A time of unrest

NovMy next book, Too Dangerous for a Lady, is set in 1817. The date is demanded by the ongoing timeline of my Company of Rogues books. They started in late 1814 (An Arranged Marriage) and so have progressed through Napoleon's return from Elba, Waterloo, and into the post-war period which was marked by economic depression and real hardship. That's often the case after wars, even for the victorious, because war is expensive and leads to massive debt, plus the high demand caused by the war machine goes away, leading to unemployment.

Some of my Rogues books are directly involved with the events of the time and some only have it as a backdrop,  (you can read more about the Rogues here) but I'm always aware of the historical timeline. Tdfalm

In 1817 things were coming to a boil. There was severe unemployment in many parts of the north where demand for cloth goods and weapons had gone way down. To add to that, the end of hostilities meant the possibility of cheaper imports from abroad. There were many small gatherings and protests, especially in the north. As a reaction, the government repealed the Habeas Corpus Act, making it possible to arrest and hold people without trial.


In March 1817 unemployed weavers from Lancashire decided to walk to London to present petitions to the Regent asking for help with employment, but also to bring back Habeas Corpus. They were each to carry a rolled up blanket, in part to use on the way but also to advertise their profession. They became known as the Blanketeers. Troops were brought in to stop them and the leaders were arrested. 

I originally wanted to use the Blanketeers March as backdrop to my story, but it wouldn't fit in a variety of ways so I invented something similar later in the year. My story isn't about the Blanketeers or the details of the reform/revolution movement, but it all plays a part. My hero is working as a sort of undercover cop, trying to stop the extremists who want to use the genuine unrest to cause a revolution as bloody as the one in France. These people aren't concerned with employment for the poor. When they gather in the King's Head Inn on the night before the planned march, they propose toasts.

 “To the King’s Head. Soon we’ll have the king’s head off on our guillotine!”

Indeed, they had a beheading machine built and stored in a warehouse in East London, so everyone had drunk to that.

Solange had added, “And the head of the monkey-faced queen and her far too many whelps.”

The woman disgusted Mark, but he drank and added,“Especially the fat Regent’s.”

“And his pampered daughter,” said Benjamin Durrant. “Before her whelp is born.”

(It's true, by the way, that one pro-revolutionary group built a guillotine, to have it to hand.)

TdflsbMy heroine, Hermione, and her family happen to be stopping for the night in the King's Head, and they wake to general alarm because a huge mob is gathering.

She, Polly, and the children made their way along the corridor and downstairs to a crowded entrance hall. They struggled in the crush even though the flow was all in one direction. It seemed everyone was fleeing, so perhaps Polly’s reaction hadn’t been overblown.

“The mob is planning to march to London,” a man said as he pushed by them in the hall. “Carrying petitions.”

“Carrying petitions!” Polly gasped, as if he’d said, “Carrying guns." "Come, come!” Polly rushed toward the innyard, carrying the baby.

“Polly!” Hermione protested to her back. She was left with two children and a valise.

But the prospects of a mob and riots are not the worst of it. Hermione has already become entangled with Mark and soon things are going to become very dangerous indeed for her.

Tdfalmemewench

How do you feel about real historical situations in historical romances?

How do you feel about authors making one up? 

It seems to me that there are a lot more spies and soldiers in Regency romances than there are people dealing with the social problems, economy and politics of the time, even though there were some true heroes there. Do spies and soldiers seem more dashing?

One commenter on this blog will get to read the adventures of Hermione and Mark before the release date of April 7th, because I'll send them an early reading copy. So have your say. I'll pick a name next Sunday.

Jo 

275 thoughts on “A time of unrest”

  1. I have always enjoyed your books and have them all. Looking forward to being royally entertained with this one also.
    Keep them coming
    Paula

    Reply
  2. I have always enjoyed your books and have them all. Looking forward to being royally entertained with this one also.
    Keep them coming
    Paula

    Reply
  3. I have always enjoyed your books and have them all. Looking forward to being royally entertained with this one also.
    Keep them coming
    Paula

    Reply
  4. I have always enjoyed your books and have them all. Looking forward to being royally entertained with this one also.
    Keep them coming
    Paula

    Reply
  5. I have always enjoyed your books and have them all. Looking forward to being royally entertained with this one also.
    Keep them coming
    Paula

    Reply
  6. I enjoy both having real events thrown in and the making up of some or using poetic license. I think real events help set the scene so to speak. I have all of Jo’s books and can’t wait to read this one

    Reply
  7. I enjoy both having real events thrown in and the making up of some or using poetic license. I think real events help set the scene so to speak. I have all of Jo’s books and can’t wait to read this one

    Reply
  8. I enjoy both having real events thrown in and the making up of some or using poetic license. I think real events help set the scene so to speak. I have all of Jo’s books and can’t wait to read this one

    Reply
  9. I enjoy both having real events thrown in and the making up of some or using poetic license. I think real events help set the scene so to speak. I have all of Jo’s books and can’t wait to read this one

    Reply
  10. I enjoy both having real events thrown in and the making up of some or using poetic license. I think real events help set the scene so to speak. I have all of Jo’s books and can’t wait to read this one

    Reply
  11. “It seems to me that there are a lot more spies and soldiers in Regency romances than there are people dealing with the social problems, economy and politics of the time, even though there were some true heroes there.”
    This is very true, and I also think it’s the case in contemporary genres, particularly romantic suspense. Lots of made-up security agencies dealing with made-up problems even though the world is full of real unrest at the moment.
    When it comes to historical romance I think it all depends on the author and how they handle it. I suppose that in order to use real events you’re going to have to work VERY hard to get the facts right. I appreciate it when it’s done well, but can also see why authors might choose to create a something different.

    Reply
  12. “It seems to me that there are a lot more spies and soldiers in Regency romances than there are people dealing with the social problems, economy and politics of the time, even though there were some true heroes there.”
    This is very true, and I also think it’s the case in contemporary genres, particularly romantic suspense. Lots of made-up security agencies dealing with made-up problems even though the world is full of real unrest at the moment.
    When it comes to historical romance I think it all depends on the author and how they handle it. I suppose that in order to use real events you’re going to have to work VERY hard to get the facts right. I appreciate it when it’s done well, but can also see why authors might choose to create a something different.

    Reply
  13. “It seems to me that there are a lot more spies and soldiers in Regency romances than there are people dealing with the social problems, economy and politics of the time, even though there were some true heroes there.”
    This is very true, and I also think it’s the case in contemporary genres, particularly romantic suspense. Lots of made-up security agencies dealing with made-up problems even though the world is full of real unrest at the moment.
    When it comes to historical romance I think it all depends on the author and how they handle it. I suppose that in order to use real events you’re going to have to work VERY hard to get the facts right. I appreciate it when it’s done well, but can also see why authors might choose to create a something different.

    Reply
  14. “It seems to me that there are a lot more spies and soldiers in Regency romances than there are people dealing with the social problems, economy and politics of the time, even though there were some true heroes there.”
    This is very true, and I also think it’s the case in contemporary genres, particularly romantic suspense. Lots of made-up security agencies dealing with made-up problems even though the world is full of real unrest at the moment.
    When it comes to historical romance I think it all depends on the author and how they handle it. I suppose that in order to use real events you’re going to have to work VERY hard to get the facts right. I appreciate it when it’s done well, but can also see why authors might choose to create a something different.

