A Christmas Tree’s a Tree for A’ That

Christmas tree and womenThis is a slightly idealized version of the family Christmas tree

Joanna here, and again we're talking Christmas trees. Yesterday's post was about the many Wench trees of Christmas. Today's post is about my own trees of Christmas past.

Paper Christmas TreeWe always had full-sized trees when I was little. I've decorated a few Big Trees in my adult life. But most often it's been little trees.

Most often, in fact, it's been 'make do with what you can get'.

I remember the Christmas tree of cut-and-taped construction paper in London. That was that year they flew me in to take up work on December 24. (And sent all my luggage, including the presents, off to spend the holidays who knows where.)

I taped my paper tree to the wall. We made chains from red and blue Paper-Chain-2 and yellow construction paper. Made flat circles to be the Christmas tree balls.

We gave each other gifts we could buy at the drug store, since that was the only store open on Christmas Eve.Kriskindle mart

Julgransförsäljning_utanför_Lunds_domkyrkaIn Germany … Oh, they do Christmas trees with flair and vigor in Germany, that being more or less where the whole Christmas Tree  idea comes from.  I bought my trees from the Boy Scouts, who were very kind about putting them on top of the car. I bought hand-carved and painted decorations in the Christmas Market. I still have some of those. And I followed the local custom of buying the tree just a day or two before Christmas.

I like that idea of the tree being special for the day. I still put up and decorate my tree just ahead of the Solstice.

ChristmarktIn Paris we bought small trees. Chic urban trees. Trees you could balance precariously on the top of your wheelie shopping cart and roll home through the streets, up and down curbs and stairs. Apartment-sized trees. Trees from the town Marché, only a little larger than the huge bouquets of flowers everyone was carting around pour présenter and sold by the same deft and flattering young men.

Nigeria was to Christmas trees utterly unknown. I mean, conifers are a concept pretty much alien to the equatorial ecosystem. So we had a 'Christmas branch'. We'd swipe a fringy palm leaf from the nearest scrub brush area. This would arch in an un-Christmas-tree-like way but was pretty and satisfying unless you have the unshakabPalm branchle conviction that Christmas trees are supposed to stand up straight Nigerian angel 2. The way you do it is you put long strings on the baubles and let them hang down at artistically satisfying lengths.

In the beach market I bought lovely carved angels about two inches high made from the wood of the local thorn trees. 

Saudi Arabia was a bit of a challenge, since the sale of Christmas trees was officially forbidden. The garden shops, however, just happened to do a roaring business in potted evergreen landscape shrubs at that time of the year. The proprietor would show us to the selection way out behind the potting sheds. We'd drive around back to discreetly load up our landscape spruce in the jeep and toss a tarp over it on the way home.     

Here in the US, I've sometimes bought living trees. I'd dig a hole — or get one of the kids to dig a hole — in Christmas tree 2014 3September or October. Then pick out some baby evergreen, celebrate it for the holidays, and then plant it in the ground after the holidays. Very satisfying. Christmas tree e 2015

If I was feeling less proactive I'd take my handsaw and wander up into the woods, of which we have quite a wide selection in this part of the country, and collect a nice little conifer. Best place is some construction site, one jump ahead of the bulldozers. I would think of it as pre-recycling.

And this year, it's been a rosemary Christmas. I bought a rosemary bush and celebrated with tiny trimmings. The smell is wonderful. Just wonderful.

What's your very favorite life-affirming plant for the winter season?

80 thoughts on “A Christmas Tree’s a Tree for A’ That”

  1. I made a Christmas tree one year while living in a house during college. Took the trimmed off branches from my mom’s tree and wired them together to be “tree like”. Then hung bits and bobs of stuff since I didn’t have any ornaments. It actually looked pretty good! And even better it was cheap (always a plus in college) and smelled wonderful.

    Reply
  2. I made a Christmas tree one year while living in a house during college. Took the trimmed off branches from my mom’s tree and wired them together to be “tree like”. Then hung bits and bobs of stuff since I didn’t have any ornaments. It actually looked pretty good! And even better it was cheap (always a plus in college) and smelled wonderful.

