A Touch of Magic!

JE press 1Andrea here, musing today about making things by hand, and the tactile and visual pleasures of connecting with three dimensions in this digital age. It seems that more and more institutions of learning, from school classrooms to museums of every discipline, are recognizing the importance of object-based learning. Engaging with an actual “concrete” (okay, not literally) entity brings a subject—be it history, art, technology, the natural sciences—magically alive in ways that transcends a computer screen image or photographic reproduction.

JE press 2I recently had a wonderful first-hand experience in watching this happen. In September, I teamed up to do a special project with a professor who teaches undergraduates at my alma mater how to print on an old-fashioned printing press. It involved creating a keepsake for an alumni gathering, and as it was my bright idea to print it by hand with real type and quality paper—even though 700 copies were needed—the two of us had a LOT time to chat in the press room as we cranked out the pieces one by one. (I fell in love with letterpress printing as a freshman, and did a lot of it, so it was great fun for me to get ink on my hands again after so many years.)

Italian rare bookIn particular, Richard and I talked about our love of handmade books and ephemera, and how the meticulous craft of hand-setting type, adjusting the pressure of the paper to get just the right impression, keeping track of the ink on the rollers teaches you so many good things—patience, having an eye for detail, and an appreciation of all the little differences in texture and nuance. You really do begin to see things differently when you really pay attention to those things.

Lead typeHe also teaches a freshman seminar on the art of the printed word. The students spend half their time visiting various rare book collections, and half their time learning to handset type and print a personal project. Now, as I also serve as a freshman advisor, I’m always really interested in what the students are doing and thinking, so I was delighted when Richard asked me if I wanted to come along with the class on one of their rare book collection visits.

German rare bookThe curators have fun doing this because they know it’s meant to be a “hands-on” experience. So, when our class (there are 15 students) trooped into the study room, there were a number of treasures lying there on the tables. Each book's history and significance was explained, and then handed around, with the students encouraged to feel the different textures of the paper—and vellum! They were also allowed to thumb through the pages and take note of the illustrations, the different colors, and how they would have to be registered on a press.

DurerI got such a kick out of watching their faces, and the look of excitement as they pointed out to each other certain basics of book design and printing that they had discussed in class. To actually hold and touch incunabula (the term for books printed before 1500) and look closely at the subtle differences in shades of black ink had them mesmerized. I saw Richard light up as one of the students came over to him and began to discuss the serifs on several of the different typefaces. It makes me so pleased to think that these students will always look at a book differently—however unconsciously—from now on, appreciating all nuances, like the type styles, the proportions of the margins, the quality of the paper.

IMG_8477Some of the illustrations we saw were a Durer wood engraving (above right) for a German text, and a mezzotint of Napoleon, (left) considered to be one of the finest examples of the artform ever made, in a French legal book on the Code Napoleon . . . Really amazing stuff. It’s just the sort of experience you can’t get in digital media.

Richard also told me how fascinated the students are by the process of hand-setting type. (You have to really pay attention, as the type cases aren’t arranged alphabetically, but by how frequently a letter is used. There’s a standard layout in this country that we call the California job case. I used to have it memorized so I could set type pretty quickly, but I’m way out of practice. )

Mom's bookThey also have to create their own illustrations by cutting a design on a linoleum block,(called a lino cut), which is designed to be type high, so it can be printed. They’re a little intimidated by that, so I’m going up again next week and show them some examples of my student work, as well as some of the really cool books that my artist mother created using lino cuts. (right)

I’m having a ball working with the class, and it’s reminded me how much I like making things with my hands. (Yes, I type on a keyboard all day . . . but that’s different in the ways I just explained.) What about you? Do you like the idea of object-based learning? Do have special things that you love to make by hand?

105 thoughts on “A Touch of Magic!”

  1. The freshmen are very lucky to have you as an adviser. You are making a big difference in their lives and possibly in their career paths.

    Reply
  2. The freshmen are very lucky to have you as an adviser. You are making a big difference in their lives and possibly in their career paths.

    Reply
  3. The freshmen are very lucky to have you as an adviser. You are making a big difference in their lives and possibly in their career paths.

