A Wenchly Ode to Mary Stewart

Mary StewartCara/Andrea here,
The Wenches talk among themselves nearly every day on a variety of topics, from the silly to the sublime. But as you can well imagine, books figure prominently in the discussions. And recently, as the questions of early “influences” came up, the name of Mary Stewart jumped to the fore. As we waxed enthusiastic, it occurred to us that our thoughts would be a fun thing to feature on this month’s “What We Are Reading” as many of you no doubt share our love of her books. So, here are some of our thoughts on her works. And we encourage you to share yours as well!



Airs Above the GroundNicola:
Mary Stewart was one of those authors I discovered at a young age. Her books 
totally swept me away. They still do even though I have read and re-read
them more times than I can count. The first one I read was Airs Above the
 Ground and I adored the element of foreign travel, which seemed very exotic
to me as a teenager, spiced with mystery, danger, a strong heroine and an 
enigmatic and sexy hero. Mary Stewart was one of the few authors I remember
discovering collectively but in an informal way. My school friends and I
swapped her books amongst ourselves and had a sort of Mary Stewart book club
 where we met up to chat about which ones we liked best and what we
 particularly enjoyed about the settings and the characters.



Gabriel HoundsAs I grew older and started writing myself I began to recognise what a
 consummate storyteller she is. Her wonderfully evocative descriptions add so
 much to the atmosphere of the story. I still remember how her descriptions
 of the heat and aridity of Crete added to the tension in The Moon Spinners,
 and the first line of The Gabriel Hounds is one of my favourites: "I met him
 in the street called Straight." Some of her heroes are to die for and I 
loved that her heroines always had a lot of gumption, as they say where I
 come from. Some of those books can still make me cry even though I know them
 so well. There's a particular scene in This Rough Magic that gets me every
time. 

I'd better stop there or I'll be eulogising about Mary Stewart for pages and
 pages!

Moonspinner movie posterJo:
When I discovered and relished Mary Stewart as a teen I didn't note her 
excellent writing; I simply enjoyed her stories. She wrote damn good 
adventures with central female characters who weren't wimps. Yay! I was, and 
still am, a mostly historical reader, but perhaps her Continental settings 
such as Provence, Greece and French chateaux were as beyond reach to a working 
class girl in Lancashire as the middle ages. Though perhaps not my favorite, 
the one that sticks in my mind is The Moon Spinners, mostly because of the 1964 
film starring Hayley Mills. Her character was younger than in the book, but 
that meant she was my age, so that I felt I could almost be in an adventure in 
Crete myself.

Rough MagicJoanna:
I grew up with a fascination for the Greek myths. Read the Odyssey. Read Greek plays even. I imagined Dryads and Neriads and naughty Fawns wandering among classical white marble temples and wide fountains. Think Maxwell Parrish, and remember I was very young. 
   
I'll just add that when I got to visit Greece in my late teens, I found it nothing at all like that mannered land of my child's imagination. I loved the reality even more.
   
Anyhow, my first Mary Stewart books were The Moon Spinners and My Brother Michael. I didn't think of them as love stories. (c.f. I was very young, above)  To me they were adventure stories, set in the familiar landscape of great epics and mythical beings. Adventure stories made more marvelous because the protagonist was female.
   
Stewart had an unparalleled ability to connect to setting.  Whether it was wild flowers on the mountains in Crete or the Lipizzaner horses and a traveling circus in Austria, she created a 'sense of place' in her stories.  Her landscapes are rich with embedded story, stuffed plum-pudding style with possibilities ready to be plucked out.  I was as enthralled by her places as by her characters.
   
My favorite line is from another of her Greek-set books, This Rough Magic: "You wanted to eat his heart, little sister. I have cooked it for you."

Cover_madamAnne:
I read my first Mary Stewart when I was a young teenager and my eldest sister, who was a librarian, brought home some books that had been cancelled and were going to be tossed out. I was the kind of kid that was always looking for something to read, so she fed my habit (thanks Big Sis!)

The first was Madam Will You Talk and I loved it to bits. I loved the car chase, I loved the descriptions of the French countryside, and I vowed one day I'd visit those places. It's a cracking good romantic suspense and remains a favorite of mine. After that I devoured everything of Mary Stewart's I could find. Another favorite is Nine Coaches Waiting, where the hero was the delicious Raoul.

Mary Stewart's heroines are the kind of women we'd like to be. They're intelligent, attractive, well read, sophisticated but also down to earth, and when they're thrown out of their comfort zone, as they inevitably are, they use their wits and act courageously. Her settings are drawn in wonderfully textured detail, whether it's a picturesque English village, or a Greek island or the south of France. She's a born storyteller, but is also very much a writers' writer.

Nine Coaches WaitingSusan:
My first introduction to Mary Stewart was not on the page but on the screen, when as a kid, I saw Disney's The Moon Spinners with Hayley Mills and Peter McEnery on TV – and fell in love. Learning that it was a book, I was off to the library like a "pea from a catapult," to quote La Stewart–and discovered my favorite author, hands down. In high school, I cleared the library shelves of all the Mary Stewarts in their collection, read each one, and started over. I did an oral book report on The Ivy Tree. When Mary Stewart wrote her Arthurian series, I devoured each one, completely enchanted. I now have every book she's ever written, including the YAs, and I've read each one more than once. Some, I've read many times. She is my comfort read–the author I turn to most often, even in repeats.
 
My+Brother+MichaelWhy? Because Mary Stewart is, quite simply, magic on the page. Her writing is fluid, sparkling, evocative, her characters authentic and appealing, her settings beautifully created and utterly essential to the story. She has a gift for visual and sensory description and she conjures a sense of the ancient and historical in timeless contemporary settings. Her heroines are sympathetic in their vulnerability and adaptability–and her heroes are quiet, intelligent, understated and all the more charismatic and sexy for it. She is a skilled, subtle, artful writer. Not only have I loved every story–as a writer, I've learned a great deal soaking up atmosphere and craft among her pages.

Most of us have one or two utmost favorite Mary Stewart novels. For me, those are The Moon Spinners (masterful romantic suspense and an extraordinary evocation of sun-drenched Greece); Wildfire at Midnight (Scotland, the power of the Cuillins, and a strong, subtle hero with a dark side), and for a third, it's a toss up between My Brother Michael and This Rough Magic (Greece again!). I've never visited Greece–but thanks to Mary Stewart, I feel an affinity for it. I'm happy and proud to have a Mary Stewart shelf of honor in my library.

Mary Jo:
Mary Stewart is one of the triumvirate of writers who influenced me most.  (The other two are Georgette Heyer and Dorothy Dunnett.)
 
With each of these writers, the first book read was as memorable as it was powerful.  My first Mary Stewart was The Ivy Tree, and I read a condensed version on a women's magazine of my mother's.  I was riveted–and the big plot twist left me stunned and forever shaped my impressionable young mind.  <G>
 
In later years I read and reread all her books.  Among the romantic suspense, I particularly loved Madame, Will You Talk?, My Brother Michael, and of course, The Ivy Tree.  I adored her exotic settings and Greece went on my travel bucket list.  (Yes, I've been there, and I want to go back!)
 
I loved her characters–her heroines were interesting women who did interesting things, and her heroes were honorable, very appealing men.  And, though I didn't realize it at the time, I loved the quality of her writing.  She did marvelous light handed descriptions and created a wonderful sense of place, and she was never, ever dull.
 
That's not even mentioning her Arthurian books.  The Crystal Cave was another book that changed the way I thought, this time about Roman Britain and the Arthurian tales.  I read the trilogy three times, but the fourth book, The Wicked Day, only once.  The way Stewart treated Mordred was brilliant, but the story is inherently tragic.  Reading it once was enough.
 
Like the other Wenches, I could go on and on and on, but one must draw the line somewhere!  I'm looking forward to hearing what other readers have to say about her.

The MoonspinnersCara/Andrea:

I remember distinctly my first Mary Stewart book—I was thirteen and my best friend had just gotten The Moon Spinners from the library and gave it to me when she finished. I was entranced—the exotic setting, the whiff of danger, the handsome stranger . . . but most of all, the spunky heroine, who was resourceful and bolder and braver than she thought she could be when push came to shove. I was hooked! Add to that the weaving in of history (This Rough Magic came next, and it’s still one of my favorites) Stewart’s wonderful sense of storytelling and descriptive details of place, and it’s no wonder that to this day, they are still books I go back to time and time again for the sheer magic of losing myself in a grand adventure for several hours.
   