    Reply
  3. I made a Christmas tree one year while living in a house during college. Took the trimmed off branches from my mom’s tree and wired them together to be “tree like”. Then hung bits and bobs of stuff since I didn’t have any ornaments. It actually looked pretty good! And even better it was cheap (always a plus in college) and smelled wonderful.

    Reply
  4. I made a Christmas tree one year while living in a house during college. Took the trimmed off branches from my mom’s tree and wired them together to be “tree like”. Then hung bits and bobs of stuff since I didn’t have any ornaments. It actually looked pretty good! And even better it was cheap (always a plus in college) and smelled wonderful.

    Reply
  5. I made a Christmas tree one year while living in a house during college. Took the trimmed off branches from my mom’s tree and wired them together to be “tree like”. Then hung bits and bobs of stuff since I didn’t have any ornaments. It actually looked pretty good! And even better it was cheap (always a plus in college) and smelled wonderful.

    Reply
  6. Joanna, what a wonderful world journey through Christmas tree possibilities! You get a gold star for ingenuity. *G* And I quite like your current rosemary tree! One of my favorie scents, and so small and cute. Very nice.
    I’ve always had a tree, even just a very small one in California (but it was a beautiful little blue spruce.) The most exotic I get is going between fresh and artificial for various reasons. (Love the scent of fresh, but they do shed needles everywhere at the end!)

    Reply
  7. Joanna, what a wonderful world journey through Christmas tree possibilities! You get a gold star for ingenuity. *G* And I quite like your current rosemary tree! One of my favorie scents, and so small and cute. Very nice.
    I’ve always had a tree, even just a very small one in California (but it was a beautiful little blue spruce.) The most exotic I get is going between fresh and artificial for various reasons. (Love the scent of fresh, but they do shed needles everywhere at the end!)

    Reply
  8. Joanna, what a wonderful world journey through Christmas tree possibilities! You get a gold star for ingenuity. *G* And I quite like your current rosemary tree! One of my favorie scents, and so small and cute. Very nice.
    I’ve always had a tree, even just a very small one in California (but it was a beautiful little blue spruce.) The most exotic I get is going between fresh and artificial for various reasons. (Love the scent of fresh, but they do shed needles everywhere at the end!)

    Reply
  9. Joanna, what a wonderful world journey through Christmas tree possibilities! You get a gold star for ingenuity. *G* And I quite like your current rosemary tree! One of my favorie scents, and so small and cute. Very nice.
    I’ve always had a tree, even just a very small one in California (but it was a beautiful little blue spruce.) The most exotic I get is going between fresh and artificial for various reasons. (Love the scent of fresh, but they do shed needles everywhere at the end!)

    Reply
  10. Joanna, what a wonderful world journey through Christmas tree possibilities! You get a gold star for ingenuity. *G* And I quite like your current rosemary tree! One of my favorie scents, and so small and cute. Very nice.
    I’ve always had a tree, even just a very small one in California (but it was a beautiful little blue spruce.) The most exotic I get is going between fresh and artificial for various reasons. (Love the scent of fresh, but they do shed needles everywhere at the end!)

    Reply
  11. I’ve tried to plant evergreens that were potted after Christmas but haven’t had much luck.It must be the “brown thumb.”
    In 1972, our first Christmas after we were married (extremely poor students) we went out to a lot that was about to close down on Christmas Eve and got a bargain tree, similar to that seen on “A Charlie Brown Christmas.” We had no money for ornaments so we popped popcorn and strung the popcorn and cranberries into festoons. The day after Christmas we had gotten some money so we went to a “dime store” and found some ornaments on closeout sale and purchased a couple of boxes for a starter kit. For those of you too young to remember a dime store, that is similar to the Dollar store now, without the cost inflation. Nowadays we have ornaments for each of our children and ones they made in school so decorating the tree is a trip down memory lane.