    Reply
  4. The freshmen are very lucky to have you as an adviser. You are making a big difference in their lives and possibly in their career paths.

    Reply
  5. The freshmen are very lucky to have you as an adviser. You are making a big difference in their lives and possibly in their career paths.

    Reply
  6. This sounds like such a wonderful experience, I am envious.
    I have never touched vellum, so that alone would make me happy. I love the smell of books and can imagine how much I would loves these old books, and the printing of them.
    I like working with my hands, but no one thing. Needlework, drawing, origami, doing wooden puzzles(more tactile that cardboard jigsaw puzzles)and gardening for the feel of the dirt. I guess feeling things in my hands is one reason I prefer to read solid books, not electronic ones.

    Reply
  7. This sounds like such a wonderful experience, I am envious.
    I have never touched vellum, so that alone would make me happy. I love the smell of books and can imagine how much I would loves these old books, and the printing of them.
    I like working with my hands, but no one thing. Needlework, drawing, origami, doing wooden puzzles(more tactile that cardboard jigsaw puzzles)and gardening for the feel of the dirt. I guess feeling things in my hands is one reason I prefer to read solid books, not electronic ones.

    Reply
  8. This sounds like such a wonderful experience, I am envious.
    I have never touched vellum, so that alone would make me happy. I love the smell of books and can imagine how much I would loves these old books, and the printing of them.
    I like working with my hands, but no one thing. Needlework, drawing, origami, doing wooden puzzles(more tactile that cardboard jigsaw puzzles)and gardening for the feel of the dirt. I guess feeling things in my hands is one reason I prefer to read solid books, not electronic ones.

    Reply
  9. This sounds like such a wonderful experience, I am envious.
    I have never touched vellum, so that alone would make me happy. I love the smell of books and can imagine how much I would loves these old books, and the printing of them.
    I like working with my hands, but no one thing. Needlework, drawing, origami, doing wooden puzzles(more tactile that cardboard jigsaw puzzles)and gardening for the feel of the dirt. I guess feeling things in my hands is one reason I prefer to read solid books, not electronic ones.

    Reply
  10. This sounds like such a wonderful experience, I am envious.
    I have never touched vellum, so that alone would make me happy. I love the smell of books and can imagine how much I would loves these old books, and the printing of them.
    I like working with my hands, but no one thing. Needlework, drawing, origami, doing wooden puzzles(more tactile that cardboard jigsaw puzzles)and gardening for the feel of the dirt. I guess feeling things in my hands is one reason I prefer to read solid books, not electronic ones.

    Reply
  11. I WANT TO TAKE THAT CLASS! This takes me back to my own art school days. Learning to set type and do letter press weren’t things I did, but many of the other classes were very hands on. As a writer, I live in my head. Petting cats is about as real world as I get. *G*

    Reply
  12. I WANT TO TAKE THAT CLASS! This takes me back to my own art school days. Learning to set type and do letter press weren’t things I did, but many of the other classes were very hands on. As a writer, I live in my head. Petting cats is about as real world as I get. *G*

    Reply
  13. I WANT TO TAKE THAT CLASS! This takes me back to my own art school days. Learning to set type and do letter press weren’t things I did, but many of the other classes were very hands on. As a writer, I live in my head. Petting cats is about as real world as I get. *G*

    Reply
  14. I WANT TO TAKE THAT CLASS! This takes me back to my own art school days. Learning to set type and do letter press weren’t things I did, but many of the other classes were very hands on. As a writer, I live in my head. Petting cats is about as real world as I get. *G*

    Reply
  15. I WANT TO TAKE THAT CLASS! This takes me back to my own art school days. Learning to set type and do letter press weren’t things I did, but many of the other classes were very hands on. As a writer, I live in my head. Petting cats is about as real world as I get. *G*

    Reply
  16. It’s amazing, Alison! I love seeing their curiosity and enthusiasm,. It reminds me to keep curious, too, and be excited by new experiences.
    I’ve seen and held old books before, but it never loses its sense of wonder. Like you, I love the smell, the textures, the typefaces of real books. I like e-books for travel, but much prfer paper for all else.
    I love all the things you do. I really think touch keeps us connected to our world in so many good ways.