I think part of the universal appeal of her books is how real her heroines are—a mix of vulnerability and strength, a self-deprecating sense of humor, curiosity, and the ability to rise to the occasion even when she scared witless. I know they shaped my sense of what made a great “intrepid heroine.”

So what about you? Are you a big fan of Mary Stewart? Did you discover her early in your reading life, and did she have an influence on you? Please share your thoughts!

250 thoughts on “A Wenchly Ode to Mary Stewart”

  1. Oh, wenches you’ve pretty well covered everything I love about all of Mary Stewart’s engaging stories. She is also credited by Pamela Regis with being the instigator of the romantic suspense genre.

    Reply
  2. Oh, wenches you’ve pretty well covered everything I love about all of Mary Stewart’s engaging stories. She is also credited by Pamela Regis with being the instigator of the romantic suspense genre.

    Reply
  3. Oh, wenches you’ve pretty well covered everything I love about all of Mary Stewart’s engaging stories. She is also credited by Pamela Regis with being the instigator of the romantic suspense genre.

    Reply
  4. Oh, wenches you’ve pretty well covered everything I love about all of Mary Stewart’s engaging stories. She is also credited by Pamela Regis with being the instigator of the romantic suspense genre.

    Reply
  5. Oh, wenches you’ve pretty well covered everything I love about all of Mary Stewart’s engaging stories. She is also credited by Pamela Regis with being the instigator of the romantic suspense genre.

    Reply
  6. My first, and still my favorite, Mary Stewart read was This Rough Magic. I loved the setting and the strong heroine. Just as important, was the Shakespeare connection. It made me read The Tempest, which lead to reading other Shakespeare works.

    Reply
  7. My first, and still my favorite, Mary Stewart read was This Rough Magic. I loved the setting and the strong heroine. Just as important, was the Shakespeare connection. It made me read The Tempest, which lead to reading other Shakespeare works.

    Reply
  8. My first, and still my favorite, Mary Stewart read was This Rough Magic. I loved the setting and the strong heroine. Just as important, was the Shakespeare connection. It made me read The Tempest, which lead to reading other Shakespeare works.

    Reply
  9. My first, and still my favorite, Mary Stewart read was This Rough Magic. I loved the setting and the strong heroine. Just as important, was the Shakespeare connection. It made me read The Tempest, which lead to reading other Shakespeare works.

    Reply
  10. My first, and still my favorite, Mary Stewart read was This Rough Magic. I loved the setting and the strong heroine. Just as important, was the Shakespeare connection. It made me read The Tempest, which lead to reading other Shakespeare works.

    Reply
  11. And Nine Coaches Waiting led me to Tourneur and Jacobean tragedy in general. Plus there was a French chateau, sigh.
    Come to think of it, there are a lot of literary/classical allusions in Stewart. She never assumed her readers were either stupid or ignorant.

    Reply
  12. And Nine Coaches Waiting led me to Tourneur and Jacobean tragedy in general. Plus there was a French chateau, sigh.
    Come to think of it, there are a lot of literary/classical allusions in Stewart. She never assumed her readers were either stupid or ignorant.

    Reply
  13. And Nine Coaches Waiting led me to Tourneur and Jacobean tragedy in general. Plus there was a French chateau, sigh.
    Come to think of it, there are a lot of literary/classical allusions in Stewart. She never assumed her readers were either stupid or ignorant.

    Reply
  14. And Nine Coaches Waiting led me to Tourneur and Jacobean tragedy in general. Plus there was a French chateau, sigh.
    Come to think of it, there are a lot of literary/classical allusions in Stewart. She never assumed her readers were either stupid or ignorant.

    Reply
  15. And Nine Coaches Waiting led me to Tourneur and Jacobean tragedy in general. Plus there was a French chateau, sigh.
    Come to think of it, there are a lot of literary/classical allusions in Stewart. She never assumed her readers were either stupid or ignorant.

    Reply
  16. I wonder how many journeys have been prompted by Mary Stewart’s books? I love going to the places featured in her books. She is also one of my all-time favourite authors, and one of the first I turn to for a re-read when I need to comfort read. I think it’s significant that no-one has mentioned that the romantic suspenses were mostly written decades ago, and might be considered dated; because the qualities which set them above other books are timeless, so are the books. I just hope she realises how much-loved she and her books still are.

    Reply
  17. I wonder how many journeys have been prompted by Mary Stewart’s books? I love going to the places featured in her books. She is also one of my all-time favourite authors, and one of the first I turn to for a re-read when I need to comfort read. I think it’s significant that no-one has mentioned that the romantic suspenses were mostly written decades ago, and might be considered dated; because the qualities which set them above other books are timeless, so are the books. I just hope she realises how much-loved she and her books still are.

    Reply
  18. I wonder how many journeys have been prompted by Mary Stewart’s books? I love going to the places featured in her books. She is also one of my all-time favourite authors, and one of the first I turn to for a re-read when I need to comfort read. I think it’s significant that no-one has mentioned that the romantic suspenses were mostly written decades ago, and might be considered dated; because the qualities which set them above other books are timeless, so are the books. I just hope she realises how much-loved she and her books still are.

    Reply
  19. I wonder how many journeys have been prompted by Mary Stewart’s books? I love going to the places featured in her books. She is also one of my all-time favourite authors, and one of the first I turn to for a re-read when I need to comfort read. I think it’s significant that no-one has mentioned that the romantic suspenses were mostly written decades ago, and might be considered dated; because the qualities which set them above other books are timeless, so are the books. I just hope she realises how much-loved she and her books still are.

    Reply
  20. I wonder how many journeys have been prompted by Mary Stewart’s books? I love going to the places featured in her books. She is also one of my all-time favourite authors, and one of the first I turn to for a re-read when I need to comfort read. I think it’s significant that no-one has mentioned that the romantic suspenses were mostly written decades ago, and might be considered dated; because the qualities which set them above other books are timeless, so are the books. I just hope she realises how much-loved she and her books still are.

    Reply
  21. Well, I can honestly say that Mary Stewart is single handedly responsible for the life long love affair that I’ve had with the Greek islands.The fact that I chose Corfu for my very first solo holiday(ok I went with a friend!) Is down to This Rough Magic. She’s a writer that I return to time and time again…my favourite though, is Madam Will You Talk… now there is a book that is screaming out to be filmed.. & yes, I found myself travelling in the South of France because of it.

    Reply
  22. Well, I can honestly say that Mary Stewart is single handedly responsible for the life long love affair that I’ve had with the Greek islands.The fact that I chose Corfu for my very first solo holiday(ok I went with a friend!) Is down to This Rough Magic. She’s a writer that I return to time and time again…my favourite though, is Madam Will You Talk… now there is a book that is screaming out to be filmed.. & yes, I found myself travelling in the South of France because of it.

    Reply
  23. Well, I can honestly say that Mary Stewart is single handedly responsible for the life long love affair that I’ve had with the Greek islands.The fact that I chose Corfu for my very first solo holiday(ok I went with a friend!) Is down to This Rough Magic. She’s a writer that I return to time and time again…my favourite though, is Madam Will You Talk… now there is a book that is screaming out to be filmed.. & yes, I found myself travelling in the South of France because of it.

    Reply
  24. Well, I can honestly say that Mary Stewart is single handedly responsible for the life long love affair that I’ve had with the Greek islands.The fact that I chose Corfu for my very first solo holiday(ok I went with a friend!) Is down to This Rough Magic. She’s a writer that I return to time and time again…my favourite though, is Madam Will You Talk… now there is a book that is screaming out to be filmed.. & yes, I found myself travelling in the South of France because of it.

    Reply
  25. Well, I can honestly say that Mary Stewart is single handedly responsible for the life long love affair that I’ve had with the Greek islands.The fact that I chose Corfu for my very first solo holiday(ok I went with a friend!) Is down to This Rough Magic. She’s a writer that I return to time and time again…my favourite though, is Madam Will You Talk… now there is a book that is screaming out to be filmed.. & yes, I found myself travelling in the South of France because of it.

    Reply
  26. Mary Stewart’s descriptive passages were so evocative and elegant and never overwritten. In “Madam, Will You Talk”, when the hero meets the heroine the first thing he says to her is “All right you beautiful bitch, where’s David?” (his son). That one sentence sets up the characters and the situation — you know Charity is beautiful without having to know her eye or hair color (and having them described every time she appears on the page) and you know that Richard is angry (understandably, as it turns out) yet clearly very aware of Charity as a woman. Wonderfully done.