    Reply
  12. I’ve tried to plant evergreens that were potted after Christmas but haven’t had much luck.It must be the “brown thumb.”
    In 1972, our first Christmas after we were married (extremely poor students) we went out to a lot that was about to close down on Christmas Eve and got a bargain tree, similar to that seen on “A Charlie Brown Christmas.” We had no money for ornaments so we popped popcorn and strung the popcorn and cranberries into festoons. The day after Christmas we had gotten some money so we went to a “dime store” and found some ornaments on closeout sale and purchased a couple of boxes for a starter kit. For those of you too young to remember a dime store, that is similar to the Dollar store now, without the cost inflation. Nowadays we have ornaments for each of our children and ones they made in school so decorating the tree is a trip down memory lane.

    Reply
  13. I’ve tried to plant evergreens that were potted after Christmas but haven’t had much luck.It must be the “brown thumb.”
    In 1972, our first Christmas after we were married (extremely poor students) we went out to a lot that was about to close down on Christmas Eve and got a bargain tree, similar to that seen on “A Charlie Brown Christmas.” We had no money for ornaments so we popped popcorn and strung the popcorn and cranberries into festoons. The day after Christmas we had gotten some money so we went to a “dime store” and found some ornaments on closeout sale and purchased a couple of boxes for a starter kit. For those of you too young to remember a dime store, that is similar to the Dollar store now, without the cost inflation. Nowadays we have ornaments for each of our children and ones they made in school so decorating the tree is a trip down memory lane.

    Reply
  14. I’ve tried to plant evergreens that were potted after Christmas but haven’t had much luck.It must be the “brown thumb.”
    In 1972, our first Christmas after we were married (extremely poor students) we went out to a lot that was about to close down on Christmas Eve and got a bargain tree, similar to that seen on “A Charlie Brown Christmas.” We had no money for ornaments so we popped popcorn and strung the popcorn and cranberries into festoons. The day after Christmas we had gotten some money so we went to a “dime store” and found some ornaments on closeout sale and purchased a couple of boxes for a starter kit. For those of you too young to remember a dime store, that is similar to the Dollar store now, without the cost inflation. Nowadays we have ornaments for each of our children and ones they made in school so decorating the tree is a trip down memory lane.

    Reply
  15. I’ve tried to plant evergreens that were potted after Christmas but haven’t had much luck.It must be the “brown thumb.”
    In 1972, our first Christmas after we were married (extremely poor students) we went out to a lot that was about to close down on Christmas Eve and got a bargain tree, similar to that seen on “A Charlie Brown Christmas.” We had no money for ornaments so we popped popcorn and strung the popcorn and cranberries into festoons. The day after Christmas we had gotten some money so we went to a “dime store” and found some ornaments on closeout sale and purchased a couple of boxes for a starter kit. For those of you too young to remember a dime store, that is similar to the Dollar store now, without the cost inflation. Nowadays we have ornaments for each of our children and ones they made in school so decorating the tree is a trip down memory lane.

    Reply
  16. I think the potted evergreens sold at Christmas time,
    (as opposed to the landscaping plants sold at whatever time one generally puts in evergreens which I very much doubt is when the ground is frozen,)
    are not taken care of very well.
    That probably makes them hard to raise.
    From this you have figured out that my repotted plants have slight problems staying alive.
    I am so touched thinking of those young people without money to buy a Christmas tree or ornaments.

    Reply
  17. I think the potted evergreens sold at Christmas time,
    (as opposed to the landscaping plants sold at whatever time one generally puts in evergreens which I very much doubt is when the ground is frozen,)
    are not taken care of very well.
    That probably makes them hard to raise.
    From this you have figured out that my repotted plants have slight problems staying alive.
    I am so touched thinking of those young people without money to buy a Christmas tree or ornaments.

    Reply
  18. I think the potted evergreens sold at Christmas time,
    (as opposed to the landscaping plants sold at whatever time one generally puts in evergreens which I very much doubt is when the ground is frozen,)
    are not taken care of very well.
    That probably makes them hard to raise.
    From this you have figured out that my repotted plants have slight problems staying alive.
    I am so touched thinking of those young people without money to buy a Christmas tree or ornaments.