    Reply
  17. It’s amazing, Alison! I love seeing their curiosity and enthusiasm,. It reminds me to keep curious, too, and be excited by new experiences.
    I’ve seen and held old books before, but it never loses its sense of wonder. Like you, I love the smell, the textures, the typefaces of real books. I like e-books for travel, but much prfer paper for all else.
    I love all the things you do. I really think touch keeps us connected to our world in so many good ways.

    Reply
  18. It’s amazing, Alison! I love seeing their curiosity and enthusiasm,. It reminds me to keep curious, too, and be excited by new experiences.
    I’ve seen and held old books before, but it never loses its sense of wonder. Like you, I love the smell, the textures, the typefaces of real books. I like e-books for travel, but much prfer paper for all else.
    I love all the things you do. I really think touch keeps us connected to our world in so many good ways.

    Reply
  19. It’s amazing, Alison! I love seeing their curiosity and enthusiasm,. It reminds me to keep curious, too, and be excited by new experiences.
    I’ve seen and held old books before, but it never loses its sense of wonder. Like you, I love the smell, the textures, the typefaces of real books. I like e-books for travel, but much prfer paper for all else.
    I love all the things you do. I really think touch keeps us connected to our world in so many good ways.

    Reply
  20. It’s amazing, Alison! I love seeing their curiosity and enthusiasm,. It reminds me to keep curious, too, and be excited by new experiences.
    I’ve seen and held old books before, but it never loses its sense of wonder. Like you, I love the smell, the textures, the typefaces of real books. I like e-books for travel, but much prfer paper for all else.
    I love all the things you do. I really think touch keeps us connected to our world in so many good ways.

    Reply
  21. Ha, ha, ha on the cats! Our make-believe worlds really do take over sometimes!
    You would LOVE the class! Hands-on stuff is SO important, especially in these e-times. I really do worry that young people are wired to the wrong things, and a sense of disconnect is causing a lot of anxiety. We all need to be more mindful of real stuff and interacting with the world around us.

    Reply
  22. Ha, ha, ha on the cats! Our make-believe worlds really do take over sometimes!
    You would LOVE the class! Hands-on stuff is SO important, especially in these e-times. I really do worry that young people are wired to the wrong things, and a sense of disconnect is causing a lot of anxiety. We all need to be more mindful of real stuff and interacting with the world around us.

    Reply
  23. Ha, ha, ha on the cats! Our make-believe worlds really do take over sometimes!
    You would LOVE the class! Hands-on stuff is SO important, especially in these e-times. I really do worry that young people are wired to the wrong things, and a sense of disconnect is causing a lot of anxiety. We all need to be more mindful of real stuff and interacting with the world around us.

    Reply
  24. Ha, ha, ha on the cats! Our make-believe worlds really do take over sometimes!
    You would LOVE the class! Hands-on stuff is SO important, especially in these e-times. I really do worry that young people are wired to the wrong things, and a sense of disconnect is causing a lot of anxiety. We all need to be more mindful of real stuff and interacting with the world around us.

    Reply
  25. Ha, ha, ha on the cats! Our make-believe worlds really do take over sometimes!
    You would LOVE the class! Hands-on stuff is SO important, especially in these e-times. I really do worry that young people are wired to the wrong things, and a sense of disconnect is causing a lot of anxiety. We all need to be more mindful of real stuff and interacting with the world around us.

    Reply
  26. What a wonderful post, Andrea, and what a great opportunity for you and the students. I’ve made some postcards and cards at a monthly art gathering I attend; that’s the height of creativity for me! Your mother’s artwork looks lovely. Thanks for sharing it.
    I’ve been trying unsuccessfully to read the text of your alumni keepsake. Can you share?

    Reply
  27. What a wonderful post, Andrea, and what a great opportunity for you and the students. I’ve made some postcards and cards at a monthly art gathering I attend; that’s the height of creativity for me! Your mother’s artwork looks lovely. Thanks for sharing it.
    I’ve been trying unsuccessfully to read the text of your alumni keepsake. Can you share?

    Reply
  28. What a wonderful post, Andrea, and what a great opportunity for you and the students. I’ve made some postcards and cards at a monthly art gathering I attend; that’s the height of creativity for me! Your mother’s artwork looks lovely. Thanks for sharing it.
    I’ve been trying unsuccessfully to read the text of your alumni keepsake. Can you share?

