out in audio with a narrator that I like. Then I will sometimes give it another chance. A recent example was Virginia Woolf’s ‘Mrs Dalloway’. Reading the print version long ago it seemed to have no plot to speak of and was a string of rather pointless observations in Clarissa Dalloway’s day (the suicide was an exception!). However the narration by Kristin Scott Thomas brought the book to life. The rather poetical stream of consciousness style was totally absorbing. Reminded me of a walk in the English countryside with changeable weather patterns …. bright and sunny one moment, gathering cloud patterns next, then spots of rain followed by a rainbow… and so on. I will now try more of Woolf’s work!

    Reply
  122. I rarely re-read. There are so many new authors and books to explore, that treading old ground seems rather boring. An exception is when a print book that I DNF’d comes out in audio with a narrator that I like. Then I will sometimes give it another chance. A recent example was Virginia Woolf’s ‘Mrs Dalloway’. Reading the print version long ago it seemed to have no plot to speak of and was a string of rather pointless observations in Clarissa Dalloway’s day (the suicide was an exception!). However the narration by Kristin Scott Thomas brought the book to life. The rather poetical stream of consciousness style was totally absorbing. Reminded me of a walk in the English countryside with changeable weather patterns …. bright and sunny one moment, gathering cloud patterns next, then spots of rain followed by a rainbow… and so on. I will now try more of Woolf’s work!

    Reply
  123. I rarely re-read. There are so many new authors and books to explore, that treading old ground seems rather boring. An exception is when a print book that I DNF’d comes out in audio with a narrator that I like. Then I will sometimes give it another chance. A recent example was Virginia Woolf’s ‘Mrs Dalloway’. Reading the print version long ago it seemed to have no plot to speak of and was a string of rather pointless observations in Clarissa Dalloway’s day (the suicide was an exception!). However the narration by Kristin Scott Thomas brought the book to life. The rather poetical stream of consciousness style was totally absorbing. Reminded me of a walk in the English countryside with changeable weather patterns …. bright and sunny one moment, gathering cloud patterns next, then spots of rain followed by a rainbow… and so on. I will now try more of Woolf’s work!

    Reply
  124. I rarely re-read. There are so many new authors and books to explore, that treading old ground seems rather boring. An exception is when a print book that I DNF’d comes out in audio with a narrator that I like. Then I will sometimes give it another chance. A recent example was Virginia Woolf’s ‘Mrs Dalloway’. Reading the print version long ago it seemed to have no plot to speak of and was a string of rather pointless observations in Clarissa Dalloway’s day (the suicide was an exception!). However the narration by Kristin Scott Thomas brought the book to life. The rather poetical stream of consciousness style was totally absorbing. Reminded me of a walk in the English countryside with changeable weather patterns …. bright and sunny one moment, gathering cloud patterns next, then spots of rain followed by a rainbow… and so on. I will now try more of Woolf’s work!

    Reply
  125. I rarely re-read. There are so many new authors and books to explore, that treading old ground seems rather boring. An exception is when a print book that I DNF’d comes out in audio with a narrator that I like. Then I will sometimes give it another chance. A recent example was Virginia Woolf’s ‘Mrs Dalloway’. Reading the print version long ago it seemed to have no plot to speak of and was a string of rather pointless observations in Clarissa Dalloway’s day (the suicide was an exception!). However the narration by Kristin Scott Thomas brought the book to life. The rather poetical stream of consciousness style was totally absorbing. Reminded me of a walk in the English countryside with changeable weather patterns …. bright and sunny one moment, gathering cloud patterns next, then spots of rain followed by a rainbow… and so on. I will now try more of Woolf’s work!

    Reply
  126. Understood. Modern books are equivalent to modern clothes–simple with little structure and yawn… unless an author has a talent for that sort of thing.

    Reply
  127. Understood. Modern books are equivalent to modern clothes–simple with little structure and yawn… unless an author has a talent for that sort of thing.

