A Wench Classic: “The All-Time Champion List”

Susan Sarah here … Over the next few weeks at Word Wenches, we’ll introduce some surprises and new features. Today we’re launching “Wench Classics,” in which we’ll post earlier, classic blogs for a chance to renew some great discussions. We’ve been blogging on WW for nearly two and half years – that’s a lot of blogs!! – and we thought, with the archives so very full of some interesting stuff, that we’d like to revisit some of them with new perspectives and new thoughts to share.

The first “Wench Classic” edition comes from one of my earlier blogs on the topic of books we’ve read that have become our own personal classics. In going back to it, I’ve revised (that’s compulsive by now!!) and added more books….

….. A Wench Classic: * The All-Time Champion List * …..

Lordleighton_the_maid_with_golden_h Yesterday a great discussion about unread books gathering dust on our bookshelves got me thinking about books that I have actually read again and again. These are the ones that have found a permanent place in my heart and my thoughts … we’ve all read so very many books in our lives – probably a staggering number if we attempted to make a count – yet only a fraction of those will stick with us forever. For each one of us, that list is very different.

I have a short list of the books that I will always remember and treasure, the ones that have moved me, made me think, taught me something essential, and thrilled me with story or characters or artful writing. For me, the quality of the writing itself can be as interesting as the story and the characters; where all the elements are masterfully woven together with some elusive book magic that connects with me — then I’m in book bliss. I am sometimes drawn to read the books on my list again for a sense of comfort, support, even love that they bring me — a feeling not unlike pulling on a favorite sweatshirt or curling up with a cosy old comforter on a chilly night.

Some books made my all-time champion list, my keeper list, for emotional and personal reasons. Some books have affected me deeply at certain turning points in my life; others may have taught me something I needed to learn; still others kept me going or gave me an escape hatch when I desperately needed one. I’ll be forever grateful to those books, and to their authors, for a sort of therapeutic support, or the sense of an old friend guiding us through.

Here are some of my ultimate favorites. A few are acknowledged as "great" or classic books; some are personally dear to me; some are gorgeously written and thought-provoking; some taught me skills of writing and storytelling; and some are just cracking good stories, and that’s enough.

It’s a partial list because the full list is very long and always growing. In no particular order:

Thisroughmagic The Ivy Tree, Moonspinners, This Rough Magic, The Crystal Cave…just about anything by Mary Stewart (these are my comfort reads, exquisite writing and masterful storytelling)
Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier (breathtaking in all its aspects)
Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte (one of my dearest favorites)Jane_eyre
Gone With the Wind, Margaret Mitchell (I read this five times in high school)

Anne of Cambray, Mary Lide (exquisite! Wish I could write like that!)
The Wolf and the Dove, Kathleen Woodiwiss (my first introduction to true historical romance) — and here’s a quick list of some of my favorite historical romances EVER:
Prince of Midnight, Laura Kinsale; Lord of Scoundrels, Loretta Chase; The Wild Child, Mary Jo Putney; Tapestry of Dreams, Roberta Gellis…and too many more to count….

Playing_the_jack Playing the Jack, Mary Brown (so much fun, and skilled storytelling too) and also The Unlikely Ones, Mary Brown (how could I choose between them!)

Pippi Longstocking (hey, like I said, no particular order! this is probably the first book chronologically to make my all-time list of favorites, and it’s still on it. I read this over and over and over when I was a kid)

The Far Pavilions, M.M. Kaye (a huge sentimental favorite, as I remember being stuck in a hospital bed the week I read it. This is a savior book for me)

Vision of Light, Judith Merkle Riley (I adored this book, every word, start to finish)

Hendersonbellow The Hobbit, J. R. R. Tolkein (and the rest of the series, though The Hobbit introduced me not only to Tolkein but to fantasy and the epic, visionary storytelling of LOTR)
Henderson the Rain King, Saul Bellow  (deep, insightful, poignant, wacky, funny, fascinating and unforgettable… and an early revelation for me that contemporary lit fic could be so very enjoyable)
One Hundred Years of Solitude, Gabriel Garcia Marquez (dazzling writing, wild and gorgeous story and craft)

To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee (deeply moved me as a kid, when I didn’t fully understand it, and as an adult, when I did)
Kristin Lavransdatter, Sigrid Undset (masterful on every level, unforgettable characters and setting)
Moby Dick, Herman Melville (once I got past the "assigned reading" mentality, I loved it–pure writing, as good as it gets in parts)
Tale_of_two_cities A Tale of Two Cities, Dickens (I love his work, but of all of his work, this and “A Christmas Carol” speak most closely to me)

On Walden Pond, Henry David Thoreau – who had three chairs, "one for solitude, two for friendship, three for society” (I loved this book so much I did an independent study course in college just to learn more about it)

Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen (I truly enjoyed this in college, and was fascinated to find this so very readable)

There are more, but that’s a start. As soon as I post this, I’ll be smacking my forehead: "Oh yeah! that one! and that one too! And that one!" The list just makes me long to dive in and start reading them all again. 

Stack_of_books What books are your ultimate, all-time favorites? What books will stay with you forever, on your bookshelf and in your heart? Which books resonated deeply with you – and which books do you consider to be the best books you’ve ever read to date?

I’m willing to bet that we’ll have a lot of the same books on our lists!

~Susan Sarah

65 thoughts on “A Wench Classic: “The All-Time Champion List””

  1. Overlap:
    Just about anything by Mary Stewart (these are my comfort reads, exquisite writing and masterful storytelling)
    The Hobbit, J. R. R. Tolkein
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez (pretty much anything BUT One Hundred Years of Solitude, which I’ve never managed to finish, LOL!). Love in the time of Cholera is a my absolute fav of his.
    On Walden Pond, Henry David Thoreau
    Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen (ok, really I think I like Persuasion best)
    My own list:
    Heyer!!! I’ve got about a dozen that I’m addicted to.
    Guy Gavriel Kay, esp. A Song for Arbonne.
    Anne of Green Gables, L. M. Montgomery.
    P.C. Hodgell!!! The God Stalk series is amazing.
    Neil Gaiman. Pretty much everything.
    The Club Dumas, Arturo Pérez-Reverte (I like a lot of the others too)
    Interview with the Vampire, Anne Rice (ONLY this book)
    As for romance, I glom the Wenches, Candice Hern, Julia Ross, Sabrina Jeffries, Pam Rosenthal, and Tracy Grant.

    Reply
  2. Overlap:
    Just about anything by Mary Stewart (these are my comfort reads, exquisite writing and masterful storytelling)
    The Hobbit, J. R. R. Tolkein
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez (pretty much anything BUT One Hundred Years of Solitude, which I’ve never managed to finish, LOL!). Love in the time of Cholera is a my absolute fav of his.
    On Walden Pond, Henry David Thoreau
    Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen (ok, really I think I like Persuasion best)
    My own list:
    Heyer!!! I’ve got about a dozen that I’m addicted to.
    Guy Gavriel Kay, esp. A Song for Arbonne.
    Anne of Green Gables, L. M. Montgomery.
    P.C. Hodgell!!! The God Stalk series is amazing.
    Neil Gaiman. Pretty much everything.
    The Club Dumas, Arturo Pérez-Reverte (I like a lot of the others too)
    Interview with the Vampire, Anne Rice (ONLY this book)
    As for romance, I glom the Wenches, Candice Hern, Julia Ross, Sabrina Jeffries, Pam Rosenthal, and Tracy Grant.

