a question or two for you

It’s Sunday, and it’s Edith, again. You’ve seen so much of me this week (interview last Sunday, and a blog last Thursday) that I thought it would be funand only fair to hear from you for a change.
So I’ve some questions – answer at will.

Have you ever taken out an old favorite romance from your shelves, read it, and wondered:

Have my tastes changed that much?
or
Why don’t they write books like that anymore?

and if you did, either way, which book was it?

Have you a new favorite romance and if so … do you find it resembles an old one?
That is, are your favorite themes the same as they were when you first began to read romance?
If not, what’s the difference?

Enquiring, not to mention snoopy, minds want to know!

:

44 thoughts on “a question or two for you”

  1. I’ve only been reading romances a couple years now, so things haven’t changed that much. LOL But for me, I think I read so much that as soon as I start a new book, I forget a lot of the last one. So when I reread a lot of older books this year, I’d say, oh, I forgot that. Even ones I just a 1000% loved, I’d forget a lot of stuff in them. LOL
    The themes. . . ah. . . hmm. I’m not really sure. Well, if you want to consider Regency a theme, then that significantly changed over time. I started off with a couple of contemporaries, picked up a few historicals. . . surfed online and then figured out I was starting to lean to the early 1800s, which is funny because I never heard of the period until I started reading them.
    Oh, and the biggest other change is when I started reading and now, I gained a whole lotta books in that time. 😉
    Lois

    Reply
  2. I’ve only been reading romances a couple years now, so things haven’t changed that much. LOL But for me, I think I read so much that as soon as I start a new book, I forget a lot of the last one. So when I reread a lot of older books this year, I’d say, oh, I forgot that. Even ones I just a 1000% loved, I’d forget a lot of stuff in them. LOL
    The themes. . . ah. . . hmm. I’m not really sure. Well, if you want to consider Regency a theme, then that significantly changed over time. I started off with a couple of contemporaries, picked up a few historicals. . . surfed online and then figured out I was starting to lean to the early 1800s, which is funny because I never heard of the period until I started reading them.
    Oh, and the biggest other change is when I started reading and now, I gained a whole lotta books in that time. 😉
    Lois

    Reply
  3. I’ve only been reading romances a couple years now, so things haven’t changed that much. LOL But for me, I think I read so much that as soon as I start a new book, I forget a lot of the last one. So when I reread a lot of older books this year, I’d say, oh, I forgot that. Even ones I just a 1000% loved, I’d forget a lot of stuff in them. LOL
    The themes. . . ah. . . hmm. I’m not really sure. Well, if you want to consider Regency a theme, then that significantly changed over time. I started off with a couple of contemporaries, picked up a few historicals. . . surfed online and then figured out I was starting to lean to the early 1800s, which is funny because I never heard of the period until I started reading them.
    Oh, and the biggest other change is when I started reading and now, I gained a whole lotta books in that time. 😉
    Lois

    Reply
  4. I’ve only been reading romances a couple years now, so things haven’t changed that much. LOL But for me, I think I read so much that as soon as I start a new book, I forget a lot of the last one. So when I reread a lot of older books this year, I’d say, oh, I forgot that. Even ones I just a 1000% loved, I’d forget a lot of stuff in them. LOL
    The themes. . . ah. . . hmm. I’m not really sure. Well, if you want to consider Regency a theme, then that significantly changed over time. I started off with a couple of contemporaries, picked up a few historicals. . . surfed online and then figured out I was starting to lean to the early 1800s, which is funny because I never heard of the period until I started reading them.
    Oh, and the biggest other change is when I started reading and now, I gained a whole lotta books in that time. 😉
    Lois

    Reply
  5. Hey Edith! Good to ‘see’ you again. You really threw me off when you posted on Thursday. Don’t you know I gauge the start of my week by your WW’s post? *g*
    I read my first romance in January of this year so I’m just a little wenchling. Recently I picked up my first Heyer (THE DEVIL’S CUB — what a hoot!) and now I’m reading AN INFAMOUS ARMY. I really like her style. And while I see shadows of Heyer in all of the WW’s books, I wish the style was more in vogue.
    Without a doubt I prefer historical. Even at that, I haven’t found a non-WordWench book I was willing to spend money on. Contemporary Romance — forget it. I want fantasy, not pseudo-reality. The only contemporaries I’ve ever read was Pat’s SMALL TOWN GIRL and CALIFORNIA GIRL. Both excellent, btw.
    As for themes… I like a slash (preferably a good hearty dose) of magic/sifi/paranormal. Comes from my Star Trek days. Mary Jo’s KOF and STOLEN MAGIC and Pat’s MUCH ADO ABOUT MAGIC come to mind. I also like stories that are based in a historical reality like Susan Scott’s DUCHESS and your QOS. Gives the time spent a double meaning — I was entertained (more like enthralled) and I learned something too.
    Hope Baby Hugo is doing well…
    Nina

