A Plague of Dragons

Dragonlady_1
Pat Rice here, just back from the Celebrate Romance conference in Kansas City. We had a rowdy good time, and I’ll print pictures once I download them. Really, we need more of these reader/writer conferences where we can all just sit down and talk about books and where they’re going.

But apparently it turned into Dragon Month while I was gone! A plague of dragons creates interesting images in my head, but mostly as a curse of some kind. A plague of dragons be upon you!  But otherwise, dragons don’t interest me much more than villains.  One kills them and wins the fair maiden, right? Like unicorns, they’re there as metaphors in fairy tales, but it never occurred to me to write about one. (The lovely lady and dragon on your left was colored by our very own Jo
with some software that makes me shiver just thinking about it!)

Admittedly, I wasn’t exposed to many fairy tales when I was little. I have a distinct memory ofFlyingfairy_1
deserting my friends to peruse their parents’ library where I’d found a wonderful old fairy tale book.  But sadly, those were the only fairy stories I ever saw until I was old enough to buy my own, so maybe I missed out on that fantasy.

Instead, I read fun books like Eleanor Cameron’s Mushroom Planet series, so I got Mushroomplanet
sucked into a warped version of science fiction at an early age.  I adore space alien books, and I miss the futuristics of the nineties. Apparently, I’m in the minority.

I went on to lap up all things Isaac Asimov and Ray Bradbury, who is a fantasy writer of the best sort. I branched out into psychic phenomena and von Daniken’s wild theories of long ago visitors from other planets by high school. My aptitude was pretty definitely in the sciences, but I was willing to consider all possibilities.

In other words, unless dragons were dinosaurs, I wasn’t interested.  And the Munsters are as close to vampires as I can get, even though there are scientific theories about them, too. Blood, yuck. My mother could never convince me to be a doctor. Weak stomach.

So, unlike Susan/Miranda, I’m quite happy contemplating witches and wizards and space aliens and125
even ghosts, because they have some connection to the real world as my open mind sees it. Trolls are fine when Pratchett writes them, and fairies ought to be fey creatures who live in the woods and perform mischievous magic, so they’re in my universe as interesting creatures. But dragons? Sorry, Tolkien’s hoarder was much too obviously metaphorical to hold my interest. So I guess I’ll leave that fantasy to Mary Jo, et al.   

Have you ever thought about what books in your childhood affect your current reading tastes now? Heyer fans gobble up Regencies, right? Give us the name of the guilty culprits that led you astray from literary tomes and into the wonderful wacky world of mass market fiction….

80 thoughts on “A Plague of Dragons”

  1. I got in too late last night to comment on paranormal fiction, but then realized I had read quite a bit of it when I was young. I devoured Arthur C. Clark, Arthurian legend stuff with witches and warlocks, Edward Eager’s magic series which were so fabulously inventive that I re-read them to this day.
    I stopped reading fantasy and romance for decades, but I’m making up for lost time. Reality bites. Bring on the dragons and the damsels in distress.

    Reply
  2. I got in too late last night to comment on paranormal fiction, but then realized I had read quite a bit of it when I was young. I devoured Arthur C. Clark, Arthurian legend stuff with witches and warlocks, Edward Eager’s magic series which were so fabulously inventive that I re-read them to this day.
    I stopped reading fantasy and romance for decades, but I’m making up for lost time. Reality bites. Bring on the dragons and the damsels in distress.

    Reply
  3. I got in too late last night to comment on paranormal fiction, but then realized I had read quite a bit of it when I was young. I devoured Arthur C. Clark, Arthurian legend stuff with witches and warlocks, Edward Eager’s magic series which were so fabulously inventive that I re-read them to this day.
    I stopped reading fantasy and romance for decades, but I’m making up for lost time. Reality bites. Bring on the dragons and the damsels in distress.

    Reply
  4. I got in too late last night to comment on paranormal fiction, but then realized I had read quite a bit of it when I was young. I devoured Arthur C. Clark, Arthurian legend stuff with witches and warlocks, Edward Eager’s magic series which were so fabulously inventive that I re-read them to this day.
    I stopped reading fantasy and romance for decades, but I’m making up for lost time. Reality bites. Bring on the dragons and the damsels in distress.

    Reply
  5. My favourite book when I was three years old (before I could read) was “Where Do Babies Come From?” with all the great and realistic pictures it had. I made my Grampa read it to me, even though it embarrassed him to no end. I’m pretty sure he decided that it was “taking one for the team”, so to speak, because my mum was pregnant at the time.
    Personally I think that’s the reason I am so interested in sex. I’ll read all kinds of fiction and non-fiction on the subject, whereas I’m very picky about what I read otherwise.

    Reply
  6. My favourite book when I was three years old (before I could read) was “Where Do Babies Come From?” with all the great and realistic pictures it had. I made my Grampa read it to me, even though it embarrassed him to no end. I’m pretty sure he decided that it was “taking one for the team”, so to speak, because my mum was pregnant at the time.
    Personally I think that’s the reason I am so interested in sex. I’ll read all kinds of fiction and non-fiction on the subject, whereas I’m very picky about what I read otherwise.

    Reply
  7. My favourite book when I was three years old (before I could read) was “Where Do Babies Come From?” with all the great and realistic pictures it had. I made my Grampa read it to me, even though it embarrassed him to no end. I’m pretty sure he decided that it was “taking one for the team”, so to speak, because my mum was pregnant at the time.
    Personally I think that’s the reason I am so interested in sex. I’ll read all kinds of fiction and non-fiction on the subject, whereas I’m very picky about what I read otherwise.

    Reply
  8. My favourite book when I was three years old (before I could read) was “Where Do Babies Come From?” with all the great and realistic pictures it had. I made my Grampa read it to me, even though it embarrassed him to no end. I’m pretty sure he decided that it was “taking one for the team”, so to speak, because my mum was pregnant at the time.
    Personally I think that’s the reason I am so interested in sex. I’ll read all kinds of fiction and non-fiction on the subject, whereas I’m very picky about what I read otherwise.

