A Day in the Life of a Writer

From Pat Rice:

Pprincesstallpurple_1 As you may have already ascertained, I’m not the most PC person in this group. Nor the most educated or intellectual or thoughtful. I tell it like it is, and you can take it or toss it aside.  I recommend you toss this one aside. 

I’ve been having one of those days.  Or weeks.  Or lives.  Whatever.  It’s mid-August and all of

New York City

is supposed to be up in the mountains, cooling off.  Instead, all of

New York City

except my agent–who is up in the mountains–is still hard at work, making my life…interesting.

To start my day, I received the new cover art for my next contemporary (note to self, look up pub date), which my editor has told me I will love. Having been ordered to do so, I agree, I love it.  Great colors.  It’s an adirondack chair sitting beside a pond in a field of summer flowers.  Quite pretty.  I’ve always wanted to read a book about adirondack chairs. Note to self, buy this book to find out how people get out of those pretzel-twister chairs.

I go back to watching the hummingbird out the window while I figure out how to push my next contemporary heroine off a cliff. The phone rings, interrupting fantasy of hero with flapping wings pulling her back.  Hherowings

It’s my historical editor, who finally wants to discuss the six-book series I talked to her about a year ago. I’ve just turned in the first book, and I have five more great characters and a real swashbuckling fantasy/adventure that’s carried across sea and land in one of my favorite time periods, the Georgian era.  Think Scarlet Pimpernel meets the X-Men on a quest. 

My editor is equally thrilled with the idea, hallelujah!  She wants a cover “look” for the entire series, which, BTW, needs to be cut down to a trilogy so marketing can keep it on the shelves.

Ya win some, ya lose some.

Oh, and BTW, do I happen to have any idea what kind of cover I’d like on these books? The cover conference is next week.

In this case, yes, I do have some idea!  Hurray for me.  I send appropriate weblink and editor is very happy.

I, in the meantime, am contemplating slitting my throat.  Maybe the wrist would be easier.

Leaving heroine hanging off cliff where she belongs, I go back to perusing the copyedit on the book about the nonexistent adirondack chair. (Hero sits in director’s chair. Wonder if artist could put director’s chair by pond. . .) 

Copyedits are works of art, and this copyeditor has been quite good to me.  He/she has forced me to face my own timeline and caught all my wandering clauses and missing commas. This is what a good copyeditor does. And she’s even found better words for ones my addled brain couldn’t conjure up the day I wrote some really. . . interesting. . . sentences.  But she has this habit of adding “have” to every verb where it seems that I may have accidentally forgotten it.  This last has some. . . interesting. . . results, as in “She wasn’t used to having a man in the kitchen.” Think about it. 

Maybe my heroine ought to spice up her sex life and try a man in the kitchen next time. That way, she won’t be jumping off cliffs.

Having decided that slitting wrists and throats would require pain and mess, I check my e-mail. My historical editor has been a busy little bee.  She writes that she thinks we ought to add a man’s face to the mystical landscapes for the cover art. She points out wonderful sexy images. . .which means. . . wait for it. . .WE NEED NEW TITLES.  Mystic Maiden probably isn’t appropriate with a man hanging above it.  Frantic thesaurus thumbing ensues.  Panicked e-mails to brainstorming pals.  More thesaurus thumbing.

Has this day ended yet?

Having compiled a fascinating collection of Mystic names that I intend to use on every book until the day I die, I prepare an e-mail with my choices. Only to discover an e-mail in my box from my editor with her three choices.  Which, I am, of course, going to love. 

And I will, too, just as soon as I finish making paper dolls out of the outline for the next book that I no longer need since Book Two, Three, and Four are now ether. 

Oh, and I guess I’d better find that magic box which I’ve apparently misplaced in hopes that it contains a brand new outline for Book Five now that I’ve ditched the guys that were going to retrieve the chalice which would produce the fair maiden. . .

I bet my agent doesn’t have e-mail in her d*mned mountains.  But if she has an adirondack chair, she’d better figure out how to get out of it before my X-ray vision vaporizes it into the ether.

Since Typepad is refusing to allow me to edit out the Purple Prose Princess and add my links and questions, I’m attempting to add them here.  I told you, it’s one of those days!