    Reply
  6. Hey Edith! Good to ‘see’ you again. You really threw me off when you posted on Thursday. Don’t you know I gauge the start of my week by your WW’s post? *g*
    I read my first romance in January of this year so I’m just a little wenchling. Recently I picked up my first Heyer (THE DEVIL’S CUB — what a hoot!) and now I’m reading AN INFAMOUS ARMY. I really like her style. And while I see shadows of Heyer in all of the WW’s books, I wish the style was more in vogue.
    Without a doubt I prefer historical. Even at that, I haven’t found a non-WordWench book I was willing to spend money on. Contemporary Romance — forget it. I want fantasy, not pseudo-reality. The only contemporaries I’ve ever read was Pat’s SMALL TOWN GIRL and CALIFORNIA GIRL. Both excellent, btw.
    As for themes… I like a slash (preferably a good hearty dose) of magic/sifi/paranormal. Comes from my Star Trek days. Mary Jo’s KOF and STOLEN MAGIC and Pat’s MUCH ADO ABOUT MAGIC come to mind. I also like stories that are based in a historical reality like Susan Scott’s DUCHESS and your QOS. Gives the time spent a double meaning — I was entertained (more like enthralled) and I learned something too.
    Hope Baby Hugo is doing well…
    Nina

    Reply
  7. Hey Edith! Good to ‘see’ you again. You really threw me off when you posted on Thursday. Don’t you know I gauge the start of my week by your WW’s post? *g*
    I read my first romance in January of this year so I’m just a little wenchling. Recently I picked up my first Heyer (THE DEVIL’S CUB — what a hoot!) and now I’m reading AN INFAMOUS ARMY. I really like her style. And while I see shadows of Heyer in all of the WW’s books, I wish the style was more in vogue.
    Without a doubt I prefer historical. Even at that, I haven’t found a non-WordWench book I was willing to spend money on. Contemporary Romance — forget it. I want fantasy, not pseudo-reality. The only contemporaries I’ve ever read was Pat’s SMALL TOWN GIRL and CALIFORNIA GIRL. Both excellent, btw.
    As for themes… I like a slash (preferably a good hearty dose) of magic/sifi/paranormal. Comes from my Star Trek days. Mary Jo’s KOF and STOLEN MAGIC and Pat’s MUCH ADO ABOUT MAGIC come to mind. I also like stories that are based in a historical reality like Susan Scott’s DUCHESS and your QOS. Gives the time spent a double meaning — I was entertained (more like enthralled) and I learned something too.
    Hope Baby Hugo is doing well…
    Nina

    Reply
  8. Hey Edith! Good to ‘see’ you again. You really threw me off when you posted on Thursday. Don’t you know I gauge the start of my week by your WW’s post? *g*
    I read my first romance in January of this year so I’m just a little wenchling. Recently I picked up my first Heyer (THE DEVIL’S CUB — what a hoot!) and now I’m reading AN INFAMOUS ARMY. I really like her style. And while I see shadows of Heyer in all of the WW’s books, I wish the style was more in vogue.
    Without a doubt I prefer historical. Even at that, I haven’t found a non-WordWench book I was willing to spend money on. Contemporary Romance — forget it. I want fantasy, not pseudo-reality. The only contemporaries I’ve ever read was Pat’s SMALL TOWN GIRL and CALIFORNIA GIRL. Both excellent, btw.
    As for themes… I like a slash (preferably a good hearty dose) of magic/sifi/paranormal. Comes from my Star Trek days. Mary Jo’s KOF and STOLEN MAGIC and Pat’s MUCH ADO ABOUT MAGIC come to mind. I also like stories that are based in a historical reality like Susan Scott’s DUCHESS and your QOS. Gives the time spent a double meaning — I was entertained (more like enthralled) and I learned something too.
    Hope Baby Hugo is doing well…
    Nina