    Reply
  3. Overlap:
    Just about anything by Mary Stewart (these are my comfort reads, exquisite writing and masterful storytelling)
    The Hobbit, J. R. R. Tolkein
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez (pretty much anything BUT One Hundred Years of Solitude, which I’ve never managed to finish, LOL!). Love in the time of Cholera is a my absolute fav of his.
    On Walden Pond, Henry David Thoreau
    Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen (ok, really I think I like Persuasion best)
    My own list:
    Heyer!!! I’ve got about a dozen that I’m addicted to.
    Guy Gavriel Kay, esp. A Song for Arbonne.
    Anne of Green Gables, L. M. Montgomery.
    P.C. Hodgell!!! The God Stalk series is amazing.
    Neil Gaiman. Pretty much everything.
    The Club Dumas, Arturo Pérez-Reverte (I like a lot of the others too)
    Interview with the Vampire, Anne Rice (ONLY this book)
    As for romance, I glom the Wenches, Candice Hern, Julia Ross, Sabrina Jeffries, Pam Rosenthal, and Tracy Grant.

    Reply
  4. Overlap:
    Just about anything by Mary Stewart (these are my comfort reads, exquisite writing and masterful storytelling)
    The Hobbit, J. R. R. Tolkein
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez (pretty much anything BUT One Hundred Years of Solitude, which I’ve never managed to finish, LOL!). Love in the time of Cholera is a my absolute fav of his.
    On Walden Pond, Henry David Thoreau
    Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen (ok, really I think I like Persuasion best)
    My own list:
    Heyer!!! I’ve got about a dozen that I’m addicted to.
    Guy Gavriel Kay, esp. A Song for Arbonne.
    Anne of Green Gables, L. M. Montgomery.
    P.C. Hodgell!!! The God Stalk series is amazing.
    Neil Gaiman. Pretty much everything.
    The Club Dumas, Arturo Pérez-Reverte (I like a lot of the others too)
    Interview with the Vampire, Anne Rice (ONLY this book)
    As for romance, I glom the Wenches, Candice Hern, Julia Ross, Sabrina Jeffries, Pam Rosenthal, and Tracy Grant.

    Reply
  5. Overlap:
    Just about anything by Mary Stewart (these are my comfort reads, exquisite writing and masterful storytelling)
    The Hobbit, J. R. R. Tolkein
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez (pretty much anything BUT One Hundred Years of Solitude, which I’ve never managed to finish, LOL!). Love in the time of Cholera is a my absolute fav of his.
    On Walden Pond, Henry David Thoreau
    Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen (ok, really I think I like Persuasion best)
    My own list:
    Heyer!!! I’ve got about a dozen that I’m addicted to.
    Guy Gavriel Kay, esp. A Song for Arbonne.
    Anne of Green Gables, L. M. Montgomery.
    P.C. Hodgell!!! The God Stalk series is amazing.
    Neil Gaiman. Pretty much everything.
    The Club Dumas, Arturo Pérez-Reverte (I like a lot of the others too)
    Interview with the Vampire, Anne Rice (ONLY this book)
    As for romance, I glom the Wenches, Candice Hern, Julia Ross, Sabrina Jeffries, Pam Rosenthal, and Tracy Grant.

    Reply
  6. Well, this is very timely. Just yesterday I spent about an hour paging through the Word Wenches archives looking for an old post I had a vague recollection of. A lot of them made me think they’d be good topics for re-discussion.
    So my favorites :
    Books I’ve read numerous times :
    1) The Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. I’ve read all 6 (so far) books twice and listened to all of them on unabridged audio at least twice. Whenever someone asks me for reading suggestions, this is my go to recommendation.
    2) The Sunday Philosophy Club series by Alexander McCall Smith. I love the heroine Isabel Dalhousie and want to be just like her. 😉
    3) Dear Exile : The Story of Two Friends Separated (For a Year) By an Ocean by Hilary Liftin and Kate Montgomery. Ohhh…I love this book. After college, one joins the Peace Corps and one stays in New York. This is a collection of their correspondence.
    4) The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley. I had a friend once who said if you read this book, you’d understand her. I don’t know that I’d go that far, but it might take you a couple steps in that direction.
    5) A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle. One of my favorite books as a kid.
    6) Andrew Henry’s Meadow by Doris Burn. My absolute favorite book as a kid. “Andrew Henry loved to build things….” Recently re-released 40th Anniversary Edition!
    Books I’ve read that I go back to and read parts of on occasion :
    1) A Natural History of the Senses by Diane Ackerman. Jeeze – I hardly know how to describe this. It’s about biology, philosophy, and poetry, and how our senses evolved and are expressed. Terrible description for a beautifully written book.
    2) Meditations for the Humanist : Ethics for a Secular Age by A.C. Grayling.
    3) The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck.
    4) A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens.
    5) Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte.
    I reserve the right to post an addendum when I am not at work and have time to give this question proper consideration.

    Reply
  7. Well, this is very timely. Just yesterday I spent about an hour paging through the Word Wenches archives looking for an old post I had a vague recollection of. A lot of them made me think they’d be good topics for re-discussion.
    So my favorites :
    Books I’ve read numerous times :
    1) The Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. I’ve read all 6 (so far) books twice and listened to all of them on unabridged audio at least twice. Whenever someone asks me for reading suggestions, this is my go to recommendation.
    2) The Sunday Philosophy Club series by Alexander McCall Smith. I love the heroine Isabel Dalhousie and want to be just like her. 😉
    3) Dear Exile : The Story of Two Friends Separated (For a Year) By an Ocean by Hilary Liftin and Kate Montgomery. Ohhh…I love this book. After college, one joins the Peace Corps and one stays in New York. This is a collection of their correspondence.
    4) The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley. I had a friend once who said if you read this book, you’d understand her. I don’t know that I’d go that far, but it might take you a couple steps in that direction.
    5) A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle. One of my favorite books as a kid.
    6) Andrew Henry’s Meadow by Doris Burn. My absolute favorite book as a kid. “Andrew Henry loved to build things….” Recently re-released 40th Anniversary Edition!
    Books I’ve read that I go back to and read parts of on occasion :
    1) A Natural History of the Senses by Diane Ackerman. Jeeze – I hardly know how to describe this. It’s about biology, philosophy, and poetry, and how our senses evolved and are expressed. Terrible description for a beautifully written book.
    2) Meditations for the Humanist : Ethics for a Secular Age by A.C. Grayling.
    3) The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck.
    4) A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens.
    5) Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte.
    I reserve the right to post an addendum when I am not at work and have time to give this question proper consideration.

    Reply
  8. Well, this is very timely. Just yesterday I spent about an hour paging through the Word Wenches archives looking for an old post I had a vague recollection of. A lot of them made me think they’d be good topics for re-discussion.
    So my favorites :
    Books I’ve read numerous times :
    1) The Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. I’ve read all 6 (so far) books twice and listened to all of them on unabridged audio at least twice. Whenever someone asks me for reading suggestions, this is my go to recommendation.
    2) The Sunday Philosophy Club series by Alexander McCall Smith. I love the heroine Isabel Dalhousie and want to be just like her. 😉
    3) Dear Exile : The Story of Two Friends Separated (For a Year) By an Ocean by Hilary Liftin and Kate Montgomery. Ohhh…I love this book. After college, one joins the Peace Corps and one stays in New York. This is a collection of their correspondence.
    4) The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley. I had a friend once who said if you read this book, you’d understand her. I don’t know that I’d go that far, but it might take you a couple steps in that direction.
    5) A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle. One of my favorite books as a kid.
    6) Andrew Henry’s Meadow by Doris Burn. My absolute favorite book as a kid. “Andrew Henry loved to build things….” Recently re-released 40th Anniversary Edition!
    Books I’ve read that I go back to and read parts of on occasion :
    1) A Natural History of the Senses by Diane Ackerman. Jeeze – I hardly know how to describe this. It’s about biology, philosophy, and poetry, and how our senses evolved and are expressed. Terrible description for a beautifully written book.
    2) Meditations for the Humanist : Ethics for a Secular Age by A.C. Grayling.
    3) The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck.
    4) A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens.
    5) Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte.
    I reserve the right to post an addendum when I am not at work and have time to give this question proper consideration.