    Reply
  9. All sorts of book shaped my reading and writing. The first books I really dove into were the Chronicles of Narnia. Soon after I fell in love with all the Fairy Books by Andrew Lang. Then just about everything by Louisa May Alcott–there’s some nice proto-romance for you. In third grade I started sneaking my mom’s Georgette Heyers. The principal had a hissy fit when she found one in my bookbag. I wonder what she would think if she knew that I grew up to write “those books”? 🙂

    Reply
  10. All sorts of book shaped my reading and writing. The first books I really dove into were the Chronicles of Narnia. Soon after I fell in love with all the Fairy Books by Andrew Lang. Then just about everything by Louisa May Alcott–there’s some nice proto-romance for you. In third grade I started sneaking my mom’s Georgette Heyers. The principal had a hissy fit when she found one in my bookbag. I wonder what she would think if she knew that I grew up to write “those books”? 🙂

    Reply
  11. All sorts of book shaped my reading and writing. The first books I really dove into were the Chronicles of Narnia. Soon after I fell in love with all the Fairy Books by Andrew Lang. Then just about everything by Louisa May Alcott–there’s some nice proto-romance for you. In third grade I started sneaking my mom’s Georgette Heyers. The principal had a hissy fit when she found one in my bookbag. I wonder what she would think if she knew that I grew up to write “those books”? 🙂

    Reply
  12. All sorts of book shaped my reading and writing. The first books I really dove into were the Chronicles of Narnia. Soon after I fell in love with all the Fairy Books by Andrew Lang. Then just about everything by Louisa May Alcott–there’s some nice proto-romance for you. In third grade I started sneaking my mom’s Georgette Heyers. The principal had a hissy fit when she found one in my bookbag. I wonder what she would think if she knew that I grew up to write “those books”? 🙂

    Reply
  13. I was another book vaccuum, sucking up popular fiction of all sorts when I was a kid. Animal books, mysteries, all the YA sff the library had, plus, oddly, boys’ sports series. That’s odd because as an adult, my interest in sports is in minus numbers, but maybe reading all those guy books as a kid helps me write heroes.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  14. I was another book vaccuum, sucking up popular fiction of all sorts when I was a kid. Animal books, mysteries, all the YA sff the library had, plus, oddly, boys’ sports series. That’s odd because as an adult, my interest in sports is in minus numbers, but maybe reading all those guy books as a kid helps me write heroes.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  15. I was another book vaccuum, sucking up popular fiction of all sorts when I was a kid. Animal books, mysteries, all the YA sff the library had, plus, oddly, boys’ sports series. That’s odd because as an adult, my interest in sports is in minus numbers, but maybe reading all those guy books as a kid helps me write heroes.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  16. I was another book vaccuum, sucking up popular fiction of all sorts when I was a kid. Animal books, mysteries, all the YA sff the library had, plus, oddly, boys’ sports series. That’s odd because as an adult, my interest in sports is in minus numbers, but maybe reading all those guy books as a kid helps me write heroes.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  17. Pat, you dragon-slayer nay-sayer, you!
    Once I was old enough to choose my own books, I was always hunting for books with girl protagonists: Louisa May Alcott(not just Little Women, but her A Round Dozen, which was a major fav), the LIttle House books, The Secret Garden, and The LIttle Princess. I always preferred books set in the past instead of contemporary ones. Escape from middle-class New Jersey!!!
    The illustrations were important to me, too. I’d read just about anything that was illustrated by Tasha Tudor, and even now I have a print of hers on the wall beside my computer.
    But I never did like Nancy Drew (I thought Nancy was dorky, and besides, one of my friend’s fathers painted cover art for the books, using my friend as a model, which kind of creeped me out.)
    I soon moved on to big old-fashioned adventure books like The Three Musketeers, plus newer ones by Kenneth Roberts and Frank Yerby. Never could get into Georgette Heyer, though I distinctly remember the covers on the editions in my high school library. Wasn’t enough action in them to suit me then, and all years later, there still isn’t. *g*
    But the real revelation was Forever Amber, who, clearly, is haunting me still. I checked that one out of the library again and again, each time praying that my mother wouldn’† look past the worn cover.
    And, like Mary Jo, I read all those sports-hero books, too (though I’m addicted to ESPN, so obviously they affected us very differently. *GGG*)

    Reply
  18. Pat, you dragon-slayer nay-sayer, you!
    Once I was old enough to choose my own books, I was always hunting for books with girl protagonists: Louisa May Alcott(not just Little Women, but her A Round Dozen, which was a major fav), the LIttle House books, The Secret Garden, and The LIttle Princess. I always preferred books set in the past instead of contemporary ones. Escape from middle-class New Jersey!!!
    The illustrations were important to me, too. I’d read just about anything that was illustrated by Tasha Tudor, and even now I have a print of hers on the wall beside my computer.
    But I never did like Nancy Drew (I thought Nancy was dorky, and besides, one of my friend’s fathers painted cover art for the books, using my friend as a model, which kind of creeped me out.)
    I soon moved on to big old-fashioned adventure books like The Three Musketeers, plus newer ones by Kenneth Roberts and Frank Yerby. Never could get into Georgette Heyer, though I distinctly remember the covers on the editions in my high school library. Wasn’t enough action in them to suit me then, and all years later, there still isn’t. *g*
    But the real revelation was Forever Amber, who, clearly, is haunting me still. I checked that one out of the library again and again, each time praying that my mother wouldn’† look past the worn cover.
    And, like Mary Jo, I read all those sports-hero books, too (though I’m addicted to ESPN, so obviously they affected us very differently. *GGG*)

    Reply
  19. Pat, you dragon-slayer nay-sayer, you!
    Once I was old enough to choose my own books, I was always hunting for books with girl protagonists: Louisa May Alcott(not just Little Women, but her A Round Dozen, which was a major fav), the LIttle House books, The Secret Garden, and The LIttle Princess. I always preferred books set in the past instead of contemporary ones. Escape from middle-class New Jersey!!!
    The illustrations were important to me, too. I’d read just about anything that was illustrated by Tasha Tudor, and even now I have a print of hers on the wall beside my computer.
    But I never did like Nancy Drew (I thought Nancy was dorky, and besides, one of my friend’s fathers painted cover art for the books, using my friend as a model, which kind of creeped me out.)
    I soon moved on to big old-fashioned adventure books like The Three Musketeers, plus newer ones by Kenneth Roberts and Frank Yerby. Never could get into Georgette Heyer, though I distinctly remember the covers on the editions in my high school library. Wasn’t enough action in them to suit me then, and all years later, there still isn’t. *g*
    But the real revelation was Forever Amber, who, clearly, is haunting me still. I checked that one out of the library again and again, each time praying that my mother wouldn’† look past the worn cover.
    And, like Mary Jo, I read all those sports-hero books, too (though I’m addicted to ESPN, so obviously they affected us very differently. *GGG*)

