AAW — Comfort reads

AAWGraphicAnne here, hosting Ask-A-Wench for this month and today the question we're answering is "What are your 'comfort reads?' — the books you turn to when you're ill or tired, or it's a cold, wet, miserable day and you want to curl up with an 'old friend' of a book. This question sparked a conversation between the wenches, as we went back and forth talking of this writer and that.

In general, my comfort reads tend to be writers like Georgette Heyer and Eva Venetia
Ibbotson. I really enjoy plunging back into those familiar worlds and revisiting beloved characters. I still get a chuckle out of Ferdy and Gil and the Nemesis discussion in Friday's Child, or the Pel and Pom conversation in the street, followed by the search for Pom's aunt's brooch in The Convenient Marriage

I ache for the noble heroes in Eva Ibbotson's stories and cheer the heroines on, and smile knowingly to myself when Guy Farne arranges a proper haircut for the heroine in Magic Flutes, or Rupert in The Countess Below Stairs forbids Anna to cut her hair because he "must have something." It's all about subtext in those books.

I've also reread Linda Howard's McKenzie's Mountain a heap of times, Elizabeth Lowell's medievals and Amanda Quick/JAK's stories. But I also enjoy non-romantic reads, like Dick Francis's crime books — Whip Hand is a favorite, as is Decider, and also Risk — most of them, really. And occasionally I'll turn to P.G.Wodehouse or Terry Pratchett for a chuckle. I reread a lot — books for me are like old friends and I like to revisit those worlds and characters. 

HarrisWhatAngelsFearJoanna said: When I'm troubled, I'll go to mysteries.  The intellectual puzzle and the certainty of a solution comfort me.  Agatha Christie.  Patricia Wentworth.  Dorothy Sayers.  Or any of the recent cozy mystery writers.  And C.S. Harris who writes mysteries set in the Regency period.  I also have a particular fondness for C.S. Lewis' Narnia series and the books set in the land of Oz.  Nothing really bad can happen in those countries.  Nora Roberts gives me this same assurance in her Romances, especially the fantasy, magical ones.  Sometimes we need a vacation from reality.

Cara/Andrea: I definitely have "go-to" comfort reads. Mary Stewart is a real favorite,  especially The Moonspinners and This Rough Magic. I also adore  Elizabeth Peters's Amelia Peabody series, with Crocodile on the Sandbank and Children of the Storm, my top picks. And then there is, of course, Jane Austen. Pride and Prejudice and Persuasion always soothe the soul. Moonspinners

Anne poking nose in again:  Ohh, yes to Mary Stewart as a comfort read. My faves are Madam Will You Talk and Nine Coaches Waiting. I have a theory that every romance writer who's ever written a hero  called Raoul is a Mary Stewart fan. There are those of us who write Regency era where it's difficult, but  I suspect Joanna could fit in a Raoulish hero… And I adore Peabody and Emerson in Crocodile on the Sandbank.

Joanna jumped back in, saying: Yes, yes, yes! Mary Stewart is definitely a comfort read. I go for The Moonspinners and This Rough Magic

Susan agrees: My favorite comfort read by far is Mary Stewart — though a favorite book within that group of favorites isn't easy to choose! Moonspinners, Wildfire at Midnight, My Brother MichaelThe Gabriel Hounds — I love them all. When I'm laid up with a cold or flu, or if I really need an escape, I go straight to the Mary Stewart shelf. As a reader I'm comforted, and as a writer, I learn something with every reading about lyricism, description, subtle characterization, and understated, compelling heroes.  

PrinceofmidnightOther comfort reads — Elizabeth Peters/Barbara Michaels; Josephine Tey's Daughter of Time; Prince of Midnight by Laura Kinsale; and my comfort-classic is Jane Eyre.  A comfort read for me is a novel that brings back that first, fresh feeling of discovery and joy in story and voice, helping me feel good no matter what.

Mary Jo said: When I'm stressed out on deadline and need to read something familiar and beloved, my default is SFF:  Lois McMaster Bujold's Vorkosigan books, especially MEMORY, KOMARR, and A CIVIL CAMPAIGN.  Her CURSE OF CHALION — love, love, LOVE that story.  Chalion

Sharon Shinn's Thirteen Houses series, especially READER AND RAELYNX.  Catherine Asaro's Skolian series, especially SPHERICAL HARMONICS (which I just reread, as a matter of fact.)  All strong stories with strong characters and satisfying endings.    But reading all these comments is making me want to reach for a Mary Stewart!  It's been too long since I read MADAM, WILL YOU TALK.…   and THE IVY TREE.  Sigh…..

Pat said: I'm probably not a good person for the comfort read blog. The only book I've ever re-read is Pride and Prejudice, because I read it first when I was very young and needed to refresh my memory. There are just way too many new books to drool over for me to be tempted to go back to something where I have some chance of remembering how it ends. 

LastHawkJo Beverley said: 
Comfort reads come in two categories for me. One is the old favourites that are 
guaranteed to take me to familiar content. Heyer is in there, and in a recent 
re-read I particularly enjoyed The Reluctant Widow. Like Mary Jo, some SF and fantasy fits. I too love Bujold's Curse of Chalion. My favourite Asaro is The Last Hawk. I have some Sharon Lee and Steven Miller favourites, and one of those is Local Custom. Very much a romance, and with characters struggling with rules and honor, which always appeals.

The other category is, well, categories. 
When I'm wanting both a new book and a comfort read, I'll go to the library and 
try a mystery. I think that's because they're an emotionally safer read. I 
avoid the sort of mystery writers — too many of them these days IMO — who 
want to explore the darkest aspects of the human psyche. I want a puzzle, a 
good range of characters, and a clever but convincing solution.

* Nicola is away on a well-deserved break, hopefully curled up somewhere lovely, possibly on a boat, with fine company and a good book.

So what about you? Are you are rereader of favorite books? Or is once mostly enough for you? What are your comfort reads? Let's share.

 

180 thoughts on “AAW — Comfort reads”

  1. You’ve mentioned almost all my comfort reads – Georgette Heyer, Mary Stewart, and Josephine Tey are my first resort, and I also love tried-and-trusted mysteries including the Dick Francis books. I also read my favourite children’s books, by Malcolm Saville and Monica Edwards.
    I love C.S. Harris Sebastien St Cyr series, but they don’t fall into the category of “comfort read” because I haven’t re-read them yet! And that is the essence of a comfort read for me – a book I love and have re-read frequently, so that the characters are like old friends.
    I am fascinated by those who don’t re-read, like Pat. Do you not keep any books, then? For me, one way in which I know I like a book when I first read it is thinking that I will want to re-read it at some point. And the really good books reveal more and more as I re-read.
    That may be a function of how I read – I think I read a book for the first time far too quickly, because I want to find out what happens. On a re-read I can “stop and stare” a little. Also, I don’t tend to remember in detail books I’ve only read once, so I will enjoy re-reading them even if I don’t remember exactly what happens.

    Reply
  2. You’ve mentioned almost all my comfort reads – Georgette Heyer, Mary Stewart, and Josephine Tey are my first resort, and I also love tried-and-trusted mysteries including the Dick Francis books. I also read my favourite children’s books, by Malcolm Saville and Monica Edwards.
    I love C.S. Harris Sebastien St Cyr series, but they don’t fall into the category of “comfort read” because I haven’t re-read them yet! And that is the essence of a comfort read for me – a book I love and have re-read frequently, so that the characters are like old friends.
    I am fascinated by those who don’t re-read, like Pat. Do you not keep any books, then? For me, one way in which I know I like a book when I first read it is thinking that I will want to re-read it at some point. And the really good books reveal more and more as I re-read.
    That may be a function of how I read – I think I read a book for the first time far too quickly, because I want to find out what happens. On a re-read I can “stop and stare” a little. Also, I don’t tend to remember in detail books I’ve only read once, so I will enjoy re-reading them even if I don’t remember exactly what happens.

    Reply
  3. You’ve mentioned almost all my comfort reads – Georgette Heyer, Mary Stewart, and Josephine Tey are my first resort, and I also love tried-and-trusted mysteries including the Dick Francis books. I also read my favourite children’s books, by Malcolm Saville and Monica Edwards.
    I love C.S. Harris Sebastien St Cyr series, but they don’t fall into the category of “comfort read” because I haven’t re-read them yet! And that is the essence of a comfort read for me – a book I love and have re-read frequently, so that the characters are like old friends.
    I am fascinated by those who don’t re-read, like Pat. Do you not keep any books, then? For me, one way in which I know I like a book when I first read it is thinking that I will want to re-read it at some point. And the really good books reveal more and more as I re-read.
    That may be a function of how I read – I think I read a book for the first time far too quickly, because I want to find out what happens. On a re-read I can “stop and stare” a little. Also, I don’t tend to remember in detail books I’ve only read once, so I will enjoy re-reading them even if I don’t remember exactly what happens.

    Reply
  4. You’ve mentioned almost all my comfort reads – Georgette Heyer, Mary Stewart, and Josephine Tey are my first resort, and I also love tried-and-trusted mysteries including the Dick Francis books. I also read my favourite children’s books, by Malcolm Saville and Monica Edwards.
    I love C.S. Harris Sebastien St Cyr series, but they don’t fall into the category of “comfort read” because I haven’t re-read them yet! And that is the essence of a comfort read for me – a book I love and have re-read frequently, so that the characters are like old friends.
    I am fascinated by those who don’t re-read, like Pat. Do you not keep any books, then? For me, one way in which I know I like a book when I first read it is thinking that I will want to re-read it at some point. And the really good books reveal more and more as I re-read.
    That may be a function of how I read – I think I read a book for the first time far too quickly, because I want to find out what happens. On a re-read I can “stop and stare” a little. Also, I don’t tend to remember in detail books I’ve only read once, so I will enjoy re-reading them even if I don’t remember exactly what happens.

    Reply
  5. You’ve mentioned almost all my comfort reads – Georgette Heyer, Mary Stewart, and Josephine Tey are my first resort, and I also love tried-and-trusted mysteries including the Dick Francis books. I also read my favourite children’s books, by Malcolm Saville and Monica Edwards.
    I love C.S. Harris Sebastien St Cyr series, but they don’t fall into the category of “comfort read” because I haven’t re-read them yet! And that is the essence of a comfort read for me – a book I love and have re-read frequently, so that the characters are like old friends.
    I am fascinated by those who don’t re-read, like Pat. Do you not keep any books, then? For me, one way in which I know I like a book when I first read it is thinking that I will want to re-read it at some point. And the really good books reveal more and more as I re-read.
    That may be a function of how I read – I think I read a book for the first time far too quickly, because I want to find out what happens. On a re-read I can “stop and stare” a little. Also, I don’t tend to remember in detail books I’ve only read once, so I will enjoy re-reading them even if I don’t remember exactly what happens.