The magic link I sent to my editor:  http://www.powergalleryhawaii.com/

Magic20island20640x480 I also wanted to add QUESTIONS:

I think it only fair that we get to ask questions if we answer them—

Are you more likely to pick up a book with people or faces in the landscape then one without them?

Would you pick up one with an adirondack chair? Why? <G>

If the romance is fully satisfied within the pages of a book, do you mind if a piece of the story arc continues to the next book?

51 thoughts on “A Day in the Life of a Writer”

  1. Are you more likely to pick up a book with people or faces in the landscape then one without them?
    At this point I buy more by author than cover…but…if you mean disembodied faces hanging in the landscape, I’m not crazy about them.
    Would you pick up one with an adirondack chair? Why?
    Give me a directors chair any time over an adirondack chair. Really. I don’t like adirondack chairs and they make me think sad women’s fiction (I don’t know why). They’re also very Right Coast. I’m Left Coast which is directors chairs…
    If the romance is fully satisfied within the pages of a book, do you mind if a piece of the story arc continues to the next book?
    I think I’d like that. Especially if I don’t have to wait forever for the next book to come out. No pressure, though. Really 😉

    Reply
  2. Are you more likely to pick up a book with people or faces in the landscape then one without them?
    At this point I buy more by author than cover…but…if you mean disembodied faces hanging in the landscape, I’m not crazy about them.
    Would you pick up one with an adirondack chair? Why?
    Give me a directors chair any time over an adirondack chair. Really. I don’t like adirondack chairs and they make me think sad women’s fiction (I don’t know why). They’re also very Right Coast. I’m Left Coast which is directors chairs…
    If the romance is fully satisfied within the pages of a book, do you mind if a piece of the story arc continues to the next book?
    I think I’d like that. Especially if I don’t have to wait forever for the next book to come out. No pressure, though. Really 😉

    Reply
  3. Are you more likely to pick up a book with people or faces in the landscape then one without them?
    At this point I buy more by author than cover…but…if you mean disembodied faces hanging in the landscape, I’m not crazy about them.
    Would you pick up one with an adirondack chair? Why?
    Give me a directors chair any time over an adirondack chair. Really. I don’t like adirondack chairs and they make me think sad women’s fiction (I don’t know why). They’re also very Right Coast. I’m Left Coast which is directors chairs…
    If the romance is fully satisfied within the pages of a book, do you mind if a piece of the story arc continues to the next book?
    I think I’d like that. Especially if I don’t have to wait forever for the next book to come out. No pressure, though. Really 😉

    Reply
  4. I don’t sit in Adirondack chairs, not comfortable enough for me. But I’ve purchased at least one book that has one on its cover. I happen to like that sort of cover art. I don’t have an Adirondack chair, but many of my neighbours do. And I sort of live the “Adirondack chair, pond watching, flower growing ifestyle,” (without the chair component). So it works for me!
    I also think it communicates a certain something to readers.
    I buy “real estate” covers all the time. I buy cartoon covers. I buy clinches. I buy flowers and doilies.
    I’ll buy anything, if the cover a) features a trusted author’s name, or b) sparks my interest or curiosity enough to make me pick it up and delve in.

    Reply
  5. I don’t sit in Adirondack chairs, not comfortable enough for me. But I’ve purchased at least one book that has one on its cover. I happen to like that sort of cover art. I don’t have an Adirondack chair, but many of my neighbours do. And I sort of live the “Adirondack chair, pond watching, flower growing ifestyle,” (without the chair component). So it works for me!
    I also think it communicates a certain something to readers.
    I buy “real estate” covers all the time. I buy cartoon covers. I buy clinches. I buy flowers and doilies.
    I’ll buy anything, if the cover a) features a trusted author’s name, or b) sparks my interest or curiosity enough to make me pick it up and delve in.

    Reply
  6. I don’t sit in Adirondack chairs, not comfortable enough for me. But I’ve purchased at least one book that has one on its cover. I happen to like that sort of cover art. I don’t have an Adirondack chair, but many of my neighbours do. And I sort of live the “Adirondack chair, pond watching, flower growing ifestyle,” (without the chair component). So it works for me!
    I also think it communicates a certain something to readers.
    I buy “real estate” covers all the time. I buy cartoon covers. I buy clinches. I buy flowers and doilies.
    I’ll buy anything, if the cover a) features a trusted author’s name, or b) sparks my interest or curiosity enough to make me pick it up and delve in.

