A Work In Progress

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Susanna here.

I thought I'd do something a little different for my turn this week, and share the first chapter of my current work-in-progress with you.

It's a novella that will be part of a book titled THE DEADLY HOURS, with three other novellas contributed by Anna Lee Huber, Christine Trent, and C.S. Harris, to be published next year by Sourcebooks, following a possibly-cursed pocket watch as it wreaks havoc in the lives of its various owners through the centuries.


My novella brings Hugh and Mary from A Desperate Fortune together with Anna and Edmund from The Firebird and Daniel from The Rose Garden in an effort to thwart an assassin on his way to Rome…

Here's how it begins:

***********

He never would tire of watching her sleep.

In his boyhood, when he’d still believed in such things, he’d imagined what angels must look like, their faces unmarked by the vices of men—and to his eyes, awake or asleep, that was how Mary looked. Like an angel. His angel.

His wife.

He found it incredible she’d bound her life to his. Had someone told him a year ago he’d earn the love of a woman like this, he’d have thought them insane.

Before she’d crossed his path, he’d been resigned to going through his life unburdened by entanglements and sentiment, in service to the earl he had protected since the time when they had both been younger men.

He’d done what needed to be done. He’d killed when duty had required it. When duty had required him to guard a group of travellers in Paris, he had done as he was ordered, keeping safely out of sight, as was his habit. In the shadows.

He’d been watching from his window when she stepped down from the coach into the Paris street. And from that moment, everything had changed.

She stirred, curled in the berth set in the curved hull of this forward cabin of the ship. They’d shared this cabin once before, when she had neither trusted him nor liked him much, and he had made his bed upon the floor, but now she reached for him, still sleeping, as she often did. Her hand fell on the empty blankets where he had been lying, and he watched her eyes drift open.

“Hugh?”

He’d finished dressing. In its bracket on the wall the lamp was swinging, throwing his tall shadow into motion.

She was only half awake. “Is something wrong?”

Extinguishing the lamp, he told her, “No. Go back to sleep.”

It was a touching measure of her faith in him that, by the time he’d reached the door, her breathing had resettled in its former peaceful rhythm.

Up on deck, his eyes adjusting to the darkness of a night sky lit by nothing but a crescent moon against a sweep of stars, he found the captain standing by the rail.

Captain Marcos María del Rio Cuerda was Hugh’s exact opposite—handsome and cultured and gallant with ladies, his coats made of velvet, his cuffs edged with lace, his dark beard and curling hair trimmed in the fashion of his native Spain. But he’d earned Hugh’s respect and, within certain limits, his trust.

And he didn’t miss much. Without looking around from the rail now, Del Rio said, “You have just won me a wager, my friend.” He called up to the brown-skinned sailor working to make some adjustment to the rigging, “You see, Juan? It is as I told you.”

Whatever Juan answered was carried away by the wind, but Del Rio looked satisfied. “I told him when we changed course, I said, ‘Watch now, MacPherson will come up to see what is happening,’ but Juan was sure you’d stay sleeping. It was a good wager. Shall I tell you what you’ve won me?”

Hugh said nothing. Stepped up to the rail. “Tell me why we’ve changed course.”

“Ah. Because of that.” Del Rio gave a nod to where the stars were being swallowed by a rising wall of blackness. “It is the time for storms here in these seas of course, but this, to me, does not look like an ordinary storm. And always it is better to prevent than to lament.”

Hugh accepted this, and so said nothing.

“If it worsens,” said Del Rio, “we may have to change our course again and seek a port for shelter. Portofino is the closest. But that may upset your plans to be in Genoa in two days’ time.”

“My plans will also be upset if I am drowned.”

Del Rio grinned. “It’s true. It’s also true, my friend, that you are changed since last I saw you. You now have a sense of humour. I give credit to your lovely wife. I see that you have finally found a ring for her at Rome.”

“Yes.”

“She’s a woman most remarkable.” Del Rio grinned more broadly. “I can promise you, if you are drowned, I will take the best care of her and see she is not lonely.”

Hugh reminded him, “You have a wife.”

A pause. “Ah, yes, Emiliana. Yes, of course. My wife,” he said, acknowledging the woman who had sailed with them last spring, and who, like Mary in those days, had worn no ring. “And now we also have a son. Domingo. Did I mention this?”

“No.”

“It is a great thing, to have a family. I can recommend it. I would have them with me, but it has not been so safe since this past summer, with so many ships involved in all the fighting for Oran, and the corsairs since then have been a greater nuisance. They have kept me very busy.”