    Reply
  6. HJ, my definition of comfort read is the same, I think. I’m currently faced with the realization that I have too many books — I *never* thought there could be such a concept, but if I ever manage to bite the bullet and give some away, my guiding principle will be whether or not I will want to read them again. And like you, some new books I want to reread almost immediately because I wolfed them down in one gulp for the story. It’s a different pleasure later to go through them again to enjoy the writing, to notice the subtleties, and to linger.
    Thank you for the mention of those children’s book authors because I don’t know them at all. And will immediately order them. Who said I had too many books? Nonsense. No such thing. *g*

    Reply
  7. HJ, my definition of comfort read is the same, I think. I’m currently faced with the realization that I have too many books — I *never* thought there could be such a concept, but if I ever manage to bite the bullet and give some away, my guiding principle will be whether or not I will want to read them again. And like you, some new books I want to reread almost immediately because I wolfed them down in one gulp for the story. It’s a different pleasure later to go through them again to enjoy the writing, to notice the subtleties, and to linger.
    Thank you for the mention of those children’s book authors because I don’t know them at all. And will immediately order them. Who said I had too many books? Nonsense. No such thing. *g*

    Reply
  8. HJ, my definition of comfort read is the same, I think. I’m currently faced with the realization that I have too many books — I *never* thought there could be such a concept, but if I ever manage to bite the bullet and give some away, my guiding principle will be whether or not I will want to read them again. And like you, some new books I want to reread almost immediately because I wolfed them down in one gulp for the story. It’s a different pleasure later to go through them again to enjoy the writing, to notice the subtleties, and to linger.
    Thank you for the mention of those children’s book authors because I don’t know them at all. And will immediately order them. Who said I had too many books? Nonsense. No such thing. *g*

    Reply
  9. HJ, my definition of comfort read is the same, I think. I’m currently faced with the realization that I have too many books — I *never* thought there could be such a concept, but if I ever manage to bite the bullet and give some away, my guiding principle will be whether or not I will want to read them again. And like you, some new books I want to reread almost immediately because I wolfed them down in one gulp for the story. It’s a different pleasure later to go through them again to enjoy the writing, to notice the subtleties, and to linger.
    Thank you for the mention of those children’s book authors because I don’t know them at all. And will immediately order them. Who said I had too many books? Nonsense. No such thing. *g*

    Reply
  10. HJ, my definition of comfort read is the same, I think. I’m currently faced with the realization that I have too many books — I *never* thought there could be such a concept, but if I ever manage to bite the bullet and give some away, my guiding principle will be whether or not I will want to read them again. And like you, some new books I want to reread almost immediately because I wolfed them down in one gulp for the story. It’s a different pleasure later to go through them again to enjoy the writing, to notice the subtleties, and to linger.
    Thank you for the mention of those children’s book authors because I don’t know them at all. And will immediately order them. Who said I had too many books? Nonsense. No such thing. *g*

    Reply
  11. Comfort reads are the very best! One of my favorites is Rosamund Pilcher’s Winter Solstice. I love her characters and the setting in Scotland is just perfect. I am actually listening to it now in the car. This is a book that I can enjoy over and over.
    I also reread the Bridgerton series by Julia Quinn. They aren’t as soothing as Winter Solstice but I like the characters and I like the touch of humor that Quinn brings to her stories and I like revisiting characters from her other books in the series.

    Reply
  12. Comfort reads are the very best! One of my favorites is Rosamund Pilcher’s Winter Solstice. I love her characters and the setting in Scotland is just perfect. I am actually listening to it now in the car. This is a book that I can enjoy over and over.
    I also reread the Bridgerton series by Julia Quinn. They aren’t as soothing as Winter Solstice but I like the characters and I like the touch of humor that Quinn brings to her stories and I like revisiting characters from her other books in the series.

    Reply
  13. Comfort reads are the very best! One of my favorites is Rosamund Pilcher’s Winter Solstice. I love her characters and the setting in Scotland is just perfect. I am actually listening to it now in the car. This is a book that I can enjoy over and over.
    I also reread the Bridgerton series by Julia Quinn. They aren’t as soothing as Winter Solstice but I like the characters and I like the touch of humor that Quinn brings to her stories and I like revisiting characters from her other books in the series.

    Reply
  14. Comfort reads are the very best! One of my favorites is Rosamund Pilcher’s Winter Solstice. I love her characters and the setting in Scotland is just perfect. I am actually listening to it now in the car. This is a book that I can enjoy over and over.
    I also reread the Bridgerton series by Julia Quinn. They aren’t as soothing as Winter Solstice but I like the characters and I like the touch of humor that Quinn brings to her stories and I like revisiting characters from her other books in the series.

    Reply
  15. Comfort reads are the very best! One of my favorites is Rosamund Pilcher’s Winter Solstice. I love her characters and the setting in Scotland is just perfect. I am actually listening to it now in the car. This is a book that I can enjoy over and over.
    I also reread the Bridgerton series by Julia Quinn. They aren’t as soothing as Winter Solstice but I like the characters and I like the touch of humor that Quinn brings to her stories and I like revisiting characters from her other books in the series.

    Reply
  16. Thanks, Priscilla — Rosamund Pilcher is a favorite author of a good friend of mine, so I can’t imagine why I haven’t read her yet. Your post has reminded me.
    I gather you have these books on audio — there’s a pleasure in being read to that I’d almost forgotten about, but these days I love audio books. Julie Quinn’s Bridgerton world is very appealing, isn’t it? I enjoy revisiting it, too.

    Reply
  17. Thanks, Priscilla — Rosamund Pilcher is a favorite author of a good friend of mine, so I can’t imagine why I haven’t read her yet. Your post has reminded me.
    I gather you have these books on audio — there’s a pleasure in being read to that I’d almost forgotten about, but these days I love audio books. Julie Quinn’s Bridgerton world is very appealing, isn’t it? I enjoy revisiting it, too.

    Reply
  18. Thanks, Priscilla — Rosamund Pilcher is a favorite author of a good friend of mine, so I can’t imagine why I haven’t read her yet. Your post has reminded me.
    I gather you have these books on audio — there’s a pleasure in being read to that I’d almost forgotten about, but these days I love audio books. Julie Quinn’s Bridgerton world is very appealing, isn’t it? I enjoy revisiting it, too.

    Reply
  19. Thanks, Priscilla — Rosamund Pilcher is a favorite author of a good friend of mine, so I can’t imagine why I haven’t read her yet. Your post has reminded me.
    I gather you have these books on audio — there’s a pleasure in being read to that I’d almost forgotten about, but these days I love audio books. Julie Quinn’s Bridgerton world is very appealing, isn’t it? I enjoy revisiting it, too.

    Reply
  20. Thanks, Priscilla — Rosamund Pilcher is a favorite author of a good friend of mine, so I can’t imagine why I haven’t read her yet. Your post has reminded me.
    I gather you have these books on audio — there’s a pleasure in being read to that I’d almost forgotten about, but these days I love audio books. Julie Quinn’s Bridgerton world is very appealing, isn’t it? I enjoy revisiting it, too.

    Reply
  21. I am definitely a rereader. Heyer, Stewart, and Ibbotson are all on my keeper shelves, and their books are among those I return to when I want a comfort read or when I’ve read several disappointing books in a row and need a metaphoric palate cleanser. I recently reread The Unknown Ajax and fell in love with Hugo Darracott all over again, although Frederica is still my favorite Heyer. This Rough Magic is my favorite Stewart, The Magic Flute my favorite Ibbotson.
    Favorite series–romance and mystery–are comfort reads for me as well, including several wenchly ones and some old category series and singles by Nora Roberts, Kathleen Korbel, Emilie Richards, Barbara Samuel/Ruth Wind, Kathleen Gilles Seidel, and others. After reading today’s posts, I feel the need for a break from ARCs and some time with old favorites.

    Reply
  22. I am definitely a rereader. Heyer, Stewart, and Ibbotson are all on my keeper shelves, and their books are among those I return to when I want a comfort read or when I’ve read several disappointing books in a row and need a metaphoric palate cleanser. I recently reread The Unknown Ajax and fell in love with Hugo Darracott all over again, although Frederica is still my favorite Heyer. This Rough Magic is my favorite Stewart, The Magic Flute my favorite Ibbotson.
    Favorite series–romance and mystery–are comfort reads for me as well, including several wenchly ones and some old category series and singles by Nora Roberts, Kathleen Korbel, Emilie Richards, Barbara Samuel/Ruth Wind, Kathleen Gilles Seidel, and others. After reading today’s posts, I feel the need for a break from ARCs and some time with old favorites.

    Reply
  23. I am definitely a rereader. Heyer, Stewart, and Ibbotson are all on my keeper shelves, and their books are among those I return to when I want a comfort read or when I’ve read several disappointing books in a row and need a metaphoric palate cleanser. I recently reread The Unknown Ajax and fell in love with Hugo Darracott all over again, although Frederica is still my favorite Heyer. This Rough Magic is my favorite Stewart, The Magic Flute my favorite Ibbotson.
    Favorite series–romance and mystery–are comfort reads for me as well, including several wenchly ones and some old category series and singles by Nora Roberts, Kathleen Korbel, Emilie Richards, Barbara Samuel/Ruth Wind, Kathleen Gilles Seidel, and others. After reading today’s posts, I feel the need for a break from ARCs and some time with old favorites.

    Reply
  24. I am definitely a rereader. Heyer, Stewart, and Ibbotson are all on my keeper shelves, and their books are among those I return to when I want a comfort read or when I’ve read several disappointing books in a row and need a metaphoric palate cleanser. I recently reread The Unknown Ajax and fell in love with Hugo Darracott all over again, although Frederica is still my favorite Heyer. This Rough Magic is my favorite Stewart, The Magic Flute my favorite Ibbotson.
    Favorite series–romance and mystery–are comfort reads for me as well, including several wenchly ones and some old category series and singles by Nora Roberts, Kathleen Korbel, Emilie Richards, Barbara Samuel/Ruth Wind, Kathleen Gilles Seidel, and others. After reading today’s posts, I feel the need for a break from ARCs and some time with old favorites.