    Reply
  9. Well, this is very timely. Just yesterday I spent about an hour paging through the Word Wenches archives looking for an old post I had a vague recollection of. A lot of them made me think they’d be good topics for re-discussion.
    So my favorites :
    Books I’ve read numerous times :
    1) The Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. I’ve read all 6 (so far) books twice and listened to all of them on unabridged audio at least twice. Whenever someone asks me for reading suggestions, this is my go to recommendation.
    2) The Sunday Philosophy Club series by Alexander McCall Smith. I love the heroine Isabel Dalhousie and want to be just like her. 😉
    3) Dear Exile : The Story of Two Friends Separated (For a Year) By an Ocean by Hilary Liftin and Kate Montgomery. Ohhh…I love this book. After college, one joins the Peace Corps and one stays in New York. This is a collection of their correspondence.
    4) The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley. I had a friend once who said if you read this book, you’d understand her. I don’t know that I’d go that far, but it might take you a couple steps in that direction.
    5) A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle. One of my favorite books as a kid.
    6) Andrew Henry’s Meadow by Doris Burn. My absolute favorite book as a kid. “Andrew Henry loved to build things….” Recently re-released 40th Anniversary Edition!
    Books I’ve read that I go back to and read parts of on occasion :
    1) A Natural History of the Senses by Diane Ackerman. Jeeze – I hardly know how to describe this. It’s about biology, philosophy, and poetry, and how our senses evolved and are expressed. Terrible description for a beautifully written book.
    2) Meditations for the Humanist : Ethics for a Secular Age by A.C. Grayling.
    3) The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck.
    4) A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens.
    5) Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte.
    I reserve the right to post an addendum when I am not at work and have time to give this question proper consideration.

    Reply
  10. Well, this is very timely. Just yesterday I spent about an hour paging through the Word Wenches archives looking for an old post I had a vague recollection of. A lot of them made me think they’d be good topics for re-discussion.
    So my favorites :
    Books I’ve read numerous times :
    1) The Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. I’ve read all 6 (so far) books twice and listened to all of them on unabridged audio at least twice. Whenever someone asks me for reading suggestions, this is my go to recommendation.
    2) The Sunday Philosophy Club series by Alexander McCall Smith. I love the heroine Isabel Dalhousie and want to be just like her. 😉
    3) Dear Exile : The Story of Two Friends Separated (For a Year) By an Ocean by Hilary Liftin and Kate Montgomery. Ohhh…I love this book. After college, one joins the Peace Corps and one stays in New York. This is a collection of their correspondence.
    4) The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley. I had a friend once who said if you read this book, you’d understand her. I don’t know that I’d go that far, but it might take you a couple steps in that direction.
    5) A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle. One of my favorite books as a kid.
    6) Andrew Henry’s Meadow by Doris Burn. My absolute favorite book as a kid. “Andrew Henry loved to build things….” Recently re-released 40th Anniversary Edition!
    Books I’ve read that I go back to and read parts of on occasion :
    1) A Natural History of the Senses by Diane Ackerman. Jeeze – I hardly know how to describe this. It’s about biology, philosophy, and poetry, and how our senses evolved and are expressed. Terrible description for a beautifully written book.
    2) Meditations for the Humanist : Ethics for a Secular Age by A.C. Grayling.
    3) The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck.
    4) A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens.
    5) Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte.
    I reserve the right to post an addendum when I am not at work and have time to give this question proper consideration.

    Reply
  11. Some of my all-time favorites, in no particular order:
    1. Persuasion, by Jane Austen. I love all of Austen’s books, but Persuasion is the most *satisfying*, somehow.
    2. The Chronicles of Narnia, by CS Lewis.
    3. Sharpe’s Triumph, Sharpe’s Trafalgar, and Sharpe’s Waterloo, by Bernard Cornwell. I love the whole series, but those are the three I like to re-read.
    4. In This House of Brede, by Rumer Godden. I can’t even explain to myself why a book about a community of Benedictine nuns makes my list, but I can re-read it again and again because the characters come to life for me.
    5. Eight Cousins, Rose in Bloom, and An Old-Fashioned Girl, by Louisa May Alcott. I’m glad I didn’t give up on Alcott after Little Women, which I liked but didn’t love, because I found these lesser-known books a lot more appealing.
    6. Anne of the Island, Anne’s House of Dreams, and Rilla of Ingleside, by LM Montgomery. Again, the parts of a series I return to most often.
    7. The Long Winter, Little Town on the Prairie, and These Happy Golden Years from the Little House books.
    8. All of Dorothy Sayers’ Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries that feature Harriet Vane (Strong Poison, Have His Carcase, Gaudy Night, and Busman’s Honeymoon). I’ve often argued that the moment in Gaudy Night where Harriet realizes she’s attracted to Peter is among the sexiest things I’ve ever read, and all she’s doing is looking at him.
    9. Raney, by Clyde Edgerton. No one writes Southern voice better, in the opinion of this Alabama-bred reader.
    10. Jennie About to Be, The World of Jennie G., and Jennie Glenroy, by Elisabeth Ogilvie. I’ve yet to met anyone else who’s even HEARD of this trilogy set in England, Scotland, and Maine roughly 1810-1830, but IMHO they’re wonderful.
    And, some newer books that I’ve re-read at least once and think will earn a place on my classics list:
    1. Kushiel’s Dart, by Jacqueline Carey.
    2. His Majesty’s Dragon, by Naomi Novik
    As usual, my list is heavy on series. It’s not that I don’t enjoy standalone books; they just don’t drive me to re-read them in the same way my favorite stories from a multi-volume world do. Something about a story being complete in one volume makes its whole world feel complete for me, so I rarely feel the same need to revisit it.

    Reply
  12. Some of my all-time favorites, in no particular order:
    1. Persuasion, by Jane Austen. I love all of Austen’s books, but Persuasion is the most *satisfying*, somehow.
    2. The Chronicles of Narnia, by CS Lewis.
    3. Sharpe’s Triumph, Sharpe’s Trafalgar, and Sharpe’s Waterloo, by Bernard Cornwell. I love the whole series, but those are the three I like to re-read.
    4. In This House of Brede, by Rumer Godden. I can’t even explain to myself why a book about a community of Benedictine nuns makes my list, but I can re-read it again and again because the characters come to life for me.
    5. Eight Cousins, Rose in Bloom, and An Old-Fashioned Girl, by Louisa May Alcott. I’m glad I didn’t give up on Alcott after Little Women, which I liked but didn’t love, because I found these lesser-known books a lot more appealing.
    6. Anne of the Island, Anne’s House of Dreams, and Rilla of Ingleside, by LM Montgomery. Again, the parts of a series I return to most often.
    7. The Long Winter, Little Town on the Prairie, and These Happy Golden Years from the Little House books.
    8. All of Dorothy Sayers’ Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries that feature Harriet Vane (Strong Poison, Have His Carcase, Gaudy Night, and Busman’s Honeymoon). I’ve often argued that the moment in Gaudy Night where Harriet realizes she’s attracted to Peter is among the sexiest things I’ve ever read, and all she’s doing is looking at him.
    9. Raney, by Clyde Edgerton. No one writes Southern voice better, in the opinion of this Alabama-bred reader.
    10. Jennie About to Be, The World of Jennie G., and Jennie Glenroy, by Elisabeth Ogilvie. I’ve yet to met anyone else who’s even HEARD of this trilogy set in England, Scotland, and Maine roughly 1810-1830, but IMHO they’re wonderful.
    And, some newer books that I’ve re-read at least once and think will earn a place on my classics list:
    1. Kushiel’s Dart, by Jacqueline Carey.
    2. His Majesty’s Dragon, by Naomi Novik
    As usual, my list is heavy on series. It’s not that I don’t enjoy standalone books; they just don’t drive me to re-read them in the same way my favorite stories from a multi-volume world do. Something about a story being complete in one volume makes its whole world feel complete for me, so I rarely feel the same need to revisit it.