Underneath the offhand elegance there lay an iron strength. Del Rio once had been a pirate, before turning those same skills to a more honourable use in hunting pirates for the Spanish crown—specifically the Barbary corsairs who prowled these seas in search of prisoners and plunder, making slaves of those they captured.

That the Spaniard smiled and joked and was a gallant host did nothing to erase the fact that he was as adept as Hugh at killing when the need arose, and any man who failed to see the ruthless edge concealed within the velvet scabbard did so at his peril.

As did any man who let his guard down when Del Rio asked a question that seemed innocent.

“Your wife’s maid and the little dog are still at Rome?”

Hugh answered, not confirming nor denying this, “They do not travel well.”

“Of course. It’s only that I’ve heard reports you Jacobites have trouble there—that all the court of your King James at Rome is under heavy guard, and that the Pope is also much concerned, and gives an order no one is to enter Rome without great scrutiny. As though they fear that someone may be coming who is dangerous.”

He glanced at Hugh, who kept his gaze fixed on the storm, unhelpfully.

“But maybe these reports are wrong,” Del Rio said. “The English tell so many lies about your king, to make their own King George seem more legitimate, as though they did not steal your own king’s birthright and his crown and set it on a German prince for no more reason than your James was born a Catholic. It’s a very great injustice. I pray daily that your king regains his kingdom, for the sake of his own sons. They say the young prince, Charles, is handsome and quite clever.”

Handsome, yes. Hugh was less sure about the clever part, preferring young Prince Henry, but he kept his own opinions to himself.

His silence did not stop Del Rio from continuing, “And if your king was sending you to Genoa because of something dangerous, I do not think that you would bring your wife. Unless,” he said, “this danger was so great you could trust no one else to keep her safe.”

The wind was rising, and more stars had now been lost behind the swiftly spreading blackness. Hugh’s eyes narrowed on the swelling waves. “Is that a ship?”

Del Rio looked, and swore.

“Corsairs?”

The Spaniard raised his spyglass for a better view, and swore again. “No. Something worse.”

He handed Hugh the spyglass. From that distance, Hugh could only see the white of sails that caught the pale faint gleam of moonlight, with the dark shape of a running ship beneath it, and small glints of light like those of lanterns near the prow.

Del Rio said, “It is Vautour. We have a long acquaintance.”

“French?”

“I do not think Lambert Vautour claims any country as his own, and I am sure none claims him back.” He called again to Juan, up in the rigging. “Leave that. Go and get the others. I want every man on deck. You tell them it is La Sirène.” There was a grimness to his voice that Hugh had never heard before. “At least we know now why there is a storm.”

Hugh frowned. “A ship can’t raise a storm.”

“I would agree,” Del Rio said. “But La Sirène is not a ship.” And with a final quick assessment of the far-off sails now being chased towards them by the ever-growing dark, he turned his back against the rising gale. “We make for Portofino.”

***********

This is the first novella I've ever attempted, and to be honest it's taking almost as long as any of my novels. Do you like shorter reads, or do you prefer longer ones? Do you have any favourite novellas I should put on my TBR list?

60 thoughts on “A Work In Progress”

  1. I enjoyed the excerpt quite a bit, Susanna, so thank you.
    As to shorter versus longer reads, I enjoy anything that tells a good story.
    Some novellas I like:
    Courtney Milan’s The Governess Affair which is currently free for Kindle readers.
    Patricia Briggs’ Alpha and Omega novella
    Anna Richland’s His Road Home
    Lyn Gala’s Prelude to Claimings, Tails, and Other Alien Artifacts (Claimings, #0.5) (though I’m not sure how one obtains this now that LooseID is defunct)
    If I think of others, I’ll be back!

    Reply
  2. I enjoyed the excerpt quite a bit, Susanna, so thank you.
    As to shorter versus longer reads, I enjoy anything that tells a good story.
    Some novellas I like:
    Courtney Milan’s The Governess Affair which is currently free for Kindle readers.
    Patricia Briggs’ Alpha and Omega novella
    Anna Richland’s His Road Home
    Lyn Gala’s Prelude to Claimings, Tails, and Other Alien Artifacts (Claimings, #0.5) (though I’m not sure how one obtains this now that LooseID is defunct)
    If I think of others, I’ll be back!