    Reply
  128. Understood. Modern books are equivalent to modern clothes–simple with little structure and yawn… unless an author has a talent for that sort of thing.

    Reply
  129. Understood. Modern books are equivalent to modern clothes–simple with little structure and yawn… unless an author has a talent for that sort of thing.

    Reply
  130. Understood. Modern books are equivalent to modern clothes–simple with little structure and yawn… unless an author has a talent for that sort of thing.

    Reply
  131. Oh, I’m so glad you discovered Veryan! She’s a true gem.
    We didn’t have many books when I was a kid and the ones we had tended to be plays by dead Russians or Reader’s Digest box sets which I’d reluctantly re-read when desperate. You may be on to something there.

    Reply
  132. Oh, I’m so glad you discovered Veryan! She’s a true gem.
    We didn’t have many books when I was a kid and the ones we had tended to be plays by dead Russians or Reader’s Digest box sets which I’d reluctantly re-read when desperate. You may be on to something there.

    Reply
  133. Oh, I’m so glad you discovered Veryan! She’s a true gem.
    We didn’t have many books when I was a kid and the ones we had tended to be plays by dead Russians or Reader’s Digest box sets which I’d reluctantly re-read when desperate. You may be on to something there.

    Reply
  134. Oh, I’m so glad you discovered Veryan! She’s a true gem.
    We didn’t have many books when I was a kid and the ones we had tended to be plays by dead Russians or Reader’s Digest box sets which I’d reluctantly re-read when desperate. You may be on to something there.

    Reply
  135. Oh, I’m so glad you discovered Veryan! She’s a true gem.
    We didn’t have many books when I was a kid and the ones we had tended to be plays by dead Russians or Reader’s Digest box sets which I’d reluctantly re-read when desperate. You may be on to something there.

    Reply
  136. What a joy to read this and recognize so many of the authors I started reading and collecting so long ago! Mary Stewart, Daphne du Maurier, Anya Seton, Elizabeth Peters – the list goes on. I also saved and re-read Rosamund Pilcher and several of my favorite mystery series – the ones in which I care about the recurring characters and what happens to them. The Bridgerton TV series caused me to get out my Julia Quinns again; the show was amazing but reading those sparkling books is the best! My most re-read books are the Outlander series: I used to reread the whole series just prior to the release of each new title – and I reread the whole thing again during quarantine. Thank you, Wenches, for all of your wonderful books and these blogs as well!

    Reply
  137. What a joy to read this and recognize so many of the authors I started reading and collecting so long ago! Mary Stewart, Daphne du Maurier, Anya Seton, Elizabeth Peters – the list goes on. I also saved and re-read Rosamund Pilcher and several of my favorite mystery series – the ones in which I care about the recurring characters and what happens to them. The Bridgerton TV series caused me to get out my Julia Quinns again; the show was amazing but reading those sparkling books is the best! My most re-read books are the Outlander series: I used to reread the whole series just prior to the release of each new title – and I reread the whole thing again during quarantine. Thank you, Wenches, for all of your wonderful books and these blogs as well!

    Reply
  138. What a joy to read this and recognize so many of the authors I started reading and collecting so long ago! Mary Stewart, Daphne du Maurier, Anya Seton, Elizabeth Peters – the list goes on. I also saved and re-read Rosamund Pilcher and several of my favorite mystery series – the ones in which I care about the recurring characters and what happens to them. The Bridgerton TV series caused me to get out my Julia Quinns again; the show was amazing but reading those sparkling books is the best! My most re-read books are the Outlander series: I used to reread the whole series just prior to the release of each new title – and I reread the whole thing again during quarantine. Thank you, Wenches, for all of your wonderful books and these blogs as well!