    Reply
  20. Pat, you dragon-slayer nay-sayer, you!
    Once I was old enough to choose my own books, I was always hunting for books with girl protagonists: Louisa May Alcott(not just Little Women, but her A Round Dozen, which was a major fav), the LIttle House books, The Secret Garden, and The LIttle Princess. I always preferred books set in the past instead of contemporary ones. Escape from middle-class New Jersey!!!
    The illustrations were important to me, too. I’d read just about anything that was illustrated by Tasha Tudor, and even now I have a print of hers on the wall beside my computer.
    But I never did like Nancy Drew (I thought Nancy was dorky, and besides, one of my friend’s fathers painted cover art for the books, using my friend as a model, which kind of creeped me out.)
    I soon moved on to big old-fashioned adventure books like The Three Musketeers, plus newer ones by Kenneth Roberts and Frank Yerby. Never could get into Georgette Heyer, though I distinctly remember the covers on the editions in my high school library. Wasn’t enough action in them to suit me then, and all years later, there still isn’t. *g*
    But the real revelation was Forever Amber, who, clearly, is haunting me still. I checked that one out of the library again and again, each time praying that my mother wouldn’† look past the worn cover.
    And, like Mary Jo, I read all those sports-hero books, too (though I’m addicted to ESPN, so obviously they affected us very differently. *GGG*)

    Reply
  21. I loved Narnia and the Little House books above all else as a child. I think the former made me a fantasy reader, gave me a certain degree of Anglophilia, and fed my love of language, while the latter made me a lover of historical fiction in general, and probably encouraged my taste for relatively gritty and realistic stories. In a way, Almanzo and Laura were my first romance–followed very soon by Han and Leia. I had a novelization of The Empire Strikes Back that got just as tattered as those Narnia and Little House books, now that I think of it!
    Once I moved on to the adult section of the library (when I was, oh, 10 or 11) it was Georgette Heyer and Clare Darcy’s Regencies, along with favorites of my mother’s like Eugenia Price, Alexandra Ripley, and Catherine Cookson. I went through a John Jakes glom around the time of the North & South miniseries. And that wasn’t my only adolescent miniseries-driven read–there was THE THORN BIRDS, not to mention THE WINDS OF WAR and WAR AND REMEMBRANCE. Good stuff.
    Incidentally, I’m only barely aware that there was such a thing as boys’ sports stories (unless things like the Black Stallion books count), but I’m a huge sports fan–I grew up in college football country, went to a basketball school, and moved to a baseball town (less than four weeks to Opening Day, and I have tickets and the day off!). I guess it just soaks in from the environment.

    Reply
  22. I loved Narnia and the Little House books above all else as a child. I think the former made me a fantasy reader, gave me a certain degree of Anglophilia, and fed my love of language, while the latter made me a lover of historical fiction in general, and probably encouraged my taste for relatively gritty and realistic stories. In a way, Almanzo and Laura were my first romance–followed very soon by Han and Leia. I had a novelization of The Empire Strikes Back that got just as tattered as those Narnia and Little House books, now that I think of it!
    Once I moved on to the adult section of the library (when I was, oh, 10 or 11) it was Georgette Heyer and Clare Darcy’s Regencies, along with favorites of my mother’s like Eugenia Price, Alexandra Ripley, and Catherine Cookson. I went through a John Jakes glom around the time of the North & South miniseries. And that wasn’t my only adolescent miniseries-driven read–there was THE THORN BIRDS, not to mention THE WINDS OF WAR and WAR AND REMEMBRANCE. Good stuff.
    Incidentally, I’m only barely aware that there was such a thing as boys’ sports stories (unless things like the Black Stallion books count), but I’m a huge sports fan–I grew up in college football country, went to a basketball school, and moved to a baseball town (less than four weeks to Opening Day, and I have tickets and the day off!). I guess it just soaks in from the environment.

    Reply
  23. I loved Narnia and the Little House books above all else as a child. I think the former made me a fantasy reader, gave me a certain degree of Anglophilia, and fed my love of language, while the latter made me a lover of historical fiction in general, and probably encouraged my taste for relatively gritty and realistic stories. In a way, Almanzo and Laura were my first romance–followed very soon by Han and Leia. I had a novelization of The Empire Strikes Back that got just as tattered as those Narnia and Little House books, now that I think of it!
    Once I moved on to the adult section of the library (when I was, oh, 10 or 11) it was Georgette Heyer and Clare Darcy’s Regencies, along with favorites of my mother’s like Eugenia Price, Alexandra Ripley, and Catherine Cookson. I went through a John Jakes glom around the time of the North & South miniseries. And that wasn’t my only adolescent miniseries-driven read–there was THE THORN BIRDS, not to mention THE WINDS OF WAR and WAR AND REMEMBRANCE. Good stuff.
    Incidentally, I’m only barely aware that there was such a thing as boys’ sports stories (unless things like the Black Stallion books count), but I’m a huge sports fan–I grew up in college football country, went to a basketball school, and moved to a baseball town (less than four weeks to Opening Day, and I have tickets and the day off!). I guess it just soaks in from the environment.

    Reply
  24. I loved Narnia and the Little House books above all else as a child. I think the former made me a fantasy reader, gave me a certain degree of Anglophilia, and fed my love of language, while the latter made me a lover of historical fiction in general, and probably encouraged my taste for relatively gritty and realistic stories. In a way, Almanzo and Laura were my first romance–followed very soon by Han and Leia. I had a novelization of The Empire Strikes Back that got just as tattered as those Narnia and Little House books, now that I think of it!
    Once I moved on to the adult section of the library (when I was, oh, 10 or 11) it was Georgette Heyer and Clare Darcy’s Regencies, along with favorites of my mother’s like Eugenia Price, Alexandra Ripley, and Catherine Cookson. I went through a John Jakes glom around the time of the North & South miniseries. And that wasn’t my only adolescent miniseries-driven read–there was THE THORN BIRDS, not to mention THE WINDS OF WAR and WAR AND REMEMBRANCE. Good stuff.
    Incidentally, I’m only barely aware that there was such a thing as boys’ sports stories (unless things like the Black Stallion books count), but I’m a huge sports fan–I grew up in college football country, went to a basketball school, and moved to a baseball town (less than four weeks to Opening Day, and I have tickets and the day off!). I guess it just soaks in from the environment.

    Reply
  25. Oh, meardaba, that’s fabulous! You must have been born a trollop, but a smart one to figure out all the tricks before hand.
    You’re stirring all kinds of warm memories today. I think I got hooked on historical English novels with Pride and Prejudice and Jane Eyre, read at a painfully early age and re-read consistently for years after. If our library had Georgette Heyer, I never ran across it, although I consumed every Zane Grey on the shelf. So maybe my action/adventure background seeps in somewhat from there, although I willingly sucked up all the emotional Russians and Victorian novels I could lay hands on. Very eccentric reading habits. Preferred the Hardy Boys to Nancy Drew, and wasn’t there some series about twins solving mysteries? I never found enough of them. Romance and mystery, from the very start, I was hooked.
    The sports stories I remember were biographies of famous athletes. You may be right, MJ, those could be our hero material. I certainly never had the coordination for sports!