    Reply
  7. Good Lord! And I thought I had problems. After experiencing yours, I have no more problems!
    … Adirondack chairs… I have to go with Gina on this one. I don’t like them. They do not convey romance but shriveled old ladies capped by large brimmed hats sipping iced tea. But hey, if that’s what the story is about…
    … faces on the cover… The most interesting cover I’ve ever seen is HAWKSONG. (YA by Amelia Atwater-Rhodes) It has the faces of the two main characters against the wings of a hawk. (no Adirondack chairs) I am more apt to look at a face when I’m scanning the book shelves than a picture i.e.: MJ’s STOLEN MAGIC, TMS and Susan’s DUCHESS. Although I have a real thing for castles. Susan King’s SWORD MAIDEN and MJ’s KOF and the moon. A big one casting silvery moon light over a delicate waterfall, illuminating the still pool below. In the foreground, just to the left is a flat plane of lush grass kissed by the long tresses of a large willow tree. Lots of things could happen there.
    … your magic link: The Art of Steven Powers….
    The one with the moon… now that would make me explore the idea of ‘having’ a man on the beach.
    Hope your day improves and you find a man in your kitchen.
    –Nina, going back to work.

    Reply
  8. Good Lord! And I thought I had problems. After experiencing yours, I have no more problems!
    … Adirondack chairs… I have to go with Gina on this one. I don’t like them. They do not convey romance but shriveled old ladies capped by large brimmed hats sipping iced tea. But hey, if that’s what the story is about…
    … faces on the cover… The most interesting cover I’ve ever seen is HAWKSONG. (YA by Amelia Atwater-Rhodes) It has the faces of the two main characters against the wings of a hawk. (no Adirondack chairs) I am more apt to look at a face when I’m scanning the book shelves than a picture i.e.: MJ’s STOLEN MAGIC, TMS and Susan’s DUCHESS. Although I have a real thing for castles. Susan King’s SWORD MAIDEN and MJ’s KOF and the moon. A big one casting silvery moon light over a delicate waterfall, illuminating the still pool below. In the foreground, just to the left is a flat plane of lush grass kissed by the long tresses of a large willow tree. Lots of things could happen there.
    … your magic link: The Art of Steven Powers….
    The one with the moon… now that would make me explore the idea of ‘having’ a man on the beach.
    Hope your day improves and you find a man in your kitchen.
    –Nina, going back to work.

    Reply
  9. Good Lord! And I thought I had problems. After experiencing yours, I have no more problems!
    … Adirondack chairs… I have to go with Gina on this one. I don’t like them. They do not convey romance but shriveled old ladies capped by large brimmed hats sipping iced tea. But hey, if that’s what the story is about…
    … faces on the cover… The most interesting cover I’ve ever seen is HAWKSONG. (YA by Amelia Atwater-Rhodes) It has the faces of the two main characters against the wings of a hawk. (no Adirondack chairs) I am more apt to look at a face when I’m scanning the book shelves than a picture i.e.: MJ’s STOLEN MAGIC, TMS and Susan’s DUCHESS. Although I have a real thing for castles. Susan King’s SWORD MAIDEN and MJ’s KOF and the moon. A big one casting silvery moon light over a delicate waterfall, illuminating the still pool below. In the foreground, just to the left is a flat plane of lush grass kissed by the long tresses of a large willow tree. Lots of things could happen there.
    … your magic link: The Art of Steven Powers….
    The one with the moon… now that would make me explore the idea of ‘having’ a man on the beach.
    Hope your day improves and you find a man in your kitchen.
    –Nina, going back to work.

    Reply
  10. Oh, forgot one. Don’t want to leave ya hang’n.
    >> If the romance is fully satisfied within the pages of a book, do you mind if a piece of the story arc continues to the next book?>>
    Not at all. I love knowing there’s more to come. That the time I’ve invested in the last 350 pages or so has purpose beyond the ‘moment.’ I love the whole romance thing, but for me, there’s more to a satisfying plot than… well, you know.