    Reply
  29. What a wonderful post, Andrea, and what a great opportunity for you and the students. I’ve made some postcards and cards at a monthly art gathering I attend; that’s the height of creativity for me! Your mother’s artwork looks lovely. Thanks for sharing it.
    I’ve been trying unsuccessfully to read the text of your alumni keepsake. Can you share?

    Reply
  30. What a wonderful post, Andrea, and what a great opportunity for you and the students. I’ve made some postcards and cards at a monthly art gathering I attend; that’s the height of creativity for me! Your mother’s artwork looks lovely. Thanks for sharing it.
    I’ve been trying unsuccessfully to read the text of your alumni keepsake. Can you share?

    Reply
  31. In your photography post I mentioned my uncle, the family photographer. He was also a printer, with a press in his basement. I never saw him assemble the type, but I played with the “furniture” and odd leftover bits of type all my life. I learned to read type by playing with those pieces.
    When I was working as a copyeditor in St. Louis, our primter would give tours of the printing area. It was always a fascination visit. At one such vist, after the tour, our guide said, “I have a piece of typseetting from one of your books. And pass a piece of typsesetting around the group. I happened to be sitting on his left, so was surprised when he passed the type to the right – until it reached me as the last of the group. I bufst out, “Ed, that’s not fair – its in French!’ (We were publishing a beginning French reader.) Ed had known I would be able to read the type and so kept me last to see.

    Reply
  32. In your photography post I mentioned my uncle, the family photographer. He was also a printer, with a press in his basement. I never saw him assemble the type, but I played with the “furniture” and odd leftover bits of type all my life. I learned to read type by playing with those pieces.
    When I was working as a copyeditor in St. Louis, our primter would give tours of the printing area. It was always a fascination visit. At one such vist, after the tour, our guide said, “I have a piece of typseetting from one of your books. And pass a piece of typsesetting around the group. I happened to be sitting on his left, so was surprised when he passed the type to the right – until it reached me as the last of the group. I bufst out, “Ed, that’s not fair – its in French!’ (We were publishing a beginning French reader.) Ed had known I would be able to read the type and so kept me last to see.

    Reply
  33. In your photography post I mentioned my uncle, the family photographer. He was also a printer, with a press in his basement. I never saw him assemble the type, but I played with the “furniture” and odd leftover bits of type all my life. I learned to read type by playing with those pieces.
    When I was working as a copyeditor in St. Louis, our primter would give tours of the printing area. It was always a fascination visit. At one such vist, after the tour, our guide said, “I have a piece of typseetting from one of your books. And pass a piece of typsesetting around the group. I happened to be sitting on his left, so was surprised when he passed the type to the right – until it reached me as the last of the group. I bufst out, “Ed, that’s not fair – its in French!’ (We were publishing a beginning French reader.) Ed had known I would be able to read the type and so kept me last to see.

    Reply
  34. In your photography post I mentioned my uncle, the family photographer. He was also a printer, with a press in his basement. I never saw him assemble the type, but I played with the “furniture” and odd leftover bits of type all my life. I learned to read type by playing with those pieces.
    When I was working as a copyeditor in St. Louis, our primter would give tours of the printing area. It was always a fascination visit. At one such vist, after the tour, our guide said, “I have a piece of typseetting from one of your books. And pass a piece of typsesetting around the group. I happened to be sitting on his left, so was surprised when he passed the type to the right – until it reached me as the last of the group. I bufst out, “Ed, that’s not fair – its in French!’ (We were publishing a beginning French reader.) Ed had known I would be able to read the type and so kept me last to see.

    Reply
  35. In your photography post I mentioned my uncle, the family photographer. He was also a printer, with a press in his basement. I never saw him assemble the type, but I played with the “furniture” and odd leftover bits of type all my life. I learned to read type by playing with those pieces.
    When I was working as a copyeditor in St. Louis, our primter would give tours of the printing area. It was always a fascination visit. At one such vist, after the tour, our guide said, “I have a piece of typseetting from one of your books. And pass a piece of typsesetting around the group. I happened to be sitting on his left, so was surprised when he passed the type to the right – until it reached me as the last of the group. I bufst out, “Ed, that’s not fair – its in French!’ (We were publishing a beginning French reader.) Ed had known I would be able to read the type and so kept me last to see.