    Reply
  13. Some of my all-time favorites, in no particular order:
    1. Persuasion, by Jane Austen. I love all of Austen’s books, but Persuasion is the most *satisfying*, somehow.
    2. The Chronicles of Narnia, by CS Lewis.
    3. Sharpe’s Triumph, Sharpe’s Trafalgar, and Sharpe’s Waterloo, by Bernard Cornwell. I love the whole series, but those are the three I like to re-read.
    4. In This House of Brede, by Rumer Godden. I can’t even explain to myself why a book about a community of Benedictine nuns makes my list, but I can re-read it again and again because the characters come to life for me.
    5. Eight Cousins, Rose in Bloom, and An Old-Fashioned Girl, by Louisa May Alcott. I’m glad I didn’t give up on Alcott after Little Women, which I liked but didn’t love, because I found these lesser-known books a lot more appealing.
    6. Anne of the Island, Anne’s House of Dreams, and Rilla of Ingleside, by LM Montgomery. Again, the parts of a series I return to most often.
    7. The Long Winter, Little Town on the Prairie, and These Happy Golden Years from the Little House books.
    8. All of Dorothy Sayers’ Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries that feature Harriet Vane (Strong Poison, Have His Carcase, Gaudy Night, and Busman’s Honeymoon). I’ve often argued that the moment in Gaudy Night where Harriet realizes she’s attracted to Peter is among the sexiest things I’ve ever read, and all she’s doing is looking at him.
    9. Raney, by Clyde Edgerton. No one writes Southern voice better, in the opinion of this Alabama-bred reader.
    10. Jennie About to Be, The World of Jennie G., and Jennie Glenroy, by Elisabeth Ogilvie. I’ve yet to met anyone else who’s even HEARD of this trilogy set in England, Scotland, and Maine roughly 1810-1830, but IMHO they’re wonderful.
    And, some newer books that I’ve re-read at least once and think will earn a place on my classics list:
    1. Kushiel’s Dart, by Jacqueline Carey.
    2. His Majesty’s Dragon, by Naomi Novik
    As usual, my list is heavy on series. It’s not that I don’t enjoy standalone books; they just don’t drive me to re-read them in the same way my favorite stories from a multi-volume world do. Something about a story being complete in one volume makes its whole world feel complete for me, so I rarely feel the same need to revisit it.

    Reply
  14. Some of my all-time favorites, in no particular order:
    1. Persuasion, by Jane Austen. I love all of Austen’s books, but Persuasion is the most *satisfying*, somehow.
    2. The Chronicles of Narnia, by CS Lewis.
    3. Sharpe’s Triumph, Sharpe’s Trafalgar, and Sharpe’s Waterloo, by Bernard Cornwell. I love the whole series, but those are the three I like to re-read.
    4. In This House of Brede, by Rumer Godden. I can’t even explain to myself why a book about a community of Benedictine nuns makes my list, but I can re-read it again and again because the characters come to life for me.
    5. Eight Cousins, Rose in Bloom, and An Old-Fashioned Girl, by Louisa May Alcott. I’m glad I didn’t give up on Alcott after Little Women, which I liked but didn’t love, because I found these lesser-known books a lot more appealing.
    6. Anne of the Island, Anne’s House of Dreams, and Rilla of Ingleside, by LM Montgomery. Again, the parts of a series I return to most often.
    7. The Long Winter, Little Town on the Prairie, and These Happy Golden Years from the Little House books.
    8. All of Dorothy Sayers’ Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries that feature Harriet Vane (Strong Poison, Have His Carcase, Gaudy Night, and Busman’s Honeymoon). I’ve often argued that the moment in Gaudy Night where Harriet realizes she’s attracted to Peter is among the sexiest things I’ve ever read, and all she’s doing is looking at him.
    9. Raney, by Clyde Edgerton. No one writes Southern voice better, in the opinion of this Alabama-bred reader.
    10. Jennie About to Be, The World of Jennie G., and Jennie Glenroy, by Elisabeth Ogilvie. I’ve yet to met anyone else who’s even HEARD of this trilogy set in England, Scotland, and Maine roughly 1810-1830, but IMHO they’re wonderful.
    And, some newer books that I’ve re-read at least once and think will earn a place on my classics list:
    1. Kushiel’s Dart, by Jacqueline Carey.
    2. His Majesty’s Dragon, by Naomi Novik
    As usual, my list is heavy on series. It’s not that I don’t enjoy standalone books; they just don’t drive me to re-read them in the same way my favorite stories from a multi-volume world do. Something about a story being complete in one volume makes its whole world feel complete for me, so I rarely feel the same need to revisit it.

    Reply
  15. Some of my all-time favorites, in no particular order:
    1. Persuasion, by Jane Austen. I love all of Austen’s books, but Persuasion is the most *satisfying*, somehow.
    2. The Chronicles of Narnia, by CS Lewis.
    3. Sharpe’s Triumph, Sharpe’s Trafalgar, and Sharpe’s Waterloo, by Bernard Cornwell. I love the whole series, but those are the three I like to re-read.
    4. In This House of Brede, by Rumer Godden. I can’t even explain to myself why a book about a community of Benedictine nuns makes my list, but I can re-read it again and again because the characters come to life for me.
    5. Eight Cousins, Rose in Bloom, and An Old-Fashioned Girl, by Louisa May Alcott. I’m glad I didn’t give up on Alcott after Little Women, which I liked but didn’t love, because I found these lesser-known books a lot more appealing.
    6. Anne of the Island, Anne’s House of Dreams, and Rilla of Ingleside, by LM Montgomery. Again, the parts of a series I return to most often.
    7. The Long Winter, Little Town on the Prairie, and These Happy Golden Years from the Little House books.
    8. All of Dorothy Sayers’ Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries that feature Harriet Vane (Strong Poison, Have His Carcase, Gaudy Night, and Busman’s Honeymoon). I’ve often argued that the moment in Gaudy Night where Harriet realizes she’s attracted to Peter is among the sexiest things I’ve ever read, and all she’s doing is looking at him.
    9. Raney, by Clyde Edgerton. No one writes Southern voice better, in the opinion of this Alabama-bred reader.
    10. Jennie About to Be, The World of Jennie G., and Jennie Glenroy, by Elisabeth Ogilvie. I’ve yet to met anyone else who’s even HEARD of this trilogy set in England, Scotland, and Maine roughly 1810-1830, but IMHO they’re wonderful.
    And, some newer books that I’ve re-read at least once and think will earn a place on my classics list:
    1. Kushiel’s Dart, by Jacqueline Carey.
    2. His Majesty’s Dragon, by Naomi Novik
    As usual, my list is heavy on series. It’s not that I don’t enjoy standalone books; they just don’t drive me to re-read them in the same way my favorite stories from a multi-volume world do. Something about a story being complete in one volume makes its whole world feel complete for me, so I rarely feel the same need to revisit it.