    Reply
  11. Oh, forgot one. Don’t want to leave ya hang’n.
    >> If the romance is fully satisfied within the pages of a book, do you mind if a piece of the story arc continues to the next book?>>
    Not at all. I love knowing there’s more to come. That the time I’ve invested in the last 350 pages or so has purpose beyond the ‘moment.’ I love the whole romance thing, but for me, there’s more to a satisfying plot than… well, you know.

    Reply
  12. Oh, forgot one. Don’t want to leave ya hang’n.
    >> If the romance is fully satisfied within the pages of a book, do you mind if a piece of the story arc continues to the next book?>>
    Not at all. I love knowing there’s more to come. That the time I’ve invested in the last 350 pages or so has purpose beyond the ‘moment.’ I love the whole romance thing, but for me, there’s more to a satisfying plot than… well, you know.

    Reply
  13. First, let me say that I think the marketing department is crazy and you should be allowed to make your series as long as you want, or as long as is needed to tell everyone’s story (Jo’s Company of Rogues is certainly longer than 3 books and is very popular). I think I can speak for all of your fans when I say that we would be more than happy to “have” as many books in a series as you want and would eagerly await all of them. One thing I have always appreciated is when somewhere obvious on a book in a series it is mentioned that it IS a series. I’m afraid I’m somewhat anal about reading the books in a series in order, and prefer to start at the beginning and read them relatively straight through. If I know there are more to come I will get the first and hang on to them until I can have them all and read them in order so as not to lose the flow from story to story and the connectins between the characters, etc. In a way, I guess this is sort of an answer to your last question — no, I don’t mind if the entire story arc is continued from book to book as long as the essential story of that particular H&H is concluded.
    Anyway, for your other questions, I tend to prefer covers with no pictures of people on them. I have too often looked at covers of a dark haired hero with the red-haired heroine only to open the story as have them described as both being blondes. I’ve gotten to the point where I ignore the people on the cover. I like the cover to be romantic, but this does not necessarily mean that people are needed, let alone a clinch (which I could do without).
    As for adirondack chairs, I too think them uncomfortable and they definitely wouldn’t “lure” me to a book just by being on the cover. It would especially annoy me if there were no such chair or even setting in the story. IOW if there are specific people or things on the cover I like them to bear some relationship to the story on the inside. For what it’s worth.
    BTW, I love this site. I always know all of you ladies were talented, but you’re fun, too. I’m thinking I may have to break down and try to attend an RWA conference or something to meet you all in person.

    Reply
  14. First, let me say that I think the marketing department is crazy and you should be allowed to make your series as long as you want, or as long as is needed to tell everyone’s story (Jo’s Company of Rogues is certainly longer than 3 books and is very popular). I think I can speak for all of your fans when I say that we would be more than happy to “have” as many books in a series as you want and would eagerly await all of them. One thing I have always appreciated is when somewhere obvious on a book in a series it is mentioned that it IS a series. I’m afraid I’m somewhat anal about reading the books in a series in order, and prefer to start at the beginning and read them relatively straight through. If I know there are more to come I will get the first and hang on to them until I can have them all and read them in order so as not to lose the flow from story to story and the connectins between the characters, etc. In a way, I guess this is sort of an answer to your last question — no, I don’t mind if the entire story arc is continued from book to book as long as the essential story of that particular H&H is concluded.
    Anyway, for your other questions, I tend to prefer covers with no pictures of people on them. I have too often looked at covers of a dark haired hero with the red-haired heroine only to open the story as have them described as both being blondes. I’ve gotten to the point where I ignore the people on the cover. I like the cover to be romantic, but this does not necessarily mean that people are needed, let alone a clinch (which I could do without).
    As for adirondack chairs, I too think them uncomfortable and they definitely wouldn’t “lure” me to a book just by being on the cover. It would especially annoy me if there were no such chair or even setting in the story. IOW if there are specific people or things on the cover I like them to bear some relationship to the story on the inside. For what it’s worth.
    BTW, I love this site. I always know all of you ladies were talented, but you’re fun, too. I’m thinking I may have to break down and try to attend an RWA conference or something to meet you all in person.