    Reply
  15. “It seems to me that there are a lot more spies and soldiers in Regency romances than there are people dealing with the social problems, economy and politics of the time, even though there were some true heroes there.”
    This is very true, and I also think it’s the case in contemporary genres, particularly romantic suspense. Lots of made-up security agencies dealing with made-up problems even though the world is full of real unrest at the moment.
    When it comes to historical romance I think it all depends on the author and how they handle it. I suppose that in order to use real events you’re going to have to work VERY hard to get the facts right. I appreciate it when it’s done well, but can also see why authors might choose to create a something different.

    Reply
  16. As long as the made-up event is believable and true to the period, I don’t have any problem with authors using one. I can imagine it would be hard to make an actual event fit into a lot of stories – you can only manipulate so many details without changing the event to something completely unrecognizable.
    Looking forward to the new book!

    Reply
  17. As long as the made-up event is believable and true to the period, I don’t have any problem with authors using one. I can imagine it would be hard to make an actual event fit into a lot of stories – you can only manipulate so many details without changing the event to something completely unrecognizable.
    Looking forward to the new book!

    Reply
  18. As long as the made-up event is believable and true to the period, I don’t have any problem with authors using one. I can imagine it would be hard to make an actual event fit into a lot of stories – you can only manipulate so many details without changing the event to something completely unrecognizable.
    Looking forward to the new book!

    Reply
  19. As long as the made-up event is believable and true to the period, I don’t have any problem with authors using one. I can imagine it would be hard to make an actual event fit into a lot of stories – you can only manipulate so many details without changing the event to something completely unrecognizable.
    Looking forward to the new book!

    Reply
  20. As long as the made-up event is believable and true to the period, I don’t have any problem with authors using one. I can imagine it would be hard to make an actual event fit into a lot of stories – you can only manipulate so many details without changing the event to something completely unrecognizable.
    Looking forward to the new book!

    Reply
  21. Funny. My first thought was about the date. I thought, “Too bad she didn’t do 1817 and could release it on the day that starts the book. ” Then there was your explanation. Funny that you would feel the need to justify your choice.
    I love free stuff.

    Reply
  22. Funny. My first thought was about the date. I thought, “Too bad she didn’t do 1817 and could release it on the day that starts the book. ” Then there was your explanation. Funny that you would feel the need to justify your choice.
    I love free stuff.

    Reply
  23. Funny. My first thought was about the date. I thought, “Too bad she didn’t do 1817 and could release it on the day that starts the book. ” Then there was your explanation. Funny that you would feel the need to justify your choice.
    I love free stuff.

    Reply
  24. Funny. My first thought was about the date. I thought, “Too bad she didn’t do 1817 and could release it on the day that starts the book. ” Then there was your explanation. Funny that you would feel the need to justify your choice.
    I love free stuff.

    Reply
  25. Funny. My first thought was about the date. I thought, “Too bad she didn’t do 1817 and could release it on the day that starts the book. ” Then there was your explanation. Funny that you would feel the need to justify your choice.
    I love free stuff.

    Reply
  26. I enjoy reading about the spies and soldiers in the novels as it at a certain level of drama to the story. The history events that re mentioned or referred to makes me want to read more about the true history. I have all of Jo’s novels and enjoy reading the over again. I love the way she continues to use characters throughout the series. I always look forward to the next book and how the series will progress.

    Reply
  27. I enjoy reading about the spies and soldiers in the novels as it at a certain level of drama to the story. The history events that re mentioned or referred to makes me want to read more about the true history. I have all of Jo’s novels and enjoy reading the over again. I love the way she continues to use characters throughout the series. I always look forward to the next book and how the series will progress.

    Reply
  28. I enjoy reading about the spies and soldiers in the novels as it at a certain level of drama to the story. The history events that re mentioned or referred to makes me want to read more about the true history. I have all of Jo’s novels and enjoy reading the over again. I love the way she continues to use characters throughout the series. I always look forward to the next book and how the series will progress.

    Reply
  29. I enjoy reading about the spies and soldiers in the novels as it at a certain level of drama to the story. The history events that re mentioned or referred to makes me want to read more about the true history. I have all of Jo’s novels and enjoy reading the over again. I love the way she continues to use characters throughout the series. I always look forward to the next book and how the series will progress.

    Reply
  30. I enjoy reading about the spies and soldiers in the novels as it at a certain level of drama to the story. The history events that re mentioned or referred to makes me want to read more about the true history. I have all of Jo’s novels and enjoy reading the over again. I love the way she continues to use characters throughout the series. I always look forward to the next book and how the series will progress.

    Reply
  31. Yes, it would have been interesting to track the years, wouldn’t it? Last year — 2014 — was the same calendar as 1817, but we’ve slid one day off now. March 2nd was a Sunday.

    Reply
  32. Yes, it would have been interesting to track the years, wouldn’t it? Last year — 2014 — was the same calendar as 1817, but we’ve slid one day off now. March 2nd was a Sunday.

    Reply
  33. Yes, it would have been interesting to track the years, wouldn’t it? Last year — 2014 — was the same calendar as 1817, but we’ve slid one day off now. March 2nd was a Sunday.

    Reply
  34. Yes, it would have been interesting to track the years, wouldn’t it? Last year — 2014 — was the same calendar as 1817, but we’ve slid one day off now. March 2nd was a Sunday.

    Reply
  35. Yes, it would have been interesting to track the years, wouldn’t it? Last year — 2014 — was the same calendar as 1817, but we’ve slid one day off now. March 2nd was a Sunday.

    Reply
  36. To put your characters into the middle of an actual historic event is full of possible problems.It is probably easier if the event is extremely well known -such as Waterloo but with lesser known events if the characters need to be physically involved a side reference to the real happenings and a fictional occurance for the book sounds sensible to me.Your characters can then do what you want them to -hopefully .

    Reply
  37. To put your characters into the middle of an actual historic event is full of possible problems.It is probably easier if the event is extremely well known -such as Waterloo but with lesser known events if the characters need to be physically involved a side reference to the real happenings and a fictional occurance for the book sounds sensible to me.Your characters can then do what you want them to -hopefully .

    Reply
  38. To put your characters into the middle of an actual historic event is full of possible problems.It is probably easier if the event is extremely well known -such as Waterloo but with lesser known events if the characters need to be physically involved a side reference to the real happenings and a fictional occurance for the book sounds sensible to me.Your characters can then do what you want them to -hopefully .

    Reply
  39. To put your characters into the middle of an actual historic event is full of possible problems.It is probably easier if the event is extremely well known -such as Waterloo but with lesser known events if the characters need to be physically involved a side reference to the real happenings and a fictional occurance for the book sounds sensible to me.Your characters can then do what you want them to -hopefully .

    Reply
  40. To put your characters into the middle of an actual historic event is full of possible problems.It is probably easier if the event is extremely well known -such as Waterloo but with lesser known events if the characters need to be physically involved a side reference to the real happenings and a fictional occurance for the book sounds sensible to me.Your characters can then do what you want them to -hopefully .

    Reply
  41. I enjoy historical events, characters, and issues to add life and depth to historical romance. As to the spies and soldiers in historical romance, I would point out that some of the current popular movies include American Sniper and Kingsman, a soldier and spies.

    Reply
  42. I enjoy historical events, characters, and issues to add life and depth to historical romance. As to the spies and soldiers in historical romance, I would point out that some of the current popular movies include American Sniper and Kingsman, a soldier and spies.

    Reply
  43. I enjoy historical events, characters, and issues to add life and depth to historical romance. As to the spies and soldiers in historical romance, I would point out that some of the current popular movies include American Sniper and Kingsman, a soldier and spies.

    Reply
  44. I enjoy historical events, characters, and issues to add life and depth to historical romance. As to the spies and soldiers in historical romance, I would point out that some of the current popular movies include American Sniper and Kingsman, a soldier and spies.