    Reply
  16. Oh, my! I’ve missed so much! My MIL has been in hospital, very sick, so I’m just catching up but my favorites that I’ve read until I’ve had to replace them….and in no order I might add…
    Several different WW books 🙂
    Anne Gracie’s Perfect series which really is ‘perfect’.
    Karen Marie Moning’s Highlanders (Oh, geez, Adam…my number one Alpha Hero of all time!) but not her Fever series.
    A Rose in Winter by Woodiwiss (My intro to her and my favorite of hers)
    Gone with the Wind: Margaret Mitchell
    Crystal Cave (which I think I stumbled on when I was about nine, and still have!)
    Charlotte’s Web: EB White (and yes, I still ball like a baby!)
    The Madeline books by Bemelmans
    The entire Oz series: L. Frank Baum
    Several classics and my list goes on and on…
    What a great discussion!
    ps. I missed you all!

    Reply
  17. Oh, my! I’ve missed so much! My MIL has been in hospital, very sick, so I’m just catching up but my favorites that I’ve read until I’ve had to replace them….and in no order I might add…
    Several different WW books 🙂
    Anne Gracie’s Perfect series which really is ‘perfect’.
    Karen Marie Moning’s Highlanders (Oh, geez, Adam…my number one Alpha Hero of all time!) but not her Fever series.
    A Rose in Winter by Woodiwiss (My intro to her and my favorite of hers)
    Gone with the Wind: Margaret Mitchell
    Crystal Cave (which I think I stumbled on when I was about nine, and still have!)
    Charlotte’s Web: EB White (and yes, I still ball like a baby!)
    The Madeline books by Bemelmans
    The entire Oz series: L. Frank Baum
    Several classics and my list goes on and on…
    What a great discussion!
    ps. I missed you all!

    Reply
  18. Oh, my! I’ve missed so much! My MIL has been in hospital, very sick, so I’m just catching up but my favorites that I’ve read until I’ve had to replace them….and in no order I might add…
    Several different WW books 🙂
    Anne Gracie’s Perfect series which really is ‘perfect’.
    Karen Marie Moning’s Highlanders (Oh, geez, Adam…my number one Alpha Hero of all time!) but not her Fever series.
    A Rose in Winter by Woodiwiss (My intro to her and my favorite of hers)
    Gone with the Wind: Margaret Mitchell
    Crystal Cave (which I think I stumbled on when I was about nine, and still have!)
    Charlotte’s Web: EB White (and yes, I still ball like a baby!)
    The Madeline books by Bemelmans
    The entire Oz series: L. Frank Baum
    Several classics and my list goes on and on…
    What a great discussion!
    ps. I missed you all!

    Reply
  19. Oh, my! I’ve missed so much! My MIL has been in hospital, very sick, so I’m just catching up but my favorites that I’ve read until I’ve had to replace them….and in no order I might add…
    Several different WW books 🙂
    Anne Gracie’s Perfect series which really is ‘perfect’.
    Karen Marie Moning’s Highlanders (Oh, geez, Adam…my number one Alpha Hero of all time!) but not her Fever series.
    A Rose in Winter by Woodiwiss (My intro to her and my favorite of hers)
    Gone with the Wind: Margaret Mitchell
    Crystal Cave (which I think I stumbled on when I was about nine, and still have!)
    Charlotte’s Web: EB White (and yes, I still ball like a baby!)
    The Madeline books by Bemelmans
    The entire Oz series: L. Frank Baum
    Several classics and my list goes on and on…
    What a great discussion!
    ps. I missed you all!

    Reply
  20. Oh, my! I’ve missed so much! My MIL has been in hospital, very sick, so I’m just catching up but my favorites that I’ve read until I’ve had to replace them….and in no order I might add…
    Several different WW books 🙂
    Anne Gracie’s Perfect series which really is ‘perfect’.
    Karen Marie Moning’s Highlanders (Oh, geez, Adam…my number one Alpha Hero of all time!) but not her Fever series.
    A Rose in Winter by Woodiwiss (My intro to her and my favorite of hers)
    Gone with the Wind: Margaret Mitchell
    Crystal Cave (which I think I stumbled on when I was about nine, and still have!)
    Charlotte’s Web: EB White (and yes, I still ball like a baby!)
    The Madeline books by Bemelmans
    The entire Oz series: L. Frank Baum
    Several classics and my list goes on and on…
    What a great discussion!
    ps. I missed you all!

    Reply
  21. Some of my favorite classics:
    A Tale of Two Cities – Dickens
    Captains and Kings – Taylor Caldwell
    Rebecca – Daphne DuMaurier
    Green Darkness – Anya Seton
    Little Women – Alcott
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest – Ken Kesey
    The Time Machine – HG Wells
    Brave New World – Huxley
    Catcher in the Rye – Salinger
    Catch-22 – Joseph Heller

    Reply
  22. Some of my favorite classics:
    A Tale of Two Cities – Dickens
    Captains and Kings – Taylor Caldwell
    Rebecca – Daphne DuMaurier
    Green Darkness – Anya Seton
    Little Women – Alcott
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest – Ken Kesey
    The Time Machine – HG Wells
    Brave New World – Huxley
    Catcher in the Rye – Salinger
    Catch-22 – Joseph Heller

    Reply
  23. Some of my favorite classics:
    A Tale of Two Cities – Dickens
    Captains and Kings – Taylor Caldwell
    Rebecca – Daphne DuMaurier
    Green Darkness – Anya Seton
    Little Women – Alcott
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest – Ken Kesey
    The Time Machine – HG Wells
    Brave New World – Huxley
    Catcher in the Rye – Salinger
    Catch-22 – Joseph Heller

    Reply
  24. Some of my favorite classics:
    A Tale of Two Cities – Dickens
    Captains and Kings – Taylor Caldwell
    Rebecca – Daphne DuMaurier
    Green Darkness – Anya Seton
    Little Women – Alcott
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest – Ken Kesey
    The Time Machine – HG Wells
    Brave New World – Huxley
    Catcher in the Rye – Salinger
    Catch-22 – Joseph Heller

    Reply
  25. Some of my favorite classics:
    A Tale of Two Cities – Dickens
    Captains and Kings – Taylor Caldwell
    Rebecca – Daphne DuMaurier
    Green Darkness – Anya Seton
    Little Women – Alcott
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest – Ken Kesey
    The Time Machine – HG Wells
    Brave New World – Huxley
    Catcher in the Rye – Salinger
    Catch-22 – Joseph Heller

    Reply
  26. “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury
    “Nectar in a Sieve” by Kamala Markandaya
    “Animal Farm” by George Orwell
    “Member of the Wedding” by Carson McCullers
    “Treasure Island” by Robert Louis Stevenson
    Anything by Agatha Christie and Julie Garwood

    Reply
  27. “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury
    “Nectar in a Sieve” by Kamala Markandaya
    “Animal Farm” by George Orwell
    “Member of the Wedding” by Carson McCullers
    “Treasure Island” by Robert Louis Stevenson
    Anything by Agatha Christie and Julie Garwood

    Reply
  28. “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury
    “Nectar in a Sieve” by Kamala Markandaya
    “Animal Farm” by George Orwell
    “Member of the Wedding” by Carson McCullers
    “Treasure Island” by Robert Louis Stevenson
    Anything by Agatha Christie and Julie Garwood