    Reply
  25. I am definitely a rereader. Heyer, Stewart, and Ibbotson are all on my keeper shelves, and their books are among those I return to when I want a comfort read or when I’ve read several disappointing books in a row and need a metaphoric palate cleanser. I recently reread The Unknown Ajax and fell in love with Hugo Darracott all over again, although Frederica is still my favorite Heyer. This Rough Magic is my favorite Stewart, The Magic Flute my favorite Ibbotson.
    Favorite series–romance and mystery–are comfort reads for me as well, including several wenchly ones and some old category series and singles by Nora Roberts, Kathleen Korbel, Emilie Richards, Barbara Samuel/Ruth Wind, Kathleen Gilles Seidel, and others. After reading today’s posts, I feel the need for a break from ARCs and some time with old favorites.

    Reply
  26. Janga, Hugo Darracott is one of my favorite Heyeroes, battling it out with Damerel, probably – and in both case the sense of humor plays a big part. And yes, the wenchly discussion, where we all shared memories of Mary Stewart books certainly has me itching to go back and reread some of them.
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  27. Janga, Hugo Darracott is one of my favorite Heyeroes, battling it out with Damerel, probably – and in both case the sense of humor plays a big part. And yes, the wenchly discussion, where we all shared memories of Mary Stewart books certainly has me itching to go back and reread some of them.
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  28. Janga, Hugo Darracott is one of my favorite Heyeroes, battling it out with Damerel, probably – and in both case the sense of humor plays a big part. And yes, the wenchly discussion, where we all shared memories of Mary Stewart books certainly has me itching to go back and reread some of them.
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  29. Janga, Hugo Darracott is one of my favorite Heyeroes, battling it out with Damerel, probably – and in both case the sense of humor plays a big part. And yes, the wenchly discussion, where we all shared memories of Mary Stewart books certainly has me itching to go back and reread some of them.
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  30. Janga, Hugo Darracott is one of my favorite Heyeroes, battling it out with Damerel, probably – and in both case the sense of humor plays a big part. And yes, the wenchly discussion, where we all shared memories of Mary Stewart books certainly has me itching to go back and reread some of them.
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  31. Count me in as a Mary Stewart fan who has tried several times to have a hero called Raoul – but every time his name always gets changed in the final draft: my theory is that none of them can live up to the Raoul in Nine Coaches Waiting!
    I’m a huge comfort reader too: Mary Stewart and Heyer (just to be like everyone else), also Loretta Chase, Susan Elizabeth Phillips, Nora Roberts, Lee Child, Harlan Coben, Juliet Marillier, P.J. Tracy … Also some very old historical romances that have stood the test of time so well: Joan Wolf ‘The Edge of Light’ and ‘The Road to Avalon’ and Mary Lide ‘Anne of Cambray’. Does anyone else remember Stella Riley, who wrote some great books set in the 17th century (my own favourites A Splendid Defiance and Garland of Straw) in the 1980s? Loved Pamela Bella’s trilogy about Wintercombe too, also about the Civil War. All these books aren’t just comfort for me, though. I’ll often dip in to one with my lunch, for instance, like a quick catch up with old friends, but I also find them inspiring when I’m writing.

    Reply
  32. Count me in as a Mary Stewart fan who has tried several times to have a hero called Raoul – but every time his name always gets changed in the final draft: my theory is that none of them can live up to the Raoul in Nine Coaches Waiting!
    I’m a huge comfort reader too: Mary Stewart and Heyer (just to be like everyone else), also Loretta Chase, Susan Elizabeth Phillips, Nora Roberts, Lee Child, Harlan Coben, Juliet Marillier, P.J. Tracy … Also some very old historical romances that have stood the test of time so well: Joan Wolf ‘The Edge of Light’ and ‘The Road to Avalon’ and Mary Lide ‘Anne of Cambray’. Does anyone else remember Stella Riley, who wrote some great books set in the 17th century (my own favourites A Splendid Defiance and Garland of Straw) in the 1980s? Loved Pamela Bella’s trilogy about Wintercombe too, also about the Civil War. All these books aren’t just comfort for me, though. I’ll often dip in to one with my lunch, for instance, like a quick catch up with old friends, but I also find them inspiring when I’m writing.

    Reply
  33. Count me in as a Mary Stewart fan who has tried several times to have a hero called Raoul – but every time his name always gets changed in the final draft: my theory is that none of them can live up to the Raoul in Nine Coaches Waiting!
    I’m a huge comfort reader too: Mary Stewart and Heyer (just to be like everyone else), also Loretta Chase, Susan Elizabeth Phillips, Nora Roberts, Lee Child, Harlan Coben, Juliet Marillier, P.J. Tracy … Also some very old historical romances that have stood the test of time so well: Joan Wolf ‘The Edge of Light’ and ‘The Road to Avalon’ and Mary Lide ‘Anne of Cambray’. Does anyone else remember Stella Riley, who wrote some great books set in the 17th century (my own favourites A Splendid Defiance and Garland of Straw) in the 1980s? Loved Pamela Bella’s trilogy about Wintercombe too, also about the Civil War. All these books aren’t just comfort for me, though. I’ll often dip in to one with my lunch, for instance, like a quick catch up with old friends, but I also find them inspiring when I’m writing.

    Reply
  34. Count me in as a Mary Stewart fan who has tried several times to have a hero called Raoul – but every time his name always gets changed in the final draft: my theory is that none of them can live up to the Raoul in Nine Coaches Waiting!
    I’m a huge comfort reader too: Mary Stewart and Heyer (just to be like everyone else), also Loretta Chase, Susan Elizabeth Phillips, Nora Roberts, Lee Child, Harlan Coben, Juliet Marillier, P.J. Tracy … Also some very old historical romances that have stood the test of time so well: Joan Wolf ‘The Edge of Light’ and ‘The Road to Avalon’ and Mary Lide ‘Anne of Cambray’. Does anyone else remember Stella Riley, who wrote some great books set in the 17th century (my own favourites A Splendid Defiance and Garland of Straw) in the 1980s? Loved Pamela Bella’s trilogy about Wintercombe too, also about the Civil War. All these books aren’t just comfort for me, though. I’ll often dip in to one with my lunch, for instance, like a quick catch up with old friends, but I also find them inspiring when I’m writing.

    Reply
  35. Count me in as a Mary Stewart fan who has tried several times to have a hero called Raoul – but every time his name always gets changed in the final draft: my theory is that none of them can live up to the Raoul in Nine Coaches Waiting!
    I’m a huge comfort reader too: Mary Stewart and Heyer (just to be like everyone else), also Loretta Chase, Susan Elizabeth Phillips, Nora Roberts, Lee Child, Harlan Coben, Juliet Marillier, P.J. Tracy … Also some very old historical romances that have stood the test of time so well: Joan Wolf ‘The Edge of Light’ and ‘The Road to Avalon’ and Mary Lide ‘Anne of Cambray’. Does anyone else remember Stella Riley, who wrote some great books set in the 17th century (my own favourites A Splendid Defiance and Garland of Straw) in the 1980s? Loved Pamela Bella’s trilogy about Wintercombe too, also about the Civil War. All these books aren’t just comfort for me, though. I’ll often dip in to one with my lunch, for instance, like a quick catch up with old friends, but I also find them inspiring when I’m writing.

    Reply
  36. Mary Stewart and Georgette Heyer, certainly, but I also turn to old mysteries—real oldies. Not just Agatha Christie, but also Marjorie Allingham, Ngaio Marsh, John Dickson Carr, Michael Innes. I love Carr’s “impossible” crimes and the insanely complicated plots in early Innes, but mostly what I enjoy in those books is the sort of fairytale world the authors create. Most of the world’s ill are excluded, nothing truly horrible happens and all comes out right at the end. Sort of like romance. 🙂

    Reply
  37. Mary Stewart and Georgette Heyer, certainly, but I also turn to old mysteries—real oldies. Not just Agatha Christie, but also Marjorie Allingham, Ngaio Marsh, John Dickson Carr, Michael Innes. I love Carr’s “impossible” crimes and the insanely complicated plots in early Innes, but mostly what I enjoy in those books is the sort of fairytale world the authors create. Most of the world’s ill are excluded, nothing truly horrible happens and all comes out right at the end. Sort of like romance. 🙂

    Reply
  38. Mary Stewart and Georgette Heyer, certainly, but I also turn to old mysteries—real oldies. Not just Agatha Christie, but also Marjorie Allingham, Ngaio Marsh, John Dickson Carr, Michael Innes. I love Carr’s “impossible” crimes and the insanely complicated plots in early Innes, but mostly what I enjoy in those books is the sort of fairytale world the authors create. Most of the world’s ill are excluded, nothing truly horrible happens and all comes out right at the end. Sort of like romance. 🙂

    Reply
  39. Mary Stewart and Georgette Heyer, certainly, but I also turn to old mysteries—real oldies. Not just Agatha Christie, but also Marjorie Allingham, Ngaio Marsh, John Dickson Carr, Michael Innes. I love Carr’s “impossible” crimes and the insanely complicated plots in early Innes, but mostly what I enjoy in those books is the sort of fairytale world the authors create. Most of the world’s ill are excluded, nothing truly horrible happens and all comes out right at the end. Sort of like romance. 🙂

    Reply
  40. Mary Stewart and Georgette Heyer, certainly, but I also turn to old mysteries—real oldies. Not just Agatha Christie, but also Marjorie Allingham, Ngaio Marsh, John Dickson Carr, Michael Innes. I love Carr’s “impossible” crimes and the insanely complicated plots in early Innes, but mostly what I enjoy in those books is the sort of fairytale world the authors create. Most of the world’s ill are excluded, nothing truly horrible happens and all comes out right at the end. Sort of like romance. 🙂

    Reply
  41. I definitely reread books that make me happy! I also reread books that are in a series when the new book comes out! A couple of my comfort reads would be Big Stone Gap by Adrianna Trigiani & Love Walked In by Marissa de los Santos.

    Reply
  42. I definitely reread books that make me happy! I also reread books that are in a series when the new book comes out! A couple of my comfort reads would be Big Stone Gap by Adrianna Trigiani & Love Walked In by Marissa de los Santos.