    Reply
  19. I think the potted evergreens sold at Christmas time,
    (as opposed to the landscaping plants sold at whatever time one generally puts in evergreens which I very much doubt is when the ground is frozen,)
    are not taken care of very well.
    That probably makes them hard to raise.
    From this you have figured out that my repotted plants have slight problems staying alive.
    I am so touched thinking of those young people without money to buy a Christmas tree or ornaments.

    Reply
  20. I think the potted evergreens sold at Christmas time,
    (as opposed to the landscaping plants sold at whatever time one generally puts in evergreens which I very much doubt is when the ground is frozen,)
    are not taken care of very well.
    That probably makes them hard to raise.
    From this you have figured out that my repotted plants have slight problems staying alive.
    I am so touched thinking of those young people without money to buy a Christmas tree or ornaments.

    Reply
  21. Your wired together tree with its bit and bobs sounds splendid. And inventive.
    VERY college student, which is to say — clever.
    I made a Christmas tree once long ago. It’s not listed among the others but it was lovely and memorable.
    I made a cone out of fine chicken wire and filled it with peat moss, stuffed down tightly. Then I went around a Christmas tree lot, picking up all the trimmings. Stuffed those into the cone of peat moss and voila! had myself a pretty, symmetrical tree.
    It was really most satisfying.

    Reply
  22. Your wired together tree with its bit and bobs sounds splendid. And inventive.
    VERY college student, which is to say — clever.
    I made a Christmas tree once long ago. It’s not listed among the others but it was lovely and memorable.
    I made a cone out of fine chicken wire and filled it with peat moss, stuffed down tightly. Then I went around a Christmas tree lot, picking up all the trimmings. Stuffed those into the cone of peat moss and voila! had myself a pretty, symmetrical tree.
    It was really most satisfying.

    Reply
  23. Your wired together tree with its bit and bobs sounds splendid. And inventive.
    VERY college student, which is to say — clever.
    I made a Christmas tree once long ago. It’s not listed among the others but it was lovely and memorable.
    I made a cone out of fine chicken wire and filled it with peat moss, stuffed down tightly. Then I went around a Christmas tree lot, picking up all the trimmings. Stuffed those into the cone of peat moss and voila! had myself a pretty, symmetrical tree.
    It was really most satisfying.

    Reply
  24. Your wired together tree with its bit and bobs sounds splendid. And inventive.
    VERY college student, which is to say — clever.
    I made a Christmas tree once long ago. It’s not listed among the others but it was lovely and memorable.
    I made a cone out of fine chicken wire and filled it with peat moss, stuffed down tightly. Then I went around a Christmas tree lot, picking up all the trimmings. Stuffed those into the cone of peat moss and voila! had myself a pretty, symmetrical tree.
    It was really most satisfying.

    Reply
  25. Your wired together tree with its bit and bobs sounds splendid. And inventive.
    VERY college student, which is to say — clever.
    I made a Christmas tree once long ago. It’s not listed among the others but it was lovely and memorable.
    I made a cone out of fine chicken wire and filled it with peat moss, stuffed down tightly. Then I went around a Christmas tree lot, picking up all the trimmings. Stuffed those into the cone of peat moss and voila! had myself a pretty, symmetrical tree.
    It was really most satisfying.

    Reply
  26. When I was a single working parent, I earned out living in the classroom. Teacher’s furnished trees for their classrooms and the children decorated them. Our budget didn’t extend to two trees, so when school closed for the holidays, I brought the classroom tree home. My children added their decorations to the tree (home-made plus family memories). We did manage to keep the tree up until around January 6. But INDEED there were pine needles.
    After I got a better job, we bought our own tree, just before Christmas. It was a smaller tree, because the only place to put it was on our dining table (seldom used for food, since we ate in the kitchen). One Christmas I came home from the last day at work with a bad case of flu. My mother came in to find me crying because I was too sick to go buy the tree.
    She took the children off to find a tree. Before they left the house my two older children climbed on the table. The second oldest turned out to be just shorter than the ceiling. So at the tree lot her brother tested every tree against her height; he found the perfect fit for our tree. Their grandmother was proud of their ingenuity and told the tale often.