    Reply
  45. I enjoy historical events, characters, and issues to add life and depth to historical romance. As to the spies and soldiers in historical romance, I would point out that some of the current popular movies include American Sniper and Kingsman, a soldier and spies.

    Reply
  46. I enjoy the historical events but the pragmatist in me always thinks, “Did that really happen?” Which is why I really love the Author’s Notes that explain which events are real and give more context. I love books where I am entertained and also learn something.

    Reply
  47. I enjoy the historical events but the pragmatist in me always thinks, “Did that really happen?” Which is why I really love the Author’s Notes that explain which events are real and give more context. I love books where I am entertained and also learn something.

    Reply
  48. I enjoy the historical events but the pragmatist in me always thinks, “Did that really happen?” Which is why I really love the Author’s Notes that explain which events are real and give more context. I love books where I am entertained and also learn something.

    Reply
  49. I enjoy the historical events but the pragmatist in me always thinks, “Did that really happen?” Which is why I really love the Author’s Notes that explain which events are real and give more context. I love books where I am entertained and also learn something.

    Reply
  50. I enjoy the historical events but the pragmatist in me always thinks, “Did that really happen?” Which is why I really love the Author’s Notes that explain which events are real and give more context. I love books where I am entertained and also learn something.

    Reply
  51. The first time I fell in love with a book, it was a historical romance. It makes everything so much more exciting for me . The history comes alive with the characters and their dialogue and costumes, and the author’s descriptions. And the romance adds that special oomph, spice and flavor, and integrity to the history of the event. I do prefer the real ones rather than the ” author created” ones. But that’s just me. However, historical or not, your books are fascinating!

    Reply
  52. The first time I fell in love with a book, it was a historical romance. It makes everything so much more exciting for me . The history comes alive with the characters and their dialogue and costumes, and the author’s descriptions. And the romance adds that special oomph, spice and flavor, and integrity to the history of the event. I do prefer the real ones rather than the ” author created” ones. But that’s just me. However, historical or not, your books are fascinating!

    Reply
  53. The first time I fell in love with a book, it was a historical romance. It makes everything so much more exciting for me . The history comes alive with the characters and their dialogue and costumes, and the author’s descriptions. And the romance adds that special oomph, spice and flavor, and integrity to the history of the event. I do prefer the real ones rather than the ” author created” ones. But that’s just me. However, historical or not, your books are fascinating!

    Reply
  54. The first time I fell in love with a book, it was a historical romance. It makes everything so much more exciting for me . The history comes alive with the characters and their dialogue and costumes, and the author’s descriptions. And the romance adds that special oomph, spice and flavor, and integrity to the history of the event. I do prefer the real ones rather than the ” author created” ones. But that’s just me. However, historical or not, your books are fascinating!

    Reply
  55. The first time I fell in love with a book, it was a historical romance. It makes everything so much more exciting for me . The history comes alive with the characters and their dialogue and costumes, and the author’s descriptions. And the romance adds that special oomph, spice and flavor, and integrity to the history of the event. I do prefer the real ones rather than the ” author created” ones. But that’s just me. However, historical or not, your books are fascinating!

    Reply
  56. I love encountering real (interesting!) people and places in historical lit, especially Regencies. Whether it’s the author’s take on Prinny or Brummell, or a famous courtesan like Grace Elliott, or an inn in Bristol or on the the Great North Road, I learn something new about the period. And since I’ve moved mainly to ebooks, I can flick a finger and check him/her/it out via Wikipedia or Google. Sometimes I go so far down the Wiki rabbit hole, from one entry to another, I suddenly realize I’ve spent half an hour or more on “research”! And miracle of modern miracles, another finger flick and I’m right back to my reading. Of course, that puts the pressure on authors to get it right (or explain why they deviated, which is okay with me, too). So bring on the true history, the more the better.

    Reply
  57. I love encountering real (interesting!) people and places in historical lit, especially Regencies. Whether it’s the author’s take on Prinny or Brummell, or a famous courtesan like Grace Elliott, or an inn in Bristol or on the the Great North Road, I learn something new about the period. And since I’ve moved mainly to ebooks, I can flick a finger and check him/her/it out via Wikipedia or Google. Sometimes I go so far down the Wiki rabbit hole, from one entry to another, I suddenly realize I’ve spent half an hour or more on “research”! And miracle of modern miracles, another finger flick and I’m right back to my reading. Of course, that puts the pressure on authors to get it right (or explain why they deviated, which is okay with me, too). So bring on the true history, the more the better.

    Reply
  58. I love encountering real (interesting!) people and places in historical lit, especially Regencies. Whether it’s the author’s take on Prinny or Brummell, or a famous courtesan like Grace Elliott, or an inn in Bristol or on the the Great North Road, I learn something new about the period. And since I’ve moved mainly to ebooks, I can flick a finger and check him/her/it out via Wikipedia or Google. Sometimes I go so far down the Wiki rabbit hole, from one entry to another, I suddenly realize I’ve spent half an hour or more on “research”! And miracle of modern miracles, another finger flick and I’m right back to my reading. Of course, that puts the pressure on authors to get it right (or explain why they deviated, which is okay with me, too). So bring on the true history, the more the better.

    Reply
  59. I love encountering real (interesting!) people and places in historical lit, especially Regencies. Whether it’s the author’s take on Prinny or Brummell, or a famous courtesan like Grace Elliott, or an inn in Bristol or on the the Great North Road, I learn something new about the period. And since I’ve moved mainly to ebooks, I can flick a finger and check him/her/it out via Wikipedia or Google. Sometimes I go so far down the Wiki rabbit hole, from one entry to another, I suddenly realize I’ve spent half an hour or more on “research”! And miracle of modern miracles, another finger flick and I’m right back to my reading. Of course, that puts the pressure on authors to get it right (or explain why they deviated, which is okay with me, too). So bring on the true history, the more the better.

    Reply
  60. I love encountering real (interesting!) people and places in historical lit, especially Regencies. Whether it’s the author’s take on Prinny or Brummell, or a famous courtesan like Grace Elliott, or an inn in Bristol or on the the Great North Road, I learn something new about the period. And since I’ve moved mainly to ebooks, I can flick a finger and check him/her/it out via Wikipedia or Google. Sometimes I go so far down the Wiki rabbit hole, from one entry to another, I suddenly realize I’ve spent half an hour or more on “research”! And miracle of modern miracles, another finger flick and I’m right back to my reading. Of course, that puts the pressure on authors to get it right (or explain why they deviated, which is okay with me, too). So bring on the true history, the more the better.

    Reply
  61. I like it when a real historical event is used as a backdrop for an historical romance, but the major historical facts need to be correct – or at least an explanation of why things may have been altered. Similarly, if an event is purely fictitious, then I like to be informed. I always read the author’s notes. For major events, like Waterloo, there was so much happening that there is scope for vignettes involving fictitious characters.
    Love your books – especially the “Rogues”. Also like the way you maintain the continuity of characters and time lines. Not all authors manage this, which is not necessarily apparent when each book is read alone. I like to read a series back to back and then these discrepancies become apparent. Can’t wait for the new book -will reread the Rogues while I wait.

    Reply
  62. I like it when a real historical event is used as a backdrop for an historical romance, but the major historical facts need to be correct – or at least an explanation of why things may have been altered. Similarly, if an event is purely fictitious, then I like to be informed. I always read the author’s notes. For major events, like Waterloo, there was so much happening that there is scope for vignettes involving fictitious characters.
    Love your books – especially the “Rogues”. Also like the way you maintain the continuity of characters and time lines. Not all authors manage this, which is not necessarily apparent when each book is read alone. I like to read a series back to back and then these discrepancies become apparent. Can’t wait for the new book -will reread the Rogues while I wait.