    Reply
  43. I definitely reread books that make me happy! I also reread books that are in a series when the new book comes out! A couple of my comfort reads would be Big Stone Gap by Adrianna Trigiani & Love Walked In by Marissa de los Santos.

    Reply
  44. I definitely reread books that make me happy! I also reread books that are in a series when the new book comes out! A couple of my comfort reads would be Big Stone Gap by Adrianna Trigiani & Love Walked In by Marissa de los Santos.

    Reply
  45. I definitely reread books that make me happy! I also reread books that are in a series when the new book comes out! A couple of my comfort reads would be Big Stone Gap by Adrianna Trigiani & Love Walked In by Marissa de los Santos.

    Reply
  46. I just re-read Joanna’s series for comfort (lots of stress going on in my life!). I started with Doyle’s story and ended with Adrian in The Black Hawk. Then I went searching for any hints about her next book’s release date but couldn’t find any. What’s looming on the horizon, Joanna?
    I also re-read Jo and Mary Jo’s books as well as JAK and Susan Elizabeth Phillips as well as Mary Balogh, Kasey Michaels and Loretta Chase.

    Reply
  47. I just re-read Joanna’s series for comfort (lots of stress going on in my life!). I started with Doyle’s story and ended with Adrian in The Black Hawk. Then I went searching for any hints about her next book’s release date but couldn’t find any. What’s looming on the horizon, Joanna?
    I also re-read Jo and Mary Jo’s books as well as JAK and Susan Elizabeth Phillips as well as Mary Balogh, Kasey Michaels and Loretta Chase.

    Reply
  48. I just re-read Joanna’s series for comfort (lots of stress going on in my life!). I started with Doyle’s story and ended with Adrian in The Black Hawk. Then I went searching for any hints about her next book’s release date but couldn’t find any. What’s looming on the horizon, Joanna?
    I also re-read Jo and Mary Jo’s books as well as JAK and Susan Elizabeth Phillips as well as Mary Balogh, Kasey Michaels and Loretta Chase.

    Reply
  49. I just re-read Joanna’s series for comfort (lots of stress going on in my life!). I started with Doyle’s story and ended with Adrian in The Black Hawk. Then I went searching for any hints about her next book’s release date but couldn’t find any. What’s looming on the horizon, Joanna?
    I also re-read Jo and Mary Jo’s books as well as JAK and Susan Elizabeth Phillips as well as Mary Balogh, Kasey Michaels and Loretta Chase.

    Reply
  50. I just re-read Joanna’s series for comfort (lots of stress going on in my life!). I started with Doyle’s story and ended with Adrian in The Black Hawk. Then I went searching for any hints about her next book’s release date but couldn’t find any. What’s looming on the horizon, Joanna?
    I also re-read Jo and Mary Jo’s books as well as JAK and Susan Elizabeth Phillips as well as Mary Balogh, Kasey Michaels and Loretta Chase.

    Reply
  51. Definitely Mary Stewart, Josephine Tey, and Rosamunde Pilcher (but Coming Home).
    For a reality check, Corrie ten Boom’s The Hiding Place. I am slowly working through her other books.
    I have only just read Scent of the Missing by Susannah Charleson for the first time today but can see re-reading this story with laugh-out-loud comments on converting a rambunctious Golden Retriever puppy into a trained SAR dog and a longtime dog rescuer into a trained SAR dog handler.

    Reply
  52. Definitely Mary Stewart, Josephine Tey, and Rosamunde Pilcher (but Coming Home).
    For a reality check, Corrie ten Boom’s The Hiding Place. I am slowly working through her other books.
    I have only just read Scent of the Missing by Susannah Charleson for the first time today but can see re-reading this story with laugh-out-loud comments on converting a rambunctious Golden Retriever puppy into a trained SAR dog and a longtime dog rescuer into a trained SAR dog handler.

    Reply
  53. Definitely Mary Stewart, Josephine Tey, and Rosamunde Pilcher (but Coming Home).
    For a reality check, Corrie ten Boom’s The Hiding Place. I am slowly working through her other books.
    I have only just read Scent of the Missing by Susannah Charleson for the first time today but can see re-reading this story with laugh-out-loud comments on converting a rambunctious Golden Retriever puppy into a trained SAR dog and a longtime dog rescuer into a trained SAR dog handler.

    Reply
  54. Definitely Mary Stewart, Josephine Tey, and Rosamunde Pilcher (but Coming Home).
    For a reality check, Corrie ten Boom’s The Hiding Place. I am slowly working through her other books.
    I have only just read Scent of the Missing by Susannah Charleson for the first time today but can see re-reading this story with laugh-out-loud comments on converting a rambunctious Golden Retriever puppy into a trained SAR dog and a longtime dog rescuer into a trained SAR dog handler.

    Reply
  55. Definitely Mary Stewart, Josephine Tey, and Rosamunde Pilcher (but Coming Home).
    For a reality check, Corrie ten Boom’s The Hiding Place. I am slowly working through her other books.
    I have only just read Scent of the Missing by Susannah Charleson for the first time today but can see re-reading this story with laugh-out-loud comments on converting a rambunctious Golden Retriever puppy into a trained SAR dog and a longtime dog rescuer into a trained SAR dog handler.

    Reply
  56. Definitely Heyer, especially Venetia. And Loretta Chase’s Lord of Scoundrels. And Laura Kinsale’s Flowers from the Storm. Mary Balogh’s Slightly series and A Perfect Jewel. And Mel Starr’s Hugh de Singleton mystery series set in 14th century England. And Dean James contemporary cozy mystery series set in a little village in England. The hero is a gay vampire from Mississippi. James captures English village life perfectly and the humor in these books is BEYOND brilliant. With titles like Baked to Death, Posted to Death, Decorated to Death you can imagine the fun they are to read!

    Reply
  57. Definitely Heyer, especially Venetia. And Loretta Chase’s Lord of Scoundrels. And Laura Kinsale’s Flowers from the Storm. Mary Balogh’s Slightly series and A Perfect Jewel. And Mel Starr’s Hugh de Singleton mystery series set in 14th century England. And Dean James contemporary cozy mystery series set in a little village in England. The hero is a gay vampire from Mississippi. James captures English village life perfectly and the humor in these books is BEYOND brilliant. With titles like Baked to Death, Posted to Death, Decorated to Death you can imagine the fun they are to read!

    Reply
  58. Definitely Heyer, especially Venetia. And Loretta Chase’s Lord of Scoundrels. And Laura Kinsale’s Flowers from the Storm. Mary Balogh’s Slightly series and A Perfect Jewel. And Mel Starr’s Hugh de Singleton mystery series set in 14th century England. And Dean James contemporary cozy mystery series set in a little village in England. The hero is a gay vampire from Mississippi. James captures English village life perfectly and the humor in these books is BEYOND brilliant. With titles like Baked to Death, Posted to Death, Decorated to Death you can imagine the fun they are to read!

    Reply
  59. Definitely Heyer, especially Venetia. And Loretta Chase’s Lord of Scoundrels. And Laura Kinsale’s Flowers from the Storm. Mary Balogh’s Slightly series and A Perfect Jewel. And Mel Starr’s Hugh de Singleton mystery series set in 14th century England. And Dean James contemporary cozy mystery series set in a little village in England. The hero is a gay vampire from Mississippi. James captures English village life perfectly and the humor in these books is BEYOND brilliant. With titles like Baked to Death, Posted to Death, Decorated to Death you can imagine the fun they are to read!

    Reply
  60. Definitely Heyer, especially Venetia. And Loretta Chase’s Lord of Scoundrels. And Laura Kinsale’s Flowers from the Storm. Mary Balogh’s Slightly series and A Perfect Jewel. And Mel Starr’s Hugh de Singleton mystery series set in 14th century England. And Dean James contemporary cozy mystery series set in a little village in England. The hero is a gay vampire from Mississippi. James captures English village life perfectly and the humor in these books is BEYOND brilliant. With titles like Baked to Death, Posted to Death, Decorated to Death you can imagine the fun they are to read!

    Reply
  61. I got to “Nemesis discussion” and literally laughed out loud!
    Like Pat, I usually don’t re-read – too many good books out there, and Amazon and Kindle have spawned a monster! Comfort reads for me tend to be cozy mysteries or the light, traditional Regencies a la Heyer, Metzger and Smith.
    In answer to HJ’s question about keeping books… I used to have hundreds. Hated to part with them for any reason, even to loan to a friend (you NEVER get them back). And then one day, a very good friend said to me, “Books can’t live on shelves; they die.” Well, that resonated so profoundly with me that I boxed most of them up and took them to a library way down in the mountains of Eastern Ky. I was honestly embarrassed by their gratitude! It really changed the way I looked at keeping anything that others can use.
    This then is my conflict with the Kindle – I love the “green” aspect, and the space-saving aspect, and the convenience, but I can’t give them away when I’ve read them.
    And finally, Anne, I wondered if the Raoul hero writers were Phantom of the Opera fans?!?

    Reply
  62. I got to “Nemesis discussion” and literally laughed out loud!
    Like Pat, I usually don’t re-read – too many good books out there, and Amazon and Kindle have spawned a monster! Comfort reads for me tend to be cozy mysteries or the light, traditional Regencies a la Heyer, Metzger and Smith.
    In answer to HJ’s question about keeping books… I used to have hundreds. Hated to part with them for any reason, even to loan to a friend (you NEVER get them back). And then one day, a very good friend said to me, “Books can’t live on shelves; they die.” Well, that resonated so profoundly with me that I boxed most of them up and took them to a library way down in the mountains of Eastern Ky. I was honestly embarrassed by their gratitude! It really changed the way I looked at keeping anything that others can use.
    This then is my conflict with the Kindle – I love the “green” aspect, and the space-saving aspect, and the convenience, but I can’t give them away when I’ve read them.
    And finally, Anne, I wondered if the Raoul hero writers were Phantom of the Opera fans?!?