    Reply
  27. When I was a single working parent, I earned out living in the classroom. Teacher’s furnished trees for their classrooms and the children decorated them. Our budget didn’t extend to two trees, so when school closed for the holidays, I brought the classroom tree home. My children added their decorations to the tree (home-made plus family memories). We did manage to keep the tree up until around January 6. But INDEED there were pine needles.
    After I got a better job, we bought our own tree, just before Christmas. It was a smaller tree, because the only place to put it was on our dining table (seldom used for food, since we ate in the kitchen). One Christmas I came home from the last day at work with a bad case of flu. My mother came in to find me crying because I was too sick to go buy the tree.
    She took the children off to find a tree. Before they left the house my two older children climbed on the table. The second oldest turned out to be just shorter than the ceiling. So at the tree lot her brother tested every tree against her height; he found the perfect fit for our tree. Their grandmother was proud of their ingenuity and told the tale often.

    Reply
  28. When I was a single working parent, I earned out living in the classroom. Teacher’s furnished trees for their classrooms and the children decorated them. Our budget didn’t extend to two trees, so when school closed for the holidays, I brought the classroom tree home. My children added their decorations to the tree (home-made plus family memories). We did manage to keep the tree up until around January 6. But INDEED there were pine needles.
    After I got a better job, we bought our own tree, just before Christmas. It was a smaller tree, because the only place to put it was on our dining table (seldom used for food, since we ate in the kitchen). One Christmas I came home from the last day at work with a bad case of flu. My mother came in to find me crying because I was too sick to go buy the tree.
    She took the children off to find a tree. Before they left the house my two older children climbed on the table. The second oldest turned out to be just shorter than the ceiling. So at the tree lot her brother tested every tree against her height; he found the perfect fit for our tree. Their grandmother was proud of their ingenuity and told the tale often.

    Reply
  29. When I was a single working parent, I earned out living in the classroom. Teacher’s furnished trees for their classrooms and the children decorated them. Our budget didn’t extend to two trees, so when school closed for the holidays, I brought the classroom tree home. My children added their decorations to the tree (home-made plus family memories). We did manage to keep the tree up until around January 6. But INDEED there were pine needles.
    After I got a better job, we bought our own tree, just before Christmas. It was a smaller tree, because the only place to put it was on our dining table (seldom used for food, since we ate in the kitchen). One Christmas I came home from the last day at work with a bad case of flu. My mother came in to find me crying because I was too sick to go buy the tree.
    She took the children off to find a tree. Before they left the house my two older children climbed on the table. The second oldest turned out to be just shorter than the ceiling. So at the tree lot her brother tested every tree against her height; he found the perfect fit for our tree. Their grandmother was proud of their ingenuity and told the tale often.

    Reply
  30. When I was a single working parent, I earned out living in the classroom. Teacher’s furnished trees for their classrooms and the children decorated them. Our budget didn’t extend to two trees, so when school closed for the holidays, I brought the classroom tree home. My children added their decorations to the tree (home-made plus family memories). We did manage to keep the tree up until around January 6. But INDEED there were pine needles.
    After I got a better job, we bought our own tree, just before Christmas. It was a smaller tree, because the only place to put it was on our dining table (seldom used for food, since we ate in the kitchen). One Christmas I came home from the last day at work with a bad case of flu. My mother came in to find me crying because I was too sick to go buy the tree.
    She took the children off to find a tree. Before they left the house my two older children climbed on the table. The second oldest turned out to be just shorter than the ceiling. So at the tree lot her brother tested every tree against her height; he found the perfect fit for our tree. Their grandmother was proud of their ingenuity and told the tale often.

    Reply
  31. I adore hearing Christmas tree stories from people, especially their ‘salad days’ stories. Those are the ones you tell your children and grandchildren about in later years. These are wonderful stories, ladies. I loved all of Joanna’s trees too. Remembering this one thing from our lives year after year is like seeing a flip-page diary of your whole life. A little schmaltzy yes, but true I think.
    We’ve had our tree tales to tell too, some silly some sad, all special.
    Happy New Year Wenches and all your lovely commenters.