    Reply
  3. I enjoyed the excerpt quite a bit, Susanna, so thank you.
    As to shorter versus longer reads, I enjoy anything that tells a good story.
    Some novellas I like:
    Courtney Milan’s The Governess Affair which is currently free for Kindle readers.
    Patricia Briggs’ Alpha and Omega novella
    Anna Richland’s His Road Home
    Lyn Gala’s Prelude to Claimings, Tails, and Other Alien Artifacts (Claimings, #0.5) (though I’m not sure how one obtains this now that LooseID is defunct)
    If I think of others, I’ll be back!

    Reply
  4. I enjoyed the excerpt quite a bit, Susanna, so thank you.
    As to shorter versus longer reads, I enjoy anything that tells a good story.
    Some novellas I like:
    Courtney Milan’s The Governess Affair which is currently free for Kindle readers.
    Patricia Briggs’ Alpha and Omega novella
    Anna Richland’s His Road Home
    Lyn Gala’s Prelude to Claimings, Tails, and Other Alien Artifacts (Claimings, #0.5) (though I’m not sure how one obtains this now that LooseID is defunct)
    If I think of others, I’ll be back!

    Reply
  5. I enjoyed the excerpt quite a bit, Susanna, so thank you.
    As to shorter versus longer reads, I enjoy anything that tells a good story.
    Some novellas I like:
    Courtney Milan’s The Governess Affair which is currently free for Kindle readers.
    Patricia Briggs’ Alpha and Omega novella
    Anna Richland’s His Road Home
    Lyn Gala’s Prelude to Claimings, Tails, and Other Alien Artifacts (Claimings, #0.5) (though I’m not sure how one obtains this now that LooseID is defunct)
    If I think of others, I’ll be back!

    Reply
  6. Some more titles:
    Blonde Date by Sarina Bowen
    Thea Harrison has some enjoyable novellas and stories. I’ll recommend The Wicked.
    The Nekkid Truth by Nicole Camden

    Reply
  7. Some more titles:
    Blonde Date by Sarina Bowen
    Thea Harrison has some enjoyable novellas and stories. I’ll recommend The Wicked.
    The Nekkid Truth by Nicole Camden

    Reply
  8. Some more titles:
    Blonde Date by Sarina Bowen
    Thea Harrison has some enjoyable novellas and stories. I’ll recommend The Wicked.
    The Nekkid Truth by Nicole Camden

    Reply
  9. Some more titles:
    Blonde Date by Sarina Bowen
    Thea Harrison has some enjoyable novellas and stories. I’ll recommend The Wicked.
    The Nekkid Truth by Nicole Camden

    Reply
  10. Some more titles:
    Blonde Date by Sarina Bowen
    Thea Harrison has some enjoyable novellas and stories. I’ll recommend The Wicked.
    The Nekkid Truth by Nicole Camden

    Reply
  11. Wonderful reading, Susanna, especially since earlier this week I decided to wend my way through Shadowy Horses to Winter Sea to Firebird. I’d forgotten Hugh, so I may have to add Desperate Fortune to the journey.
    As for novellas, I’ll recommend four by Wenches and one by a former Wench, which actually happen to be my favorite novellas:
    Mary Jo’s The Best Husband Money Can Buy; Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know; and Sunshine for Christmas
    Loretta Chase’s The Mad Earl’s Bride,
    And Susan King’s The Snow Rose
    Thanks for adding to my journey through some favorite comfort reads, Susanna.
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  12. Wonderful reading, Susanna, especially since earlier this week I decided to wend my way through Shadowy Horses to Winter Sea to Firebird. I’d forgotten Hugh, so I may have to add Desperate Fortune to the journey.
    As for novellas, I’ll recommend four by Wenches and one by a former Wench, which actually happen to be my favorite novellas:
    Mary Jo’s The Best Husband Money Can Buy; Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know; and Sunshine for Christmas
    Loretta Chase’s The Mad Earl’s Bride,
    And Susan King’s The Snow Rose
    Thanks for adding to my journey through some favorite comfort reads, Susanna.
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  13. Wonderful reading, Susanna, especially since earlier this week I decided to wend my way through Shadowy Horses to Winter Sea to Firebird. I’d forgotten Hugh, so I may have to add Desperate Fortune to the journey.
    As for novellas, I’ll recommend four by Wenches and one by a former Wench, which actually happen to be my favorite novellas:
    Mary Jo’s The Best Husband Money Can Buy; Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know; and Sunshine for Christmas
    Loretta Chase’s The Mad Earl’s Bride,
    And Susan King’s The Snow Rose
    Thanks for adding to my journey through some favorite comfort reads, Susanna.
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  14. Wonderful reading, Susanna, especially since earlier this week I decided to wend my way through Shadowy Horses to Winter Sea to Firebird. I’d forgotten Hugh, so I may have to add Desperate Fortune to the journey.
    As for novellas, I’ll recommend four by Wenches and one by a former Wench, which actually happen to be my favorite novellas:
    Mary Jo’s The Best Husband Money Can Buy; Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know; and Sunshine for Christmas
    Loretta Chase’s The Mad Earl’s Bride,
    And Susan King’s The Snow Rose
    Thanks for adding to my journey through some favorite comfort reads, Susanna.
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  15. Wonderful reading, Susanna, especially since earlier this week I decided to wend my way through Shadowy Horses to Winter Sea to Firebird. I’d forgotten Hugh, so I may have to add Desperate Fortune to the journey.
    As for novellas, I’ll recommend four by Wenches and one by a former Wench, which actually happen to be my favorite novellas:
    Mary Jo’s The Best Husband Money Can Buy; Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know; and Sunshine for Christmas
    Loretta Chase’s The Mad Earl’s Bride,
    And Susan King’s The Snow Rose
    Thanks for adding to my journey through some favorite comfort reads, Susanna.
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  16. The novellas in the Signet Regency Christmas anthologies are almost all good, but I especially love those by Carla Kelly, one of my favorite writers (I majored in history in college and still love it).