    Reply
  63. I got to “Nemesis discussion” and literally laughed out loud!
    Like Pat, I usually don’t re-read – too many good books out there, and Amazon and Kindle have spawned a monster! Comfort reads for me tend to be cozy mysteries or the light, traditional Regencies a la Heyer, Metzger and Smith.
    In answer to HJ’s question about keeping books… I used to have hundreds. Hated to part with them for any reason, even to loan to a friend (you NEVER get them back). And then one day, a very good friend said to me, “Books can’t live on shelves; they die.” Well, that resonated so profoundly with me that I boxed most of them up and took them to a library way down in the mountains of Eastern Ky. I was honestly embarrassed by their gratitude! It really changed the way I looked at keeping anything that others can use.
    This then is my conflict with the Kindle – I love the “green” aspect, and the space-saving aspect, and the convenience, but I can’t give them away when I’ve read them.
    And finally, Anne, I wondered if the Raoul hero writers were Phantom of the Opera fans?!?

    Reply
  64. I got to “Nemesis discussion” and literally laughed out loud!
    Like Pat, I usually don’t re-read – too many good books out there, and Amazon and Kindle have spawned a monster! Comfort reads for me tend to be cozy mysteries or the light, traditional Regencies a la Heyer, Metzger and Smith.
    In answer to HJ’s question about keeping books… I used to have hundreds. Hated to part with them for any reason, even to loan to a friend (you NEVER get them back). And then one day, a very good friend said to me, “Books can’t live on shelves; they die.” Well, that resonated so profoundly with me that I boxed most of them up and took them to a library way down in the mountains of Eastern Ky. I was honestly embarrassed by their gratitude! It really changed the way I looked at keeping anything that others can use.
    This then is my conflict with the Kindle – I love the “green” aspect, and the space-saving aspect, and the convenience, but I can’t give them away when I’ve read them.
    And finally, Anne, I wondered if the Raoul hero writers were Phantom of the Opera fans?!?

    Reply
  65. I got to “Nemesis discussion” and literally laughed out loud!
    Like Pat, I usually don’t re-read – too many good books out there, and Amazon and Kindle have spawned a monster! Comfort reads for me tend to be cozy mysteries or the light, traditional Regencies a la Heyer, Metzger and Smith.
    In answer to HJ’s question about keeping books… I used to have hundreds. Hated to part with them for any reason, even to loan to a friend (you NEVER get them back). And then one day, a very good friend said to me, “Books can’t live on shelves; they die.” Well, that resonated so profoundly with me that I boxed most of them up and took them to a library way down in the mountains of Eastern Ky. I was honestly embarrassed by their gratitude! It really changed the way I looked at keeping anything that others can use.
    This then is my conflict with the Kindle – I love the “green” aspect, and the space-saving aspect, and the convenience, but I can’t give them away when I’ve read them.
    And finally, Anne, I wondered if the Raoul hero writers were Phantom of the Opera fans?!?

    Reply
  66. Like Priscilla, I love Rosamund Pilcher’s WINTER SOLSTICE. There’s incredible serenity in all those people who are having a hard time finding their homes of the heart. I bought the book a second time to take on a vacation when I couldn’t find the first copy. *G*
    And as Janga said: Eva Ibbotson!!!! Kathleen Gilles Seidel! How could I leave them off a comfort read list??
    Hugh Darracott. Damerel. Yes. *G*

    Reply
  67. Like Priscilla, I love Rosamund Pilcher’s WINTER SOLSTICE. There’s incredible serenity in all those people who are having a hard time finding their homes of the heart. I bought the book a second time to take on a vacation when I couldn’t find the first copy. *G*
    And as Janga said: Eva Ibbotson!!!! Kathleen Gilles Seidel! How could I leave them off a comfort read list??
    Hugh Darracott. Damerel. Yes. *G*

    Reply
  68. Like Priscilla, I love Rosamund Pilcher’s WINTER SOLSTICE. There’s incredible serenity in all those people who are having a hard time finding their homes of the heart. I bought the book a second time to take on a vacation when I couldn’t find the first copy. *G*
    And as Janga said: Eva Ibbotson!!!! Kathleen Gilles Seidel! How could I leave them off a comfort read list??
    Hugh Darracott. Damerel. Yes. *G*

    Reply
  69. Like Priscilla, I love Rosamund Pilcher’s WINTER SOLSTICE. There’s incredible serenity in all those people who are having a hard time finding their homes of the heart. I bought the book a second time to take on a vacation when I couldn’t find the first copy. *G*
    And as Janga said: Eva Ibbotson!!!! Kathleen Gilles Seidel! How could I leave them off a comfort read list??
    Hugh Darracott. Damerel. Yes. *G*

    Reply
  70. Like Priscilla, I love Rosamund Pilcher’s WINTER SOLSTICE. There’s incredible serenity in all those people who are having a hard time finding their homes of the heart. I bought the book a second time to take on a vacation when I couldn’t find the first copy. *G*
    And as Janga said: Eva Ibbotson!!!! Kathleen Gilles Seidel! How could I leave them off a comfort read list??
    Hugh Darracott. Damerel. Yes. *G*

    Reply
  71. Pam, I’ve had a series of heroes who started off as Adam, then morphed into someone else.
    I’m smiling at how many of us love the same authors — explains why we’re a bit of a community, I guess. I went on a huge glom of Juliet Marillier last year, and was delighted to learn she’ll be at the Aussie RWA conference in August. I’d also add in Catherine Gaskin and the Cadfael series. Never heard of Stella Riley — I’ll see if the library has her.
    Lil, I also have old, battered copies of Ngaio Marsh and Allingham and Michael Innes. There’s quite a bit of crime on my shelves, but I think I’ve only reread the Ngaio Marshes. And I do like that about the old, “cosy” mysteries, that no matter what’s happened justice is done and the world’s made right again.

    Reply
  72. Pam, I’ve had a series of heroes who started off as Adam, then morphed into someone else.
    I’m smiling at how many of us love the same authors — explains why we’re a bit of a community, I guess. I went on a huge glom of Juliet Marillier last year, and was delighted to learn she’ll be at the Aussie RWA conference in August. I’d also add in Catherine Gaskin and the Cadfael series. Never heard of Stella Riley — I’ll see if the library has her.
    Lil, I also have old, battered copies of Ngaio Marsh and Allingham and Michael Innes. There’s quite a bit of crime on my shelves, but I think I’ve only reread the Ngaio Marshes. And I do like that about the old, “cosy” mysteries, that no matter what’s happened justice is done and the world’s made right again.

    Reply
  73. Pam, I’ve had a series of heroes who started off as Adam, then morphed into someone else.
    I’m smiling at how many of us love the same authors — explains why we’re a bit of a community, I guess. I went on a huge glom of Juliet Marillier last year, and was delighted to learn she’ll be at the Aussie RWA conference in August. I’d also add in Catherine Gaskin and the Cadfael series. Never heard of Stella Riley — I’ll see if the library has her.
    Lil, I also have old, battered copies of Ngaio Marsh and Allingham and Michael Innes. There’s quite a bit of crime on my shelves, but I think I’ve only reread the Ngaio Marshes. And I do like that about the old, “cosy” mysteries, that no matter what’s happened justice is done and the world’s made right again.

    Reply
  74. Pam, I’ve had a series of heroes who started off as Adam, then morphed into someone else.
    I’m smiling at how many of us love the same authors — explains why we’re a bit of a community, I guess. I went on a huge glom of Juliet Marillier last year, and was delighted to learn she’ll be at the Aussie RWA conference in August. I’d also add in Catherine Gaskin and the Cadfael series. Never heard of Stella Riley — I’ll see if the library has her.
    Lil, I also have old, battered copies of Ngaio Marsh and Allingham and Michael Innes. There’s quite a bit of crime on my shelves, but I think I’ve only reread the Ngaio Marshes. And I do like that about the old, “cosy” mysteries, that no matter what’s happened justice is done and the world’s made right again.

    Reply
  75. Pam, I’ve had a series of heroes who started off as Adam, then morphed into someone else.
    I’m smiling at how many of us love the same authors — explains why we’re a bit of a community, I guess. I went on a huge glom of Juliet Marillier last year, and was delighted to learn she’ll be at the Aussie RWA conference in August. I’d also add in Catherine Gaskin and the Cadfael series. Never heard of Stella Riley — I’ll see if the library has her.
    Lil, I also have old, battered copies of Ngaio Marsh and Allingham and Michael Innes. There’s quite a bit of crime on my shelves, but I think I’ve only reread the Ngaio Marshes. And I do like that about the old, “cosy” mysteries, that no matter what’s happened justice is done and the world’s made right again.

    Reply
  76. Sharlene, thanks for those suggestions — I must admit, I haven’t heard of either author.
    MJ, Joanna’s world is so compelling, I agree. I’ve revisited it several times, too, not always to reread the whole book, but sometimes just to pop into a favorite bit — like the great ferret chase.*g* I’m also in synch with your other faves. Well chosen.

    Reply
  77. Sharlene, thanks for those suggestions — I must admit, I haven’t heard of either author.
    MJ, Joanna’s world is so compelling, I agree. I’ve revisited it several times, too, not always to reread the whole book, but sometimes just to pop into a favorite bit — like the great ferret chase.*g* I’m also in synch with your other faves. Well chosen.

    Reply
  78. Sharlene, thanks for those suggestions — I must admit, I haven’t heard of either author.
    MJ, Joanna’s world is so compelling, I agree. I’ve revisited it several times, too, not always to reread the whole book, but sometimes just to pop into a favorite bit — like the great ferret chase.*g* I’m also in synch with your other faves. Well chosen.

    Reply
  79. Sharlene, thanks for those suggestions — I must admit, I haven’t heard of either author.
    MJ, Joanna’s world is so compelling, I agree. I’ve revisited it several times, too, not always to reread the whole book, but sometimes just to pop into a favorite bit — like the great ferret chase.*g* I’m also in synch with your other faves. Well chosen.

    Reply
  80. Sharlene, thanks for those suggestions — I must admit, I haven’t heard of either author.
    MJ, Joanna’s world is so compelling, I agree. I’ve revisited it several times, too, not always to reread the whole book, but sometimes just to pop into a favorite bit — like the great ferret chase.*g* I’m also in synch with your other faves. Well chosen.

    Reply
  81. Liz, the Scent of the Missing sounds like a must for dog lovers. I must remember to recommend it to Nicola when she returns — she and her husband raised a guide dog puppy — see her blog for a link to the guide dog posts.
    Louise, I’ve never heard of Dean James’s mysteries, or Mel Starr’s. Yay, new authors to check out — thanks.
    And Laura Kinsale’s Flowers From the Storm is one of my all-time-favorite romances.