    Reply
  36. I loved this post as my father apprenticed for three years as a printer and bookbinder in Germany in the mind 1930’s He loved doing this type of work and both he and my mother were artistic in their own way. I did not get that skill – other siblings did.
    I remember doing lino-cut block prints as a teen – mostly for greeting cards. As long as I was making designs rather than illustrations, they worked well. My only hand skills are knitting and free style embroidery and making cookies.

    Reply
  37. I loved this post as my father apprenticed for three years as a printer and bookbinder in Germany in the mind 1930’s He loved doing this type of work and both he and my mother were artistic in their own way. I did not get that skill – other siblings did.
    I remember doing lino-cut block prints as a teen – mostly for greeting cards. As long as I was making designs rather than illustrations, they worked well. My only hand skills are knitting and free style embroidery and making cookies.

    Reply
  38. I loved this post as my father apprenticed for three years as a printer and bookbinder in Germany in the mind 1930’s He loved doing this type of work and both he and my mother were artistic in their own way. I did not get that skill – other siblings did.
    I remember doing lino-cut block prints as a teen – mostly for greeting cards. As long as I was making designs rather than illustrations, they worked well. My only hand skills are knitting and free style embroidery and making cookies.

    Reply
  39. I loved this post as my father apprenticed for three years as a printer and bookbinder in Germany in the mind 1930’s He loved doing this type of work and both he and my mother were artistic in their own way. I did not get that skill – other siblings did.
    I remember doing lino-cut block prints as a teen – mostly for greeting cards. As long as I was making designs rather than illustrations, they worked well. My only hand skills are knitting and free style embroidery and making cookies.

    Reply
  40. I loved this post as my father apprenticed for three years as a printer and bookbinder in Germany in the mind 1930’s He loved doing this type of work and both he and my mother were artistic in their own way. I did not get that skill – other siblings did.
    I remember doing lino-cut block prints as a teen – mostly for greeting cards. As long as I was making designs rather than illustrations, they worked well. My only hand skills are knitting and free style embroidery and making cookies.

    Reply
  41. Oh, Sue, what a marvelous story about your uncle! What an amazing man. I love that you played with “furniture”. (You’re one of the few people I know who understands what that meaning in printing terms!
    How fun that you’ve enjoyed tours through the pressroom, and seeing actual. (Love the French story, too!)

    Reply
  42. Oh, Sue, what a marvelous story about your uncle! What an amazing man. I love that you played with “furniture”. (You’re one of the few people I know who understands what that meaning in printing terms!
    How fun that you’ve enjoyed tours through the pressroom, and seeing actual. (Love the French story, too!)

    Reply
  43. Oh, Sue, what a marvelous story about your uncle! What an amazing man. I love that you played with “furniture”. (You’re one of the few people I know who understands what that meaning in printing terms!
    How fun that you’ve enjoyed tours through the pressroom, and seeing actual. (Love the French story, too!)

    Reply
  44. Oh, Sue, what a marvelous story about your uncle! What an amazing man. I love that you played with “furniture”. (You’re one of the few people I know who understands what that meaning in printing terms!
    How fun that you’ve enjoyed tours through the pressroom, and seeing actual. (Love the French story, too!)

    Reply
  45. Oh, Sue, what a marvelous story about your uncle! What an amazing man. I love that you played with “furniture”. (You’re one of the few people I know who understands what that meaning in printing terms!
    How fun that you’ve enjoyed tours through the pressroom, and seeing actual. (Love the French story, too!)

    Reply
  46. How very wonderful, Margot! Thanks so much for sharing. My mother took up bookbinding,too and loved it. I think the two go hand in hand. I can well imagine that your father loved it. I could very happy puttering in a pressroom, printing and binding artistic books.
    And how cool that you’ve done linocuts.They are a lot of fun.