    Reply
  29. “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury
    “Nectar in a Sieve” by Kamala Markandaya
    “Animal Farm” by George Orwell
    “Member of the Wedding” by Carson McCullers
    “Treasure Island” by Robert Louis Stevenson
    Anything by Agatha Christie and Julie Garwood

    Reply
  30. “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury
    “Nectar in a Sieve” by Kamala Markandaya
    “Animal Farm” by George Orwell
    “Member of the Wedding” by Carson McCullers
    “Treasure Island” by Robert Louis Stevenson
    Anything by Agatha Christie and Julie Garwood

    Reply
  31. OH! The Nine Tailors by Dorothy L Sayers…probably the only book I’ve ever read where I didn’t see the protagonist until she disclosed him.
    And you know, I’m looking at all these adult classics, and my list which for some odd reason half of which is children’s and YA and wondering what that says about me.
    I do read adult books! I read the WWs and they’re all adult (though I wonder how many will say it’s only the books that are 😉 )

    Reply
  32. OH! The Nine Tailors by Dorothy L Sayers…probably the only book I’ve ever read where I didn’t see the protagonist until she disclosed him.
    And you know, I’m looking at all these adult classics, and my list which for some odd reason half of which is children’s and YA and wondering what that says about me.
    I do read adult books! I read the WWs and they’re all adult (though I wonder how many will say it’s only the books that are 😉 )

    Reply
  33. OH! The Nine Tailors by Dorothy L Sayers…probably the only book I’ve ever read where I didn’t see the protagonist until she disclosed him.
    And you know, I’m looking at all these adult classics, and my list which for some odd reason half of which is children’s and YA and wondering what that says about me.
    I do read adult books! I read the WWs and they’re all adult (though I wonder how many will say it’s only the books that are 😉 )

    Reply
  34. OH! The Nine Tailors by Dorothy L Sayers…probably the only book I’ve ever read where I didn’t see the protagonist until she disclosed him.
    And you know, I’m looking at all these adult classics, and my list which for some odd reason half of which is children’s and YA and wondering what that says about me.
    I do read adult books! I read the WWs and they’re all adult (though I wonder how many will say it’s only the books that are 😉 )

    Reply
  35. OH! The Nine Tailors by Dorothy L Sayers…probably the only book I’ve ever read where I didn’t see the protagonist until she disclosed him.
    And you know, I’m looking at all these adult classics, and my list which for some odd reason half of which is children’s and YA and wondering what that says about me.
    I do read adult books! I read the WWs and they’re all adult (though I wonder how many will say it’s only the books that are 😉 )

    Reply
  36. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
    anything by Jane Austen
    anything by the Bronte sisters
    Newer books:
    Dreaming of You by Lisa Kleypas
    Lord of Scoundrels by Loretta Chase
    just about anything by Nora Roberts and Julia Quinn
    AND SO MANY MORE!

    Reply
  37. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
    anything by Jane Austen
    anything by the Bronte sisters
    Newer books:
    Dreaming of You by Lisa Kleypas
    Lord of Scoundrels by Loretta Chase
    just about anything by Nora Roberts and Julia Quinn
    AND SO MANY MORE!

    Reply
  38. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
    anything by Jane Austen
    anything by the Bronte sisters
    Newer books:
    Dreaming of You by Lisa Kleypas
    Lord of Scoundrels by Loretta Chase
    just about anything by Nora Roberts and Julia Quinn
    AND SO MANY MORE!

    Reply
  39. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
    anything by Jane Austen
    anything by the Bronte sisters
    Newer books:
    Dreaming of You by Lisa Kleypas
    Lord of Scoundrels by Loretta Chase
    just about anything by Nora Roberts and Julia Quinn
    AND SO MANY MORE!

    Reply
  40. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
    anything by Jane Austen
    anything by the Bronte sisters
    Newer books:
    Dreaming of You by Lisa Kleypas
    Lord of Scoundrels by Loretta Chase
    just about anything by Nora Roberts and Julia Quinn
    AND SO MANY MORE!

    Reply
  41. WordWench Classics… What fun!
    Here are a few of my favorite reads from this past year in no particular order…
    The Red Tent by Anita Diamant
    Mary Jo’s Contemporary Series (taught me so much about myself) along with Kiss of Fate, the book that put me on the path to romance.
    Loretta’s Lord of Scoundrels — A timeless example of a truly dark yet beautiful hero.
    When Christ and his Saints Slept by Sharon Penman – A huge cast of rich, robust characters wrapped around an even bigger, richer history lesson.

    Reply
  42. WordWench Classics… What fun!
    Here are a few of my favorite reads from this past year in no particular order…
    The Red Tent by Anita Diamant
    Mary Jo’s Contemporary Series (taught me so much about myself) along with Kiss of Fate, the book that put me on the path to romance.
    Loretta’s Lord of Scoundrels — A timeless example of a truly dark yet beautiful hero.
    When Christ and his Saints Slept by Sharon Penman – A huge cast of rich, robust characters wrapped around an even bigger, richer history lesson.

    Reply
  43. WordWench Classics… What fun!
    Here are a few of my favorite reads from this past year in no particular order…
    The Red Tent by Anita Diamant
    Mary Jo’s Contemporary Series (taught me so much about myself) along with Kiss of Fate, the book that put me on the path to romance.
    Loretta’s Lord of Scoundrels — A timeless example of a truly dark yet beautiful hero.
    When Christ and his Saints Slept by Sharon Penman – A huge cast of rich, robust characters wrapped around an even bigger, richer history lesson.

    Reply
  44. WordWench Classics… What fun!
    Here are a few of my favorite reads from this past year in no particular order…
    The Red Tent by Anita Diamant
    Mary Jo’s Contemporary Series (taught me so much about myself) along with Kiss of Fate, the book that put me on the path to romance.
    Loretta’s Lord of Scoundrels — A timeless example of a truly dark yet beautiful hero.
    When Christ and his Saints Slept by Sharon Penman – A huge cast of rich, robust characters wrapped around an even bigger, richer history lesson.

    Reply
  45. WordWench Classics… What fun!
    Here are a few of my favorite reads from this past year in no particular order…
    The Red Tent by Anita Diamant
    Mary Jo’s Contemporary Series (taught me so much about myself) along with Kiss of Fate, the book that put me on the path to romance.
    Loretta’s Lord of Scoundrels — A timeless example of a truly dark yet beautiful hero.
    When Christ and his Saints Slept by Sharon Penman – A huge cast of rich, robust characters wrapped around an even bigger, richer history lesson.

    Reply
  46. Oh what a great thing. I don’t know where to start.
    Anne of Green Gables books, L.M.Montgomery-I didn’t read these until I was in college and I couldn’t put them down.
    In This House of Brede, Rumer Godden-I didn’t think anyone else had ever heard of this book but I see that it is on Susan Wilbanks list as well.
    The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R.Tolkien-Every read is a fresh and new one.
    God is an Englishman, R.F.Delderfield-Read when I was in high school and loved ever since.
    Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
    A Year Down Yonder, Richard Peck-The FUNNIEST young adult book around. The audio version is a favorite of ours.
    Anything by P.G.Wodehouse
    David Copperfield, Charles Dickens-I can read this every year and still not get tired of it
    A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Betty Smith
    Two in the Far North, Margaret E. Murie-memoir of her life in the Alaskan frontier
    An Old Fashioned Girl, Louisa May Alcott
    I had better stop with 10 or I will never stop.