    Reply
  27. Mary Stewart’s descriptive passages were so evocative and elegant and never overwritten. In “Madam, Will You Talk”, when the hero meets the heroine the first thing he says to her is “All right you beautiful bitch, where’s David?” (his son). That one sentence sets up the characters and the situation — you know Charity is beautiful without having to know her eye or hair color (and having them described every time she appears on the page) and you know that Richard is angry (understandably, as it turns out) yet clearly very aware of Charity as a woman. Wonderfully done.

    Reply
  28. Mary Stewart’s descriptive passages were so evocative and elegant and never overwritten. In “Madam, Will You Talk”, when the hero meets the heroine the first thing he says to her is “All right you beautiful bitch, where’s David?” (his son). That one sentence sets up the characters and the situation — you know Charity is beautiful without having to know her eye or hair color (and having them described every time she appears on the page) and you know that Richard is angry (understandably, as it turns out) yet clearly very aware of Charity as a woman. Wonderfully done.

    Reply
  29. Mary Stewart’s descriptive passages were so evocative and elegant and never overwritten. In “Madam, Will You Talk”, when the hero meets the heroine the first thing he says to her is “All right you beautiful bitch, where’s David?” (his son). That one sentence sets up the characters and the situation — you know Charity is beautiful without having to know her eye or hair color (and having them described every time she appears on the page) and you know that Richard is angry (understandably, as it turns out) yet clearly very aware of Charity as a woman. Wonderfully done.

    Reply
  30. Mary Stewart’s descriptive passages were so evocative and elegant and never overwritten. In “Madam, Will You Talk”, when the hero meets the heroine the first thing he says to her is “All right you beautiful bitch, where’s David?” (his son). That one sentence sets up the characters and the situation — you know Charity is beautiful without having to know her eye or hair color (and having them described every time she appears on the page) and you know that Richard is angry (understandably, as it turns out) yet clearly very aware of Charity as a woman. Wonderfully done.

    Reply
  31. I first encountered Mary Stuart through her Arthurian trilogy. Quite the best account of Merlin’s escapades that I have read!
    Nicola: I still remember how her descriptions of the heat and aridity of Crete added to the tension
    I love the island of Crete, especially the Minoan relics, so think I will try ‘The Moon Spinners’ next. I well remember walking in the hills and then diving into the Med to cool off.
    I clearly have a lot of reading to catch up on! 🙂

    Reply
  32. I first encountered Mary Stuart through her Arthurian trilogy. Quite the best account of Merlin’s escapades that I have read!
    Nicola: I still remember how her descriptions of the heat and aridity of Crete added to the tension
    I love the island of Crete, especially the Minoan relics, so think I will try ‘The Moon Spinners’ next. I well remember walking in the hills and then diving into the Med to cool off.
    I clearly have a lot of reading to catch up on! 🙂

    Reply
  33. I first encountered Mary Stuart through her Arthurian trilogy. Quite the best account of Merlin’s escapades that I have read!
    Nicola: I still remember how her descriptions of the heat and aridity of Crete added to the tension
    I love the island of Crete, especially the Minoan relics, so think I will try ‘The Moon Spinners’ next. I well remember walking in the hills and then diving into the Med to cool off.
    I clearly have a lot of reading to catch up on! 🙂

    Reply
  34. I first encountered Mary Stuart through her Arthurian trilogy. Quite the best account of Merlin’s escapades that I have read!
    Nicola: I still remember how her descriptions of the heat and aridity of Crete added to the tension
    I love the island of Crete, especially the Minoan relics, so think I will try ‘The Moon Spinners’ next. I well remember walking in the hills and then diving into the Med to cool off.
    I clearly have a lot of reading to catch up on! 🙂

    Reply
  35. I first encountered Mary Stuart through her Arthurian trilogy. Quite the best account of Merlin’s escapades that I have read!
    Nicola: I still remember how her descriptions of the heat and aridity of Crete added to the tension
    I love the island of Crete, especially the Minoan relics, so think I will try ‘The Moon Spinners’ next. I well remember walking in the hills and then diving into the Med to cool off.
    I clearly have a lot of reading to catch up on! 🙂

    Reply
  36. Just talking about Mary Stewart’s stories in the Wench loop got me to reorder a couple of her books that are mysteriously missing from my keeper shelf. I might have worn them out. I can’t wait for MADAME, WILL YOU TALK? to arrive so I can read it again!

    Reply
  37. Just talking about Mary Stewart’s stories in the Wench loop got me to reorder a couple of her books that are mysteriously missing from my keeper shelf. I might have worn them out. I can’t wait for MADAME, WILL YOU TALK? to arrive so I can read it again!

    Reply
  38. Just talking about Mary Stewart’s stories in the Wench loop got me to reorder a couple of her books that are mysteriously missing from my keeper shelf. I might have worn them out. I can’t wait for MADAME, WILL YOU TALK? to arrive so I can read it again!

    Reply
  39. Just talking about Mary Stewart’s stories in the Wench loop got me to reorder a couple of her books that are mysteriously missing from my keeper shelf. I might have worn them out. I can’t wait for MADAME, WILL YOU TALK? to arrive so I can read it again!

    Reply
  40. Just talking about Mary Stewart’s stories in the Wench loop got me to reorder a couple of her books that are mysteriously missing from my keeper shelf. I might have worn them out. I can’t wait for MADAME, WILL YOU TALK? to arrive so I can read it again!

    Reply
  41. I recently reread Wildfire at Midnight and the only sign of dating to the story was the number of cigarettes consumed !! Not that it made any difference to the story it just suddenly struck me as odd living in an age where smoking is banned from restaurants etc.I fell in love with her writing in my teens and soon worked my way through the library’s collection.She is still one of my comfort reads when I need to get my nose out of history.

    Reply
  42. I recently reread Wildfire at Midnight and the only sign of dating to the story was the number of cigarettes consumed !! Not that it made any difference to the story it just suddenly struck me as odd living in an age where smoking is banned from restaurants etc.I fell in love with her writing in my teens and soon worked my way through the library’s collection.She is still one of my comfort reads when I need to get my nose out of history.

    Reply
  43. I recently reread Wildfire at Midnight and the only sign of dating to the story was the number of cigarettes consumed !! Not that it made any difference to the story it just suddenly struck me as odd living in an age where smoking is banned from restaurants etc.I fell in love with her writing in my teens and soon worked my way through the library’s collection.She is still one of my comfort reads when I need to get my nose out of history.

    Reply
  44. I recently reread Wildfire at Midnight and the only sign of dating to the story was the number of cigarettes consumed !! Not that it made any difference to the story it just suddenly struck me as odd living in an age where smoking is banned from restaurants etc.I fell in love with her writing in my teens and soon worked my way through the library’s collection.She is still one of my comfort reads when I need to get my nose out of history.

    Reply
  45. I recently reread Wildfire at Midnight and the only sign of dating to the story was the number of cigarettes consumed !! Not that it made any difference to the story it just suddenly struck me as odd living in an age where smoking is banned from restaurants etc.I fell in love with her writing in my teens and soon worked my way through the library’s collection.She is still one of my comfort reads when I need to get my nose out of history.

    Reply
  46. Airs Above the Ground was my first–I grew up in a horsey household, and somebody thought to expose me to the novel at a young age. My mother, most likely.
    I discovered This Rough Magic on my own and it remains my favourite of all, because for such a long time after my equestrienne years I was an actress. I still return to that book more than almost any other of hers–or anybody’s–but have enjoyed the rest of her titles as well.

    Reply
  47. Airs Above the Ground was my first–I grew up in a horsey household, and somebody thought to expose me to the novel at a young age. My mother, most likely.
    I discovered This Rough Magic on my own and it remains my favourite of all, because for such a long time after my equestrienne years I was an actress. I still return to that book more than almost any other of hers–or anybody’s–but have enjoyed the rest of her titles as well.

    Reply
  48. Airs Above the Ground was my first–I grew up in a horsey household, and somebody thought to expose me to the novel at a young age. My mother, most likely.
    I discovered This Rough Magic on my own and it remains my favourite of all, because for such a long time after my equestrienne years I was an actress. I still return to that book more than almost any other of hers–or anybody’s–but have enjoyed the rest of her titles as well.

    Reply
  49. Airs Above the Ground was my first–I grew up in a horsey household, and somebody thought to expose me to the novel at a young age. My mother, most likely.
    I discovered This Rough Magic on my own and it remains my favourite of all, because for such a long time after my equestrienne years I was an actress. I still return to that book more than almost any other of hers–or anybody’s–but have enjoyed the rest of her titles as well.