    Reply
  26. Oh, meardaba, that’s fabulous! You must have been born a trollop, but a smart one to figure out all the tricks before hand.
    You’re stirring all kinds of warm memories today. I think I got hooked on historical English novels with Pride and Prejudice and Jane Eyre, read at a painfully early age and re-read consistently for years after. If our library had Georgette Heyer, I never ran across it, although I consumed every Zane Grey on the shelf. So maybe my action/adventure background seeps in somewhat from there, although I willingly sucked up all the emotional Russians and Victorian novels I could lay hands on. Very eccentric reading habits. Preferred the Hardy Boys to Nancy Drew, and wasn’t there some series about twins solving mysteries? I never found enough of them. Romance and mystery, from the very start, I was hooked.
    The sports stories I remember were biographies of famous athletes. You may be right, MJ, those could be our hero material. I certainly never had the coordination for sports!

    Reply
  27. Oh, meardaba, that’s fabulous! You must have been born a trollop, but a smart one to figure out all the tricks before hand.
    You’re stirring all kinds of warm memories today. I think I got hooked on historical English novels with Pride and Prejudice and Jane Eyre, read at a painfully early age and re-read consistently for years after. If our library had Georgette Heyer, I never ran across it, although I consumed every Zane Grey on the shelf. So maybe my action/adventure background seeps in somewhat from there, although I willingly sucked up all the emotional Russians and Victorian novels I could lay hands on. Very eccentric reading habits. Preferred the Hardy Boys to Nancy Drew, and wasn’t there some series about twins solving mysteries? I never found enough of them. Romance and mystery, from the very start, I was hooked.
    The sports stories I remember were biographies of famous athletes. You may be right, MJ, those could be our hero material. I certainly never had the coordination for sports!

    Reply
  28. Oh, meardaba, that’s fabulous! You must have been born a trollop, but a smart one to figure out all the tricks before hand.
    You’re stirring all kinds of warm memories today. I think I got hooked on historical English novels with Pride and Prejudice and Jane Eyre, read at a painfully early age and re-read consistently for years after. If our library had Georgette Heyer, I never ran across it, although I consumed every Zane Grey on the shelf. So maybe my action/adventure background seeps in somewhat from there, although I willingly sucked up all the emotional Russians and Victorian novels I could lay hands on. Very eccentric reading habits. Preferred the Hardy Boys to Nancy Drew, and wasn’t there some series about twins solving mysteries? I never found enough of them. Romance and mystery, from the very start, I was hooked.
    The sports stories I remember were biographies of famous athletes. You may be right, MJ, those could be our hero material. I certainly never had the coordination for sports!

    Reply
  29. I, too, loved Edgar Eager’s books, and later on when I could find them, E. Nesbit’s work. In fact I loved them so much that my own first (still unpublished) novel was what one might kindly call an homage. I also loved Miss Pickerel. When you think about it, between fairy tales, Mary Poppins, Narnia, Tolkien, Nesbit and now Harry Potter (not to mention Spiderman and his ilk), kids get a HUGE helping of paranormal stories right from the start. (Peter Pan! Atom Ant! The list goes on and on.) What can it mean? Alas, I will have to add this question to the list of many others that would make a great Ph.D. thesis had I but world enough and time.

    Reply
  30. I, too, loved Edgar Eager’s books, and later on when I could find them, E. Nesbit’s work. In fact I loved them so much that my own first (still unpublished) novel was what one might kindly call an homage. I also loved Miss Pickerel. When you think about it, between fairy tales, Mary Poppins, Narnia, Tolkien, Nesbit and now Harry Potter (not to mention Spiderman and his ilk), kids get a HUGE helping of paranormal stories right from the start. (Peter Pan! Atom Ant! The list goes on and on.) What can it mean? Alas, I will have to add this question to the list of many others that would make a great Ph.D. thesis had I but world enough and time.

    Reply
  31. I, too, loved Edgar Eager’s books, and later on when I could find them, E. Nesbit’s work. In fact I loved them so much that my own first (still unpublished) novel was what one might kindly call an homage. I also loved Miss Pickerel. When you think about it, between fairy tales, Mary Poppins, Narnia, Tolkien, Nesbit and now Harry Potter (not to mention Spiderman and his ilk), kids get a HUGE helping of paranormal stories right from the start. (Peter Pan! Atom Ant! The list goes on and on.) What can it mean? Alas, I will have to add this question to the list of many others that would make a great Ph.D. thesis had I but world enough and time.

    Reply
  32. I, too, loved Edgar Eager’s books, and later on when I could find them, E. Nesbit’s work. In fact I loved them so much that my own first (still unpublished) novel was what one might kindly call an homage. I also loved Miss Pickerel. When you think about it, between fairy tales, Mary Poppins, Narnia, Tolkien, Nesbit and now Harry Potter (not to mention Spiderman and his ilk), kids get a HUGE helping of paranormal stories right from the start. (Peter Pan! Atom Ant! The list goes on and on.) What can it mean? Alas, I will have to add this question to the list of many others that would make a great Ph.D. thesis had I but world enough and time.

    Reply
  33. By third grade I was reading my way through the biographies in my school library, through Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys, The Three Investigators, Encyclopedia Brown, the Bobbsey Twins… That’s also when I was introduced to EC horror comics (“Murder, mutilation, and rot served as the three recurring elements of the classic horror comics…” http://www.fortunecity.com/tatooine/niven/142/profiles/pro39.html ) which might explain my continued addiction to Stephen King, although I was never able to bring myself to read Misery. Or see it in the theaters. I did think Silence of the Lambs was fantastic, in both forms, though.
    At 10, I discovered romances and westerns, which I added to my list. I read my way through my dad’s Louis L’Amour and Zane Grey collection (Will Short, too), and read every Harlequin I could get my hands on. Then I discovered Georgette Heyer, and have loved regencies ever since. In high school I worked my way through all the mysteries in the library – Dorothy Sayers, Ngaio Marsh, Agatha Christie, Mary Roberts Rinehart, John Creasey – and the gothics like Mary Stewart and Victoria Holt.
    In college I discovered Tolkein, which lead to all manner of fantasy and sci fi reading.
    Who has prominent place on my bookshelves today? Mystery, romance, horror, fantasy. Jo Beverley, Robert Crais, Dean Koontz, Margaret Weis. What DVDs am I watching these days? X-Files. I clearly hit my stride early.
    No sports though. Sorry!