    Reply
  47. How very wonderful, Margot! Thanks so much for sharing. My mother took up bookbinding,too and loved it. I think the two go hand in hand. I can well imagine that your father loved it. I could very happy puttering in a pressroom, printing and binding artistic books.
    And how cool that you’ve done linocuts.They are a lot of fun.

    Reply
  48. How very wonderful, Margot! Thanks so much for sharing. My mother took up bookbinding,too and loved it. I think the two go hand in hand. I can well imagine that your father loved it. I could very happy puttering in a pressroom, printing and binding artistic books.
    And how cool that you’ve done linocuts.They are a lot of fun.

    Reply
  49. How very wonderful, Margot! Thanks so much for sharing. My mother took up bookbinding,too and loved it. I think the two go hand in hand. I can well imagine that your father loved it. I could very happy puttering in a pressroom, printing and binding artistic books.
    And how cool that you’ve done linocuts.They are a lot of fun.

    Reply
  50. How very wonderful, Margot! Thanks so much for sharing. My mother took up bookbinding,too and loved it. I think the two go hand in hand. I can well imagine that your father loved it. I could very happy puttering in a pressroom, printing and binding artistic books.
    And how cool that you’ve done linocuts.They are a lot of fun.

    Reply
  51. Thanks, Kareni! So glad you enjoyed it.
    Postcards and cards are very creative, and bring great joy to those who receive them,so it’s a VERY wonderful skill to have.
    The alumni keepsake was a facsimile of the wording on the commemorative threshold stone that was laid on the Old Campus of the university last month to honor the first women undergrads. It reads:
    In September 1969, the first women undergraduates arrived on campus. With spirit and determination, these women of the classes of 1971,1972, and 1973 transformed life and learning in Yale College.

    Reply
  52. Thanks, Kareni! So glad you enjoyed it.
    Postcards and cards are very creative, and bring great joy to those who receive them,so it’s a VERY wonderful skill to have.
    The alumni keepsake was a facsimile of the wording on the commemorative threshold stone that was laid on the Old Campus of the university last month to honor the first women undergrads. It reads:
    In September 1969, the first women undergraduates arrived on campus. With spirit and determination, these women of the classes of 1971,1972, and 1973 transformed life and learning in Yale College.

    Reply
  53. Thanks, Kareni! So glad you enjoyed it.
    Postcards and cards are very creative, and bring great joy to those who receive them,so it’s a VERY wonderful skill to have.
    The alumni keepsake was a facsimile of the wording on the commemorative threshold stone that was laid on the Old Campus of the university last month to honor the first women undergrads. It reads:
    In September 1969, the first women undergraduates arrived on campus. With spirit and determination, these women of the classes of 1971,1972, and 1973 transformed life and learning in Yale College.

    Reply
  54. Thanks, Kareni! So glad you enjoyed it.
    Postcards and cards are very creative, and bring great joy to those who receive them,so it’s a VERY wonderful skill to have.
    The alumni keepsake was a facsimile of the wording on the commemorative threshold stone that was laid on the Old Campus of the university last month to honor the first women undergrads. It reads:
    In September 1969, the first women undergraduates arrived on campus. With spirit and determination, these women of the classes of 1971,1972, and 1973 transformed life and learning in Yale College.

    Reply
  55. Thanks, Kareni! So glad you enjoyed it.
    Postcards and cards are very creative, and bring great joy to those who receive them,so it’s a VERY wonderful skill to have.
    The alumni keepsake was a facsimile of the wording on the commemorative threshold stone that was laid on the Old Campus of the university last month to honor the first women undergrads. It reads:
    In September 1969, the first women undergraduates arrived on campus. With spirit and determination, these women of the classes of 1971,1972, and 1973 transformed life and learning in Yale College.

    Reply
  56. Andrea, you mother’s lino cut book is gorgeous! I would love to learn how to print on a press. I did do some silk-screening back in college. And I love making things by hand, in fact I avoid using gadgets like a bread maker or food processor in the kitchen, because all the chopping and kneading by hand is the best part!

    Reply
  57. Andrea, you mother’s lino cut book is gorgeous! I would love to learn how to print on a press. I did do some silk-screening back in college. And I love making things by hand, in fact I avoid using gadgets like a bread maker or food processor in the kitchen, because all the chopping and kneading by hand is the best part!