    Reply
  50. Airs Above the Ground was my first–I grew up in a horsey household, and somebody thought to expose me to the novel at a young age. My mother, most likely.
    I discovered This Rough Magic on my own and it remains my favourite of all, because for such a long time after my equestrienne years I was an actress. I still return to that book more than almost any other of hers–or anybody’s–but have enjoyed the rest of her titles as well.

    Reply
  51. My grandmother owned every Mary Stewart book and lent them to me whenever I wanted to borrow them. Faves: My Brother Michael, The Moonspinners, and This Rough Magic (the 3 reasons Greece tops my bucket list of places I long to visit). I also love Nine Coaches Waiting and Madam, Will You Talk.
    I inherited Gram’s library. I think It’s time to pull out the Mary Stewarts and revisit those old, comforting friends.

    Reply
  52. My grandmother owned every Mary Stewart book and lent them to me whenever I wanted to borrow them. Faves: My Brother Michael, The Moonspinners, and This Rough Magic (the 3 reasons Greece tops my bucket list of places I long to visit). I also love Nine Coaches Waiting and Madam, Will You Talk.
    I inherited Gram’s library. I think It’s time to pull out the Mary Stewarts and revisit those old, comforting friends.

    Reply
  53. My grandmother owned every Mary Stewart book and lent them to me whenever I wanted to borrow them. Faves: My Brother Michael, The Moonspinners, and This Rough Magic (the 3 reasons Greece tops my bucket list of places I long to visit). I also love Nine Coaches Waiting and Madam, Will You Talk.
    I inherited Gram’s library. I think It’s time to pull out the Mary Stewarts and revisit those old, comforting friends.

    Reply
  54. My grandmother owned every Mary Stewart book and lent them to me whenever I wanted to borrow them. Faves: My Brother Michael, The Moonspinners, and This Rough Magic (the 3 reasons Greece tops my bucket list of places I long to visit). I also love Nine Coaches Waiting and Madam, Will You Talk.
    I inherited Gram’s library. I think It’s time to pull out the Mary Stewarts and revisit those old, comforting friends.

    Reply
  55. My grandmother owned every Mary Stewart book and lent them to me whenever I wanted to borrow them. Faves: My Brother Michael, The Moonspinners, and This Rough Magic (the 3 reasons Greece tops my bucket list of places I long to visit). I also love Nine Coaches Waiting and Madam, Will You Talk.
    I inherited Gram’s library. I think It’s time to pull out the Mary Stewarts and revisit those old, comforting friends.

    Reply
  56. This brings back so many memories. I loved her books, all of them. Favorites were the King Arthur Series. The Moonspinners come in next.
    There was always a mystery to solve and a hint of romance. They were quick reads for me. I spent many a summer curled up with a book.
    Amy

    Reply
  57. This brings back so many memories. I loved her books, all of them. Favorites were the King Arthur Series. The Moonspinners come in next.
    There was always a mystery to solve and a hint of romance. They were quick reads for me. I spent many a summer curled up with a book.
    Amy

    Reply
  58. This brings back so many memories. I loved her books, all of them. Favorites were the King Arthur Series. The Moonspinners come in next.
    There was always a mystery to solve and a hint of romance. They were quick reads for me. I spent many a summer curled up with a book.
    Amy

    Reply
  59. This brings back so many memories. I loved her books, all of them. Favorites were the King Arthur Series. The Moonspinners come in next.
    There was always a mystery to solve and a hint of romance. They were quick reads for me. I spent many a summer curled up with a book.
    Amy

    Reply
  60. This brings back so many memories. I loved her books, all of them. Favorites were the King Arthur Series. The Moonspinners come in next.
    There was always a mystery to solve and a hint of romance. They were quick reads for me. I spent many a summer curled up with a book.
    Amy

    Reply
  61. When I discovered Mary Stewart I re-read them many times.
    “Lady Will You Talk” was a favorite.
    That has been a good many years ago…now I’ll have to dig them out and start again.

    Reply
  62. When I discovered Mary Stewart I re-read them many times.
    “Lady Will You Talk” was a favorite.
    That has been a good many years ago…now I’ll have to dig them out and start again.

    Reply
  63. When I discovered Mary Stewart I re-read them many times.
    “Lady Will You Talk” was a favorite.
    That has been a good many years ago…now I’ll have to dig them out and start again.

    Reply
  64. When I discovered Mary Stewart I re-read them many times.
    “Lady Will You Talk” was a favorite.
    That has been a good many years ago…now I’ll have to dig them out and start again.

    Reply
  65. When I discovered Mary Stewart I re-read them many times.
    “Lady Will You Talk” was a favorite.
    That has been a good many years ago…now I’ll have to dig them out and start again.

    Reply
  66. Ohhhh, Mary Stewart … she wrote back when readers liked to sink into a story by degrees. She would often start with the landscape – something few editors would tolerate nowadays. Her lush descriptions of hillsides, weather, and blooming plants I confess I often skipped when I was young, because I didn’t know enough about horticulture to follow it! (“What’s a peony?”)
    Can you imagine if she turned in The Ivy Tree to a modern editor who wanted to ruthlessly prune out all that dreamy scene-setting at the beginning? Horrors!
    Her Merlin books still haunt me. I’ve read my copy of The Crystal Cave to tatters. And the Ivy Tree … the Merlin books, Touch Not the Cat, and The Ivy Tree are probably my favorites. Oh, wait, Nine Coaches Waiting too.
    But now I want to go back and read them ALL-! Thank you for the reminder!

    Reply
  67. Ohhhh, Mary Stewart … she wrote back when readers liked to sink into a story by degrees. She would often start with the landscape – something few editors would tolerate nowadays. Her lush descriptions of hillsides, weather, and blooming plants I confess I often skipped when I was young, because I didn’t know enough about horticulture to follow it! (“What’s a peony?”)
    Can you imagine if she turned in The Ivy Tree to a modern editor who wanted to ruthlessly prune out all that dreamy scene-setting at the beginning? Horrors!
    Her Merlin books still haunt me. I’ve read my copy of The Crystal Cave to tatters. And the Ivy Tree … the Merlin books, Touch Not the Cat, and The Ivy Tree are probably my favorites. Oh, wait, Nine Coaches Waiting too.
    But now I want to go back and read them ALL-! Thank you for the reminder!

    Reply
  68. Ohhhh, Mary Stewart … she wrote back when readers liked to sink into a story by degrees. She would often start with the landscape – something few editors would tolerate nowadays. Her lush descriptions of hillsides, weather, and blooming plants I confess I often skipped when I was young, because I didn’t know enough about horticulture to follow it! (“What’s a peony?”)
    Can you imagine if she turned in The Ivy Tree to a modern editor who wanted to ruthlessly prune out all that dreamy scene-setting at the beginning? Horrors!
    Her Merlin books still haunt me. I’ve read my copy of The Crystal Cave to tatters. And the Ivy Tree … the Merlin books, Touch Not the Cat, and The Ivy Tree are probably my favorites. Oh, wait, Nine Coaches Waiting too.
    But now I want to go back and read them ALL-! Thank you for the reminder!

    Reply
  69. Ohhhh, Mary Stewart … she wrote back when readers liked to sink into a story by degrees. She would often start with the landscape – something few editors would tolerate nowadays. Her lush descriptions of hillsides, weather, and blooming plants I confess I often skipped when I was young, because I didn’t know enough about horticulture to follow it! (“What’s a peony?”)
    Can you imagine if she turned in The Ivy Tree to a modern editor who wanted to ruthlessly prune out all that dreamy scene-setting at the beginning? Horrors!
    Her Merlin books still haunt me. I’ve read my copy of The Crystal Cave to tatters. And the Ivy Tree … the Merlin books, Touch Not the Cat, and The Ivy Tree are probably my favorites. Oh, wait, Nine Coaches Waiting too.
    But now I want to go back and read them ALL-! Thank you for the reminder!

    Reply
  70. Ohhhh, Mary Stewart … she wrote back when readers liked to sink into a story by degrees. She would often start with the landscape – something few editors would tolerate nowadays. Her lush descriptions of hillsides, weather, and blooming plants I confess I often skipped when I was young, because I didn’t know enough about horticulture to follow it! (“What’s a peony?”)
    Can you imagine if she turned in The Ivy Tree to a modern editor who wanted to ruthlessly prune out all that dreamy scene-setting at the beginning? Horrors!
    Her Merlin books still haunt me. I’ve read my copy of The Crystal Cave to tatters. And the Ivy Tree … the Merlin books, Touch Not the Cat, and The Ivy Tree are probably my favorites. Oh, wait, Nine Coaches Waiting too.
    But now I want to go back and read them ALL-! Thank you for the reminder!