    Reply
  9. Edith, you asked if our tastes have changed very much. I have to say that since I became a writer, they have. Sometimes I mourn the loss of innocence. *g*
    I remember back when Steve and Ginny were just on the brink of finally being happy, and they got into another argument and off they went into another stormy journey toward reconciliation. I just wanted to read a romance where everyone got along!
    Of course, back then, I didn’t realize how utterly boring a book like that would be. I had no idea how difficult it was to actually write a book, either.
    But yes, my tastes have changed. I used to read a lot of Mary Stewarts and Victoria Holts and Georgette Heyers, and I loved their books. But as their novels began to fade from the scene and were replaced by more modern writers, I was introduced to other kinds of romances, and my tastes broadened.
    About two years ago I was rearranging my bookshelves and came across Forever Amber. I thumbed through it, reading various passages, trying to remember why I had loved it so much the first time I read it in my youth. After awhile, I put it back on the shelf. Had it been a Wench book I was thumbing through, I’d have found myself sprawled on the floor 5 hours later, deeply engrossed, the bookshelf forgotten. So yes, my tastes *have* changed. *g*

    Reply
  10. Edith, you asked if our tastes have changed very much. I have to say that since I became a writer, they have. Sometimes I mourn the loss of innocence. *g*
    I remember back when Steve and Ginny were just on the brink of finally being happy, and they got into another argument and off they went into another stormy journey toward reconciliation. I just wanted to read a romance where everyone got along!
    Of course, back then, I didn’t realize how utterly boring a book like that would be. I had no idea how difficult it was to actually write a book, either.
    But yes, my tastes have changed. I used to read a lot of Mary Stewarts and Victoria Holts and Georgette Heyers, and I loved their books. But as their novels began to fade from the scene and were replaced by more modern writers, I was introduced to other kinds of romances, and my tastes broadened.
    About two years ago I was rearranging my bookshelves and came across Forever Amber. I thumbed through it, reading various passages, trying to remember why I had loved it so much the first time I read it in my youth. After awhile, I put it back on the shelf. Had it been a Wench book I was thumbing through, I’d have found myself sprawled on the floor 5 hours later, deeply engrossed, the bookshelf forgotten. So yes, my tastes *have* changed. *g*

    Reply
  11. Edith, you asked if our tastes have changed very much. I have to say that since I became a writer, they have. Sometimes I mourn the loss of innocence. *g*
    I remember back when Steve and Ginny were just on the brink of finally being happy, and they got into another argument and off they went into another stormy journey toward reconciliation. I just wanted to read a romance where everyone got along!
    Of course, back then, I didn’t realize how utterly boring a book like that would be. I had no idea how difficult it was to actually write a book, either.
    But yes, my tastes have changed. I used to read a lot of Mary Stewarts and Victoria Holts and Georgette Heyers, and I loved their books. But as their novels began to fade from the scene and were replaced by more modern writers, I was introduced to other kinds of romances, and my tastes broadened.
    About two years ago I was rearranging my bookshelves and came across Forever Amber. I thumbed through it, reading various passages, trying to remember why I had loved it so much the first time I read it in my youth. After awhile, I put it back on the shelf. Had it been a Wench book I was thumbing through, I’d have found myself sprawled on the floor 5 hours later, deeply engrossed, the bookshelf forgotten. So yes, my tastes *have* changed. *g*

    Reply
  12. Edith, you asked if our tastes have changed very much. I have to say that since I became a writer, they have. Sometimes I mourn the loss of innocence. *g*
    I remember back when Steve and Ginny were just on the brink of finally being happy, and they got into another argument and off they went into another stormy journey toward reconciliation. I just wanted to read a romance where everyone got along!
    Of course, back then, I didn’t realize how utterly boring a book like that would be. I had no idea how difficult it was to actually write a book, either.
    But yes, my tastes have changed. I used to read a lot of Mary Stewarts and Victoria Holts and Georgette Heyers, and I loved their books. But as their novels began to fade from the scene and were replaced by more modern writers, I was introduced to other kinds of romances, and my tastes broadened.
    About two years ago I was rearranging my bookshelves and came across Forever Amber. I thumbed through it, reading various passages, trying to remember why I had loved it so much the first time I read it in my youth. After awhile, I put it back on the shelf. Had it been a Wench book I was thumbing through, I’d have found myself sprawled on the floor 5 hours later, deeply engrossed, the bookshelf forgotten. So yes, my tastes *have* changed. *g*

    Reply
  13. I still like the same type of books but I have broadened my tastes a bit. For years I only read traditional regencies but I now enjoy other historical novels, as well as a few conteporary paranormals. My favorite historical theme is still the Cinderella theme, or secret love hidden behind friendship.
    When I pull out my favorite traditionals they still give me a thrill, and that special feeling of reuniting with a long lost friend. I find myself wishing for more time so that I could reread all my old favorites, but know that it will only happen if I go bankrupt and can’t buy new books. But I still can’t get rid of them because I think “Maybe someday….”