    Reply
  15. First, let me say that I think the marketing department is crazy and you should be allowed to make your series as long as you want, or as long as is needed to tell everyone’s story (Jo’s Company of Rogues is certainly longer than 3 books and is very popular). I think I can speak for all of your fans when I say that we would be more than happy to “have” as many books in a series as you want and would eagerly await all of them. One thing I have always appreciated is when somewhere obvious on a book in a series it is mentioned that it IS a series. I’m afraid I’m somewhat anal about reading the books in a series in order, and prefer to start at the beginning and read them relatively straight through. If I know there are more to come I will get the first and hang on to them until I can have them all and read them in order so as not to lose the flow from story to story and the connectins between the characters, etc. In a way, I guess this is sort of an answer to your last question — no, I don’t mind if the entire story arc is continued from book to book as long as the essential story of that particular H&H is concluded.
    Anyway, for your other questions, I tend to prefer covers with no pictures of people on them. I have too often looked at covers of a dark haired hero with the red-haired heroine only to open the story as have them described as both being blondes. I’ve gotten to the point where I ignore the people on the cover. I like the cover to be romantic, but this does not necessarily mean that people are needed, let alone a clinch (which I could do without).
    As for adirondack chairs, I too think them uncomfortable and they definitely wouldn’t “lure” me to a book just by being on the cover. It would especially annoy me if there were no such chair or even setting in the story. IOW if there are specific people or things on the cover I like them to bear some relationship to the story on the inside. For what it’s worth.
    BTW, I love this site. I always know all of you ladies were talented, but you’re fun, too. I’m thinking I may have to break down and try to attend an RWA conference or something to meet you all in person.

    Reply
  16. I do adore our readers, people after our own hearts, for certain! Now, if I could only convince New York that my readers think as I do… Ain’t gonna happen, but fantasy is fun.
    Sharon, the next RWA is in Dallas, and the next Romance Readers conference (and I’m spacing on the name but we’re not talking RT) is in Kansas City. Come by, by all means! We’re really going to have to get work on those Wenchlings buttons.

    Reply
  17. I do adore our readers, people after our own hearts, for certain! Now, if I could only convince New York that my readers think as I do… Ain’t gonna happen, but fantasy is fun.
    Sharon, the next RWA is in Dallas, and the next Romance Readers conference (and I’m spacing on the name but we’re not talking RT) is in Kansas City. Come by, by all means! We’re really going to have to get work on those Wenchlings buttons.

    Reply
  18. I do adore our readers, people after our own hearts, for certain! Now, if I could only convince New York that my readers think as I do… Ain’t gonna happen, but fantasy is fun.
    Sharon, the next RWA is in Dallas, and the next Romance Readers conference (and I’m spacing on the name but we’re not talking RT) is in Kansas City. Come by, by all means! We’re really going to have to get work on those Wenchlings buttons.

    Reply
  19. I mainly buy books based on author name now, but I will pick up books if it has a “pretty” cover – particularly if it implies it’s a smart historical.
    This pretty cover could be a stately house or people (unless the people are in a clinch or have almost no clothes on).
    Like some of the others, adirondack chair means it’s probably more of a women’s fiction type book than a contemporary romance. That’s not a turn-off though.
    I love series (I don’t mean category) books that have a plot or continuing story connection.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  20. I mainly buy books based on author name now, but I will pick up books if it has a “pretty” cover – particularly if it implies it’s a smart historical.
    This pretty cover could be a stately house or people (unless the people are in a clinch or have almost no clothes on).
    Like some of the others, adirondack chair means it’s probably more of a women’s fiction type book than a contemporary romance. That’s not a turn-off though.
    I love series (I don’t mean category) books that have a plot or continuing story connection.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  21. I mainly buy books based on author name now, but I will pick up books if it has a “pretty” cover – particularly if it implies it’s a smart historical.
    This pretty cover could be a stately house or people (unless the people are in a clinch or have almost no clothes on).
    Like some of the others, adirondack chair means it’s probably more of a women’s fiction type book than a contemporary romance. That’s not a turn-off though.
    I love series (I don’t mean category) books that have a plot or continuing story connection.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  22. I like an adirondack chair. Especially if a gorgeous man is sitting in it.
    The tone of the whole image would be what mattered to me, actually. An empty adirondack chair with a lowering sky next to wind-tossed lake, an empty glass and hat next to it… spooky. Adirondack chair with a bikini top hanging off it… spicy. Adirondack chair in Thomas Kincaid setting… syrupy family saga. Adirondack chair in a field of flowers next to a lake… hey, Patricia Rice! Buy that baby!
    The tone of a cover really does influence me. The higher the cheese factor, the lower my interest. I do like to see some evidence of humans in the scene – a gazebo, a discarded dress, an adirondack chair – but mostly I like something classy. Subtly sexy gets high points too – like a gloved woman’s hand holding a fan, or dropping her dress off one shoulder. I just went to scan through a bunch of your covers, Patricia, and I really like most of them even though they’re very different. Even without knowing your name, I’d probably pick them up to read the back based on the cover.
    And I would like to point out that McCloud’s Woman has a canvas chair on the cover, so how could they in all good conscience give you another cover-with-a-canvas-chair unless it was the Canvas Chair Series?
    I do have another question that I wish I’d asked the other day: Do you all like to write short stories, or do you feel like it’s using up a good idea that could have been a full length novel? I dearly love anthologies, and would buy a new one every time I go to the bookstore if they were available (okay, if the *historical or regency* ones were available). I love Christmas because there is always at least one Regency anthology.