    Reply
  71. My first Mary Stewart book was ‘The Chrystal Cave’. I fell in love with her style of writing and scoured charity shops and second hand shops and managed to fine a lot more, a lot of them I lost in the 2013 floods here in Bundy but I still watch out for more when I can. I intend to e-read the couple I have left, I can really sink into other worlds through her stories.

    Reply
  72. My first Mary Stewart book was ‘The Chrystal Cave’. I fell in love with her style of writing and scoured charity shops and second hand shops and managed to fine a lot more, a lot of them I lost in the 2013 floods here in Bundy but I still watch out for more when I can. I intend to e-read the couple I have left, I can really sink into other worlds through her stories.

    Reply
  73. My first Mary Stewart book was ‘The Chrystal Cave’. I fell in love with her style of writing and scoured charity shops and second hand shops and managed to fine a lot more, a lot of them I lost in the 2013 floods here in Bundy but I still watch out for more when I can. I intend to e-read the couple I have left, I can really sink into other worlds through her stories.

    Reply
  74. My first Mary Stewart book was ‘The Chrystal Cave’. I fell in love with her style of writing and scoured charity shops and second hand shops and managed to fine a lot more, a lot of them I lost in the 2013 floods here in Bundy but I still watch out for more when I can. I intend to e-read the couple I have left, I can really sink into other worlds through her stories.

    Reply
  75. My first Mary Stewart book was ‘The Chrystal Cave’. I fell in love with her style of writing and scoured charity shops and second hand shops and managed to fine a lot more, a lot of them I lost in the 2013 floods here in Bundy but I still watch out for more when I can. I intend to e-read the couple I have left, I can really sink into other worlds through her stories.

    Reply
  76. For me, it was Airs Above the Ground – I loved the horses and the mystery of what was going on with the heroine’s husband. Mary Stewart made it possible to like both of the main characters even when everything seemed so suspicious. The next book was Madam, Will You Talk and I was thrilled to find a first edition in hardcover a few years ago. It definitely has a place on my “keeper” shelves.

    Reply
  77. For me, it was Airs Above the Ground – I loved the horses and the mystery of what was going on with the heroine’s husband. Mary Stewart made it possible to like both of the main characters even when everything seemed so suspicious. The next book was Madam, Will You Talk and I was thrilled to find a first edition in hardcover a few years ago. It definitely has a place on my “keeper” shelves.

    Reply
  78. For me, it was Airs Above the Ground – I loved the horses and the mystery of what was going on with the heroine’s husband. Mary Stewart made it possible to like both of the main characters even when everything seemed so suspicious. The next book was Madam, Will You Talk and I was thrilled to find a first edition in hardcover a few years ago. It definitely has a place on my “keeper” shelves.

    Reply
  79. For me, it was Airs Above the Ground – I loved the horses and the mystery of what was going on with the heroine’s husband. Mary Stewart made it possible to like both of the main characters even when everything seemed so suspicious. The next book was Madam, Will You Talk and I was thrilled to find a first edition in hardcover a few years ago. It definitely has a place on my “keeper” shelves.

    Reply
  80. For me, it was Airs Above the Ground – I loved the horses and the mystery of what was going on with the heroine’s husband. Mary Stewart made it possible to like both of the main characters even when everything seemed so suspicious. The next book was Madam, Will You Talk and I was thrilled to find a first edition in hardcover a few years ago. It definitely has a place on my “keeper” shelves.

    Reply
  81. HELP, PLEASE! I can’t read paper books anymore, and the only Mary Stewarts available on Kindle are the Arthurian books.
    If you have five spare minutes in the next few days, could you help my campaign to get more Mary Stewart ebooks by going to Amazon and clicking on the right-hand box under the buy and list boxes that says “I’d like to read this book on my Kindle.”
    Of course, vote for your own favorites, but if you would also vote for Moon Spinnerw, My Brother Michael, This Rough Magic and The Ivy Tree, maybe we can finally get it to happen!!
    Thanks so much for your help.
    Faith

    Reply
  82. HELP, PLEASE! I can’t read paper books anymore, and the only Mary Stewarts available on Kindle are the Arthurian books.
    If you have five spare minutes in the next few days, could you help my campaign to get more Mary Stewart ebooks by going to Amazon and clicking on the right-hand box under the buy and list boxes that says “I’d like to read this book on my Kindle.”
    Of course, vote for your own favorites, but if you would also vote for Moon Spinnerw, My Brother Michael, This Rough Magic and The Ivy Tree, maybe we can finally get it to happen!!
    Thanks so much for your help.
    Faith

    Reply
  83. HELP, PLEASE! I can’t read paper books anymore, and the only Mary Stewarts available on Kindle are the Arthurian books.
    If you have five spare minutes in the next few days, could you help my campaign to get more Mary Stewart ebooks by going to Amazon and clicking on the right-hand box under the buy and list boxes that says “I’d like to read this book on my Kindle.”
    Of course, vote for your own favorites, but if you would also vote for Moon Spinnerw, My Brother Michael, This Rough Magic and The Ivy Tree, maybe we can finally get it to happen!!
    Thanks so much for your help.
    Faith

    Reply
  84. HELP, PLEASE! I can’t read paper books anymore, and the only Mary Stewarts available on Kindle are the Arthurian books.
    If you have five spare minutes in the next few days, could you help my campaign to get more Mary Stewart ebooks by going to Amazon and clicking on the right-hand box under the buy and list boxes that says “I’d like to read this book on my Kindle.”
    Of course, vote for your own favorites, but if you would also vote for Moon Spinnerw, My Brother Michael, This Rough Magic and The Ivy Tree, maybe we can finally get it to happen!!
    Thanks so much for your help.
    Faith

    Reply
  85. HELP, PLEASE! I can’t read paper books anymore, and the only Mary Stewarts available on Kindle are the Arthurian books.
    If you have five spare minutes in the next few days, could you help my campaign to get more Mary Stewart ebooks by going to Amazon and clicking on the right-hand box under the buy and list boxes that says “I’d like to read this book on my Kindle.”
    Of course, vote for your own favorites, but if you would also vote for Moon Spinnerw, My Brother Michael, This Rough Magic and The Ivy Tree, maybe we can finally get it to happen!!
    Thanks so much for your help.
    Faith

    Reply
  86. She drew you in and transported you. Her heroines were the kind of girl I wanted to become. And now, Wenches, just think how many lives Mary Stewart influenced and you will realize your value to each of us.

    Reply
  87. She drew you in and transported you. Her heroines were the kind of girl I wanted to become. And now, Wenches, just think how many lives Mary Stewart influenced and you will realize your value to each of us.

    Reply
  88. She drew you in and transported you. Her heroines were the kind of girl I wanted to become. And now, Wenches, just think how many lives Mary Stewart influenced and you will realize your value to each of us.

    Reply
  89. She drew you in and transported you. Her heroines were the kind of girl I wanted to become. And now, Wenches, just think how many lives Mary Stewart influenced and you will realize your value to each of us.

    Reply
  90. She drew you in and transported you. Her heroines were the kind of girl I wanted to become. And now, Wenches, just think how many lives Mary Stewart influenced and you will realize your value to each of us.

    Reply
  91. I started with her Crystal Cave series and branched out as time went on. I do love her way of writing, her voice makes things come alive. I just picked up two older ones that I haven’t read in years. I must have loaned my original copies and never got them back. My summer reading will be excellent though because of her.

    Reply
  92. I started with her Crystal Cave series and branched out as time went on. I do love her way of writing, her voice makes things come alive. I just picked up two older ones that I haven’t read in years. I must have loaned my original copies and never got them back. My summer reading will be excellent though because of her.

    Reply
  93. I started with her Crystal Cave series and branched out as time went on. I do love her way of writing, her voice makes things come alive. I just picked up two older ones that I haven’t read in years. I must have loaned my original copies and never got them back. My summer reading will be excellent though because of her.

    Reply
  94. I started with her Crystal Cave series and branched out as time went on. I do love her way of writing, her voice makes things come alive. I just picked up two older ones that I haven’t read in years. I must have loaned my original copies and never got them back. My summer reading will be excellent though because of her.

    Reply
  95. I started with her Crystal Cave series and branched out as time went on. I do love her way of writing, her voice makes things come alive. I just picked up two older ones that I haven’t read in years. I must have loaned my original copies and never got them back. My summer reading will be excellent though because of her.