    Reply
  34. By third grade I was reading my way through the biographies in my school library, through Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys, The Three Investigators, Encyclopedia Brown, the Bobbsey Twins… That’s also when I was introduced to EC horror comics (“Murder, mutilation, and rot served as the three recurring elements of the classic horror comics…” http://www.fortunecity.com/tatooine/niven/142/profiles/pro39.html ) which might explain my continued addiction to Stephen King, although I was never able to bring myself to read Misery. Or see it in the theaters. I did think Silence of the Lambs was fantastic, in both forms, though.
    At 10, I discovered romances and westerns, which I added to my list. I read my way through my dad’s Louis L’Amour and Zane Grey collection (Will Short, too), and read every Harlequin I could get my hands on. Then I discovered Georgette Heyer, and have loved regencies ever since. In high school I worked my way through all the mysteries in the library – Dorothy Sayers, Ngaio Marsh, Agatha Christie, Mary Roberts Rinehart, John Creasey – and the gothics like Mary Stewart and Victoria Holt.
    In college I discovered Tolkein, which lead to all manner of fantasy and sci fi reading.
    Who has prominent place on my bookshelves today? Mystery, romance, horror, fantasy. Jo Beverley, Robert Crais, Dean Koontz, Margaret Weis. What DVDs am I watching these days? X-Files. I clearly hit my stride early.
    No sports though. Sorry!

    Reply
  35. By third grade I was reading my way through the biographies in my school library, through Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys, The Three Investigators, Encyclopedia Brown, the Bobbsey Twins… That’s also when I was introduced to EC horror comics (“Murder, mutilation, and rot served as the three recurring elements of the classic horror comics…” http://www.fortunecity.com/tatooine/niven/142/profiles/pro39.html ) which might explain my continued addiction to Stephen King, although I was never able to bring myself to read Misery. Or see it in the theaters. I did think Silence of the Lambs was fantastic, in both forms, though.
    At 10, I discovered romances and westerns, which I added to my list. I read my way through my dad’s Louis L’Amour and Zane Grey collection (Will Short, too), and read every Harlequin I could get my hands on. Then I discovered Georgette Heyer, and have loved regencies ever since. In high school I worked my way through all the mysteries in the library – Dorothy Sayers, Ngaio Marsh, Agatha Christie, Mary Roberts Rinehart, John Creasey – and the gothics like Mary Stewart and Victoria Holt.
    In college I discovered Tolkein, which lead to all manner of fantasy and sci fi reading.
    Who has prominent place on my bookshelves today? Mystery, romance, horror, fantasy. Jo Beverley, Robert Crais, Dean Koontz, Margaret Weis. What DVDs am I watching these days? X-Files. I clearly hit my stride early.
    No sports though. Sorry!

    Reply
  36. By third grade I was reading my way through the biographies in my school library, through Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys, The Three Investigators, Encyclopedia Brown, the Bobbsey Twins… That’s also when I was introduced to EC horror comics (“Murder, mutilation, and rot served as the three recurring elements of the classic horror comics…” http://www.fortunecity.com/tatooine/niven/142/profiles/pro39.html ) which might explain my continued addiction to Stephen King, although I was never able to bring myself to read Misery. Or see it in the theaters. I did think Silence of the Lambs was fantastic, in both forms, though.
    At 10, I discovered romances and westerns, which I added to my list. I read my way through my dad’s Louis L’Amour and Zane Grey collection (Will Short, too), and read every Harlequin I could get my hands on. Then I discovered Georgette Heyer, and have loved regencies ever since. In high school I worked my way through all the mysteries in the library – Dorothy Sayers, Ngaio Marsh, Agatha Christie, Mary Roberts Rinehart, John Creasey – and the gothics like Mary Stewart and Victoria Holt.
    In college I discovered Tolkein, which lead to all manner of fantasy and sci fi reading.
    Who has prominent place on my bookshelves today? Mystery, romance, horror, fantasy. Jo Beverley, Robert Crais, Dean Koontz, Margaret Weis. What DVDs am I watching these days? X-Files. I clearly hit my stride early.
    No sports though. Sorry!

    Reply
  37. Hmm. . . well, I’ve been reading science books for a long time now, but on my way to romances a couple of years ago, I’ve been through Star Trek novels, Robert Parker mysteries, and many books that I have read through school, Shakespeare, other mysteries, some other scifi. . . but then on my own I discovered romances and been long since at it. LOL I guess I’ve stuck with romances when I didn’t stick with other stuff (except the science stuff) is just there is plenty out there to choose from! 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  38. Hmm. . . well, I’ve been reading science books for a long time now, but on my way to romances a couple of years ago, I’ve been through Star Trek novels, Robert Parker mysteries, and many books that I have read through school, Shakespeare, other mysteries, some other scifi. . . but then on my own I discovered romances and been long since at it. LOL I guess I’ve stuck with romances when I didn’t stick with other stuff (except the science stuff) is just there is plenty out there to choose from! 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  39. Hmm. . . well, I’ve been reading science books for a long time now, but on my way to romances a couple of years ago, I’ve been through Star Trek novels, Robert Parker mysteries, and many books that I have read through school, Shakespeare, other mysteries, some other scifi. . . but then on my own I discovered romances and been long since at it. LOL I guess I’ve stuck with romances when I didn’t stick with other stuff (except the science stuff) is just there is plenty out there to choose from! 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  40. Hmm. . . well, I’ve been reading science books for a long time now, but on my way to romances a couple of years ago, I’ve been through Star Trek novels, Robert Parker mysteries, and many books that I have read through school, Shakespeare, other mysteries, some other scifi. . . but then on my own I discovered romances and been long since at it. LOL I guess I’ve stuck with romances when I didn’t stick with other stuff (except the science stuff) is just there is plenty out there to choose from! 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  41. I thought I was the only girl out there who read The Hardy Boys! (My brother read Nancy Drew, LOL).
    I read lots of the same books everyone has mentioned–but the EARLIEST story I remember loving was (of course) CINDERELLA–at age 1 or 2, I think (there are photos to aid the memory).
    We had a Little Golden Book version of CINDERELLA and I insisted that it be read to me every night before bed. We saw the Disney movie something like 10 times when I was a toddler. I also remember going over to a neighbor’s house to watch the TV musical version (because at my house we didn’t get PBS–those were the Olden Days).
    Not hard to trace my interest in Romance Novels from there, is it?

    Reply
  42. I thought I was the only girl out there who read The Hardy Boys! (My brother read Nancy Drew, LOL).
    I read lots of the same books everyone has mentioned–but the EARLIEST story I remember loving was (of course) CINDERELLA–at age 1 or 2, I think (there are photos to aid the memory).
    We had a Little Golden Book version of CINDERELLA and I insisted that it be read to me every night before bed. We saw the Disney movie something like 10 times when I was a toddler. I also remember going over to a neighbor’s house to watch the TV musical version (because at my house we didn’t get PBS–those were the Olden Days).
    Not hard to trace my interest in Romance Novels from there, is it?