    Reply
  14. I still like the same type of books but I have broadened my tastes a bit. For years I only read traditional regencies but I now enjoy other historical novels, as well as a few conteporary paranormals. My favorite historical theme is still the Cinderella theme, or secret love hidden behind friendship.
    When I pull out my favorite traditionals they still give me a thrill, and that special feeling of reuniting with a long lost friend. I find myself wishing for more time so that I could reread all my old favorites, but know that it will only happen if I go bankrupt and can’t buy new books. But I still can’t get rid of them because I think “Maybe someday….”

    Reply
  15. I still like the same type of books but I have broadened my tastes a bit. For years I only read traditional regencies but I now enjoy other historical novels, as well as a few conteporary paranormals. My favorite historical theme is still the Cinderella theme, or secret love hidden behind friendship.
    When I pull out my favorite traditionals they still give me a thrill, and that special feeling of reuniting with a long lost friend. I find myself wishing for more time so that I could reread all my old favorites, but know that it will only happen if I go bankrupt and can’t buy new books. But I still can’t get rid of them because I think “Maybe someday….”

    Reply
  16. I still like the same type of books but I have broadened my tastes a bit. For years I only read traditional regencies but I now enjoy other historical novels, as well as a few conteporary paranormals. My favorite historical theme is still the Cinderella theme, or secret love hidden behind friendship.
    When I pull out my favorite traditionals they still give me a thrill, and that special feeling of reuniting with a long lost friend. I find myself wishing for more time so that I could reread all my old favorites, but know that it will only happen if I go bankrupt and can’t buy new books. But I still can’t get rid of them because I think “Maybe someday….”

    Reply
  17. It happened to me with A Knight in Shining Armour – I read it twice and loved it, but the third time I pulled it off my shelf, a few years later, I didn’t find it nearly as engaging. Have no idea why. Oh well 🙂
    I’m not really sure that my tastes have changed, though. I still prefer romances with lots of history and complex plots.

    Reply
  18. It happened to me with A Knight in Shining Armour – I read it twice and loved it, but the third time I pulled it off my shelf, a few years later, I didn’t find it nearly as engaging. Have no idea why. Oh well 🙂
    I’m not really sure that my tastes have changed, though. I still prefer romances with lots of history and complex plots.

    Reply
  19. It happened to me with A Knight in Shining Armour – I read it twice and loved it, but the third time I pulled it off my shelf, a few years later, I didn’t find it nearly as engaging. Have no idea why. Oh well 🙂
    I’m not really sure that my tastes have changed, though. I still prefer romances with lots of history and complex plots.

    Reply
  20. It happened to me with A Knight in Shining Armour – I read it twice and loved it, but the third time I pulled it off my shelf, a few years later, I didn’t find it nearly as engaging. Have no idea why. Oh well 🙂
    I’m not really sure that my tastes have changed, though. I still prefer romances with lots of history and complex plots.

    Reply
  21. Since cyberspace just ate my reply to Loretta’s column, I’ll try not to waste much more time commenting in case this one disappears as well. But I think writing has changed my tastes as much as reading. I now see the purple prose and gaping flaws in storylines that I didn’t as an innocent reader. And all that lovely flowing verbiage I worshipped in the seventies is definitely a hindrance today. (did I say I was going to be brief? is to laugh)

    Reply
  22. Since cyberspace just ate my reply to Loretta’s column, I’ll try not to waste much more time commenting in case this one disappears as well. But I think writing has changed my tastes as much as reading. I now see the purple prose and gaping flaws in storylines that I didn’t as an innocent reader. And all that lovely flowing verbiage I worshipped in the seventies is definitely a hindrance today. (did I say I was going to be brief? is to laugh)

    Reply
  23. Since cyberspace just ate my reply to Loretta’s column, I’ll try not to waste much more time commenting in case this one disappears as well. But I think writing has changed my tastes as much as reading. I now see the purple prose and gaping flaws in storylines that I didn’t as an innocent reader. And all that lovely flowing verbiage I worshipped in the seventies is definitely a hindrance today. (did I say I was going to be brief? is to laugh)

    Reply
  24. Since cyberspace just ate my reply to Loretta’s column, I’ll try not to waste much more time commenting in case this one disappears as well. But I think writing has changed my tastes as much as reading. I now see the purple prose and gaping flaws in storylines that I didn’t as an innocent reader. And all that lovely flowing verbiage I worshipped in the seventies is definitely a hindrance today. (did I say I was going to be brief? is to laugh)