    Reply
  82. Liz, the Scent of the Missing sounds like a must for dog lovers. I must remember to recommend it to Nicola when she returns — she and her husband raised a guide dog puppy — see her blog for a link to the guide dog posts.
    Louise, I’ve never heard of Dean James’s mysteries, or Mel Starr’s. Yay, new authors to check out — thanks.
    And Laura Kinsale’s Flowers From the Storm is one of my all-time-favorite romances.

    Reply
  83. Liz, the Scent of the Missing sounds like a must for dog lovers. I must remember to recommend it to Nicola when she returns — she and her husband raised a guide dog puppy — see her blog for a link to the guide dog posts.
    Louise, I’ve never heard of Dean James’s mysteries, or Mel Starr’s. Yay, new authors to check out — thanks.
    And Laura Kinsale’s Flowers From the Storm is one of my all-time-favorite romances.

    Reply
  84. Liz, the Scent of the Missing sounds like a must for dog lovers. I must remember to recommend it to Nicola when she returns — she and her husband raised a guide dog puppy — see her blog for a link to the guide dog posts.
    Louise, I’ve never heard of Dean James’s mysteries, or Mel Starr’s. Yay, new authors to check out — thanks.
    And Laura Kinsale’s Flowers From the Storm is one of my all-time-favorite romances.

    Reply
  85. Liz, the Scent of the Missing sounds like a must for dog lovers. I must remember to recommend it to Nicola when she returns — she and her husband raised a guide dog puppy — see her blog for a link to the guide dog posts.
    Louise, I’ve never heard of Dean James’s mysteries, or Mel Starr’s. Yay, new authors to check out — thanks.
    And Laura Kinsale’s Flowers From the Storm is one of my all-time-favorite romances.

    Reply
  86. Donna, just the thought of that Nemesis thread is enough to make me smile. I loved your story about taking them to the library. I did that, too a few years ago — it was a wrench to part with them, but the thought of new readers discovering them in the library encouraged me to take in several boxes of books, all in excellent condition.
    Imagine my dismay when I saw all my books being sold for 20C each or 6 for $1 at the next library sale. So after that I just give them to the op-shop (charity shop) where, though the prices are the same, it’s at least going to charity. Libraries in Australia are government funded.
    As for the Raoul, nope, I don’t think it’s anything to do with Phantom — read Nine Coaches Waiting and you’ll know why. *g*

    Reply
  87. Donna, just the thought of that Nemesis thread is enough to make me smile. I loved your story about taking them to the library. I did that, too a few years ago — it was a wrench to part with them, but the thought of new readers discovering them in the library encouraged me to take in several boxes of books, all in excellent condition.
    Imagine my dismay when I saw all my books being sold for 20C each or 6 for $1 at the next library sale. So after that I just give them to the op-shop (charity shop) where, though the prices are the same, it’s at least going to charity. Libraries in Australia are government funded.
    As for the Raoul, nope, I don’t think it’s anything to do with Phantom — read Nine Coaches Waiting and you’ll know why. *g*

    Reply
  88. Donna, just the thought of that Nemesis thread is enough to make me smile. I loved your story about taking them to the library. I did that, too a few years ago — it was a wrench to part with them, but the thought of new readers discovering them in the library encouraged me to take in several boxes of books, all in excellent condition.
    Imagine my dismay when I saw all my books being sold for 20C each or 6 for $1 at the next library sale. So after that I just give them to the op-shop (charity shop) where, though the prices are the same, it’s at least going to charity. Libraries in Australia are government funded.
    As for the Raoul, nope, I don’t think it’s anything to do with Phantom — read Nine Coaches Waiting and you’ll know why. *g*

    Reply
  89. Donna, just the thought of that Nemesis thread is enough to make me smile. I loved your story about taking them to the library. I did that, too a few years ago — it was a wrench to part with them, but the thought of new readers discovering them in the library encouraged me to take in several boxes of books, all in excellent condition.
    Imagine my dismay when I saw all my books being sold for 20C each or 6 for $1 at the next library sale. So after that I just give them to the op-shop (charity shop) where, though the prices are the same, it’s at least going to charity. Libraries in Australia are government funded.
    As for the Raoul, nope, I don’t think it’s anything to do with Phantom — read Nine Coaches Waiting and you’ll know why. *g*

    Reply
  90. Donna, just the thought of that Nemesis thread is enough to make me smile. I loved your story about taking them to the library. I did that, too a few years ago — it was a wrench to part with them, but the thought of new readers discovering them in the library encouraged me to take in several boxes of books, all in excellent condition.
    Imagine my dismay when I saw all my books being sold for 20C each or 6 for $1 at the next library sale. So after that I just give them to the op-shop (charity shop) where, though the prices are the same, it’s at least going to charity. Libraries in Australia are government funded.
    As for the Raoul, nope, I don’t think it’s anything to do with Phantom — read Nine Coaches Waiting and you’ll know why. *g*

    Reply
  91. Hi HJ —
    I do enjoy CS Harris, even though — okay — the books are a little angsty.
    And yes, I do reread, too. I wait a couple years between reads.

    Reply
  92. Hi HJ —
    I do enjoy CS Harris, even though — okay — the books are a little angsty.
    And yes, I do reread, too. I wait a couple years between reads.

    Reply
  93. Hi HJ —
    I do enjoy CS Harris, even though — okay — the books are a little angsty.
    And yes, I do reread, too. I wait a couple years between reads.

    Reply
  94. Hi HJ —
    I do enjoy CS Harris, even though — okay — the books are a little angsty.
    And yes, I do reread, too. I wait a couple years between reads.

    Reply
  95. Hi HJ —
    I do enjoy CS Harris, even though — okay — the books are a little angsty.
    And yes, I do reread, too. I wait a couple years between reads.

    Reply
  96. Hi Janga —
    I’m going to be including Ibbotson at the end of the month in What We Wenches are Reading. I reread Countess Belowstairs and it is still funny and heartwarming.

    Reply
  97. Hi Janga —
    I’m going to be including Ibbotson at the end of the month in What We Wenches are Reading. I reread Countess Belowstairs and it is still funny and heartwarming.

    Reply
  98. Hi Janga —
    I’m going to be including Ibbotson at the end of the month in What We Wenches are Reading. I reread Countess Belowstairs and it is still funny and heartwarming.

    Reply
  99. Hi Janga —
    I’m going to be including Ibbotson at the end of the month in What We Wenches are Reading. I reread Countess Belowstairs and it is still funny and heartwarming.

    Reply
  100. Hi Janga —
    I’m going to be including Ibbotson at the end of the month in What We Wenches are Reading. I reread Countess Belowstairs and it is still funny and heartwarming.

    Reply
  101. Hi MJ —
    Oh, thank you so much.
    I am working on Pax’s story, (I’m behind on deadline, actually,) but knowing you are waiting for it I will try to buckle down and get it finished.

    Reply
  102. Hi MJ —
    Oh, thank you so much.
    I am working on Pax’s story, (I’m behind on deadline, actually,) but knowing you are waiting for it I will try to buckle down and get it finished.

    Reply
  103. Hi MJ —
    Oh, thank you so much.
    I am working on Pax’s story, (I’m behind on deadline, actually,) but knowing you are waiting for it I will try to buckle down and get it finished.

    Reply
  104. Hi MJ —
    Oh, thank you so much.
    I am working on Pax’s story, (I’m behind on deadline, actually,) but knowing you are waiting for it I will try to buckle down and get it finished.

    Reply
  105. Hi MJ —
    Oh, thank you so much.
    I am working on Pax’s story, (I’m behind on deadline, actually,) but knowing you are waiting for it I will try to buckle down and get it finished.

    Reply
  106. I’m looking at all these book suggestions and it’s like walking into a bakery. Everything looks wonderful. I want it all.
    I want to take them home and snuggle down on the couch and only get up for peppermint tea and gingersnaps and stay there till, like, July.
    Folks do seem to recommend the same authors. There’s this, “Do you know?” “Yes! Have you read?” “Yes. I love her. How about …” vibe.
    I’m planning to print this list out and haul it with me to the library and the bookshop. Maybe even pull some into the kindle. There’s enough new-to-me authors here it’ll keep me reading for a long time.

    Reply
  107. I’m looking at all these book suggestions and it’s like walking into a bakery. Everything looks wonderful. I want it all.
    I want to take them home and snuggle down on the couch and only get up for peppermint tea and gingersnaps and stay there till, like, July.
    Folks do seem to recommend the same authors. There’s this, “Do you know?” “Yes! Have you read?” “Yes. I love her. How about …” vibe.
    I’m planning to print this list out and haul it with me to the library and the bookshop. Maybe even pull some into the kindle. There’s enough new-to-me authors here it’ll keep me reading for a long time.

    Reply
  108. I’m looking at all these book suggestions and it’s like walking into a bakery. Everything looks wonderful. I want it all.
    I want to take them home and snuggle down on the couch and only get up for peppermint tea and gingersnaps and stay there till, like, July.
    Folks do seem to recommend the same authors. There’s this, “Do you know?” “Yes! Have you read?” “Yes. I love her. How about …” vibe.
    I’m planning to print this list out and haul it with me to the library and the bookshop. Maybe even pull some into the kindle. There’s enough new-to-me authors here it’ll keep me reading for a long time.

    Reply
  109. I’m looking at all these book suggestions and it’s like walking into a bakery. Everything looks wonderful. I want it all.
    I want to take them home and snuggle down on the couch and only get up for peppermint tea and gingersnaps and stay there till, like, July.
    Folks do seem to recommend the same authors. There’s this, “Do you know?” “Yes! Have you read?” “Yes. I love her. How about …” vibe.
    I’m planning to print this list out and haul it with me to the library and the bookshop. Maybe even pull some into the kindle. There’s enough new-to-me authors here it’ll keep me reading for a long time.

    Reply
  110. I’m looking at all these book suggestions and it’s like walking into a bakery. Everything looks wonderful. I want it all.
    I want to take them home and snuggle down on the couch and only get up for peppermint tea and gingersnaps and stay there till, like, July.
    Folks do seem to recommend the same authors. There’s this, “Do you know?” “Yes! Have you read?” “Yes. I love her. How about …” vibe.
    I’m planning to print this list out and haul it with me to the library and the bookshop. Maybe even pull some into the kindle. There’s enough new-to-me authors here it’ll keep me reading for a long time.