    Reply
  43. I thought I was the only girl out there who read The Hardy Boys! (My brother read Nancy Drew, LOL).
    I read lots of the same books everyone has mentioned–but the EARLIEST story I remember loving was (of course) CINDERELLA–at age 1 or 2, I think (there are photos to aid the memory).
    We had a Little Golden Book version of CINDERELLA and I insisted that it be read to me every night before bed. We saw the Disney movie something like 10 times when I was a toddler. I also remember going over to a neighbor’s house to watch the TV musical version (because at my house we didn’t get PBS–those were the Olden Days).
    Not hard to trace my interest in Romance Novels from there, is it?

    Reply
  44. I thought I was the only girl out there who read The Hardy Boys! (My brother read Nancy Drew, LOL).
    I read lots of the same books everyone has mentioned–but the EARLIEST story I remember loving was (of course) CINDERELLA–at age 1 or 2, I think (there are photos to aid the memory).
    We had a Little Golden Book version of CINDERELLA and I insisted that it be read to me every night before bed. We saw the Disney movie something like 10 times when I was a toddler. I also remember going over to a neighbor’s house to watch the TV musical version (because at my house we didn’t get PBS–those were the Olden Days).
    Not hard to trace my interest in Romance Novels from there, is it?

    Reply
  45. Oh yes, all the old Disney movies always had a love story in them. And musicals. I adored musicals with all my heart and soul, and they always centered on a love story. But I think my Golden Books were the moral tales–The Little Engine That Could, and the Poky Little Puppy. “G”
    Interesting thought about children and paranormal tales. Maybe because children think the entire world is magical, they’re more susceptible to fantasy? And it’s such a rude disappointment to discover it’s not, so we dig into our romances where love conquers all. I’m sure there’s a theory in there somewhere…

    Reply
  46. Oh yes, all the old Disney movies always had a love story in them. And musicals. I adored musicals with all my heart and soul, and they always centered on a love story. But I think my Golden Books were the moral tales–The Little Engine That Could, and the Poky Little Puppy. “G”
    Interesting thought about children and paranormal tales. Maybe because children think the entire world is magical, they’re more susceptible to fantasy? And it’s such a rude disappointment to discover it’s not, so we dig into our romances where love conquers all. I’m sure there’s a theory in there somewhere…

    Reply
  47. Oh yes, all the old Disney movies always had a love story in them. And musicals. I adored musicals with all my heart and soul, and they always centered on a love story. But I think my Golden Books were the moral tales–The Little Engine That Could, and the Poky Little Puppy. “G”
    Interesting thought about children and paranormal tales. Maybe because children think the entire world is magical, they’re more susceptible to fantasy? And it’s such a rude disappointment to discover it’s not, so we dig into our romances where love conquers all. I’m sure there’s a theory in there somewhere…

    Reply
  48. Oh yes, all the old Disney movies always had a love story in them. And musicals. I adored musicals with all my heart and soul, and they always centered on a love story. But I think my Golden Books were the moral tales–The Little Engine That Could, and the Poky Little Puppy. “G”
    Interesting thought about children and paranormal tales. Maybe because children think the entire world is magical, they’re more susceptible to fantasy? And it’s such a rude disappointment to discover it’s not, so we dig into our romances where love conquers all. I’m sure there’s a theory in there somewhere…

    Reply
  49. Marguerite Henry’s horse stories. Walter Farley’s Black Stallion series. And on into Dick Francis.
    In the fifth grade my favorite book and film was Ben-Hur. Lest anyone think Chuck Heston’s bare chest was a factor, I instead lived for the moment when the sheikh invited his white horses *into* his tent!

    Reply
  50. Marguerite Henry’s horse stories. Walter Farley’s Black Stallion series. And on into Dick Francis.
    In the fifth grade my favorite book and film was Ben-Hur. Lest anyone think Chuck Heston’s bare chest was a factor, I instead lived for the moment when the sheikh invited his white horses *into* his tent!

    Reply
  51. Marguerite Henry’s horse stories. Walter Farley’s Black Stallion series. And on into Dick Francis.
    In the fifth grade my favorite book and film was Ben-Hur. Lest anyone think Chuck Heston’s bare chest was a factor, I instead lived for the moment when the sheikh invited his white horses *into* his tent!

    Reply
  52. Marguerite Henry’s horse stories. Walter Farley’s Black Stallion series. And on into Dick Francis.
    In the fifth grade my favorite book and film was Ben-Hur. Lest anyone think Chuck Heston’s bare chest was a factor, I instead lived for the moment when the sheikh invited his white horses *into* his tent!

    Reply
  53. Wench Pat said…”Interesting thought about children and paranormal tales. Maybe because children think the entire world is magical, they’re more susceptible to fantasy?”
    But, the world is magical, isn’t it, Wench Pat? Please say it is! Look at Peter Pan and Wendy. Pixie Dust!
    Ah… I loved Peter Pan. My first hero. I remember dreaming about him coming to my bedroom window and inviting me to fly off with him to Neverland. [sigh]
    Then there was Johnny Termain, Jim in Trixie Belden and Mr. Spock in ST. I still have many of these treasured books.
    As an adult it was Picard and Riker in ST:TNG and a bevy of handsome blood sucking YA vampires. Just can’t get enough of sff/fantasy.
    I didn’t start reading romance until just a year ago, with my first read being a paranormal. Now I’m on a Heyer kick. But I’m missing the paranormal elements. Bad. Bring on the Dragons!
    Nina, the littlest wenchling who refuses to grow up and will always believe she can fly.

    Reply
  54. Wench Pat said…”Interesting thought about children and paranormal tales. Maybe because children think the entire world is magical, they’re more susceptible to fantasy?”
    But, the world is magical, isn’t it, Wench Pat? Please say it is! Look at Peter Pan and Wendy. Pixie Dust!
    Ah… I loved Peter Pan. My first hero. I remember dreaming about him coming to my bedroom window and inviting me to fly off with him to Neverland. [sigh]
    Then there was Johnny Termain, Jim in Trixie Belden and Mr. Spock in ST. I still have many of these treasured books.
    As an adult it was Picard and Riker in ST:TNG and a bevy of handsome blood sucking YA vampires. Just can’t get enough of sff/fantasy.
    I didn’t start reading romance until just a year ago, with my first read being a paranormal. Now I’m on a Heyer kick. But I’m missing the paranormal elements. Bad. Bring on the Dragons!
    Nina, the littlest wenchling who refuses to grow up and will always believe she can fly.