    Reply
  17. The novellas in the Signet Regency Christmas anthologies are almost all good, but I especially love those by Carla Kelly, one of my favorite writers (I majored in history in college and still love it).

    Reply
  18. The novellas in the Signet Regency Christmas anthologies are almost all good, but I especially love those by Carla Kelly, one of my favorite writers (I majored in history in college and still love it).

    Reply
  19. The novellas in the Signet Regency Christmas anthologies are almost all good, but I especially love those by Carla Kelly, one of my favorite writers (I majored in history in college and still love it).

    Reply
  20. The novellas in the Signet Regency Christmas anthologies are almost all good, but I especially love those by Carla Kelly, one of my favorite writers (I majored in history in college and still love it).

    Reply
  21. That’s a great excerpt, I’m already hooked! I never used to read novellas when I read only print books, but I have developed a taste for them since I started reading on Kindle. A great way to try a new author at a bargain price. I especially love the holiday novellas.

    Reply
  22. That’s a great excerpt, I’m already hooked! I never used to read novellas when I read only print books, but I have developed a taste for them since I started reading on Kindle. A great way to try a new author at a bargain price. I especially love the holiday novellas.

    Reply
  23. That’s a great excerpt, I’m already hooked! I never used to read novellas when I read only print books, but I have developed a taste for them since I started reading on Kindle. A great way to try a new author at a bargain price. I especially love the holiday novellas.

    Reply
  24. That’s a great excerpt, I’m already hooked! I never used to read novellas when I read only print books, but I have developed a taste for them since I started reading on Kindle. A great way to try a new author at a bargain price. I especially love the holiday novellas.

    Reply
  25. That’s a great excerpt, I’m already hooked! I never used to read novellas when I read only print books, but I have developed a taste for them since I started reading on Kindle. A great way to try a new author at a bargain price. I especially love the holiday novellas.

    Reply
  26. I prefer a longer read, and then am still disappointed to have it end if I am engaged with the characters. If there is but a single point to make, however, a novella can be useful, such as ro give a backstory for a character in a larger book or series.

    Reply
  27. I prefer a longer read, and then am still disappointed to have it end if I am engaged with the characters. If there is but a single point to make, however, a novella can be useful, such as ro give a backstory for a character in a larger book or series.

    Reply
  28. I prefer a longer read, and then am still disappointed to have it end if I am engaged with the characters. If there is but a single point to make, however, a novella can be useful, such as ro give a backstory for a character in a larger book or series.

    Reply
  29. I prefer a longer read, and then am still disappointed to have it end if I am engaged with the characters. If there is but a single point to make, however, a novella can be useful, such as ro give a backstory for a character in a larger book or series.

    Reply
  30. I prefer a longer read, and then am still disappointed to have it end if I am engaged with the characters. If there is but a single point to make, however, a novella can be useful, such as ro give a backstory for a character in a larger book or series.