    Reply
  111. Joanna –
    MJ isn’t the only one here anxiously waiting the next book! You have no idea how many times I hit your website checking for updates. 🙂
    Donna

    Reply
  112. Joanna –
    MJ isn’t the only one here anxiously waiting the next book! You have no idea how many times I hit your website checking for updates. 🙂
    Donna

    Reply
  113. Joanna –
    MJ isn’t the only one here anxiously waiting the next book! You have no idea how many times I hit your website checking for updates. 🙂
    Donna

    Reply
  114. Joanna –
    MJ isn’t the only one here anxiously waiting the next book! You have no idea how many times I hit your website checking for updates. 🙂
    Donna

    Reply
  115. Joanna –
    MJ isn’t the only one here anxiously waiting the next book! You have no idea how many times I hit your website checking for updates. 🙂
    Donna

    Reply
  116. Thanks everyone for sharing! So interesting that so many of us have the same authors. It’s been a long time since I read Rosamund Pilcher, but now must go back. I remember loving WINTER SOLSTICE. And lots of other great suggestions. I’m not a sci-fi fan, but must try some of Mary Jo’s picks.

    Reply
  117. Thanks everyone for sharing! So interesting that so many of us have the same authors. It’s been a long time since I read Rosamund Pilcher, but now must go back. I remember loving WINTER SOLSTICE. And lots of other great suggestions. I’m not a sci-fi fan, but must try some of Mary Jo’s picks.

    Reply
  118. Thanks everyone for sharing! So interesting that so many of us have the same authors. It’s been a long time since I read Rosamund Pilcher, but now must go back. I remember loving WINTER SOLSTICE. And lots of other great suggestions. I’m not a sci-fi fan, but must try some of Mary Jo’s picks.

    Reply
  119. Thanks everyone for sharing! So interesting that so many of us have the same authors. It’s been a long time since I read Rosamund Pilcher, but now must go back. I remember loving WINTER SOLSTICE. And lots of other great suggestions. I’m not a sci-fi fan, but must try some of Mary Jo’s picks.

    Reply
  120. Thanks everyone for sharing! So interesting that so many of us have the same authors. It’s been a long time since I read Rosamund Pilcher, but now must go back. I remember loving WINTER SOLSTICE. And lots of other great suggestions. I’m not a sci-fi fan, but must try some of Mary Jo’s picks.

    Reply
  121. Joanna-
    I was thinking this provides a dream list of new/old books.
    With sequestration looming, I re-read nearly everything that I had kept because one day I would want to re-read. Yes, that library included Mary Jo’s and Joanna’s romances.
    All of you have mentioned some of my other favorites, Heyer, Mary Stewart, Austen, and Balogh.
    I have three SF authors who write series that I have re-read a lot: Sherwood Smith and Dave Trowbridge who wrote a four volume series as a team long ago and Peter Hamilton’s most recent trilogy. After great torture, both have satisfying endings.

    Reply
  122. Joanna-
    I was thinking this provides a dream list of new/old books.
    With sequestration looming, I re-read nearly everything that I had kept because one day I would want to re-read. Yes, that library included Mary Jo’s and Joanna’s romances.
    All of you have mentioned some of my other favorites, Heyer, Mary Stewart, Austen, and Balogh.
    I have three SF authors who write series that I have re-read a lot: Sherwood Smith and Dave Trowbridge who wrote a four volume series as a team long ago and Peter Hamilton’s most recent trilogy. After great torture, both have satisfying endings.

    Reply
  123. Joanna-
    I was thinking this provides a dream list of new/old books.
    With sequestration looming, I re-read nearly everything that I had kept because one day I would want to re-read. Yes, that library included Mary Jo’s and Joanna’s romances.
    All of you have mentioned some of my other favorites, Heyer, Mary Stewart, Austen, and Balogh.
    I have three SF authors who write series that I have re-read a lot: Sherwood Smith and Dave Trowbridge who wrote a four volume series as a team long ago and Peter Hamilton’s most recent trilogy. After great torture, both have satisfying endings.

    Reply
  124. Joanna-
    I was thinking this provides a dream list of new/old books.
    With sequestration looming, I re-read nearly everything that I had kept because one day I would want to re-read. Yes, that library included Mary Jo’s and Joanna’s romances.
    All of you have mentioned some of my other favorites, Heyer, Mary Stewart, Austen, and Balogh.
    I have three SF authors who write series that I have re-read a lot: Sherwood Smith and Dave Trowbridge who wrote a four volume series as a team long ago and Peter Hamilton’s most recent trilogy. After great torture, both have satisfying endings.

    Reply
  125. Joanna-
    I was thinking this provides a dream list of new/old books.
    With sequestration looming, I re-read nearly everything that I had kept because one day I would want to re-read. Yes, that library included Mary Jo’s and Joanna’s romances.
    All of you have mentioned some of my other favorites, Heyer, Mary Stewart, Austen, and Balogh.
    I have three SF authors who write series that I have re-read a lot: Sherwood Smith and Dave Trowbridge who wrote a four volume series as a team long ago and Peter Hamilton’s most recent trilogy. After great torture, both have satisfying endings.

    Reply
  126. Sorry I’ve been so incommunicado but we just moved across country and the new house isn’t set up for internet or anything else yet. My head is buried in painting cabinets
    I wish I could say that because I don’t re-read, that I don’t have a library, but that’s a lie. I just left a full library behind in the move and had dozens of book boxes moved. I don’t re-read for comfort, might have been a better statement. I re-read to learn how better writers create tension, character, etc. I re-read to grasp description or I might pick up one of the comedies for a quick smile. I love my books. But there are so many more to read!

    Reply
  127. Sorry I’ve been so incommunicado but we just moved across country and the new house isn’t set up for internet or anything else yet. My head is buried in painting cabinets
    I wish I could say that because I don’t re-read, that I don’t have a library, but that’s a lie. I just left a full library behind in the move and had dozens of book boxes moved. I don’t re-read for comfort, might have been a better statement. I re-read to learn how better writers create tension, character, etc. I re-read to grasp description or I might pick up one of the comedies for a quick smile. I love my books. But there are so many more to read!

    Reply
  128. Sorry I’ve been so incommunicado but we just moved across country and the new house isn’t set up for internet or anything else yet. My head is buried in painting cabinets
    I wish I could say that because I don’t re-read, that I don’t have a library, but that’s a lie. I just left a full library behind in the move and had dozens of book boxes moved. I don’t re-read for comfort, might have been a better statement. I re-read to learn how better writers create tension, character, etc. I re-read to grasp description or I might pick up one of the comedies for a quick smile. I love my books. But there are so many more to read!

    Reply
  129. Sorry I’ve been so incommunicado but we just moved across country and the new house isn’t set up for internet or anything else yet. My head is buried in painting cabinets
    I wish I could say that because I don’t re-read, that I don’t have a library, but that’s a lie. I just left a full library behind in the move and had dozens of book boxes moved. I don’t re-read for comfort, might have been a better statement. I re-read to learn how better writers create tension, character, etc. I re-read to grasp description or I might pick up one of the comedies for a quick smile. I love my books. But there are so many more to read!

    Reply
  130. Sorry I’ve been so incommunicado but we just moved across country and the new house isn’t set up for internet or anything else yet. My head is buried in painting cabinets
    I wish I could say that because I don’t re-read, that I don’t have a library, but that’s a lie. I just left a full library behind in the move and had dozens of book boxes moved. I don’t re-read for comfort, might have been a better statement. I re-read to learn how better writers create tension, character, etc. I re-read to grasp description or I might pick up one of the comedies for a quick smile. I love my books. But there are so many more to read!

    Reply
  131. I do re-read…a lot.
    Just finished Sizzle by Julie Garwood for about the forth time.
    Most of my re-readers have been mentioned. I’d like to add Carla Neggars as one of my re-reads.

    Reply
  132. I do re-read…a lot.
    Just finished Sizzle by Julie Garwood for about the forth time.
    Most of my re-readers have been mentioned. I’d like to add Carla Neggars as one of my re-reads.

    Reply
  133. I do re-read…a lot.
    Just finished Sizzle by Julie Garwood for about the forth time.
    Most of my re-readers have been mentioned. I’d like to add Carla Neggars as one of my re-reads.

    Reply
  134. I do re-read…a lot.
    Just finished Sizzle by Julie Garwood for about the forth time.
    Most of my re-readers have been mentioned. I’d like to add Carla Neggars as one of my re-reads.

    Reply
  135. I do re-read…a lot.
    Just finished Sizzle by Julie Garwood for about the forth time.
    Most of my re-readers have been mentioned. I’d like to add Carla Neggars as one of my re-reads.

    Reply
  136. All of these novels discussed here simply make me want to grab them up again and settle in for a terrific read. There’s nothing like the tried and true!

    Reply
  137. All of these novels discussed here simply make me want to grab them up again and settle in for a terrific read. There’s nothing like the tried and true!

    Reply
  138. All of these novels discussed here simply make me want to grab them up again and settle in for a terrific read. There’s nothing like the tried and true!

    Reply
  139. All of these novels discussed here simply make me want to grab them up again and settle in for a terrific read. There’s nothing like the tried and true!

    Reply
  140. All of these novels discussed here simply make me want to grab them up again and settle in for a terrific read. There’s nothing like the tried and true!