    Reply
  55. Wench Pat said…”Interesting thought about children and paranormal tales. Maybe because children think the entire world is magical, they’re more susceptible to fantasy?”
    But, the world is magical, isn’t it, Wench Pat? Please say it is! Look at Peter Pan and Wendy. Pixie Dust!
    Ah… I loved Peter Pan. My first hero. I remember dreaming about him coming to my bedroom window and inviting me to fly off with him to Neverland. [sigh]
    Then there was Johnny Termain, Jim in Trixie Belden and Mr. Spock in ST. I still have many of these treasured books.
    As an adult it was Picard and Riker in ST:TNG and a bevy of handsome blood sucking YA vampires. Just can’t get enough of sff/fantasy.
    I didn’t start reading romance until just a year ago, with my first read being a paranormal. Now I’m on a Heyer kick. But I’m missing the paranormal elements. Bad. Bring on the Dragons!
    Nina, the littlest wenchling who refuses to grow up and will always believe she can fly.

    Reply
  56. Wench Pat said…”Interesting thought about children and paranormal tales. Maybe because children think the entire world is magical, they’re more susceptible to fantasy?”
    But, the world is magical, isn’t it, Wench Pat? Please say it is! Look at Peter Pan and Wendy. Pixie Dust!
    Ah… I loved Peter Pan. My first hero. I remember dreaming about him coming to my bedroom window and inviting me to fly off with him to Neverland. [sigh]
    Then there was Johnny Termain, Jim in Trixie Belden and Mr. Spock in ST. I still have many of these treasured books.
    As an adult it was Picard and Riker in ST:TNG and a bevy of handsome blood sucking YA vampires. Just can’t get enough of sff/fantasy.
    I didn’t start reading romance until just a year ago, with my first read being a paranormal. Now I’m on a Heyer kick. But I’m missing the paranormal elements. Bad. Bring on the Dragons!
    Nina, the littlest wenchling who refuses to grow up and will always believe she can fly.

    Reply
  57. There were lots of Golden Books in my childhood. And an addiction to fairy tales. Also Classics Illustrated comic books. I remember very distinctly reading THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS at age 10, recommended by a librarian after I told her how much I liked ALICE IN WONDERLAND. I read the Bobbsey Twins and Nancy Drew and ANNE OF GREEN GABLES (a reader recently reminded me of my love of Anne Shirley) and all the Louisa May Alcott I could get my hands on. In adolescence I discovered 19th C novels as well as historical novels, some quite racy. But the taste for SFF eluded me. Friends urged me to read Tolkien but I never did. 19th C London was sufficiently exotic & magical to me.

    Reply
  58. There were lots of Golden Books in my childhood. And an addiction to fairy tales. Also Classics Illustrated comic books. I remember very distinctly reading THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS at age 10, recommended by a librarian after I told her how much I liked ALICE IN WONDERLAND. I read the Bobbsey Twins and Nancy Drew and ANNE OF GREEN GABLES (a reader recently reminded me of my love of Anne Shirley) and all the Louisa May Alcott I could get my hands on. In adolescence I discovered 19th C novels as well as historical novels, some quite racy. But the taste for SFF eluded me. Friends urged me to read Tolkien but I never did. 19th C London was sufficiently exotic & magical to me.

    Reply
  59. There were lots of Golden Books in my childhood. And an addiction to fairy tales. Also Classics Illustrated comic books. I remember very distinctly reading THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS at age 10, recommended by a librarian after I told her how much I liked ALICE IN WONDERLAND. I read the Bobbsey Twins and Nancy Drew and ANNE OF GREEN GABLES (a reader recently reminded me of my love of Anne Shirley) and all the Louisa May Alcott I could get my hands on. In adolescence I discovered 19th C novels as well as historical novels, some quite racy. But the taste for SFF eluded me. Friends urged me to read Tolkien but I never did. 19th C London was sufficiently exotic & magical to me.

    Reply
  60. There were lots of Golden Books in my childhood. And an addiction to fairy tales. Also Classics Illustrated comic books. I remember very distinctly reading THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS at age 10, recommended by a librarian after I told her how much I liked ALICE IN WONDERLAND. I read the Bobbsey Twins and Nancy Drew and ANNE OF GREEN GABLES (a reader recently reminded me of my love of Anne Shirley) and all the Louisa May Alcott I could get my hands on. In adolescence I discovered 19th C novels as well as historical novels, some quite racy. But the taste for SFF eluded me. Friends urged me to read Tolkien but I never did. 19th C London was sufficiently exotic & magical to me.

    Reply
  61. Oh my gosh! All you omniverous readers went the same route that I did: L.M. Alcott, The Lang Fairy Tale books, etc – except I didn’t glom the great Georgette until I was a grown up lady. I read everthing we had on the shelves in the house. But as for favs? I have to add Albert Payson Terhune and Felix Saltern – the Bambi books, Lad, A Dog, the Lassie books, etc. If it was about someone with fur, I adored it.
    And earliest of all, the books my sister read to me: Alice in Wonderland and Through The Looking Glass, and every Uncle Wiggley we could get our paws on.

    Reply
  62. Oh my gosh! All you omniverous readers went the same route that I did: L.M. Alcott, The Lang Fairy Tale books, etc – except I didn’t glom the great Georgette until I was a grown up lady. I read everthing we had on the shelves in the house. But as for favs? I have to add Albert Payson Terhune and Felix Saltern – the Bambi books, Lad, A Dog, the Lassie books, etc. If it was about someone with fur, I adored it.
    And earliest of all, the books my sister read to me: Alice in Wonderland and Through The Looking Glass, and every Uncle Wiggley we could get our paws on.

    Reply
  63. Oh my gosh! All you omniverous readers went the same route that I did: L.M. Alcott, The Lang Fairy Tale books, etc – except I didn’t glom the great Georgette until I was a grown up lady. I read everthing we had on the shelves in the house. But as for favs? I have to add Albert Payson Terhune and Felix Saltern – the Bambi books, Lad, A Dog, the Lassie books, etc. If it was about someone with fur, I adored it.
    And earliest of all, the books my sister read to me: Alice in Wonderland and Through The Looking Glass, and every Uncle Wiggley we could get our paws on.

    Reply
  64. Oh my gosh! All you omniverous readers went the same route that I did: L.M. Alcott, The Lang Fairy Tale books, etc – except I didn’t glom the great Georgette until I was a grown up lady. I read everthing we had on the shelves in the house. But as for favs? I have to add Albert Payson Terhune and Felix Saltern – the Bambi books, Lad, A Dog, the Lassie books, etc. If it was about someone with fur, I adored it.
    And earliest of all, the books my sister read to me: Alice in Wonderland and Through The Looking Glass, and every Uncle Wiggley we could get our paws on.