    Reply
  63. I like it when a real historical event is used as a backdrop for an historical romance, but the major historical facts need to be correct – or at least an explanation of why things may have been altered. Similarly, if an event is purely fictitious, then I like to be informed. I always read the author’s notes. For major events, like Waterloo, there was so much happening that there is scope for vignettes involving fictitious characters.
    Love your books – especially the “Rogues”. Also like the way you maintain the continuity of characters and time lines. Not all authors manage this, which is not necessarily apparent when each book is read alone. I like to read a series back to back and then these discrepancies become apparent. Can’t wait for the new book -will reread the Rogues while I wait.

    Reply
  64. I like it when a real historical event is used as a backdrop for an historical romance, but the major historical facts need to be correct – or at least an explanation of why things may have been altered. Similarly, if an event is purely fictitious, then I like to be informed. I always read the author’s notes. For major events, like Waterloo, there was so much happening that there is scope for vignettes involving fictitious characters.
    Love your books – especially the “Rogues”. Also like the way you maintain the continuity of characters and time lines. Not all authors manage this, which is not necessarily apparent when each book is read alone. I like to read a series back to back and then these discrepancies become apparent. Can’t wait for the new book -will reread the Rogues while I wait.

    Reply
  65. I like it when a real historical event is used as a backdrop for an historical romance, but the major historical facts need to be correct – or at least an explanation of why things may have been altered. Similarly, if an event is purely fictitious, then I like to be informed. I always read the author’s notes. For major events, like Waterloo, there was so much happening that there is scope for vignettes involving fictitious characters.
    Love your books – especially the “Rogues”. Also like the way you maintain the continuity of characters and time lines. Not all authors manage this, which is not necessarily apparent when each book is read alone. I like to read a series back to back and then these discrepancies become apparent. Can’t wait for the new book -will reread the Rogues while I wait.

    Reply
  66. As so many of the others have said, as long as the event is plausible and possible in the time period– it suits me fine. Still, I wouldn’t go for a second even tlike Peterloo but there were a sufficient number of smaller groups plotting various things to make the plot reasonable

    Reply
  67. As so many of the others have said, as long as the event is plausible and possible in the time period– it suits me fine. Still, I wouldn’t go for a second even tlike Peterloo but there were a sufficient number of smaller groups plotting various things to make the plot reasonable

    Reply
  68. As so many of the others have said, as long as the event is plausible and possible in the time period– it suits me fine. Still, I wouldn’t go for a second even tlike Peterloo but there were a sufficient number of smaller groups plotting various things to make the plot reasonable

    Reply
  69. As so many of the others have said, as long as the event is plausible and possible in the time period– it suits me fine. Still, I wouldn’t go for a second even tlike Peterloo but there were a sufficient number of smaller groups plotting various things to make the plot reasonable

    Reply
  70. As so many of the others have said, as long as the event is plausible and possible in the time period– it suits me fine. Still, I wouldn’t go for a second even tlike Peterloo but there were a sufficient number of smaller groups plotting various things to make the plot reasonable

    Reply
  71. I certainly don’t mind seeing real historical situations in historical romances. Though after seeing Tony Robinson’s Gods and Monsters recently, some of the historical romances I’ve been reading, including the ones set in 1800s, seem quite sanitized to me now.
    I have no problem with authors making up events. If I did, I wouldn’t read steampunk, either.

    Reply
  72. I certainly don’t mind seeing real historical situations in historical romances. Though after seeing Tony Robinson’s Gods and Monsters recently, some of the historical romances I’ve been reading, including the ones set in 1800s, seem quite sanitized to me now.
    I have no problem with authors making up events. If I did, I wouldn’t read steampunk, either.

    Reply
  73. I certainly don’t mind seeing real historical situations in historical romances. Though after seeing Tony Robinson’s Gods and Monsters recently, some of the historical romances I’ve been reading, including the ones set in 1800s, seem quite sanitized to me now.
    I have no problem with authors making up events. If I did, I wouldn’t read steampunk, either.

    Reply
  74. I certainly don’t mind seeing real historical situations in historical romances. Though after seeing Tony Robinson’s Gods and Monsters recently, some of the historical romances I’ve been reading, including the ones set in 1800s, seem quite sanitized to me now.
    I have no problem with authors making up events. If I did, I wouldn’t read steampunk, either.

    Reply
  75. I certainly don’t mind seeing real historical situations in historical romances. Though after seeing Tony Robinson’s Gods and Monsters recently, some of the historical romances I’ve been reading, including the ones set in 1800s, seem quite sanitized to me now.
    I have no problem with authors making up events. If I did, I wouldn’t read steampunk, either.

    Reply
  76. It’s great if something that really happened can be worked into a story, but not if it doesn’t fit well. I find most authors are good are taking the gist of something real and slotting it into a story.

    Reply
  77. It’s great if something that really happened can be worked into a story, but not if it doesn’t fit well. I find most authors are good are taking the gist of something real and slotting it into a story.

    Reply
  78. It’s great if something that really happened can be worked into a story, but not if it doesn’t fit well. I find most authors are good are taking the gist of something real and slotting it into a story.

    Reply
  79. It’s great if something that really happened can be worked into a story, but not if it doesn’t fit well. I find most authors are good are taking the gist of something real and slotting it into a story.

    Reply
  80. It’s great if something that really happened can be worked into a story, but not if it doesn’t fit well. I find most authors are good are taking the gist of something real and slotting it into a story.

    Reply
  81. I like bits of actual history so I can research for more information for more when I’m interested. I am intrigued to learn more about Napoleon and his era thru different regency books therefore I research the things that interest me.
    I don’t mind a made up historical event for a storyline as long as I know it didn’t actually happen. You have always told your readers the facts and fiction of your books. Thank you for that.

    Reply
  82. I like bits of actual history so I can research for more information for more when I’m interested. I am intrigued to learn more about Napoleon and his era thru different regency books therefore I research the things that interest me.
    I don’t mind a made up historical event for a storyline as long as I know it didn’t actually happen. You have always told your readers the facts and fiction of your books. Thank you for that.

    Reply
  83. I like bits of actual history so I can research for more information for more when I’m interested. I am intrigued to learn more about Napoleon and his era thru different regency books therefore I research the things that interest me.
    I don’t mind a made up historical event for a storyline as long as I know it didn’t actually happen. You have always told your readers the facts and fiction of your books. Thank you for that.

    Reply
  84. I like bits of actual history so I can research for more information for more when I’m interested. I am intrigued to learn more about Napoleon and his era thru different regency books therefore I research the things that interest me.
    I don’t mind a made up historical event for a storyline as long as I know it didn’t actually happen. You have always told your readers the facts and fiction of your books. Thank you for that.

    Reply
  85. I like bits of actual history so I can research for more information for more when I’m interested. I am intrigued to learn more about Napoleon and his era thru different regency books therefore I research the things that interest me.
    I don’t mind a made up historical event for a storyline as long as I know it didn’t actually happen. You have always told your readers the facts and fiction of your books. Thank you for that.