    Reply
  23. I like an adirondack chair. Especially if a gorgeous man is sitting in it.
    The tone of the whole image would be what mattered to me, actually. An empty adirondack chair with a lowering sky next to wind-tossed lake, an empty glass and hat next to it… spooky. Adirondack chair with a bikini top hanging off it… spicy. Adirondack chair in Thomas Kincaid setting… syrupy family saga. Adirondack chair in a field of flowers next to a lake… hey, Patricia Rice! Buy that baby!
    The tone of a cover really does influence me. The higher the cheese factor, the lower my interest. I do like to see some evidence of humans in the scene – a gazebo, a discarded dress, an adirondack chair – but mostly I like something classy. Subtly sexy gets high points too – like a gloved woman’s hand holding a fan, or dropping her dress off one shoulder. I just went to scan through a bunch of your covers, Patricia, and I really like most of them even though they’re very different. Even without knowing your name, I’d probably pick them up to read the back based on the cover.
    And I would like to point out that McCloud’s Woman has a canvas chair on the cover, so how could they in all good conscience give you another cover-with-a-canvas-chair unless it was the Canvas Chair Series?
    I do have another question that I wish I’d asked the other day: Do you all like to write short stories, or do you feel like it’s using up a good idea that could have been a full length novel? I dearly love anthologies, and would buy a new one every time I go to the bookstore if they were available (okay, if the *historical or regency* ones were available). I love Christmas because there is always at least one Regency anthology.

    Reply
  24. I like an adirondack chair. Especially if a gorgeous man is sitting in it.
    The tone of the whole image would be what mattered to me, actually. An empty adirondack chair with a lowering sky next to wind-tossed lake, an empty glass and hat next to it… spooky. Adirondack chair with a bikini top hanging off it… spicy. Adirondack chair in Thomas Kincaid setting… syrupy family saga. Adirondack chair in a field of flowers next to a lake… hey, Patricia Rice! Buy that baby!
    The tone of a cover really does influence me. The higher the cheese factor, the lower my interest. I do like to see some evidence of humans in the scene – a gazebo, a discarded dress, an adirondack chair – but mostly I like something classy. Subtly sexy gets high points too – like a gloved woman’s hand holding a fan, or dropping her dress off one shoulder. I just went to scan through a bunch of your covers, Patricia, and I really like most of them even though they’re very different. Even without knowing your name, I’d probably pick them up to read the back based on the cover.
    And I would like to point out that McCloud’s Woman has a canvas chair on the cover, so how could they in all good conscience give you another cover-with-a-canvas-chair unless it was the Canvas Chair Series?
    I do have another question that I wish I’d asked the other day: Do you all like to write short stories, or do you feel like it’s using up a good idea that could have been a full length novel? I dearly love anthologies, and would buy a new one every time I go to the bookstore if they were available (okay, if the *historical or regency* ones were available). I love Christmas because there is always at least one Regency anthology.