    Reply
  32. I adore hearing Christmas tree stories from people, especially their ‘salad days’ stories. Those are the ones you tell your children and grandchildren about in later years. These are wonderful stories, ladies. I loved all of Joanna’s trees too. Remembering this one thing from our lives year after year is like seeing a flip-page diary of your whole life. A little schmaltzy yes, but true I think.
    We’ve had our tree tales to tell too, some silly some sad, all special.
    Happy New Year Wenches and all your lovely commenters.

    Reply
  33. I adore hearing Christmas tree stories from people, especially their ‘salad days’ stories. Those are the ones you tell your children and grandchildren about in later years. These are wonderful stories, ladies. I loved all of Joanna’s trees too. Remembering this one thing from our lives year after year is like seeing a flip-page diary of your whole life. A little schmaltzy yes, but true I think.
    We’ve had our tree tales to tell too, some silly some sad, all special.
    Happy New Year Wenches and all your lovely commenters.

    Reply
  34. I adore hearing Christmas tree stories from people, especially their ‘salad days’ stories. Those are the ones you tell your children and grandchildren about in later years. These are wonderful stories, ladies. I loved all of Joanna’s trees too. Remembering this one thing from our lives year after year is like seeing a flip-page diary of your whole life. A little schmaltzy yes, but true I think.
    We’ve had our tree tales to tell too, some silly some sad, all special.
    Happy New Year Wenches and all your lovely commenters.

    Reply
  35. I adore hearing Christmas tree stories from people, especially their ‘salad days’ stories. Those are the ones you tell your children and grandchildren about in later years. These are wonderful stories, ladies. I loved all of Joanna’s trees too. Remembering this one thing from our lives year after year is like seeing a flip-page diary of your whole life. A little schmaltzy yes, but true I think.
    We’ve had our tree tales to tell too, some silly some sad, all special.
    Happy New Year Wenches and all your lovely commenters.

    Reply
  36. I used to buy a large live tree, just for me. I put hundreds of lights on it, working my way out every limb. Then hauled down many boxes of decorations and made it wonderful. But then I got older. One year the tree stood in lighted but undecorated splendor the whole season … the next year it stayed naked. The next year I bought a pre-lit artificial tree …. 😀

    Reply
  37. I used to buy a large live tree, just for me. I put hundreds of lights on it, working my way out every limb. Then hauled down many boxes of decorations and made it wonderful. But then I got older. One year the tree stood in lighted but undecorated splendor the whole season … the next year it stayed naked. The next year I bought a pre-lit artificial tree …. 😀

    Reply
  38. I used to buy a large live tree, just for me. I put hundreds of lights on it, working my way out every limb. Then hauled down many boxes of decorations and made it wonderful. But then I got older. One year the tree stood in lighted but undecorated splendor the whole season … the next year it stayed naked. The next year I bought a pre-lit artificial tree …. 😀

    Reply
  39. I used to buy a large live tree, just for me. I put hundreds of lights on it, working my way out every limb. Then hauled down many boxes of decorations and made it wonderful. But then I got older. One year the tree stood in lighted but undecorated splendor the whole season … the next year it stayed naked. The next year I bought a pre-lit artificial tree …. 😀

    Reply
  40. I used to buy a large live tree, just for me. I put hundreds of lights on it, working my way out every limb. Then hauled down many boxes of decorations and made it wonderful. But then I got older. One year the tree stood in lighted but undecorated splendor the whole season … the next year it stayed naked. The next year I bought a pre-lit artificial tree …. 😀

    Reply
  41. I guess I’m mostly annoyed at the school system for coercing you into buy a tree for the class — but I know you made so many students happy.
    I actually like trees on a table. You can see them better, the cat is less likely to knock them over, and they are just the size of the second oldest.

    Reply
  42. I guess I’m mostly annoyed at the school system for coercing you into buy a tree for the class — but I know you made so many students happy.
    I actually like trees on a table. You can see them better, the cat is less likely to knock them over, and they are just the size of the second oldest.

    Reply
  43. I guess I’m mostly annoyed at the school system for coercing you into buy a tree for the class — but I know you made so many students happy.
    I actually like trees on a table. You can see them better, the cat is less likely to knock them over, and they are just the size of the second oldest.