    Reply
  86. It’s true that a fictional event lets characters do what we want them to do. Sometimes, however, real events leave holes. It’s rare that one has been recorded in its entirety without at the least uncertainty about quite why something happened.
    That’s where a lucky author can slide in. 🙂

    Reply
  87. It’s true that a fictional event lets characters do what we want them to do. Sometimes, however, real events leave holes. It’s rare that one has been recorded in its entirety without at the least uncertainty about quite why something happened.
    That’s where a lucky author can slide in. 🙂

    Reply
  88. It’s true that a fictional event lets characters do what we want them to do. Sometimes, however, real events leave holes. It’s rare that one has been recorded in its entirety without at the least uncertainty about quite why something happened.
    That’s where a lucky author can slide in. 🙂

    Reply
  89. It’s true that a fictional event lets characters do what we want them to do. Sometimes, however, real events leave holes. It’s rare that one has been recorded in its entirety without at the least uncertainty about quite why something happened.
    That’s where a lucky author can slide in. 🙂

    Reply
  90. It’s true that a fictional event lets characters do what we want them to do. Sometimes, however, real events leave holes. It’s rare that one has been recorded in its entirety without at the least uncertainty about quite why something happened.
    That’s where a lucky author can slide in. 🙂

    Reply
  91. That’s true, Shannon. Soldiers and spies, and often the two combined, are a popular character type. I do wonder why, however. We might regard our soldiers as heroic, but do we regard all soldiers as such? Spying is necessary, but it’s rarely regarded as an honorable profession.
    Human psychology is never logical, is it?

    Reply
  92. That’s true, Shannon. Soldiers and spies, and often the two combined, are a popular character type. I do wonder why, however. We might regard our soldiers as heroic, but do we regard all soldiers as such? Spying is necessary, but it’s rarely regarded as an honorable profession.
    Human psychology is never logical, is it?

    Reply
  93. That’s true, Shannon. Soldiers and spies, and often the two combined, are a popular character type. I do wonder why, however. We might regard our soldiers as heroic, but do we regard all soldiers as such? Spying is necessary, but it’s rarely regarded as an honorable profession.
    Human psychology is never logical, is it?

    Reply
  94. That’s true, Shannon. Soldiers and spies, and often the two combined, are a popular character type. I do wonder why, however. We might regard our soldiers as heroic, but do we regard all soldiers as such? Spying is necessary, but it’s rarely regarded as an honorable profession.
    Human psychology is never logical, is it?

    Reply
  95. That’s true, Shannon. Soldiers and spies, and often the two combined, are a popular character type. I do wonder why, however. We might regard our soldiers as heroic, but do we regard all soldiers as such? Spying is necessary, but it’s rarely regarded as an honorable profession.
    Human psychology is never logical, is it?

    Reply
  96. Mary, you’ve probably sent chills down some authors’ spines with that instant checking. I agree, however, that it’s great. It also makes research easier than it used to be.

    Reply
  97. Mary, you’ve probably sent chills down some authors’ spines with that instant checking. I agree, however, that it’s great. It also makes research easier than it used to be.

    Reply
  98. Mary, you’ve probably sent chills down some authors’ spines with that instant checking. I agree, however, that it’s great. It also makes research easier than it used to be.

    Reply
  99. Mary, you’ve probably sent chills down some authors’ spines with that instant checking. I agree, however, that it’s great. It also makes research easier than it used to be.

    Reply
  100. Mary, you’ve probably sent chills down some authors’ spines with that instant checking. I agree, however, that it’s great. It also makes research easier than it used to be.

    Reply
  101. Carolyn, I’m glad you enjoy the continuity in the Rogues and Mallorens. It takes a lot of work, and I sometimes slip up, but it makes the whole world more real for me.
    I do sometimes worry a bit about the readers who goes through the whole 15 Rogues books in a short period, wondering how that comes across when they’ve been written over decades, but it seems to work as best I can tell.

    Reply
  102. Carolyn, I’m glad you enjoy the continuity in the Rogues and Mallorens. It takes a lot of work, and I sometimes slip up, but it makes the whole world more real for me.
    I do sometimes worry a bit about the readers who goes through the whole 15 Rogues books in a short period, wondering how that comes across when they’ve been written over decades, but it seems to work as best I can tell.

    Reply
  103. Carolyn, I’m glad you enjoy the continuity in the Rogues and Mallorens. It takes a lot of work, and I sometimes slip up, but it makes the whole world more real for me.
    I do sometimes worry a bit about the readers who goes through the whole 15 Rogues books in a short period, wondering how that comes across when they’ve been written over decades, but it seems to work as best I can tell.

    Reply
  104. Carolyn, I’m glad you enjoy the continuity in the Rogues and Mallorens. It takes a lot of work, and I sometimes slip up, but it makes the whole world more real for me.
    I do sometimes worry a bit about the readers who goes through the whole 15 Rogues books in a short period, wondering how that comes across when they’ve been written over decades, but it seems to work as best I can tell.

    Reply
  105. Carolyn, I’m glad you enjoy the continuity in the Rogues and Mallorens. It takes a lot of work, and I sometimes slip up, but it makes the whole world more real for me.
    I do sometimes worry a bit about the readers who goes through the whole 15 Rogues books in a short period, wondering how that comes across when they’ve been written over decades, but it seems to work as best I can tell.

    Reply
  106. I agree, Nancy. It wouldn’t do to create a new version of such a major event because it would have to have lasting effects on the fictional world, which would drag the whole thing into alternate history.

    Reply
  107. I agree, Nancy. It wouldn’t do to create a new version of such a major event because it would have to have lasting effects on the fictional world, which would drag the whole thing into alternate history.

    Reply
  108. I agree, Nancy. It wouldn’t do to create a new version of such a major event because it would have to have lasting effects on the fictional world, which would drag the whole thing into alternate history.

    Reply
  109. I agree, Nancy. It wouldn’t do to create a new version of such a major event because it would have to have lasting effects on the fictional world, which would drag the whole thing into alternate history.

    Reply
  110. I agree, Nancy. It wouldn’t do to create a new version of such a major event because it would have to have lasting effects on the fictional world, which would drag the whole thing into alternate history.

    Reply
  111. I think perhaps he was over-dramatic,but that was the point of the programme. I agree that most historical romances are sanitized to an extent and as I reader I don’t mind. I don’t want the grim side of life in that sort of reading.

    Reply
  112. I think perhaps he was over-dramatic,but that was the point of the programme. I agree that most historical romances are sanitized to an extent and as I reader I don’t mind. I don’t want the grim side of life in that sort of reading.

    Reply
  113. I think perhaps he was over-dramatic,but that was the point of the programme. I agree that most historical romances are sanitized to an extent and as I reader I don’t mind. I don’t want the grim side of life in that sort of reading.

    Reply
  114. I think perhaps he was over-dramatic,but that was the point of the programme. I agree that most historical romances are sanitized to an extent and as I reader I don’t mind. I don’t want the grim side of life in that sort of reading.

    Reply
  115. I think perhaps he was over-dramatic,but that was the point of the programme. I agree that most historical romances are sanitized to an extent and as I reader I don’t mind. I don’t want the grim side of life in that sort of reading.

    Reply
  116. What a fascinating novel which would be greatly enjoyed. A historical which sounds intriguing and unforgettable. Your books are a delight. best wishes on this release and many more successes.

    Reply
  117. What a fascinating novel which would be greatly enjoyed. A historical which sounds intriguing and unforgettable. Your books are a delight. best wishes on this release and many more successes.

    Reply
  118. What a fascinating novel which would be greatly enjoyed. A historical which sounds intriguing and unforgettable. Your books are a delight. best wishes on this release and many more successes.

    Reply
  119. What a fascinating novel which would be greatly enjoyed. A historical which sounds intriguing and unforgettable. Your books are a delight. best wishes on this release and many more successes.

    Reply
  120. What a fascinating novel which would be greatly enjoyed. A historical which sounds intriguing and unforgettable. Your books are a delight. best wishes on this release and many more successes.