    Reply
  47. Oh what a great thing. I don’t know where to start.
    Anne of Green Gables books, L.M.Montgomery-I didn’t read these until I was in college and I couldn’t put them down.
    In This House of Brede, Rumer Godden-I didn’t think anyone else had ever heard of this book but I see that it is on Susan Wilbanks list as well.
    The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R.Tolkien-Every read is a fresh and new one.
    God is an Englishman, R.F.Delderfield-Read when I was in high school and loved ever since.
    Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
    A Year Down Yonder, Richard Peck-The FUNNIEST young adult book around. The audio version is a favorite of ours.
    Anything by P.G.Wodehouse
    David Copperfield, Charles Dickens-I can read this every year and still not get tired of it
    A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Betty Smith
    Two in the Far North, Margaret E. Murie-memoir of her life in the Alaskan frontier
    An Old Fashioned Girl, Louisa May Alcott
    I had better stop with 10 or I will never stop.

    Reply
  48. Oh what a great thing. I don’t know where to start.
    Anne of Green Gables books, L.M.Montgomery-I didn’t read these until I was in college and I couldn’t put them down.
    In This House of Brede, Rumer Godden-I didn’t think anyone else had ever heard of this book but I see that it is on Susan Wilbanks list as well.
    The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R.Tolkien-Every read is a fresh and new one.
    God is an Englishman, R.F.Delderfield-Read when I was in high school and loved ever since.
    Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
    A Year Down Yonder, Richard Peck-The FUNNIEST young adult book around. The audio version is a favorite of ours.
    Anything by P.G.Wodehouse
    David Copperfield, Charles Dickens-I can read this every year and still not get tired of it
    A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Betty Smith
    Two in the Far North, Margaret E. Murie-memoir of her life in the Alaskan frontier
    An Old Fashioned Girl, Louisa May Alcott
    I had better stop with 10 or I will never stop.

    Reply
  49. Oh what a great thing. I don’t know where to start.
    Anne of Green Gables books, L.M.Montgomery-I didn’t read these until I was in college and I couldn’t put them down.
    In This House of Brede, Rumer Godden-I didn’t think anyone else had ever heard of this book but I see that it is on Susan Wilbanks list as well.
    The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R.Tolkien-Every read is a fresh and new one.
    God is an Englishman, R.F.Delderfield-Read when I was in high school and loved ever since.
    Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
    A Year Down Yonder, Richard Peck-The FUNNIEST young adult book around. The audio version is a favorite of ours.
    Anything by P.G.Wodehouse
    David Copperfield, Charles Dickens-I can read this every year and still not get tired of it
    A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Betty Smith
    Two in the Far North, Margaret E. Murie-memoir of her life in the Alaskan frontier
    An Old Fashioned Girl, Louisa May Alcott
    I had better stop with 10 or I will never stop.

    Reply
  50. Oh what a great thing. I don’t know where to start.
    Anne of Green Gables books, L.M.Montgomery-I didn’t read these until I was in college and I couldn’t put them down.
    In This House of Brede, Rumer Godden-I didn’t think anyone else had ever heard of this book but I see that it is on Susan Wilbanks list as well.
    The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R.Tolkien-Every read is a fresh and new one.
    God is an Englishman, R.F.Delderfield-Read when I was in high school and loved ever since.
    Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
    A Year Down Yonder, Richard Peck-The FUNNIEST young adult book around. The audio version is a favorite of ours.
    Anything by P.G.Wodehouse
    David Copperfield, Charles Dickens-I can read this every year and still not get tired of it
    A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Betty Smith
    Two in the Far North, Margaret E. Murie-memoir of her life in the Alaskan frontier
    An Old Fashioned Girl, Louisa May Alcott
    I had better stop with 10 or I will never stop.

    Reply
  51. Some of my favorites, from then and now:
    The Hobbit & Lord of the Rings
    All of Jane Austen’s completed works
    Mara, Daughter of the Nile – Eloise Jarvis McGraw
    Red Rose, The Secret Pearl, A Promise of Spring – Mary Balogh
    These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub, The Foundling – Georgette Heyer
    The Rolling Stones – Robert A. Heinlein
    The Lord Peter/Harriet Vane stories and Murder Must Advertise – Dorothy Sayers
    All the L. Frank Baum and Ruth Plumly Thompson Oz books
    – with the John R. Neill illos!
    The Kid Stays in the Picture -Robert Evans
    As You Do – Richard Hammond
    Miss Lockharte’s Letters – Barbara Metzger
    Star Man’s Son – Andre Norton
    Earth Abides – George Stewart
    Vanity Fair – William Thackeray
    Ancient Egyptian Civilization – John R. Wilson
    Red Land, Black Land – Barbara Mertz
    The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects – Edward J Ruppelt
    “The Hounds of Heaven” – Edith Layton

    Reply
  52. Some of my favorites, from then and now:
    The Hobbit & Lord of the Rings
    All of Jane Austen’s completed works
    Mara, Daughter of the Nile – Eloise Jarvis McGraw
    Red Rose, The Secret Pearl, A Promise of Spring – Mary Balogh
    These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub, The Foundling – Georgette Heyer
    The Rolling Stones – Robert A. Heinlein
    The Lord Peter/Harriet Vane stories and Murder Must Advertise – Dorothy Sayers
    All the L. Frank Baum and Ruth Plumly Thompson Oz books
    – with the John R. Neill illos!
    The Kid Stays in the Picture -Robert Evans
    As You Do – Richard Hammond
    Miss Lockharte’s Letters – Barbara Metzger
    Star Man’s Son – Andre Norton
    Earth Abides – George Stewart
    Vanity Fair – William Thackeray
    Ancient Egyptian Civilization – John R. Wilson
    Red Land, Black Land – Barbara Mertz
    The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects – Edward J Ruppelt
    “The Hounds of Heaven” – Edith Layton

    Reply
  53. Some of my favorites, from then and now:
    The Hobbit & Lord of the Rings
    All of Jane Austen’s completed works
    Mara, Daughter of the Nile – Eloise Jarvis McGraw
    Red Rose, The Secret Pearl, A Promise of Spring – Mary Balogh
    These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub, The Foundling – Georgette Heyer
    The Rolling Stones – Robert A. Heinlein
    The Lord Peter/Harriet Vane stories and Murder Must Advertise – Dorothy Sayers
    All the L. Frank Baum and Ruth Plumly Thompson Oz books
    – with the John R. Neill illos!
    The Kid Stays in the Picture -Robert Evans
    As You Do – Richard Hammond
    Miss Lockharte’s Letters – Barbara Metzger
    Star Man’s Son – Andre Norton
    Earth Abides – George Stewart
    Vanity Fair – William Thackeray
    Ancient Egyptian Civilization – John R. Wilson
    Red Land, Black Land – Barbara Mertz
    The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects – Edward J Ruppelt
    “The Hounds of Heaven” – Edith Layton

    Reply
  54. Some of my favorites, from then and now:
    The Hobbit & Lord of the Rings
    All of Jane Austen’s completed works
    Mara, Daughter of the Nile – Eloise Jarvis McGraw
    Red Rose, The Secret Pearl, A Promise of Spring – Mary Balogh
    These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub, The Foundling – Georgette Heyer
    The Rolling Stones – Robert A. Heinlein
    The Lord Peter/Harriet Vane stories and Murder Must Advertise – Dorothy Sayers
    All the L. Frank Baum and Ruth Plumly Thompson Oz books
    – with the John R. Neill illos!
    The Kid Stays in the Picture -Robert Evans
    As You Do – Richard Hammond
    Miss Lockharte’s Letters – Barbara Metzger
    Star Man’s Son – Andre Norton
    Earth Abides – George Stewart
    Vanity Fair – William Thackeray
    Ancient Egyptian Civilization – John R. Wilson
    Red Land, Black Land – Barbara Mertz
    The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects – Edward J Ruppelt
    “The Hounds of Heaven” – Edith Layton