    Reply
  139. What a joy to read this and recognize so many of the authors I started reading and collecting so long ago! Mary Stewart, Daphne du Maurier, Anya Seton, Elizabeth Peters – the list goes on. I also saved and re-read Rosamund Pilcher and several of my favorite mystery series – the ones in which I care about the recurring characters and what happens to them. The Bridgerton TV series caused me to get out my Julia Quinns again; the show was amazing but reading those sparkling books is the best! My most re-read books are the Outlander series: I used to reread the whole series just prior to the release of each new title – and I reread the whole thing again during quarantine. Thank you, Wenches, for all of your wonderful books and these blogs as well!

    Reply
  140. What a joy to read this and recognize so many of the authors I started reading and collecting so long ago! Mary Stewart, Daphne du Maurier, Anya Seton, Elizabeth Peters – the list goes on. I also saved and re-read Rosamund Pilcher and several of my favorite mystery series – the ones in which I care about the recurring characters and what happens to them. The Bridgerton TV series caused me to get out my Julia Quinns again; the show was amazing but reading those sparkling books is the best! My most re-read books are the Outlander series: I used to reread the whole series just prior to the release of each new title – and I reread the whole thing again during quarantine. Thank you, Wenches, for all of your wonderful books and these blogs as well!

    Reply
  141. I love Charlotte Louise Dolan and I wish she had done more than just the seve I’m aware of (plus a few novelettes). She deserves to be better known than she is.

    Reply
  142. I love Charlotte Louise Dolan and I wish she had done more than just the seve I’m aware of (plus a few novelettes). She deserves to be better known than she is.

    Reply
  143. I love Charlotte Louise Dolan and I wish she had done more than just the seve I’m aware of (plus a few novelettes). She deserves to be better known than she is.

    Reply
  144. I love Charlotte Louise Dolan and I wish she had done more than just the seve I’m aware of (plus a few novelettes). She deserves to be better known than she is.

    Reply
  145. I love Charlotte Louise Dolan and I wish she had done more than just the seve I’m aware of (plus a few novelettes). She deserves to be better known than she is.

    Reply
  146. Nicola, Thank you so very much for mentioning Alice Chetwynd Ley. I loved her books and still do, but had forgotten her name…I guess I’m getting old! I went to Amazon and bought them for my kindle and will be re-reading all of them!

    Reply
  147. Nicola, Thank you so very much for mentioning Alice Chetwynd Ley. I loved her books and still do, but had forgotten her name…I guess I’m getting old! I went to Amazon and bought them for my kindle and will be re-reading all of them!

    Reply
  148. Nicola, Thank you so very much for mentioning Alice Chetwynd Ley. I loved her books and still do, but had forgotten her name…I guess I’m getting old! I went to Amazon and bought them for my kindle and will be re-reading all of them!

    Reply
  149. Nicola, Thank you so very much for mentioning Alice Chetwynd Ley. I loved her books and still do, but had forgotten her name…I guess I’m getting old! I went to Amazon and bought them for my kindle and will be re-reading all of them!

    Reply
  150. Nicola, Thank you so very much for mentioning Alice Chetwynd Ley. I loved her books and still do, but had forgotten her name…I guess I’m getting old! I went to Amazon and bought them for my kindle and will be re-reading all of them!

    Reply
  151. Oh, I’m so pleased you’ve re-found Alice, Linnea! I love her books and am thrilled they have re-published them in e-book form. Happy reading!

    Reply
  152. Oh, I’m so pleased you’ve re-found Alice, Linnea! I love her books and am thrilled they have re-published them in e-book form. Happy reading!

    Reply
  153. Oh, I’m so pleased you’ve re-found Alice, Linnea! I love her books and am thrilled they have re-published them in e-book form. Happy reading!

    Reply
  154. Oh, I’m so pleased you’ve re-found Alice, Linnea! I love her books and am thrilled they have re-published them in e-book form. Happy reading!

    Reply
  155. Oh, I’m so pleased you’ve re-found Alice, Linnea! I love her books and am thrilled they have re-published them in e-book form. Happy reading!

    Reply

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