    Reply
  58. Andrea, you mother’s lino cut book is gorgeous! I would love to learn how to print on a press. I did do some silk-screening back in college. And I love making things by hand, in fact I avoid using gadgets like a bread maker or food processor in the kitchen, because all the chopping and kneading by hand is the best part!

    Reply
  59. Andrea, you mother’s lino cut book is gorgeous! I would love to learn how to print on a press. I did do some silk-screening back in college. And I love making things by hand, in fact I avoid using gadgets like a bread maker or food processor in the kitchen, because all the chopping and kneading by hand is the best part!

    Reply
  60. Andrea, you mother’s lino cut book is gorgeous! I would love to learn how to print on a press. I did do some silk-screening back in college. And I love making things by hand, in fact I avoid using gadgets like a bread maker or food processor in the kitchen, because all the chopping and kneading by hand is the best part!

    Reply
  61. What a lovely post. I am not talented in anything useful. I used to do embroidery and I really liked that. Baking and cooking are things I enjoy. Creating recipes from scratch or tweaking ones I already have.
    I admire all of you who are actually able to be creative and have the talent to do things like what has been described with the printing.
    Thanks for this post.

    Reply
  62. What a lovely post. I am not talented in anything useful. I used to do embroidery and I really liked that. Baking and cooking are things I enjoy. Creating recipes from scratch or tweaking ones I already have.
    I admire all of you who are actually able to be creative and have the talent to do things like what has been described with the printing.
    Thanks for this post.

    Reply
  63. What a lovely post. I am not talented in anything useful. I used to do embroidery and I really liked that. Baking and cooking are things I enjoy. Creating recipes from scratch or tweaking ones I already have.
    I admire all of you who are actually able to be creative and have the talent to do things like what has been described with the printing.
    Thanks for this post.

    Reply
  64. What a lovely post. I am not talented in anything useful. I used to do embroidery and I really liked that. Baking and cooking are things I enjoy. Creating recipes from scratch or tweaking ones I already have.
    I admire all of you who are actually able to be creative and have the talent to do things like what has been described with the printing.
    Thanks for this post.

    Reply
  65. What a lovely post. I am not talented in anything useful. I used to do embroidery and I really liked that. Baking and cooking are things I enjoy. Creating recipes from scratch or tweaking ones I already have.
    I admire all of you who are actually able to be creative and have the talent to do things like what has been described with the printing.
    Thanks for this post.

    Reply
  66. Fascinating! My craft of choice is knitting, which is both relaxing and (at times) frustrating! I almost always have several projects going, one that is simple and mindless that I can work on at meetings and movies and such, and another more complex project. I often find there is a rhythm in the stitches as I work along. And, of course, there is a connections to all the unsung knitters of the past, for whom knitting was a necessity.

    Reply
  67. Fascinating! My craft of choice is knitting, which is both relaxing and (at times) frustrating! I almost always have several projects going, one that is simple and mindless that I can work on at meetings and movies and such, and another more complex project. I often find there is a rhythm in the stitches as I work along. And, of course, there is a connections to all the unsung knitters of the past, for whom knitting was a necessity.

    Reply
  68. Fascinating! My craft of choice is knitting, which is both relaxing and (at times) frustrating! I almost always have several projects going, one that is simple and mindless that I can work on at meetings and movies and such, and another more complex project. I often find there is a rhythm in the stitches as I work along. And, of course, there is a connections to all the unsung knitters of the past, for whom knitting was a necessity.

    Reply
  69. Fascinating! My craft of choice is knitting, which is both relaxing and (at times) frustrating! I almost always have several projects going, one that is simple and mindless that I can work on at meetings and movies and such, and another more complex project. I often find there is a rhythm in the stitches as I work along. And, of course, there is a connections to all the unsung knitters of the past, for whom knitting was a necessity.

    Reply
  70. Fascinating! My craft of choice is knitting, which is both relaxing and (at times) frustrating! I almost always have several projects going, one that is simple and mindless that I can work on at meetings and movies and such, and another more complex project. I often find there is a rhythm in the stitches as I work along. And, of course, there is a connections to all the unsung knitters of the past, for whom knitting was a necessity.

    Reply

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