    Reply
  25. It’s interesting, isn’t it, how that Adirondack chair has come to symbolize women’s fiction. It’s not part of my culture. The closest for me would be one of those collapsible deck chairs.
    I don’t think it’s because women particularly like them — they always seem more of a man’s chair — so I wonder why. Because overworked women like the idea of lounging back in one of them? They are the sort of chair you sit in if you mean to stay put for a loooooong time.
    Heaven is being in the country with absolutely nothing to do and no one bugging her?
    Jo

    Reply
  26. It’s interesting, isn’t it, how that Adirondack chair has come to symbolize women’s fiction. It’s not part of my culture. The closest for me would be one of those collapsible deck chairs.
    I don’t think it’s because women particularly like them — they always seem more of a man’s chair — so I wonder why. Because overworked women like the idea of lounging back in one of them? They are the sort of chair you sit in if you mean to stay put for a loooooong time.
    Heaven is being in the country with absolutely nothing to do and no one bugging her?
    Jo

    Reply
  27. It’s interesting, isn’t it, how that Adirondack chair has come to symbolize women’s fiction. It’s not part of my culture. The closest for me would be one of those collapsible deck chairs.
    I don’t think it’s because women particularly like them — they always seem more of a man’s chair — so I wonder why. Because overworked women like the idea of lounging back in one of them? They are the sort of chair you sit in if you mean to stay put for a loooooong time.
    Heaven is being in the country with absolutely nothing to do and no one bugging her?
    Jo

    Reply
  28. If I had to guess, Jo, I’d say it’s because the editors and artists who decide about the designs spend their leisure time where the Adirondack chair is an icon – upstate NY, Connecticut, Martha’s Vineyard, Long Island. If the publishing industry was in Atlanta, it’d be a porch swing or a white wicker chair.

    Reply
  29. If I had to guess, Jo, I’d say it’s because the editors and artists who decide about the designs spend their leisure time where the Adirondack chair is an icon – upstate NY, Connecticut, Martha’s Vineyard, Long Island. If the publishing industry was in Atlanta, it’d be a porch swing or a white wicker chair.

    Reply
  30. If I had to guess, Jo, I’d say it’s because the editors and artists who decide about the designs spend their leisure time where the Adirondack chair is an icon – upstate NY, Connecticut, Martha’s Vineyard, Long Island. If the publishing industry was in Atlanta, it’d be a porch swing or a white wicker chair.

    Reply
  31. And if the publishing industry was in PA they might pick a tire swing hanging from the burly arm of an oak tree or an age stained hickory rocker.
    Hey Pat, why do they think an Adirondack chair is the way to go?

    Reply
  32. And if the publishing industry was in PA they might pick a tire swing hanging from the burly arm of an oak tree or an age stained hickory rocker.
    Hey Pat, why do they think an Adirondack chair is the way to go?

    Reply
  33. And if the publishing industry was in PA they might pick a tire swing hanging from the burly arm of an oak tree or an age stained hickory rocker.
    Hey Pat, why do they think an Adirondack chair is the way to go?

    Reply
  34. I like hammocks, I do.
    Covers – I’m a name buyer, then a synopsis and first page buyer, then if still undecided I look at the cover. Most likely to buy a cover lacking humans, then a single or clinch cover. Least likely by a huge long shot to buy a ‘mystical’ cover (ie, giant head floating over mountains) Often, those books are dreadfully bad and self impressed. There might be some very fine books with covers like that but I’ll never know because their mothers dress them funny.
    Story arc going on is fine –

    Reply
  35. I like hammocks, I do.
    Covers – I’m a name buyer, then a synopsis and first page buyer, then if still undecided I look at the cover. Most likely to buy a cover lacking humans, then a single or clinch cover. Least likely by a huge long shot to buy a ‘mystical’ cover (ie, giant head floating over mountains) Often, those books are dreadfully bad and self impressed. There might be some very fine books with covers like that but I’ll never know because their mothers dress them funny.
    Story arc going on is fine –

    Reply
  36. I like hammocks, I do.
    Covers – I’m a name buyer, then a synopsis and first page buyer, then if still undecided I look at the cover. Most likely to buy a cover lacking humans, then a single or clinch cover. Least likely by a huge long shot to buy a ‘mystical’ cover (ie, giant head floating over mountains) Often, those books are dreadfully bad and self impressed. There might be some very fine books with covers like that but I’ll never know because their mothers dress them funny.
    Story arc going on is fine –

    Reply
  37. I think the only kind of empty chair on a cover that would arouse my interest would be an elaborate throne–or an electric chair.
    I like landscapes/architecture on covers, rather than people–or animals, if they are featured, especially cats or horses. And I like the kind of Regency romance cover that features a fan or a patchbox or a flower or a pair of gloves–that sort of thing.
    This is one of my favorites:
    http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/q/amanda-quick/mistress.htm
    Of course, I have to admit to a certain fondness for this one:
    http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/P/0441013880.01._SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg
    On the one hand, I’m quite fond of series, so I have no problem with the story arc continuing into another book. OTOH, at my age, I’d be a bit leery of starting on a six-book series for fear I’d be finished before you were, so to speak….