    Reply
  55. Some of my favorites, from then and now:
    The Hobbit & Lord of the Rings
    All of Jane Austen’s completed works
    Mara, Daughter of the Nile – Eloise Jarvis McGraw
    Red Rose, The Secret Pearl, A Promise of Spring – Mary Balogh
    These Old Shades, Devil’s Cub, The Foundling – Georgette Heyer
    The Rolling Stones – Robert A. Heinlein
    The Lord Peter/Harriet Vane stories and Murder Must Advertise – Dorothy Sayers
    All the L. Frank Baum and Ruth Plumly Thompson Oz books
    – with the John R. Neill illos!
    The Kid Stays in the Picture -Robert Evans
    As You Do – Richard Hammond
    Miss Lockharte’s Letters – Barbara Metzger
    Star Man’s Son – Andre Norton
    Earth Abides – George Stewart
    Vanity Fair – William Thackeray
    Ancient Egyptian Civilization – John R. Wilson
    Red Land, Black Land – Barbara Mertz
    The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects – Edward J Ruppelt
    “The Hounds of Heaven” – Edith Layton

    Reply
  56. Outlander, by Diana Gabaldon
    Lord of Scoundrels, by Loretta Chase
    Mr. Impossible, by Loretta Chase
    My Sweet Charlie, by David Westheimer. I’ve only read this book once, but its impact was profound. It’s not necessarily the kind of book one reads over and over.
    To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
    Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue
    Random House Dictionary of the English Language, 2nd Edition, Unabridged. Published in 1987, this is a gargantuan 13.5 pound treasure trove, including etymology.

    Reply
  57. Outlander, by Diana Gabaldon
    Lord of Scoundrels, by Loretta Chase
    Mr. Impossible, by Loretta Chase
    My Sweet Charlie, by David Westheimer. I’ve only read this book once, but its impact was profound. It’s not necessarily the kind of book one reads over and over.
    To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
    Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue
    Random House Dictionary of the English Language, 2nd Edition, Unabridged. Published in 1987, this is a gargantuan 13.5 pound treasure trove, including etymology.

    Reply
  58. Outlander, by Diana Gabaldon
    Lord of Scoundrels, by Loretta Chase
    Mr. Impossible, by Loretta Chase
    My Sweet Charlie, by David Westheimer. I’ve only read this book once, but its impact was profound. It’s not necessarily the kind of book one reads over and over.
    To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
    Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue
    Random House Dictionary of the English Language, 2nd Edition, Unabridged. Published in 1987, this is a gargantuan 13.5 pound treasure trove, including etymology.

    Reply
  59. Outlander, by Diana Gabaldon
    Lord of Scoundrels, by Loretta Chase
    Mr. Impossible, by Loretta Chase
    My Sweet Charlie, by David Westheimer. I’ve only read this book once, but its impact was profound. It’s not necessarily the kind of book one reads over and over.
    To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
    Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue
    Random House Dictionary of the English Language, 2nd Edition, Unabridged. Published in 1987, this is a gargantuan 13.5 pound treasure trove, including etymology.

    Reply
  60. Outlander, by Diana Gabaldon
    Lord of Scoundrels, by Loretta Chase
    Mr. Impossible, by Loretta Chase
    My Sweet Charlie, by David Westheimer. I’ve only read this book once, but its impact was profound. It’s not necessarily the kind of book one reads over and over.
    To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
    Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue
    Random House Dictionary of the English Language, 2nd Edition, Unabridged. Published in 1987, this is a gargantuan 13.5 pound treasure trove, including etymology.

    Reply
  61. There might be some books on my list you have never even heard of:
    Moomin books by Tove Jansson
    The Lord Peter/Harriet Vane stories by Dorothy Sayers
    Books by Agatha Christie
    Sherlock Holmes by Conan Doyle
    Howling Miller and “Sweet Poison Cooker” by Arto Paasilinna -Howling Miller and a couple of his other books have been translated in English.
    Pippi Longstocking and some other books by Astrid Lindgren.
    Dog Hill books by Mauri Kunnas
    Under Milkwood by Dylan Thomas -instead of reading this you really should hear this.
    Fantasy books by David and Leigh Eddings -you would just want the stories to go on and on… And they do!
    A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
    Books by Enid Blyton
    But do you know which book inspired both Tolkien and Longfellow?

    Reply
  62. There might be some books on my list you have never even heard of:
    Moomin books by Tove Jansson
    The Lord Peter/Harriet Vane stories by Dorothy Sayers
    Books by Agatha Christie
    Sherlock Holmes by Conan Doyle
    Howling Miller and “Sweet Poison Cooker” by Arto Paasilinna -Howling Miller and a couple of his other books have been translated in English.
    Pippi Longstocking and some other books by Astrid Lindgren.
    Dog Hill books by Mauri Kunnas
    Under Milkwood by Dylan Thomas -instead of reading this you really should hear this.
    Fantasy books by David and Leigh Eddings -you would just want the stories to go on and on… And they do!
    A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
    Books by Enid Blyton
    But do you know which book inspired both Tolkien and Longfellow?

    Reply
  63. There might be some books on my list you have never even heard of:
    Moomin books by Tove Jansson
    The Lord Peter/Harriet Vane stories by Dorothy Sayers
    Books by Agatha Christie
    Sherlock Holmes by Conan Doyle
    Howling Miller and “Sweet Poison Cooker” by Arto Paasilinna -Howling Miller and a couple of his other books have been translated in English.
    Pippi Longstocking and some other books by Astrid Lindgren.
    Dog Hill books by Mauri Kunnas
    Under Milkwood by Dylan Thomas -instead of reading this you really should hear this.
    Fantasy books by David and Leigh Eddings -you would just want the stories to go on and on… And they do!
    A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
    Books by Enid Blyton
    But do you know which book inspired both Tolkien and Longfellow?

    Reply
  64. There might be some books on my list you have never even heard of:
    Moomin books by Tove Jansson
    The Lord Peter/Harriet Vane stories by Dorothy Sayers
    Books by Agatha Christie
    Sherlock Holmes by Conan Doyle
    Howling Miller and “Sweet Poison Cooker” by Arto Paasilinna -Howling Miller and a couple of his other books have been translated in English.
    Pippi Longstocking and some other books by Astrid Lindgren.
    Dog Hill books by Mauri Kunnas
    Under Milkwood by Dylan Thomas -instead of reading this you really should hear this.
    Fantasy books by David and Leigh Eddings -you would just want the stories to go on and on… And they do!
    A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
    Books by Enid Blyton
    But do you know which book inspired both Tolkien and Longfellow?

    Reply
  65. There might be some books on my list you have never even heard of:
    Moomin books by Tove Jansson
    The Lord Peter/Harriet Vane stories by Dorothy Sayers
    Books by Agatha Christie
    Sherlock Holmes by Conan Doyle
    Howling Miller and “Sweet Poison Cooker” by Arto Paasilinna -Howling Miller and a couple of his other books have been translated in English.
    Pippi Longstocking and some other books by Astrid Lindgren.
    Dog Hill books by Mauri Kunnas
    Under Milkwood by Dylan Thomas -instead of reading this you really should hear this.
    Fantasy books by David and Leigh Eddings -you would just want the stories to go on and on… And they do!
    A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
    Books by Enid Blyton
    But do you know which book inspired both Tolkien and Longfellow?

    Reply

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