    Reply
  96. I too discovered her many years ago and at one time had a large collection of her books. Airs Above the Ground is my favorite. Other favorites are: The Crystal Cave, The Gabriel Hounds, and The Moonspinners.

    Reply
  97. I too discovered her many years ago and at one time had a large collection of her books. Airs Above the Ground is my favorite. Other favorites are: The Crystal Cave, The Gabriel Hounds, and The Moonspinners.

    Reply
  98. I too discovered her many years ago and at one time had a large collection of her books. Airs Above the Ground is my favorite. Other favorites are: The Crystal Cave, The Gabriel Hounds, and The Moonspinners.

    Reply
  99. I too discovered her many years ago and at one time had a large collection of her books. Airs Above the Ground is my favorite. Other favorites are: The Crystal Cave, The Gabriel Hounds, and The Moonspinners.

    Reply
  100. I too discovered her many years ago and at one time had a large collection of her books. Airs Above the Ground is my favorite. Other favorites are: The Crystal Cave, The Gabriel Hounds, and The Moonspinners.

    Reply
  101. Adore her classic suspense books and own my own vintage collection. A favorite? Would have to reread them all to pick. (Hard duty? Not!) She creates a sense of place that I can only strive to emulate. And I loved that she encapsulated an entire romantic relationship in two sentences. Thanks for this post!

    Reply
  102. Adore her classic suspense books and own my own vintage collection. A favorite? Would have to reread them all to pick. (Hard duty? Not!) She creates a sense of place that I can only strive to emulate. And I loved that she encapsulated an entire romantic relationship in two sentences. Thanks for this post!

    Reply
  103. Adore her classic suspense books and own my own vintage collection. A favorite? Would have to reread them all to pick. (Hard duty? Not!) She creates a sense of place that I can only strive to emulate. And I loved that she encapsulated an entire romantic relationship in two sentences. Thanks for this post!

    Reply
  104. Adore her classic suspense books and own my own vintage collection. A favorite? Would have to reread them all to pick. (Hard duty? Not!) She creates a sense of place that I can only strive to emulate. And I loved that she encapsulated an entire romantic relationship in two sentences. Thanks for this post!

    Reply
  105. Adore her classic suspense books and own my own vintage collection. A favorite? Would have to reread them all to pick. (Hard duty? Not!) She creates a sense of place that I can only strive to emulate. And I loved that she encapsulated an entire romantic relationship in two sentences. Thanks for this post!

    Reply
  106. Faith, all her romantic suspense novels are available on Amazon kindle in the UK ( they have the most amazing Vogue/Harpers Bazaar covers).. I’ve just splurged on them as they were on offer ealier this year.

    Reply
  107. Faith, all her romantic suspense novels are available on Amazon kindle in the UK ( they have the most amazing Vogue/Harpers Bazaar covers).. I’ve just splurged on them as they were on offer ealier this year.

    Reply
  108. Faith, all her romantic suspense novels are available on Amazon kindle in the UK ( they have the most amazing Vogue/Harpers Bazaar covers).. I’ve just splurged on them as they were on offer ealier this year.

    Reply
  109. Faith, all her romantic suspense novels are available on Amazon kindle in the UK ( they have the most amazing Vogue/Harpers Bazaar covers).. I’ve just splurged on them as they were on offer ealier this year.

    Reply
  110. Faith, all her romantic suspense novels are available on Amazon kindle in the UK ( they have the most amazing Vogue/Harpers Bazaar covers).. I’ve just splurged on them as they were on offer ealier this year.

    Reply
  111. Who doesn’t love Mary Stewart? I feel better that I’m not alone in having found her via the Disney movie . . . I keep hoping that I’ll discover some Mary Stewart that I have missed . . . or that someone will truly pick up the Mary Stewart mantle. Favorites? Madam, Will You Talk. My Brother Michael, The Gabriel Hounds. Moonspinners . . . umm, this list is getting a little long . . .

    Reply
  112. Who doesn’t love Mary Stewart? I feel better that I’m not alone in having found her via the Disney movie . . . I keep hoping that I’ll discover some Mary Stewart that I have missed . . . or that someone will truly pick up the Mary Stewart mantle. Favorites? Madam, Will You Talk. My Brother Michael, The Gabriel Hounds. Moonspinners . . . umm, this list is getting a little long . . .

    Reply
  113. Who doesn’t love Mary Stewart? I feel better that I’m not alone in having found her via the Disney movie . . . I keep hoping that I’ll discover some Mary Stewart that I have missed . . . or that someone will truly pick up the Mary Stewart mantle. Favorites? Madam, Will You Talk. My Brother Michael, The Gabriel Hounds. Moonspinners . . . umm, this list is getting a little long . . .

    Reply
  114. Who doesn’t love Mary Stewart? I feel better that I’m not alone in having found her via the Disney movie . . . I keep hoping that I’ll discover some Mary Stewart that I have missed . . . or that someone will truly pick up the Mary Stewart mantle. Favorites? Madam, Will You Talk. My Brother Michael, The Gabriel Hounds. Moonspinners . . . umm, this list is getting a little long . . .

    Reply
  115. Who doesn’t love Mary Stewart? I feel better that I’m not alone in having found her via the Disney movie . . . I keep hoping that I’ll discover some Mary Stewart that I have missed . . . or that someone will truly pick up the Mary Stewart mantle. Favorites? Madam, Will You Talk. My Brother Michael, The Gabriel Hounds. Moonspinners . . . umm, this list is getting a little long . . .

    Reply
  116. Nine Coaches Waiting is on my TBR list, but I have to confess I’ve never read Mary Stewart. I’ll have to remedy that soon. However based on a recommendation from one of the Wenches(I think it was Jo Beverly or Mary Jo?) I just finished “Red Adam’s Lady”. It’s out of print and not easy to get hold of, I got it through an interlibrary loan. But I was up till 4 am finishing this book! Believe me, it’s worth whatever hoops to you have to jump through to find it.

    Reply
  117. Nine Coaches Waiting is on my TBR list, but I have to confess I’ve never read Mary Stewart. I’ll have to remedy that soon. However based on a recommendation from one of the Wenches(I think it was Jo Beverly or Mary Jo?) I just finished “Red Adam’s Lady”. It’s out of print and not easy to get hold of, I got it through an interlibrary loan. But I was up till 4 am finishing this book! Believe me, it’s worth whatever hoops to you have to jump through to find it.

    Reply
  118. Nine Coaches Waiting is on my TBR list, but I have to confess I’ve never read Mary Stewart. I’ll have to remedy that soon. However based on a recommendation from one of the Wenches(I think it was Jo Beverly or Mary Jo?) I just finished “Red Adam’s Lady”. It’s out of print and not easy to get hold of, I got it through an interlibrary loan. But I was up till 4 am finishing this book! Believe me, it’s worth whatever hoops to you have to jump through to find it.

    Reply
  119. Nine Coaches Waiting is on my TBR list, but I have to confess I’ve never read Mary Stewart. I’ll have to remedy that soon. However based on a recommendation from one of the Wenches(I think it was Jo Beverly or Mary Jo?) I just finished “Red Adam’s Lady”. It’s out of print and not easy to get hold of, I got it through an interlibrary loan. But I was up till 4 am finishing this book! Believe me, it’s worth whatever hoops to you have to jump through to find it.

    Reply
  120. Nine Coaches Waiting is on my TBR list, but I have to confess I’ve never read Mary Stewart. I’ll have to remedy that soon. However based on a recommendation from one of the Wenches(I think it was Jo Beverly or Mary Jo?) I just finished “Red Adam’s Lady”. It’s out of print and not easy to get hold of, I got it through an interlibrary loan. But I was up till 4 am finishing this book! Believe me, it’s worth whatever hoops to you have to jump through to find it.

    Reply
  121. I too, re-read my copy of The Crystal Cave over and over again but my mom’s copy of the Moon Spinners was my first Mary Stewart book. Love her and just FYI, the Legacy Arthurian Legend books (all four) are available on Kindle for less than $7.

    Reply
  122. I too, re-read my copy of The Crystal Cave over and over again but my mom’s copy of the Moon Spinners was my first Mary Stewart book. Love her and just FYI, the Legacy Arthurian Legend books (all four) are available on Kindle for less than $7.

    Reply
  123. I too, re-read my copy of The Crystal Cave over and over again but my mom’s copy of the Moon Spinners was my first Mary Stewart book. Love her and just FYI, the Legacy Arthurian Legend books (all four) are available on Kindle for less than $7.

    Reply
  124. I too, re-read my copy of The Crystal Cave over and over again but my mom’s copy of the Moon Spinners was my first Mary Stewart book. Love her and just FYI, the Legacy Arthurian Legend books (all four) are available on Kindle for less than $7.