    Reply
  25. I read my 1st book after my died, it was Nora Roberts book, that got me going, then I discovered historicals, WOW… Garwood, Enoch,Quinn, Medeiros got me hooked… but the book I loved the most is Keeper of the Dream by Penelope Wiulliamson… I just loved the characters.. they were wonderful,I love all historicals what sticks out with me in thes case is that the heros are always fairly easy and loveable, somehow
    redemable… but the heroines are always tricky, not every authors can make a heroine likable… the are either “fiery redheads” (yuk) or they are too whiny, and refuse to give in until the last friggin chapter!! Keeper of the Dream is my fav.!! Awesome!!
    Then I found Loretta Chase !!YEY!!
    She writes the perfect hero AND heroine!!! Lord of the Scoundrals is a very close 2nd. the heroine (of course whose name I forget) whose GREAT, smart funny and like the whole rest of the book!!! GREAT!!JUST GREAT.. I might have read that and mr.Impossible, Lord Perfect at least 3 or 4 times each! YES
    I would love to see more stories where the couple works together to solve a problem against fighting against each other…
    Loretta any updates!! am dying here!! Tal

    Reply
  26. I read my 1st book after my died, it was Nora Roberts book, that got me going, then I discovered historicals, WOW… Garwood, Enoch,Quinn, Medeiros got me hooked… but the book I loved the most is Keeper of the Dream by Penelope Wiulliamson… I just loved the characters.. they were wonderful,I love all historicals what sticks out with me in thes case is that the heros are always fairly easy and loveable, somehow
    redemable… but the heroines are always tricky, not every authors can make a heroine likable… the are either “fiery redheads” (yuk) or they are too whiny, and refuse to give in until the last friggin chapter!! Keeper of the Dream is my fav.!! Awesome!!
    Then I found Loretta Chase !!YEY!!
    She writes the perfect hero AND heroine!!! Lord of the Scoundrals is a very close 2nd. the heroine (of course whose name I forget) whose GREAT, smart funny and like the whole rest of the book!!! GREAT!!JUST GREAT.. I might have read that and mr.Impossible, Lord Perfect at least 3 or 4 times each! YES
    I would love to see more stories where the couple works together to solve a problem against fighting against each other…
    Loretta any updates!! am dying here!! Tal

    Reply
  27. I read my 1st book after my died, it was Nora Roberts book, that got me going, then I discovered historicals, WOW… Garwood, Enoch,Quinn, Medeiros got me hooked… but the book I loved the most is Keeper of the Dream by Penelope Wiulliamson… I just loved the characters.. they were wonderful,I love all historicals what sticks out with me in thes case is that the heros are always fairly easy and loveable, somehow
    redemable… but the heroines are always tricky, not every authors can make a heroine likable… the are either “fiery redheads” (yuk) or they are too whiny, and refuse to give in until the last friggin chapter!! Keeper of the Dream is my fav.!! Awesome!!
    Then I found Loretta Chase !!YEY!!
    She writes the perfect hero AND heroine!!! Lord of the Scoundrals is a very close 2nd. the heroine (of course whose name I forget) whose GREAT, smart funny and like the whole rest of the book!!! GREAT!!JUST GREAT.. I might have read that and mr.Impossible, Lord Perfect at least 3 or 4 times each! YES
    I would love to see more stories where the couple works together to solve a problem against fighting against each other…
    Loretta any updates!! am dying here!! Tal

    Reply
  28. I read my 1st book after my died, it was Nora Roberts book, that got me going, then I discovered historicals, WOW… Garwood, Enoch,Quinn, Medeiros got me hooked… but the book I loved the most is Keeper of the Dream by Penelope Wiulliamson… I just loved the characters.. they were wonderful,I love all historicals what sticks out with me in thes case is that the heros are always fairly easy and loveable, somehow
    redemable… but the heroines are always tricky, not every authors can make a heroine likable… the are either “fiery redheads” (yuk) or they are too whiny, and refuse to give in until the last friggin chapter!! Keeper of the Dream is my fav.!! Awesome!!
    Then I found Loretta Chase !!YEY!!
    She writes the perfect hero AND heroine!!! Lord of the Scoundrals is a very close 2nd. the heroine (of course whose name I forget) whose GREAT, smart funny and like the whole rest of the book!!! GREAT!!JUST GREAT.. I might have read that and mr.Impossible, Lord Perfect at least 3 or 4 times each! YES
    I would love to see more stories where the couple works together to solve a problem against fighting against each other…
    Loretta any updates!! am dying here!! Tal

    Reply
  29. For me “These Old Shades” by Georgette Heyer and of course P&P by the incomparable Austen never fails to charm and never fails to make me sigh all over it.