    Reply
  31. I have grown to like novellas as a good way to sample an author or to read more by authors I love. One of my favorites is probably Big Boy by Ruthie Knox.
    I heard about this book through Anna Lee Huber’s newsletter and I’m excited for it.

    Reply
  32. I have grown to like novellas as a good way to sample an author or to read more by authors I love. One of my favorites is probably Big Boy by Ruthie Knox.
    I heard about this book through Anna Lee Huber’s newsletter and I’m excited for it.

    Reply
  33. I have grown to like novellas as a good way to sample an author or to read more by authors I love. One of my favorites is probably Big Boy by Ruthie Knox.
    I heard about this book through Anna Lee Huber’s newsletter and I’m excited for it.

    Reply
  34. I have grown to like novellas as a good way to sample an author or to read more by authors I love. One of my favorites is probably Big Boy by Ruthie Knox.
    I heard about this book through Anna Lee Huber’s newsletter and I’m excited for it.

    Reply
  35. I have grown to like novellas as a good way to sample an author or to read more by authors I love. One of my favorites is probably Big Boy by Ruthie Knox.
    I heard about this book through Anna Lee Huber’s newsletter and I’m excited for it.

    Reply
  36. This was a great excerpt, very ‘imagination capturing.’ Count me in. A great line-up of writers, it’s intriguing what the others will like. Some of the best novellas, have in my experience come from my favorite writers in general. About half of those were authors I was familiar with, and the other half authors I was introduced to by reading novella collections.
    I especially enjoy the group efforts surrounding a theme, Christmas being a favorite, (Go Wenches!!) However, what it takes to get me interested in a collection is already being familiar with one of the authors. Your name in that group would be the clincher for me, although I am familiar with and love C.S. Harris’s books.
    I love a good long full-length novel, with character development, plot development, background insight into the character’s motives and a (please) not rushed HEA. But I think I perhaps read more novellas than ever before because good full-length is getting harder to come by. I will always applaud a well-written novella. I know from reading about authors that it takes just as much effort to cut away, ruthlessly sometimes, and yet telling a complete story.

    Reply
  37. This was a great excerpt, very ‘imagination capturing.’ Count me in. A great line-up of writers, it’s intriguing what the others will like. Some of the best novellas, have in my experience come from my favorite writers in general. About half of those were authors I was familiar with, and the other half authors I was introduced to by reading novella collections.
    I especially enjoy the group efforts surrounding a theme, Christmas being a favorite, (Go Wenches!!) However, what it takes to get me interested in a collection is already being familiar with one of the authors. Your name in that group would be the clincher for me, although I am familiar with and love C.S. Harris’s books.
    I love a good long full-length novel, with character development, plot development, background insight into the character’s motives and a (please) not rushed HEA. But I think I perhaps read more novellas than ever before because good full-length is getting harder to come by. I will always applaud a well-written novella. I know from reading about authors that it takes just as much effort to cut away, ruthlessly sometimes, and yet telling a complete story.

    Reply
  38. This was a great excerpt, very ‘imagination capturing.’ Count me in. A great line-up of writers, it’s intriguing what the others will like. Some of the best novellas, have in my experience come from my favorite writers in general. About half of those were authors I was familiar with, and the other half authors I was introduced to by reading novella collections.
    I especially enjoy the group efforts surrounding a theme, Christmas being a favorite, (Go Wenches!!) However, what it takes to get me interested in a collection is already being familiar with one of the authors. Your name in that group would be the clincher for me, although I am familiar with and love C.S. Harris’s books.
    I love a good long full-length novel, with character development, plot development, background insight into the character’s motives and a (please) not rushed HEA. But I think I perhaps read more novellas than ever before because good full-length is getting harder to come by. I will always applaud a well-written novella. I know from reading about authors that it takes just as much effort to cut away, ruthlessly sometimes, and yet telling a complete story.

    Reply
  39. This was a great excerpt, very ‘imagination capturing.’ Count me in. A great line-up of writers, it’s intriguing what the others will like. Some of the best novellas, have in my experience come from my favorite writers in general. About half of those were authors I was familiar with, and the other half authors I was introduced to by reading novella collections.
    I especially enjoy the group efforts surrounding a theme, Christmas being a favorite, (Go Wenches!!) However, what it takes to get me interested in a collection is already being familiar with one of the authors. Your name in that group would be the clincher for me, although I am familiar with and love C.S. Harris’s books.
    I love a good long full-length novel, with character development, plot development, background insight into the character’s motives and a (please) not rushed HEA. But I think I perhaps read more novellas than ever before because good full-length is getting harder to come by. I will always applaud a well-written novella. I know from reading about authors that it takes just as much effort to cut away, ruthlessly sometimes, and yet telling a complete story.