    Reply
  44. I guess I’m mostly annoyed at the school system for coercing you into buy a tree for the class — but I know you made so many students happy.
    I actually like trees on a table. You can see them better, the cat is less likely to knock them over, and they are just the size of the second oldest.

    Reply
  45. I guess I’m mostly annoyed at the school system for coercing you into buy a tree for the class — but I know you made so many students happy.
    I actually like trees on a table. You can see them better, the cat is less likely to knock them over, and they are just the size of the second oldest.

    Reply
  46. I grew up with a variety of artificial Christmas trees. My favorite was a tabletop model made of pink feathers with tiny gold-colored ornaments. It was a gift from the elderly gentleman who employed my grandmother as a home health assistant. I was too young to remember receiving it, but every year my father would bring it down from the attic, and I would carefully remove the plastic bag used as dust cover and set it on a table in my bedroom. Every year, it lost a few feathers, until my parents eventually made me dispose of it. I still miss that tree.

    Reply
  47. I grew up with a variety of artificial Christmas trees. My favorite was a tabletop model made of pink feathers with tiny gold-colored ornaments. It was a gift from the elderly gentleman who employed my grandmother as a home health assistant. I was too young to remember receiving it, but every year my father would bring it down from the attic, and I would carefully remove the plastic bag used as dust cover and set it on a table in my bedroom. Every year, it lost a few feathers, until my parents eventually made me dispose of it. I still miss that tree.

    Reply
  48. I grew up with a variety of artificial Christmas trees. My favorite was a tabletop model made of pink feathers with tiny gold-colored ornaments. It was a gift from the elderly gentleman who employed my grandmother as a home health assistant. I was too young to remember receiving it, but every year my father would bring it down from the attic, and I would carefully remove the plastic bag used as dust cover and set it on a table in my bedroom. Every year, it lost a few feathers, until my parents eventually made me dispose of it. I still miss that tree.

    Reply
  49. I grew up with a variety of artificial Christmas trees. My favorite was a tabletop model made of pink feathers with tiny gold-colored ornaments. It was a gift from the elderly gentleman who employed my grandmother as a home health assistant. I was too young to remember receiving it, but every year my father would bring it down from the attic, and I would carefully remove the plastic bag used as dust cover and set it on a table in my bedroom. Every year, it lost a few feathers, until my parents eventually made me dispose of it. I still miss that tree.

    Reply
  50. I grew up with a variety of artificial Christmas trees. My favorite was a tabletop model made of pink feathers with tiny gold-colored ornaments. It was a gift from the elderly gentleman who employed my grandmother as a home health assistant. I was too young to remember receiving it, but every year my father would bring it down from the attic, and I would carefully remove the plastic bag used as dust cover and set it on a table in my bedroom. Every year, it lost a few feathers, until my parents eventually made me dispose of it. I still miss that tree.

    Reply
  51. It’s wonderful that objects live fresh and perfect in our memory.
    I’m old enough that quite ordinary objects I had when I was very young – books and board games, framed prints, drawings, packs of cards – seem to have somehow deteriorated into fragility. How did that happen?

    Reply
  52. It’s wonderful that objects live fresh and perfect in our memory.
    I’m old enough that quite ordinary objects I had when I was very young – books and board games, framed prints, drawings, packs of cards – seem to have somehow deteriorated into fragility. How did that happen?

    Reply
  53. It’s wonderful that objects live fresh and perfect in our memory.
    I’m old enough that quite ordinary objects I had when I was very young – books and board games, framed prints, drawings, packs of cards – seem to have somehow deteriorated into fragility. How did that happen?

    Reply
  54. It’s wonderful that objects live fresh and perfect in our memory.
    I’m old enough that quite ordinary objects I had when I was very young – books and board games, framed prints, drawings, packs of cards – seem to have somehow deteriorated into fragility. How did that happen?

    Reply
  55. It’s wonderful that objects live fresh and perfect in our memory.
    I’m old enough that quite ordinary objects I had when I was very young – books and board games, framed prints, drawings, packs of cards – seem to have somehow deteriorated into fragility. How did that happen?

    Reply

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