    Reply
  30. For me “These Old Shades” by Georgette Heyer and of course P&P by the incomparable Austen never fails to charm and never fails to make me sigh all over it.

    Reply
  31. For me “These Old Shades” by Georgette Heyer and of course P&P by the incomparable Austen never fails to charm and never fails to make me sigh all over it.

    Reply
  32. For me “These Old Shades” by Georgette Heyer and of course P&P by the incomparable Austen never fails to charm and never fails to make me sigh all over it.

    Reply
  33. Oh Edith!
    Reading your post and the comments has made me nostalgic for my old Signet Regencies! I had stacks and stacks of them and they were such good friends. They were my first introduction to several of the Wenches (who were my favorites even then) and to some other wonderful writers (Carla Kelly and Mary Balogh, to name just a couple). I loved going to the bookstore and looking for the familiar names and knowing I was going to get a great read–there were three of them every month, they were so romantic, the shorter length was just great for my Young Mom with Babies lifestyle, they fit just beautifully in my purse, and they were relatively inexpensive to boot.
    I don’t know whether I’ve changed or Signet changed (or perhaps my memory is just rose-colored as usual!) but the ones that are published these days just don’t do it for me at all in general.
    I wish I could get back all those lovely Signets that I gave to the library in a fit of spring cleaning madness when we moved. What was I thinking? (and some of the rarer ones are going for quite a sum on Ebay these days!)

    Reply
  34. Oh Edith!
    Reading your post and the comments has made me nostalgic for my old Signet Regencies! I had stacks and stacks of them and they were such good friends. They were my first introduction to several of the Wenches (who were my favorites even then) and to some other wonderful writers (Carla Kelly and Mary Balogh, to name just a couple). I loved going to the bookstore and looking for the familiar names and knowing I was going to get a great read–there were three of them every month, they were so romantic, the shorter length was just great for my Young Mom with Babies lifestyle, they fit just beautifully in my purse, and they were relatively inexpensive to boot.
    I don’t know whether I’ve changed or Signet changed (or perhaps my memory is just rose-colored as usual!) but the ones that are published these days just don’t do it for me at all in general.
    I wish I could get back all those lovely Signets that I gave to the library in a fit of spring cleaning madness when we moved. What was I thinking? (and some of the rarer ones are going for quite a sum on Ebay these days!)

    Reply
  35. Oh Edith!
    Reading your post and the comments has made me nostalgic for my old Signet Regencies! I had stacks and stacks of them and they were such good friends. They were my first introduction to several of the Wenches (who were my favorites even then) and to some other wonderful writers (Carla Kelly and Mary Balogh, to name just a couple). I loved going to the bookstore and looking for the familiar names and knowing I was going to get a great read–there were three of them every month, they were so romantic, the shorter length was just great for my Young Mom with Babies lifestyle, they fit just beautifully in my purse, and they were relatively inexpensive to boot.
    I don’t know whether I’ve changed or Signet changed (or perhaps my memory is just rose-colored as usual!) but the ones that are published these days just don’t do it for me at all in general.
    I wish I could get back all those lovely Signets that I gave to the library in a fit of spring cleaning madness when we moved. What was I thinking? (and some of the rarer ones are going for quite a sum on Ebay these days!)

    Reply
  36. Oh Edith!
    Reading your post and the comments has made me nostalgic for my old Signet Regencies! I had stacks and stacks of them and they were such good friends. They were my first introduction to several of the Wenches (who were my favorites even then) and to some other wonderful writers (Carla Kelly and Mary Balogh, to name just a couple). I loved going to the bookstore and looking for the familiar names and knowing I was going to get a great read–there were three of them every month, they were so romantic, the shorter length was just great for my Young Mom with Babies lifestyle, they fit just beautifully in my purse, and they were relatively inexpensive to boot.
    I don’t know whether I’ve changed or Signet changed (or perhaps my memory is just rose-colored as usual!) but the ones that are published these days just don’t do it for me at all in general.
    I wish I could get back all those lovely Signets that I gave to the library in a fit of spring cleaning madness when we moved. What was I thinking? (and some of the rarer ones are going for quite a sum on Ebay these days!)

    Reply
  37. Hello All,
    Coming late to the party…
    My feel good book when I’m sick in bed (once a year, maybe) is always Jane Goodger’s WHEN THERE IS HOPE.
    It’s a soul/time travel piece where the heroine lands in the body of a detested Victorian east coast socialite and she has to convince everyone, including her dashing and distant husband, that she’s changed.
    I don’t even know if Goodger wrote any other books, and the beginning has some tricky POV problems. But the dang thing sucks me in every time!