    Reply
  121. I am looking forward to your next Rogue’s book. It is great to have a continuation of an interesting group of people. I thoroughly enjoy the historical aspects and basis of a story. I don’t mind an event that did not actually happen if it is believable and keeping with the time. I am anticipating a great read.

    Reply
  122. I am looking forward to your next Rogue’s book. It is great to have a continuation of an interesting group of people. I thoroughly enjoy the historical aspects and basis of a story. I don’t mind an event that did not actually happen if it is believable and keeping with the time. I am anticipating a great read.

    Reply
  123. I am looking forward to your next Rogue’s book. It is great to have a continuation of an interesting group of people. I thoroughly enjoy the historical aspects and basis of a story. I don’t mind an event that did not actually happen if it is believable and keeping with the time. I am anticipating a great read.

    Reply
  124. I am looking forward to your next Rogue’s book. It is great to have a continuation of an interesting group of people. I thoroughly enjoy the historical aspects and basis of a story. I don’t mind an event that did not actually happen if it is believable and keeping with the time. I am anticipating a great read.

    Reply
  125. I am looking forward to your next Rogue’s book. It is great to have a continuation of an interesting group of people. I thoroughly enjoy the historical aspects and basis of a story. I don’t mind an event that did not actually happen if it is believable and keeping with the time. I am anticipating a great read.

    Reply
  126. Like many of the commenters, I enjoy both a bit of reality and fantasy in my historical romances. Eloisa James wrote about indoor plumbing in one of her novels and several reviewers complained about it. I found the details fascinating. I can’t wait to read your new book!

    Reply
  127. Like many of the commenters, I enjoy both a bit of reality and fantasy in my historical romances. Eloisa James wrote about indoor plumbing in one of her novels and several reviewers complained about it. I found the details fascinating. I can’t wait to read your new book!

    Reply
  128. Like many of the commenters, I enjoy both a bit of reality and fantasy in my historical romances. Eloisa James wrote about indoor plumbing in one of her novels and several reviewers complained about it. I found the details fascinating. I can’t wait to read your new book!

    Reply
  129. Like many of the commenters, I enjoy both a bit of reality and fantasy in my historical romances. Eloisa James wrote about indoor plumbing in one of her novels and several reviewers complained about it. I found the details fascinating. I can’t wait to read your new book!

    Reply
  130. Like many of the commenters, I enjoy both a bit of reality and fantasy in my historical romances. Eloisa James wrote about indoor plumbing in one of her novels and several reviewers complained about it. I found the details fascinating. I can’t wait to read your new book!

    Reply
  131. I like spots of actual history – it gives me a point of reference. I wonder if it is easier for fiction to include soldiers and spies because not only are they dramatic but there is always action expected around them.
    I am not sure spies should be less admired. That is the way countries have conducted themselves for a very long time. And the information gathered by spies generally saved lives. Not such a bad thing.
    A question, were there many of the nobility who were actively trying to improve conditions for the average workig family? I know there were discussions in Parliament, how much support was there for improving conditions of employment and health and overall well being?

    Reply
  132. I like spots of actual history – it gives me a point of reference. I wonder if it is easier for fiction to include soldiers and spies because not only are they dramatic but there is always action expected around them.
    I am not sure spies should be less admired. That is the way countries have conducted themselves for a very long time. And the information gathered by spies generally saved lives. Not such a bad thing.
    A question, were there many of the nobility who were actively trying to improve conditions for the average workig family? I know there were discussions in Parliament, how much support was there for improving conditions of employment and health and overall well being?

    Reply
  133. I like spots of actual history – it gives me a point of reference. I wonder if it is easier for fiction to include soldiers and spies because not only are they dramatic but there is always action expected around them.
    I am not sure spies should be less admired. That is the way countries have conducted themselves for a very long time. And the information gathered by spies generally saved lives. Not such a bad thing.
    A question, were there many of the nobility who were actively trying to improve conditions for the average workig family? I know there were discussions in Parliament, how much support was there for improving conditions of employment and health and overall well being?

    Reply
  134. I like spots of actual history – it gives me a point of reference. I wonder if it is easier for fiction to include soldiers and spies because not only are they dramatic but there is always action expected around them.
    I am not sure spies should be less admired. That is the way countries have conducted themselves for a very long time. And the information gathered by spies generally saved lives. Not such a bad thing.
    A question, were there many of the nobility who were actively trying to improve conditions for the average workig family? I know there were discussions in Parliament, how much support was there for improving conditions of employment and health and overall well being?

    Reply
  135. I like spots of actual history – it gives me a point of reference. I wonder if it is easier for fiction to include soldiers and spies because not only are they dramatic but there is always action expected around them.
    I am not sure spies should be less admired. That is the way countries have conducted themselves for a very long time. And the information gathered by spies generally saved lives. Not such a bad thing.
    A question, were there many of the nobility who were actively trying to improve conditions for the average workig family? I know there were discussions in Parliament, how much support was there for improving conditions of employment and health and overall well being?

    Reply
  136. I love when historical fiction can creditably pull in historical facts to make the story settle in place. I don’t even mind if the author fudges a little on the facts, but I want the fudging explained in an author’s notes either before or afterwards.
    Thank you for sharing your Rogue’s world with us. The friendships in that world are almost as enticing as the romances.

    Reply
  137. I love when historical fiction can creditably pull in historical facts to make the story settle in place. I don’t even mind if the author fudges a little on the facts, but I want the fudging explained in an author’s notes either before or afterwards.
    Thank you for sharing your Rogue’s world with us. The friendships in that world are almost as enticing as the romances.

    Reply
  138. I love when historical fiction can creditably pull in historical facts to make the story settle in place. I don’t even mind if the author fudges a little on the facts, but I want the fudging explained in an author’s notes either before or afterwards.
    Thank you for sharing your Rogue’s world with us. The friendships in that world are almost as enticing as the romances.

    Reply
  139. I love when historical fiction can creditably pull in historical facts to make the story settle in place. I don’t even mind if the author fudges a little on the facts, but I want the fudging explained in an author’s notes either before or afterwards.
    Thank you for sharing your Rogue’s world with us. The friendships in that world are almost as enticing as the romances.

    Reply
  140. I love when historical fiction can creditably pull in historical facts to make the story settle in place. I don’t even mind if the author fudges a little on the facts, but I want the fudging explained in an author’s notes either before or afterwards.
    Thank you for sharing your Rogue’s world with us. The friendships in that world are almost as enticing as the romances.

    Reply
  141. I totally appreciate historical detail BUT any alternations need to be plausible and, as others have said, explained. What I hate is when an author takes gross liberties with known historical figures without acknowledging that he or she is presenting a fantasy.
    Along with real historical detail on events, I appreciate when characters act and think in a manner consistent with the time period, not 21st century people plopped into the 19th century!

    Reply
  142. I totally appreciate historical detail BUT any alternations need to be plausible and, as others have said, explained. What I hate is when an author takes gross liberties with known historical figures without acknowledging that he or she is presenting a fantasy.
    Along with real historical detail on events, I appreciate when characters act and think in a manner consistent with the time period, not 21st century people plopped into the 19th century!

    Reply
  143. I totally appreciate historical detail BUT any alternations need to be plausible and, as others have said, explained. What I hate is when an author takes gross liberties with known historical figures without acknowledging that he or she is presenting a fantasy.
    Along with real historical detail on events, I appreciate when characters act and think in a manner consistent with the time period, not 21st century people plopped into the 19th century!