    Reply
  125. I too, re-read my copy of The Crystal Cave over and over again but my mom’s copy of the Moon Spinners was my first Mary Stewart book. Love her and just FYI, the Legacy Arthurian Legend books (all four) are available on Kindle for less than $7.

    Reply
  126. I just went on a binge of Mary Stewart reading. I picked up a couple in March at the Library sale. Now I just have to find a couple more that my library didn’t. The two that I’ve held on to all these years was Touch Not the Cat and This Rough Magic. Love love love those 2 books.

    Reply
  127. I just went on a binge of Mary Stewart reading. I picked up a couple in March at the Library sale. Now I just have to find a couple more that my library didn’t. The two that I’ve held on to all these years was Touch Not the Cat and This Rough Magic. Love love love those 2 books.

    Reply
  128. I just went on a binge of Mary Stewart reading. I picked up a couple in March at the Library sale. Now I just have to find a couple more that my library didn’t. The two that I’ve held on to all these years was Touch Not the Cat and This Rough Magic. Love love love those 2 books.

    Reply
  129. I just went on a binge of Mary Stewart reading. I picked up a couple in March at the Library sale. Now I just have to find a couple more that my library didn’t. The two that I’ve held on to all these years was Touch Not the Cat and This Rough Magic. Love love love those 2 books.

    Reply
  130. I just went on a binge of Mary Stewart reading. I picked up a couple in March at the Library sale. Now I just have to find a couple more that my library didn’t. The two that I’ve held on to all these years was Touch Not the Cat and This Rough Magic. Love love love those 2 books.

    Reply
  131. I have loved Mary Stewart for years. My first book was Nine Coaches Waiting, and I went on to read all her novels except the Crystal Cave series, which do not interest me.
    But, please, can someone tell me if Mary is still alive? I think she lived/s in Scotland, but what a world of pleasure she made possible for so many young women at the time! I wish I could thank her.

    Reply
  132. I have loved Mary Stewart for years. My first book was Nine Coaches Waiting, and I went on to read all her novels except the Crystal Cave series, which do not interest me.
    But, please, can someone tell me if Mary is still alive? I think she lived/s in Scotland, but what a world of pleasure she made possible for so many young women at the time! I wish I could thank her.

    Reply
  133. I have loved Mary Stewart for years. My first book was Nine Coaches Waiting, and I went on to read all her novels except the Crystal Cave series, which do not interest me.
    But, please, can someone tell me if Mary is still alive? I think she lived/s in Scotland, but what a world of pleasure she made possible for so many young women at the time! I wish I could thank her.

    Reply
  134. I have loved Mary Stewart for years. My first book was Nine Coaches Waiting, and I went on to read all her novels except the Crystal Cave series, which do not interest me.
    But, please, can someone tell me if Mary is still alive? I think she lived/s in Scotland, but what a world of pleasure she made possible for so many young women at the time! I wish I could thank her.

    Reply
  135. I have loved Mary Stewart for years. My first book was Nine Coaches Waiting, and I went on to read all her novels except the Crystal Cave series, which do not interest me.
    But, please, can someone tell me if Mary is still alive? I think she lived/s in Scotland, but what a world of pleasure she made possible for so many young women at the time! I wish I could thank her.

    Reply
  136. Touch Not the Cat!!! Over the past year, I have been on some blog tours and done many guest posts which ask about my favorite books and Touch Not the Cat is ALWAYS in the Top5! This blog post has inspired me to read the Mary Stewart I have not gotten to yet – thanks!!!

    Reply
  137. Touch Not the Cat!!! Over the past year, I have been on some blog tours and done many guest posts which ask about my favorite books and Touch Not the Cat is ALWAYS in the Top5! This blog post has inspired me to read the Mary Stewart I have not gotten to yet – thanks!!!

    Reply
  138. Touch Not the Cat!!! Over the past year, I have been on some blog tours and done many guest posts which ask about my favorite books and Touch Not the Cat is ALWAYS in the Top5! This blog post has inspired me to read the Mary Stewart I have not gotten to yet – thanks!!!

    Reply
  139. Touch Not the Cat!!! Over the past year, I have been on some blog tours and done many guest posts which ask about my favorite books and Touch Not the Cat is ALWAYS in the Top5! This blog post has inspired me to read the Mary Stewart I have not gotten to yet – thanks!!!

    Reply
  140. Touch Not the Cat!!! Over the past year, I have been on some blog tours and done many guest posts which ask about my favorite books and Touch Not the Cat is ALWAYS in the Top5! This blog post has inspired me to read the Mary Stewart I have not gotten to yet – thanks!!!

    Reply
  141. Oh I love Mary Stewart, the first I read was ‘Airs Above the Ground’ which I still love but my favorite is ‘The Moonspinners’ I’ve read & reread that book countless time. I have read most of her other books as well & remember enjoying them all. I was a teenager or maybe younger and enjoyed some more than others. I think I’ll have to read them. Wonder if they are out as ebooks. My new obsession. Running out of room for books.

    Reply
  142. Oh I love Mary Stewart, the first I read was ‘Airs Above the Ground’ which I still love but my favorite is ‘The Moonspinners’ I’ve read & reread that book countless time. I have read most of her other books as well & remember enjoying them all. I was a teenager or maybe younger and enjoyed some more than others. I think I’ll have to read them. Wonder if they are out as ebooks. My new obsession. Running out of room for books.

    Reply
  143. Oh I love Mary Stewart, the first I read was ‘Airs Above the Ground’ which I still love but my favorite is ‘The Moonspinners’ I’ve read & reread that book countless time. I have read most of her other books as well & remember enjoying them all. I was a teenager or maybe younger and enjoyed some more than others. I think I’ll have to read them. Wonder if they are out as ebooks. My new obsession. Running out of room for books.

    Reply
  144. Oh I love Mary Stewart, the first I read was ‘Airs Above the Ground’ which I still love but my favorite is ‘The Moonspinners’ I’ve read & reread that book countless time. I have read most of her other books as well & remember enjoying them all. I was a teenager or maybe younger and enjoyed some more than others. I think I’ll have to read them. Wonder if they are out as ebooks. My new obsession. Running out of room for books.

    Reply
  145. Oh I love Mary Stewart, the first I read was ‘Airs Above the Ground’ which I still love but my favorite is ‘The Moonspinners’ I’ve read & reread that book countless time. I have read most of her other books as well & remember enjoying them all. I was a teenager or maybe younger and enjoyed some more than others. I think I’ll have to read them. Wonder if they are out as ebooks. My new obsession. Running out of room for books.

    Reply
  146. Mary Stewart was my first “I have to read all her books”. It doesn’t matter the time period or the location. I still own all of them and plan to reread soon.

    Reply
  147. Mary Stewart was my first “I have to read all her books”. It doesn’t matter the time period or the location. I still own all of them and plan to reread soon.

    Reply
  148. Mary Stewart was my first “I have to read all her books”. It doesn’t matter the time period or the location. I still own all of them and plan to reread soon.

    Reply
  149. Mary Stewart was my first “I have to read all her books”. It doesn’t matter the time period or the location. I still own all of them and plan to reread soon.

    Reply
  150. Mary Stewart was my first “I have to read all her books”. It doesn’t matter the time period or the location. I still own all of them and plan to reread soon.

    Reply
  151. The first book I actually bought ‘with my own money’ was The Ivy Tree. I’ve been reading Mary Stewart for over 50 years and have them all in hardback. I guess it is time to reread her again…it’s been 10 years since the last re-read. (She and the Cadfael books alternate!)

    Reply
  152. The first book I actually bought ‘with my own money’ was The Ivy Tree. I’ve been reading Mary Stewart for over 50 years and have them all in hardback. I guess it is time to reread her again…it’s been 10 years since the last re-read. (She and the Cadfael books alternate!)

    Reply
  153. The first book I actually bought ‘with my own money’ was The Ivy Tree. I’ve been reading Mary Stewart for over 50 years and have them all in hardback. I guess it is time to reread her again…it’s been 10 years since the last re-read. (She and the Cadfael books alternate!)

    Reply
  154. The first book I actually bought ‘with my own money’ was The Ivy Tree. I’ve been reading Mary Stewart for over 50 years and have them all in hardback. I guess it is time to reread her again…it’s been 10 years since the last re-read. (She and the Cadfael books alternate!)