    Reply
  38. Hello All,
    Coming late to the party…
    My feel good book when I’m sick in bed (once a year, maybe) is always Jane Goodger’s WHEN THERE IS HOPE.
    It’s a soul/time travel piece where the heroine lands in the body of a detested Victorian east coast socialite and she has to convince everyone, including her dashing and distant husband, that she’s changed.
    I don’t even know if Goodger wrote any other books, and the beginning has some tricky POV problems. But the dang thing sucks me in every time!

    Reply
  39. Hello All,
    Coming late to the party…
    My feel good book when I’m sick in bed (once a year, maybe) is always Jane Goodger’s WHEN THERE IS HOPE.
    It’s a soul/time travel piece where the heroine lands in the body of a detested Victorian east coast socialite and she has to convince everyone, including her dashing and distant husband, that she’s changed.
    I don’t even know if Goodger wrote any other books, and the beginning has some tricky POV problems. But the dang thing sucks me in every time!

    Reply
  40. Hello All,
    Coming late to the party…
    My feel good book when I’m sick in bed (once a year, maybe) is always Jane Goodger’s WHEN THERE IS HOPE.
    It’s a soul/time travel piece where the heroine lands in the body of a detested Victorian east coast socialite and she has to convince everyone, including her dashing and distant husband, that she’s changed.
    I don’t even know if Goodger wrote any other books, and the beginning has some tricky POV problems. But the dang thing sucks me in every time!