    Reply
  144. I totally appreciate historical detail BUT any alternations need to be plausible and, as others have said, explained. What I hate is when an author takes gross liberties with known historical figures without acknowledging that he or she is presenting a fantasy.
    Along with real historical detail on events, I appreciate when characters act and think in a manner consistent with the time period, not 21st century people plopped into the 19th century!

    Reply
  145. I totally appreciate historical detail BUT any alternations need to be plausible and, as others have said, explained. What I hate is when an author takes gross liberties with known historical figures without acknowledging that he or she is presenting a fantasy.
    Along with real historical detail on events, I appreciate when characters act and think in a manner consistent with the time period, not 21st century people plopped into the 19th century!

    Reply
  146. I like historical events in the background of a romance, I don’t mind made up events either.
    I do like it when the hero is a spy, it just adds to the story. I have enjoyed all the rogues books.

    Reply
  147. I like historical events in the background of a romance, I don’t mind made up events either.
    I do like it when the hero is a spy, it just adds to the story. I have enjoyed all the rogues books.

    Reply
  148. I like historical events in the background of a romance, I don’t mind made up events either.
    I do like it when the hero is a spy, it just adds to the story. I have enjoyed all the rogues books.

    Reply
  149. I like historical events in the background of a romance, I don’t mind made up events either.
    I do like it when the hero is a spy, it just adds to the story. I have enjoyed all the rogues books.

    Reply
  150. I like historical events in the background of a romance, I don’t mind made up events either.
    I do like it when the hero is a spy, it just adds to the story. I have enjoyed all the rogues books.

    Reply
  151. I like real historical situations in novels, I’ve learned a lot of history that way. And I don’t mind if they make up an event either, but it’s easier to accept if it’s in the distant past. The nearer you get to the present day the harder it is for me to find it plausible, for some reason. That’s why I love the 18th and 19th century and earlier!
    I too enjoy the author’s notes and I always read them.
    I’m really looking forward to another Rogues book.

    Reply
  152. I like real historical situations in novels, I’ve learned a lot of history that way. And I don’t mind if they make up an event either, but it’s easier to accept if it’s in the distant past. The nearer you get to the present day the harder it is for me to find it plausible, for some reason. That’s why I love the 18th and 19th century and earlier!
    I too enjoy the author’s notes and I always read them.
    I’m really looking forward to another Rogues book.

    Reply
  153. I like real historical situations in novels, I’ve learned a lot of history that way. And I don’t mind if they make up an event either, but it’s easier to accept if it’s in the distant past. The nearer you get to the present day the harder it is for me to find it plausible, for some reason. That’s why I love the 18th and 19th century and earlier!
    I too enjoy the author’s notes and I always read them.
    I’m really looking forward to another Rogues book.

    Reply
  154. I like real historical situations in novels, I’ve learned a lot of history that way. And I don’t mind if they make up an event either, but it’s easier to accept if it’s in the distant past. The nearer you get to the present day the harder it is for me to find it plausible, for some reason. That’s why I love the 18th and 19th century and earlier!
    I too enjoy the author’s notes and I always read them.
    I’m really looking forward to another Rogues book.

    Reply
  155. I like real historical situations in novels, I’ve learned a lot of history that way. And I don’t mind if they make up an event either, but it’s easier to accept if it’s in the distant past. The nearer you get to the present day the harder it is for me to find it plausible, for some reason. That’s why I love the 18th and 19th century and earlier!
    I too enjoy the author’s notes and I always read them.
    I’m really looking forward to another Rogues book.

    Reply
  156. I think it is endlessly fascinating that so many readers of fiction, myself included, demand historical accuracy in their favorite genre of historical romance. It may be that I am still somewhat new to this genre and am yet one of those dreaded ‘apologists’, that it is so curious. But I guess I feel the need to defend the genre.
    But I could relate to nearly everyone’s comments, and they varied somewhat. I too love to research an historical event or person once a story I’ve read sparks an interest. For someone who nearly failed history in a few grades because I just couldn’t remember the dates, I’ve gotten to be quite a lot more knowledgeable than even my history geek of a husband on certain time periods.
    Adding soldiers vs. spies is an interesting question. I’ve good and not-so-good with both. And we’ve all read good and not-so-good stories with historical events real or made up. I’m your fan, so I know where I stand on your success.
    I shouldn’t demand it because I know fiction is fiction, but I do like hearing where an author has invented, or time shifted an event. I really appreciate an author sharing their thought process on what they write with their fans. I know my favorite authors are historians in their own rights. I know they demand a lot of themselves, and they genuinely love history. I think it’s very generous what you and the other Wenches do. We your fans just can’t get enough.

    Reply
  157. I think it is endlessly fascinating that so many readers of fiction, myself included, demand historical accuracy in their favorite genre of historical romance. It may be that I am still somewhat new to this genre and am yet one of those dreaded ‘apologists’, that it is so curious. But I guess I feel the need to defend the genre.
    But I could relate to nearly everyone’s comments, and they varied somewhat. I too love to research an historical event or person once a story I’ve read sparks an interest. For someone who nearly failed history in a few grades because I just couldn’t remember the dates, I’ve gotten to be quite a lot more knowledgeable than even my history geek of a husband on certain time periods.
    Adding soldiers vs. spies is an interesting question. I’ve good and not-so-good with both. And we’ve all read good and not-so-good stories with historical events real or made up. I’m your fan, so I know where I stand on your success.
    I shouldn’t demand it because I know fiction is fiction, but I do like hearing where an author has invented, or time shifted an event. I really appreciate an author sharing their thought process on what they write with their fans. I know my favorite authors are historians in their own rights. I know they demand a lot of themselves, and they genuinely love history. I think it’s very generous what you and the other Wenches do. We your fans just can’t get enough.

    Reply
  158. I think it is endlessly fascinating that so many readers of fiction, myself included, demand historical accuracy in their favorite genre of historical romance. It may be that I am still somewhat new to this genre and am yet one of those dreaded ‘apologists’, that it is so curious. But I guess I feel the need to defend the genre.
    But I could relate to nearly everyone’s comments, and they varied somewhat. I too love to research an historical event or person once a story I’ve read sparks an interest. For someone who nearly failed history in a few grades because I just couldn’t remember the dates, I’ve gotten to be quite a lot more knowledgeable than even my history geek of a husband on certain time periods.
    Adding soldiers vs. spies is an interesting question. I’ve good and not-so-good with both. And we’ve all read good and not-so-good stories with historical events real or made up. I’m your fan, so I know where I stand on your success.
    I shouldn’t demand it because I know fiction is fiction, but I do like hearing where an author has invented, or time shifted an event. I really appreciate an author sharing their thought process on what they write with their fans. I know my favorite authors are historians in their own rights. I know they demand a lot of themselves, and they genuinely love history. I think it’s very generous what you and the other Wenches do. We your fans just can’t get enough.

    Reply
  159. I think it is endlessly fascinating that so many readers of fiction, myself included, demand historical accuracy in their favorite genre of historical romance. It may be that I am still somewhat new to this genre and am yet one of those dreaded ‘apologists’, that it is so curious. But I guess I feel the need to defend the genre.
    But I could relate to nearly everyone’s comments, and they varied somewhat. I too love to research an historical event or person once a story I’ve read sparks an interest. For someone who nearly failed history in a few grades because I just couldn’t remember the dates, I’ve gotten to be quite a lot more knowledgeable than even my history geek of a husband on certain time periods.
    Adding soldiers vs. spies is an interesting question. I’ve good and not-so-good with both. And we’ve all read good and not-so-good stories with historical events real or made up. I’m your fan, so I know where I stand on your success.
    I shouldn’t demand it because I know fiction is fiction, but I do like hearing where an author has invented, or time shifted an event. I really appreciate an author sharing their thought process on what they write with their fans. I know my favorite authors are historians in their own rights. I know they demand a lot of themselves, and they genuinely love history. I think it’s very generous what you and the other Wenches do. We your fans just can’t get enough.