    Reply
  65. Yet another book vacuum here. I annexed my parents library cards to get even more books out of the library! Simply cannot bear recommended “classics” – unless I don’t know they are. Much prefered reading books I shouldn’t read. So much more exciting.
    Absolute favourite was a tattered copy of “Susannah of the Yukon” that I would read every time I went to Granny’s. Though I have a lot of books now, I’m nostalgic for the idea of a small motley collection of books to be re-read over and over. Being able to get hold of practically every book in the world is overwhelming. I’m drowning in booklists, and within weeks of finding a new author I’ve read the lot, and anyone else can too. Its nice to have a book like Susannah that no one else has read (in the last 30 years in the UK anyway! It was quite a shock to find out it recently it was part of a series).

    Reply
  66. Yet another book vacuum here. I annexed my parents library cards to get even more books out of the library! Simply cannot bear recommended “classics” – unless I don’t know they are. Much prefered reading books I shouldn’t read. So much more exciting.
    Absolute favourite was a tattered copy of “Susannah of the Yukon” that I would read every time I went to Granny’s. Though I have a lot of books now, I’m nostalgic for the idea of a small motley collection of books to be re-read over and over. Being able to get hold of practically every book in the world is overwhelming. I’m drowning in booklists, and within weeks of finding a new author I’ve read the lot, and anyone else can too. Its nice to have a book like Susannah that no one else has read (in the last 30 years in the UK anyway! It was quite a shock to find out it recently it was part of a series).

    Reply
  67. Yet another book vacuum here. I annexed my parents library cards to get even more books out of the library! Simply cannot bear recommended “classics” – unless I don’t know they are. Much prefered reading books I shouldn’t read. So much more exciting.
    Absolute favourite was a tattered copy of “Susannah of the Yukon” that I would read every time I went to Granny’s. Though I have a lot of books now, I’m nostalgic for the idea of a small motley collection of books to be re-read over and over. Being able to get hold of practically every book in the world is overwhelming. I’m drowning in booklists, and within weeks of finding a new author I’ve read the lot, and anyone else can too. Its nice to have a book like Susannah that no one else has read (in the last 30 years in the UK anyway! It was quite a shock to find out it recently it was part of a series).

    Reply
  68. Yet another book vacuum here. I annexed my parents library cards to get even more books out of the library! Simply cannot bear recommended “classics” – unless I don’t know they are. Much prefered reading books I shouldn’t read. So much more exciting.
    Absolute favourite was a tattered copy of “Susannah of the Yukon” that I would read every time I went to Granny’s. Though I have a lot of books now, I’m nostalgic for the idea of a small motley collection of books to be re-read over and over. Being able to get hold of practically every book in the world is overwhelming. I’m drowning in booklists, and within weeks of finding a new author I’ve read the lot, and anyone else can too. Its nice to have a book like Susannah that no one else has read (in the last 30 years in the UK anyway! It was quite a shock to find out it recently it was part of a series).

    Reply
  69. I do love the book vaccuum image. I’ll have to see if I can fine one online somewhere. “G”
    I know exactly what you mean, Francois. My parents had a bookshelf with exactly one shelf full of motheaten books from their high school years, apparently. I would read them over and over.(When was the last time anyone read Quo Vadis?hmm?) And when I had enough allowance to buy cheap Scholastic classics, I’d read them until the pages fell out because that was all that was available to me. The ones I checked out at the school library were finished before I went home that day.
    And now my shelves will totter and fall down on me if I add one more book. There’s no time to go back and re-read those old favorites.

    Reply
  70. I do love the book vaccuum image. I’ll have to see if I can fine one online somewhere. “G”
    I know exactly what you mean, Francois. My parents had a bookshelf with exactly one shelf full of motheaten books from their high school years, apparently. I would read them over and over.(When was the last time anyone read Quo Vadis?hmm?) And when I had enough allowance to buy cheap Scholastic classics, I’d read them until the pages fell out because that was all that was available to me. The ones I checked out at the school library were finished before I went home that day.
    And now my shelves will totter and fall down on me if I add one more book. There’s no time to go back and re-read those old favorites.

    Reply
  71. I do love the book vaccuum image. I’ll have to see if I can fine one online somewhere. “G”
    I know exactly what you mean, Francois. My parents had a bookshelf with exactly one shelf full of motheaten books from their high school years, apparently. I would read them over and over.(When was the last time anyone read Quo Vadis?hmm?) And when I had enough allowance to buy cheap Scholastic classics, I’d read them until the pages fell out because that was all that was available to me. The ones I checked out at the school library were finished before I went home that day.
    And now my shelves will totter and fall down on me if I add one more book. There’s no time to go back and re-read those old favorites.

    Reply
  72. I do love the book vaccuum image. I’ll have to see if I can fine one online somewhere. “G”
    I know exactly what you mean, Francois. My parents had a bookshelf with exactly one shelf full of motheaten books from their high school years, apparently. I would read them over and over.(When was the last time anyone read Quo Vadis?hmm?) And when I had enough allowance to buy cheap Scholastic classics, I’d read them until the pages fell out because that was all that was available to me. The ones I checked out at the school library were finished before I went home that day.
    And now my shelves will totter and fall down on me if I add one more book. There’s no time to go back and re-read those old favorites.

    Reply
  73. Wow, Pat! I don’t know anyone else who has read Cameron’s Mushroom Planet series! I read all of them as a child, and loved them. My, that brings home memories.
    Also read E. Nesbit’s books, The Secret Garden (which is really quite a spiritual book), Sara Crewe, Edward Eager’s books… Oh, now I have to look them up to see if they’re still around.

    Reply
  74. Wow, Pat! I don’t know anyone else who has read Cameron’s Mushroom Planet series! I read all of them as a child, and loved them. My, that brings home memories.
    Also read E. Nesbit’s books, The Secret Garden (which is really quite a spiritual book), Sara Crewe, Edward Eager’s books… Oh, now I have to look them up to see if they’re still around.

    Reply
  75. Wow, Pat! I don’t know anyone else who has read Cameron’s Mushroom Planet series! I read all of them as a child, and loved them. My, that brings home memories.
    Also read E. Nesbit’s books, The Secret Garden (which is really quite a spiritual book), Sara Crewe, Edward Eager’s books… Oh, now I have to look them up to see if they’re still around.

    Reply
  76. Wow, Pat! I don’t know anyone else who has read Cameron’s Mushroom Planet series! I read all of them as a child, and loved them. My, that brings home memories.
    Also read E. Nesbit’s books, The Secret Garden (which is really quite a spiritual book), Sara Crewe, Edward Eager’s books… Oh, now I have to look them up to see if they’re still around.

    Reply

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