    Reply
  38. I think the only kind of empty chair on a cover that would arouse my interest would be an elaborate throne–or an electric chair.
    I like landscapes/architecture on covers, rather than people–or animals, if they are featured, especially cats or horses. And I like the kind of Regency romance cover that features a fan or a patchbox or a flower or a pair of gloves–that sort of thing.
    This is one of my favorites:
    http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/q/amanda-quick/mistress.htm
    Of course, I have to admit to a certain fondness for this one:
    http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/P/0441013880.01._SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg
    On the one hand, I’m quite fond of series, so I have no problem with the story arc continuing into another book. OTOH, at my age, I’d be a bit leery of starting on a six-book series for fear I’d be finished before you were, so to speak….

    Reply
  39. I think the only kind of empty chair on a cover that would arouse my interest would be an elaborate throne–or an electric chair.
    I like landscapes/architecture on covers, rather than people–or animals, if they are featured, especially cats or horses. And I like the kind of Regency romance cover that features a fan or a patchbox or a flower or a pair of gloves–that sort of thing.
    This is one of my favorites:
    http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/q/amanda-quick/mistress.htm
    Of course, I have to admit to a certain fondness for this one:
    http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/P/0441013880.01._SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg
    On the one hand, I’m quite fond of series, so I have no problem with the story arc continuing into another book. OTOH, at my age, I’d be a bit leery of starting on a six-book series for fear I’d be finished before you were, so to speak….

    Reply
  40. Nina, I think Susanna has the ticket–that’s all NYC artists know. It should have occurred to me to at least suggest wicker as indicative of the south.
    I’m fascinated by this opinion of floating faces. I’ve not seen a book like this but I’m thinking there must be some out there that have turned people off? I may have to pass on that info!
    Electric chair, Tal! I love that. And you may have a point about the age of some of my readers…

    Reply
  41. Nina, I think Susanna has the ticket–that’s all NYC artists know. It should have occurred to me to at least suggest wicker as indicative of the south.
    I’m fascinated by this opinion of floating faces. I’ve not seen a book like this but I’m thinking there must be some out there that have turned people off? I may have to pass on that info!
    Electric chair, Tal! I love that. And you may have a point about the age of some of my readers…

    Reply
  42. Nina, I think Susanna has the ticket–that’s all NYC artists know. It should have occurred to me to at least suggest wicker as indicative of the south.
    I’m fascinated by this opinion of floating faces. I’ve not seen a book like this but I’m thinking there must be some out there that have turned people off? I may have to pass on that info!
    Electric chair, Tal! I love that. And you may have a point about the age of some of my readers…

    Reply
  43. I was quite serious about the electric chair. I’ve read some excellent legal thrillers with covers like that–the plot usually involves trying to prove the convicted murder innocent only days before his scheduled execution.

    Reply
  44. I was quite serious about the electric chair. I’ve read some excellent legal thrillers with covers like that–the plot usually involves trying to prove the convicted murder innocent only days before his scheduled execution.

    Reply
  45. I was quite serious about the electric chair. I’ve read some excellent legal thrillers with covers like that–the plot usually involves trying to prove the convicted murder innocent only days before his scheduled execution.

    Reply
  46. Lady Layton wrote:
    A cover with a naked Adirondack chair!
    Woo wee!
    That one will go flying off the shelves!
    —————–
    Yeah, sure–at Home Depot.

    Reply
  47. Lady Layton wrote:
    A cover with a naked Adirondack chair!
    Woo wee!
    That one will go flying off the shelves!
    —————–
    Yeah, sure–at Home Depot.

    Reply
  48. Lady Layton wrote:
    A cover with a naked Adirondack chair!
    Woo wee!
    That one will go flying off the shelves!
    —————–
    Yeah, sure–at Home Depot.

    Reply

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