    Reply
  155. The first book I actually bought ‘with my own money’ was The Ivy Tree. I’ve been reading Mary Stewart for over 50 years and have them all in hardback. I guess it is time to reread her again…it’s been 10 years since the last re-read. (She and the Cadfael books alternate!)

    Reply
  156. Dear Wenches:
    Mary Stewart is the guiding influence of my writing life, and, IMHO, Madam, will you talk? is her seminal book. I read Nine Coaches Waiting first, when I was in high school. Since I’m also a “gotta read more”person, I hunted – and found Madam,will you talk? I was enchanted with the setting, the intrepid heroine, the mysteriously dangerous hero. And like Richard, I couldn’t wait to find out, “Who’s Johnny?” I loved the descriptions of the food, and fantasized about green frocks, silver cuff bracelets, and car chases between Rolls and Bentley…sigh…Thanks so much for the discussion, and the great comments, as well.

    Reply
  157. Dear Wenches:
    Mary Stewart is the guiding influence of my writing life, and, IMHO, Madam, will you talk? is her seminal book. I read Nine Coaches Waiting first, when I was in high school. Since I’m also a “gotta read more”person, I hunted – and found Madam,will you talk? I was enchanted with the setting, the intrepid heroine, the mysteriously dangerous hero. And like Richard, I couldn’t wait to find out, “Who’s Johnny?” I loved the descriptions of the food, and fantasized about green frocks, silver cuff bracelets, and car chases between Rolls and Bentley…sigh…Thanks so much for the discussion, and the great comments, as well.

    Reply
  158. Dear Wenches:
    Mary Stewart is the guiding influence of my writing life, and, IMHO, Madam, will you talk? is her seminal book. I read Nine Coaches Waiting first, when I was in high school. Since I’m also a “gotta read more”person, I hunted – and found Madam,will you talk? I was enchanted with the setting, the intrepid heroine, the mysteriously dangerous hero. And like Richard, I couldn’t wait to find out, “Who’s Johnny?” I loved the descriptions of the food, and fantasized about green frocks, silver cuff bracelets, and car chases between Rolls and Bentley…sigh…Thanks so much for the discussion, and the great comments, as well.

    Reply
  159. Dear Wenches:
    Mary Stewart is the guiding influence of my writing life, and, IMHO, Madam, will you talk? is her seminal book. I read Nine Coaches Waiting first, when I was in high school. Since I’m also a “gotta read more”person, I hunted – and found Madam,will you talk? I was enchanted with the setting, the intrepid heroine, the mysteriously dangerous hero. And like Richard, I couldn’t wait to find out, “Who’s Johnny?” I loved the descriptions of the food, and fantasized about green frocks, silver cuff bracelets, and car chases between Rolls and Bentley…sigh…Thanks so much for the discussion, and the great comments, as well.

    Reply
  160. Dear Wenches:
    Mary Stewart is the guiding influence of my writing life, and, IMHO, Madam, will you talk? is her seminal book. I read Nine Coaches Waiting first, when I was in high school. Since I’m also a “gotta read more”person, I hunted – and found Madam,will you talk? I was enchanted with the setting, the intrepid heroine, the mysteriously dangerous hero. And like Richard, I couldn’t wait to find out, “Who’s Johnny?” I loved the descriptions of the food, and fantasized about green frocks, silver cuff bracelets, and car chases between Rolls and Bentley…sigh…Thanks so much for the discussion, and the great comments, as well.

    Reply
  161. And now, she is gone. Allow me the fantasy that before she did, someone shared with her the marvelous memories we left here. They inspired me to start rereading, and Madam, Will You Talk? is now on my bedside table. I will open it with special reverence tonight.

    Reply
  162. And now, she is gone. Allow me the fantasy that before she did, someone shared with her the marvelous memories we left here. They inspired me to start rereading, and Madam, Will You Talk? is now on my bedside table. I will open it with special reverence tonight.

    Reply
  163. And now, she is gone. Allow me the fantasy that before she did, someone shared with her the marvelous memories we left here. They inspired me to start rereading, and Madam, Will You Talk? is now on my bedside table. I will open it with special reverence tonight.

    Reply
  164. And now, she is gone. Allow me the fantasy that before she did, someone shared with her the marvelous memories we left here. They inspired me to start rereading, and Madam, Will You Talk? is now on my bedside table. I will open it with special reverence tonight.

    Reply
  165. And now, she is gone. Allow me the fantasy that before she did, someone shared with her the marvelous memories we left here. They inspired me to start rereading, and Madam, Will You Talk? is now on my bedside table. I will open it with special reverence tonight.

    Reply
  166. I’m so glad that you did this lovely post before her death, and I hope that she knew just how much we all appreciate her wonderful books.

    Reply
  167. I’m so glad that you did this lovely post before her death, and I hope that she knew just how much we all appreciate her wonderful books.

    Reply
  168. I’m so glad that you did this lovely post before her death, and I hope that she knew just how much we all appreciate her wonderful books.

    Reply
  169. I’m so glad that you did this lovely post before her death, and I hope that she knew just how much we all appreciate her wonderful books.

    Reply
  170. I’m so glad that you did this lovely post before her death, and I hope that she knew just how much we all appreciate her wonderful books.

    Reply
  171. I think my first encounter was a serial in The Woman’s Journal passed on to me by my mother. I too was a history reader but devoured them as stories. I was too young on first read to pay much attention to the romance… I just wanted to know what happened . After I read the Crystal Cave I re read some. I did not like the Moonspinners much,probably because of the film. This Rough Magic and Nine Coaches Waiting being y favourites but being a Scot I was haunted bt Wildfire at Midnight and still do not wish to be alone in the Cuillins.Such is the power of her writing.

    Reply
  172. I think my first encounter was a serial in The Woman’s Journal passed on to me by my mother. I too was a history reader but devoured them as stories. I was too young on first read to pay much attention to the romance… I just wanted to know what happened . After I read the Crystal Cave I re read some. I did not like the Moonspinners much,probably because of the film. This Rough Magic and Nine Coaches Waiting being y favourites but being a Scot I was haunted bt Wildfire at Midnight and still do not wish to be alone in the Cuillins.Such is the power of her writing.

    Reply
  173. I think my first encounter was a serial in The Woman’s Journal passed on to me by my mother. I too was a history reader but devoured them as stories. I was too young on first read to pay much attention to the romance… I just wanted to know what happened . After I read the Crystal Cave I re read some. I did not like the Moonspinners much,probably because of the film. This Rough Magic and Nine Coaches Waiting being y favourites but being a Scot I was haunted bt Wildfire at Midnight and still do not wish to be alone in the Cuillins.Such is the power of her writing.

    Reply
  174. I think my first encounter was a serial in The Woman’s Journal passed on to me by my mother. I too was a history reader but devoured them as stories. I was too young on first read to pay much attention to the romance… I just wanted to know what happened . After I read the Crystal Cave I re read some. I did not like the Moonspinners much,probably because of the film. This Rough Magic and Nine Coaches Waiting being y favourites but being a Scot I was haunted bt Wildfire at Midnight and still do not wish to be alone in the Cuillins.Such is the power of her writing.

    Reply
  175. I think my first encounter was a serial in The Woman’s Journal passed on to me by my mother. I too was a history reader but devoured them as stories. I was too young on first read to pay much attention to the romance… I just wanted to know what happened . After I read the Crystal Cave I re read some. I did not like the Moonspinners much,probably because of the film. This Rough Magic and Nine Coaches Waiting being y favourites but being a Scot I was haunted bt Wildfire at Midnight and still do not wish to be alone in the Cuillins.Such is the power of her writing.

    Reply
  176. Blythe, I so hope she knew how beloved she was. I had started re-reading a bunch of her books after I put together the blog post and was in the middle of None Coaches Waiting when I read the news of her passing. She will be much missed.

    Reply
  177. Blythe, I so hope she knew how beloved she was. I had started re-reading a bunch of her books after I put together the blog post and was in the middle of None Coaches Waiting when I read the news of her passing. She will be much missed.

    Reply
  178. Blythe, I so hope she knew how beloved she was. I had started re-reading a bunch of her books after I put together the blog post and was in the middle of None Coaches Waiting when I read the news of her passing. She will be much missed.

    Reply
  179. Blythe, I so hope she knew how beloved she was. I had started re-reading a bunch of her books after I put together the blog post and was in the middle of None Coaches Waiting when I read the news of her passing. She will be much missed.

    Reply
  180. Blythe, I so hope she knew how beloved she was. I had started re-reading a bunch of her books after I put together the blog post and was in the middle of None Coaches Waiting when I read the news of her passing. She will be much missed.

    Reply

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