    Reply
  40. This was a great excerpt, very ‘imagination capturing.’ Count me in. A great line-up of writers, it’s intriguing what the others will like. Some of the best novellas, have in my experience come from my favorite writers in general. About half of those were authors I was familiar with, and the other half authors I was introduced to by reading novella collections.
    I especially enjoy the group efforts surrounding a theme, Christmas being a favorite, (Go Wenches!!) However, what it takes to get me interested in a collection is already being familiar with one of the authors. Your name in that group would be the clincher for me, although I am familiar with and love C.S. Harris’s books.
    I love a good long full-length novel, with character development, plot development, background insight into the character’s motives and a (please) not rushed HEA. But I think I perhaps read more novellas than ever before because good full-length is getting harder to come by. I will always applaud a well-written novella. I know from reading about authors that it takes just as much effort to cut away, ruthlessly sometimes, and yet telling a complete story.

    Reply
  41. Actually. Susan, you also wrote one more favorite novella of mine, WHITE FIRE, that appeared in the anthology April Moon.
    Sorry I forgot the first time! I still think it’s really hard to write a novella that feels like just as full an emotional meal as a full length, but this and the others above certainly do.
    You’d be amazed at how often I re-read these when I desperately need a diverting, comfort read AND desperately need a good night’s sleep. I know the novellas won’t keep me up all night. Very handy.
    Thanks for responding!

    Reply
  42. Actually. Susan, you also wrote one more favorite novella of mine, WHITE FIRE, that appeared in the anthology April Moon.
    Sorry I forgot the first time! I still think it’s really hard to write a novella that feels like just as full an emotional meal as a full length, but this and the others above certainly do.
    You’d be amazed at how often I re-read these when I desperately need a diverting, comfort read AND desperately need a good night’s sleep. I know the novellas won’t keep me up all night. Very handy.
    Thanks for responding!

    Reply
  43. Actually. Susan, you also wrote one more favorite novella of mine, WHITE FIRE, that appeared in the anthology April Moon.
    Sorry I forgot the first time! I still think it’s really hard to write a novella that feels like just as full an emotional meal as a full length, but this and the others above certainly do.
    You’d be amazed at how often I re-read these when I desperately need a diverting, comfort read AND desperately need a good night’s sleep. I know the novellas won’t keep me up all night. Very handy.
    Thanks for responding!

    Reply
  44. Actually. Susan, you also wrote one more favorite novella of mine, WHITE FIRE, that appeared in the anthology April Moon.
    Sorry I forgot the first time! I still think it’s really hard to write a novella that feels like just as full an emotional meal as a full length, but this and the others above certainly do.
    You’d be amazed at how often I re-read these when I desperately need a diverting, comfort read AND desperately need a good night’s sleep. I know the novellas won’t keep me up all night. Very handy.
    Thanks for responding!

    Reply
  45. Actually. Susan, you also wrote one more favorite novella of mine, WHITE FIRE, that appeared in the anthology April Moon.
    Sorry I forgot the first time! I still think it’s really hard to write a novella that feels like just as full an emotional meal as a full length, but this and the others above certainly do.
    You’d be amazed at how often I re-read these when I desperately need a diverting, comfort read AND desperately need a good night’s sleep. I know the novellas won’t keep me up all night. Very handy.
    Thanks for responding!

    Reply
  46. Thanks, Faith! Especially encouraging just now when I’m writing another novella and thinking it’s dreck at the moment. I need to go back to those earlier novellas and read them again! 😉

    Reply
  47. Thanks, Faith! Especially encouraging just now when I’m writing another novella and thinking it’s dreck at the moment. I need to go back to those earlier novellas and read them again! 😉

    Reply
  48. Thanks, Faith! Especially encouraging just now when I’m writing another novella and thinking it’s dreck at the moment. I need to go back to those earlier novellas and read them again! 😉

    Reply
  49. Thanks, Faith! Especially encouraging just now when I’m writing another novella and thinking it’s dreck at the moment. I need to go back to those earlier novellas and read them again! 😉

    Reply
  50. Thanks, Faith! Especially encouraging just now when I’m writing another novella and thinking it’s dreck at the moment. I need to go back to those earlier novellas and read them again! 😉

    Reply

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