    Reply
  141. I used to reread more than I do now. When time stretched out in front of me in a seemingly limitless way, I would often read something known and loved rather than something new. Now, with time shortening, I am more likely to do the opposite. Also I am more impatient; if a book does not draw me in, or if I get bored by the middle, I will put it aside unfinished. Time is too precious to waste on unsatisfying books or unskilled authors.
    My list of rereadable authors is quite short and includes many mentioned here — Tolkien, Sayers, early Balogh, Austen.
    I do reread Heyer – one a month for the Almacks list – and I am finding myself less and less enthralled with each rereading. One of us has changed and I guess it’s not her so it must be me 🙂

    Reply
  142. I used to reread more than I do now. When time stretched out in front of me in a seemingly limitless way, I would often read something known and loved rather than something new. Now, with time shortening, I am more likely to do the opposite. Also I am more impatient; if a book does not draw me in, or if I get bored by the middle, I will put it aside unfinished. Time is too precious to waste on unsatisfying books or unskilled authors.
    My list of rereadable authors is quite short and includes many mentioned here — Tolkien, Sayers, early Balogh, Austen.
    I do reread Heyer – one a month for the Almacks list – and I am finding myself less and less enthralled with each rereading. One of us has changed and I guess it’s not her so it must be me 🙂

    Reply
  143. I used to reread more than I do now. When time stretched out in front of me in a seemingly limitless way, I would often read something known and loved rather than something new. Now, with time shortening, I am more likely to do the opposite. Also I am more impatient; if a book does not draw me in, or if I get bored by the middle, I will put it aside unfinished. Time is too precious to waste on unsatisfying books or unskilled authors.
    My list of rereadable authors is quite short and includes many mentioned here — Tolkien, Sayers, early Balogh, Austen.
    I do reread Heyer – one a month for the Almacks list – and I am finding myself less and less enthralled with each rereading. One of us has changed and I guess it’s not her so it must be me 🙂

    Reply
  144. I used to reread more than I do now. When time stretched out in front of me in a seemingly limitless way, I would often read something known and loved rather than something new. Now, with time shortening, I am more likely to do the opposite. Also I am more impatient; if a book does not draw me in, or if I get bored by the middle, I will put it aside unfinished. Time is too precious to waste on unsatisfying books or unskilled authors.
    My list of rereadable authors is quite short and includes many mentioned here — Tolkien, Sayers, early Balogh, Austen.
    I do reread Heyer – one a month for the Almacks list – and I am finding myself less and less enthralled with each rereading. One of us has changed and I guess it’s not her so it must be me 🙂

    Reply
  145. I used to reread more than I do now. When time stretched out in front of me in a seemingly limitless way, I would often read something known and loved rather than something new. Now, with time shortening, I am more likely to do the opposite. Also I am more impatient; if a book does not draw me in, or if I get bored by the middle, I will put it aside unfinished. Time is too precious to waste on unsatisfying books or unskilled authors.
    My list of rereadable authors is quite short and includes many mentioned here — Tolkien, Sayers, early Balogh, Austen.
    I do reread Heyer – one a month for the Almacks list – and I am finding myself less and less enthralled with each rereading. One of us has changed and I guess it’s not her so it must be me 🙂

    Reply
  146. I get to identify with Cara -Austen, Elizabeth Peters, (I love the Crocodile on the Sandbank) Mary Stewart. Also Dorothy Sayers- Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon, Mary Balogh, a number of Mary Jo’s books- the Rake, Diabolical Baron, The bargain, the Marriage Spell. I also love the first part of Laurie King’s “The Beekeepers Apprentice”, where the main character meets and gets to know Sherlock Holmes. A recent addition to my comfort books is Grace Burrowes– The Heir, The Soldier, The Virtuoso. I re-read a lot. I re-read Jo Beverly’s books, but they are a little too exciting to be called “comfort”.

    Reply
  147. I get to identify with Cara -Austen, Elizabeth Peters, (I love the Crocodile on the Sandbank) Mary Stewart. Also Dorothy Sayers- Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon, Mary Balogh, a number of Mary Jo’s books- the Rake, Diabolical Baron, The bargain, the Marriage Spell. I also love the first part of Laurie King’s “The Beekeepers Apprentice”, where the main character meets and gets to know Sherlock Holmes. A recent addition to my comfort books is Grace Burrowes– The Heir, The Soldier, The Virtuoso. I re-read a lot. I re-read Jo Beverly’s books, but they are a little too exciting to be called “comfort”.

    Reply
  148. I get to identify with Cara -Austen, Elizabeth Peters, (I love the Crocodile on the Sandbank) Mary Stewart. Also Dorothy Sayers- Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon, Mary Balogh, a number of Mary Jo’s books- the Rake, Diabolical Baron, The bargain, the Marriage Spell. I also love the first part of Laurie King’s “The Beekeepers Apprentice”, where the main character meets and gets to know Sherlock Holmes. A recent addition to my comfort books is Grace Burrowes– The Heir, The Soldier, The Virtuoso. I re-read a lot. I re-read Jo Beverly’s books, but they are a little too exciting to be called “comfort”.

    Reply
  149. I get to identify with Cara -Austen, Elizabeth Peters, (I love the Crocodile on the Sandbank) Mary Stewart. Also Dorothy Sayers- Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon, Mary Balogh, a number of Mary Jo’s books- the Rake, Diabolical Baron, The bargain, the Marriage Spell. I also love the first part of Laurie King’s “The Beekeepers Apprentice”, where the main character meets and gets to know Sherlock Holmes. A recent addition to my comfort books is Grace Burrowes– The Heir, The Soldier, The Virtuoso. I re-read a lot. I re-read Jo Beverly’s books, but they are a little too exciting to be called “comfort”.

    Reply
  150. I get to identify with Cara -Austen, Elizabeth Peters, (I love the Crocodile on the Sandbank) Mary Stewart. Also Dorothy Sayers- Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon, Mary Balogh, a number of Mary Jo’s books- the Rake, Diabolical Baron, The bargain, the Marriage Spell. I also love the first part of Laurie King’s “The Beekeepers Apprentice”, where the main character meets and gets to know Sherlock Holmes. A recent addition to my comfort books is Grace Burrowes– The Heir, The Soldier, The Virtuoso. I re-read a lot. I re-read Jo Beverly’s books, but they are a little too exciting to be called “comfort”.

    Reply
  151. We have a lot of comfort reads in common. I reread Patricia Wentworth, Dorothy Sayers, Balogh’s “Slightly” books, Heyer’s “Devil’s Cub”, and some of Jo Beverly and Edith Layton’s early books over and over again. I’ve got the Curse of Chalion on my Kindle, sounds like I better get around to reading it.

    Reply
  152. We have a lot of comfort reads in common. I reread Patricia Wentworth, Dorothy Sayers, Balogh’s “Slightly” books, Heyer’s “Devil’s Cub”, and some of Jo Beverly and Edith Layton’s early books over and over again. I’ve got the Curse of Chalion on my Kindle, sounds like I better get around to reading it.

    Reply
  153. We have a lot of comfort reads in common. I reread Patricia Wentworth, Dorothy Sayers, Balogh’s “Slightly” books, Heyer’s “Devil’s Cub”, and some of Jo Beverly and Edith Layton’s early books over and over again. I’ve got the Curse of Chalion on my Kindle, sounds like I better get around to reading it.

    Reply
  154. We have a lot of comfort reads in common. I reread Patricia Wentworth, Dorothy Sayers, Balogh’s “Slightly” books, Heyer’s “Devil’s Cub”, and some of Jo Beverly and Edith Layton’s early books over and over again. I’ve got the Curse of Chalion on my Kindle, sounds like I better get around to reading it.

    Reply
  155. We have a lot of comfort reads in common. I reread Patricia Wentworth, Dorothy Sayers, Balogh’s “Slightly” books, Heyer’s “Devil’s Cub”, and some of Jo Beverly and Edith Layton’s early books over and over again. I’ve got the Curse of Chalion on my Kindle, sounds like I better get around to reading it.

    Reply
  156. Rosamond Pilcher’s “September” along with the other two mentioned. Judith Merkle Riley’s books. Bailey White. And I have started to buy the Judge Dee books from a used-book seller, while keeping an eye out for trade editions of King’s Mary Russell.

    Reply
  157. Rosamond Pilcher’s “September” along with the other two mentioned. Judith Merkle Riley’s books. Bailey White. And I have started to buy the Judge Dee books from a used-book seller, while keeping an eye out for trade editions of King’s Mary Russell.

    Reply
  158. Rosamond Pilcher’s “September” along with the other two mentioned. Judith Merkle Riley’s books. Bailey White. And I have started to buy the Judge Dee books from a used-book seller, while keeping an eye out for trade editions of King’s Mary Russell.

    Reply
  159. Rosamond Pilcher’s “September” along with the other two mentioned. Judith Merkle Riley’s books. Bailey White. And I have started to buy the Judge Dee books from a used-book seller, while keeping an eye out for trade editions of King’s Mary Russell.

    Reply
  160. Rosamond Pilcher’s “September” along with the other two mentioned. Judith Merkle Riley’s books. Bailey White. And I have started to buy the Judge Dee books from a used-book seller, while keeping an eye out for trade editions of King’s Mary Russell.

    Reply
  161. Ooohhh, thank you all! My birthday is coming up and my nieces have asked what I want. I haven’t read “Moonspinners”, so will ask my nieces to buy me that! 🙂

    Reply
  162. Ooohhh, thank you all! My birthday is coming up and my nieces have asked what I want. I haven’t read “Moonspinners”, so will ask my nieces to buy me that! 🙂

    Reply
  163. Ooohhh, thank you all! My birthday is coming up and my nieces have asked what I want. I haven’t read “Moonspinners”, so will ask my nieces to buy me that! 🙂

    Reply
  164. Ooohhh, thank you all! My birthday is coming up and my nieces have asked what I want. I haven’t read “Moonspinners”, so will ask my nieces to buy me that! 🙂

    Reply
  165. Ooohhh, thank you all! My birthday is coming up and my nieces have asked what I want. I haven’t read “Moonspinners”, so will ask my nieces to buy me that! 🙂

    Reply
  166. Mary Stewart is one of my favourites and also Tolkien.
    My granddaughter has been scouring book markets and has presented me with replacement books of The Lord of the Rings, (all three books) The Hobbit and Silmarillian. I shall be going around op shops soon to look for Mary Stewart.

    Reply
  167. Mary Stewart is one of my favourites and also Tolkien.
    My granddaughter has been scouring book markets and has presented me with replacement books of The Lord of the Rings, (all three books) The Hobbit and Silmarillian. I shall be going around op shops soon to look for Mary Stewart.

    Reply
  168. Mary Stewart is one of my favourites and also Tolkien.
    My granddaughter has been scouring book markets and has presented me with replacement books of The Lord of the Rings, (all three books) The Hobbit and Silmarillian. I shall be going around op shops soon to look for Mary Stewart.

    Reply
  169. Mary Stewart is one of my favourites and also Tolkien.
    My granddaughter has been scouring book markets and has presented me with replacement books of The Lord of the Rings, (all three books) The Hobbit and Silmarillian. I shall be going around op shops soon to look for Mary Stewart.

    Reply
  170. Mary Stewart is one of my favourites and also Tolkien.
    My granddaughter has been scouring book markets and has presented me with replacement books of The Lord of the Rings, (all three books) The Hobbit and Silmarillian. I shall be going around op shops soon to look for Mary Stewart.

    Reply

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