    Reply
  41. I first started reading romance in junior high/high school, and my tastes have changed a lot since then. I started out inhaling the short category – particularly Harlequin Presents, which I thought was full of glamorous, sophisticated stories – and the historicals of the late 80’s/early 90’s (so I at least missed the rape stage). I loved the fairy tale – in historical and in contemporary. I also was perfectly fine with a romance that’s whole structural underpinning was sexual tension and progress through the stages of intimacy. When I reread the favorites of junior high/high school, I’m almost always disappointed – and a little embarassed about my taste back then.
    My taste has really changed. Now, I’m much more into a novel with a strong story (aka plot) or strong, intelligent, complex characters. I think Mary Jo Putney destroyed my enjoyment of the “fluff” I used to read because she showed me that these stories could be so much more. She (and Ken Follett) taught me what “voice” was because I kept trying to find a book just like MJP or KF would write and never ever could.
    I do miss the historicals with big, sweeping stories. I can still find some, but not as many as before. I too loved Penelope Williamson’s old historicals. I also loved all those old Signet Regencies though. I do think though that the “best” Signet Regency authors moved on to single title, so they weren’t the same. I REALLY missed the Christmas anthology this fall though.
    Re: Jane Goodger
    I LOVED Jane Goodger, and I fear she no longer writes – though I don’t know that for sure. I read When There Is Hope, her other time travels, and her northeastern U.S. historicals. They were all so unique and good! I fear that her historical settings were not the popular ones, so she didn’t sell well enough to still be published – but I can’t confirm this.
    The two Jane Goodger’s that stick out in my mind the most is the one about the sea captain who washes up in POOR Cape Cod and falls in love with a woman who is basically subsisting and the one that takes place in Springfield, MA (20 minutes from where I grew up). The hero and heroine are in a troubled marriage, and the heroine is framed for a crime, and the hero must “save” her – and I think he’s the D.A. Anyway, I love Jane Goodger too.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  42. I first started reading romance in junior high/high school, and my tastes have changed a lot since then. I started out inhaling the short category – particularly Harlequin Presents, which I thought was full of glamorous, sophisticated stories – and the historicals of the late 80’s/early 90’s (so I at least missed the rape stage). I loved the fairy tale – in historical and in contemporary. I also was perfectly fine with a romance that’s whole structural underpinning was sexual tension and progress through the stages of intimacy. When I reread the favorites of junior high/high school, I’m almost always disappointed – and a little embarassed about my taste back then.
    My taste has really changed. Now, I’m much more into a novel with a strong story (aka plot) or strong, intelligent, complex characters. I think Mary Jo Putney destroyed my enjoyment of the “fluff” I used to read because she showed me that these stories could be so much more. She (and Ken Follett) taught me what “voice” was because I kept trying to find a book just like MJP or KF would write and never ever could.
    I do miss the historicals with big, sweeping stories. I can still find some, but not as many as before. I too loved Penelope Williamson’s old historicals. I also loved all those old Signet Regencies though. I do think though that the “best” Signet Regency authors moved on to single title, so they weren’t the same. I REALLY missed the Christmas anthology this fall though.
    Re: Jane Goodger
    I LOVED Jane Goodger, and I fear she no longer writes – though I don’t know that for sure. I read When There Is Hope, her other time travels, and her northeastern U.S. historicals. They were all so unique and good! I fear that her historical settings were not the popular ones, so she didn’t sell well enough to still be published – but I can’t confirm this.
    The two Jane Goodger’s that stick out in my mind the most is the one about the sea captain who washes up in POOR Cape Cod and falls in love with a woman who is basically subsisting and the one that takes place in Springfield, MA (20 minutes from where I grew up). The hero and heroine are in a troubled marriage, and the heroine is framed for a crime, and the hero must “save” her – and I think he’s the D.A. Anyway, I love Jane Goodger too.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  43. I first started reading romance in junior high/high school, and my tastes have changed a lot since then. I started out inhaling the short category – particularly Harlequin Presents, which I thought was full of glamorous, sophisticated stories – and the historicals of the late 80’s/early 90’s (so I at least missed the rape stage). I loved the fairy tale – in historical and in contemporary. I also was perfectly fine with a romance that’s whole structural underpinning was sexual tension and progress through the stages of intimacy. When I reread the favorites of junior high/high school, I’m almost always disappointed – and a little embarassed about my taste back then.
    My taste has really changed. Now, I’m much more into a novel with a strong story (aka plot) or strong, intelligent, complex characters. I think Mary Jo Putney destroyed my enjoyment of the “fluff” I used to read because she showed me that these stories could be so much more. She (and Ken Follett) taught me what “voice” was because I kept trying to find a book just like MJP or KF would write and never ever could.
    I do miss the historicals with big, sweeping stories. I can still find some, but not as many as before. I too loved Penelope Williamson’s old historicals. I also loved all those old Signet Regencies though. I do think though that the “best” Signet Regency authors moved on to single title, so they weren’t the same. I REALLY missed the Christmas anthology this fall though.
    Re: Jane Goodger
    I LOVED Jane Goodger, and I fear she no longer writes – though I don’t know that for sure. I read When There Is Hope, her other time travels, and her northeastern U.S. historicals. They were all so unique and good! I fear that her historical settings were not the popular ones, so she didn’t sell well enough to still be published – but I can’t confirm this.
    The two Jane Goodger’s that stick out in my mind the most is the one about the sea captain who washes up in POOR Cape Cod and falls in love with a woman who is basically subsisting and the one that takes place in Springfield, MA (20 minutes from where I grew up). The hero and heroine are in a troubled marriage, and the heroine is framed for a crime, and the hero must “save” her – and I think he’s the D.A. Anyway, I love Jane Goodger too.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  44. I first started reading romance in junior high/high school, and my tastes have changed a lot since then. I started out inhaling the short category – particularly Harlequin Presents, which I thought was full of glamorous, sophisticated stories – and the historicals of the late 80’s/early 90’s (so I at least missed the rape stage). I loved the fairy tale – in historical and in contemporary. I also was perfectly fine with a romance that’s whole structural underpinning was sexual tension and progress through the stages of intimacy. When I reread the favorites of junior high/high school, I’m almost always disappointed – and a little embarassed about my taste back then.
    My taste has really changed. Now, I’m much more into a novel with a strong story (aka plot) or strong, intelligent, complex characters. I think Mary Jo Putney destroyed my enjoyment of the “fluff” I used to read because she showed me that these stories could be so much more. She (and Ken Follett) taught me what “voice” was because I kept trying to find a book just like MJP or KF would write and never ever could.
    I do miss the historicals with big, sweeping stories. I can still find some, but not as many as before. I too loved Penelope Williamson’s old historicals. I also loved all those old Signet Regencies though. I do think though that the “best” Signet Regency authors moved on to single title, so they weren’t the same. I REALLY missed the Christmas anthology this fall though.
    Re: Jane Goodger
    I LOVED Jane Goodger, and I fear she no longer writes – though I don’t know that for sure. I read When There Is Hope, her other time travels, and her northeastern U.S. historicals. They were all so unique and good! I fear that her historical settings were not the popular ones, so she didn’t sell well enough to still be published – but I can’t confirm this.
    The two Jane Goodger’s that stick out in my mind the most is the one about the sea captain who washes up in POOR Cape Cod and falls in love with a woman who is basically subsisting and the one that takes place in Springfield, MA (20 minutes from where I grew up). The hero and heroine are in a troubled marriage, and the heroine is framed for a crime, and the hero must “save” her – and I think he’s the D.A. Anyway, I love Jane Goodger too.
    -Michelle

    Reply

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