    Reply
  160. I think it is endlessly fascinating that so many readers of fiction, myself included, demand historical accuracy in their favorite genre of historical romance. It may be that I am still somewhat new to this genre and am yet one of those dreaded ‘apologists’, that it is so curious. But I guess I feel the need to defend the genre.
    But I could relate to nearly everyone’s comments, and they varied somewhat. I too love to research an historical event or person once a story I’ve read sparks an interest. For someone who nearly failed history in a few grades because I just couldn’t remember the dates, I’ve gotten to be quite a lot more knowledgeable than even my history geek of a husband on certain time periods.
    Adding soldiers vs. spies is an interesting question. I’ve good and not-so-good with both. And we’ve all read good and not-so-good stories with historical events real or made up. I’m your fan, so I know where I stand on your success.
    I shouldn’t demand it because I know fiction is fiction, but I do like hearing where an author has invented, or time shifted an event. I really appreciate an author sharing their thought process on what they write with their fans. I know my favorite authors are historians in their own rights. I know they demand a lot of themselves, and they genuinely love history. I think it’s very generous what you and the other Wenches do. We your fans just can’t get enough.

    Reply
  161. I like real history in my fiction and I’m also fine with made up historical events as long as it fits the story and time.
    Definitely if there have been alterations to the facts there should be an author note. Minor tweaking so it works if fine but major changes that are directly opposite to what happened. Nope… Unless of course you are reading Steampunk or any of the other alternate reality books.
    For example the mention of the book Pamela is in so many novels. That is a real fact and makes the stories more believable.
    Last month I ran across Pamela at my library sale and picked it up. I felt I should at least look at it since it is mentioned so much. Same for Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman. (as in I found a copy of it as well.)

    Reply
  162. I like real history in my fiction and I’m also fine with made up historical events as long as it fits the story and time.
    Definitely if there have been alterations to the facts there should be an author note. Minor tweaking so it works if fine but major changes that are directly opposite to what happened. Nope… Unless of course you are reading Steampunk or any of the other alternate reality books.
    For example the mention of the book Pamela is in so many novels. That is a real fact and makes the stories more believable.
    Last month I ran across Pamela at my library sale and picked it up. I felt I should at least look at it since it is mentioned so much. Same for Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman. (as in I found a copy of it as well.)

    Reply
  163. I like real history in my fiction and I’m also fine with made up historical events as long as it fits the story and time.
    Definitely if there have been alterations to the facts there should be an author note. Minor tweaking so it works if fine but major changes that are directly opposite to what happened. Nope… Unless of course you are reading Steampunk or any of the other alternate reality books.
    For example the mention of the book Pamela is in so many novels. That is a real fact and makes the stories more believable.
    Last month I ran across Pamela at my library sale and picked it up. I felt I should at least look at it since it is mentioned so much. Same for Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman. (as in I found a copy of it as well.)

    Reply
  164. I like real history in my fiction and I’m also fine with made up historical events as long as it fits the story and time.
    Definitely if there have been alterations to the facts there should be an author note. Minor tweaking so it works if fine but major changes that are directly opposite to what happened. Nope… Unless of course you are reading Steampunk or any of the other alternate reality books.
    For example the mention of the book Pamela is in so many novels. That is a real fact and makes the stories more believable.
    Last month I ran across Pamela at my library sale and picked it up. I felt I should at least look at it since it is mentioned so much. Same for Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman. (as in I found a copy of it as well.)

    Reply
  165. I like real history in my fiction and I’m also fine with made up historical events as long as it fits the story and time.
    Definitely if there have been alterations to the facts there should be an author note. Minor tweaking so it works if fine but major changes that are directly opposite to what happened. Nope… Unless of course you are reading Steampunk or any of the other alternate reality books.
    For example the mention of the book Pamela is in so many novels. That is a real fact and makes the stories more believable.
    Last month I ran across Pamela at my library sale and picked it up. I felt I should at least look at it since it is mentioned so much. Same for Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman. (as in I found a copy of it as well.)

    Reply
  166. I am continually amazed at how many spies were running around Regency England Romanceland, and how many of them came from the nobility! 🙂 So it would be nice to see other ways that things were contested back then.

    Reply
  167. I am continually amazed at how many spies were running around Regency England Romanceland, and how many of them came from the nobility! 🙂 So it would be nice to see other ways that things were contested back then.

    Reply
  168. I am continually amazed at how many spies were running around Regency England Romanceland, and how many of them came from the nobility! 🙂 So it would be nice to see other ways that things were contested back then.

    Reply
  169. I am continually amazed at how many spies were running around Regency England Romanceland, and how many of them came from the nobility! 🙂 So it would be nice to see other ways that things were contested back then.

    Reply
  170. I am continually amazed at how many spies were running around Regency England Romanceland, and how many of them came from the nobility! 🙂 So it would be nice to see other ways that things were contested back then.

    Reply
  171. I honestly do think that most people prefer to read about the dashing spys and sholdiers. I mean really, exactly how many Dukes really are running around England at any given point in history? Yet most Regency books have several Dukes who are on the marriage mart.
    Don’t get me wrong, I do love a good love story involving a Duke, or a spy, or a soldier. But I do love it when real life historical events are included in books.

    Reply
  172. I honestly do think that most people prefer to read about the dashing spys and sholdiers. I mean really, exactly how many Dukes really are running around England at any given point in history? Yet most Regency books have several Dukes who are on the marriage mart.
    Don’t get me wrong, I do love a good love story involving a Duke, or a spy, or a soldier. But I do love it when real life historical events are included in books.

    Reply
  173. I honestly do think that most people prefer to read about the dashing spys and sholdiers. I mean really, exactly how many Dukes really are running around England at any given point in history? Yet most Regency books have several Dukes who are on the marriage mart.
    Don’t get me wrong, I do love a good love story involving a Duke, or a spy, or a soldier. But I do love it when real life historical events are included in books.

    Reply
  174. I honestly do think that most people prefer to read about the dashing spys and sholdiers. I mean really, exactly how many Dukes really are running around England at any given point in history? Yet most Regency books have several Dukes who are on the marriage mart.
    Don’t get me wrong, I do love a good love story involving a Duke, or a spy, or a soldier. But I do love it when real life historical events are included in books.

    Reply
  175. I honestly do think that most people prefer to read about the dashing spys and sholdiers. I mean really, exactly how many Dukes really are running around England at any given point in history? Yet most Regency books have several Dukes who are on the marriage mart.
    Don’t get me wrong, I do love a good love story involving a Duke, or a spy, or a soldier. But I do love it when real life historical events are included in books.

    Reply
  176. I like stories that delve into (or at least highlight) social issues of the time period. Although the ballrooms and bedrooms of luxurious mansions make for great escapism reading (and we all need an escape now and then to keep our stress of daily living at bay), I seem to care more about characters who think beyond pretty clothes and dashing dance partners.

    Reply
  177. I like stories that delve into (or at least highlight) social issues of the time period. Although the ballrooms and bedrooms of luxurious mansions make for great escapism reading (and we all need an escape now and then to keep our stress of daily living at bay), I seem to care more about characters who think beyond pretty clothes and dashing dance partners.

    Reply
  178. I like stories that delve into (or at least highlight) social issues of the time period. Although the ballrooms and bedrooms of luxurious mansions make for great escapism reading (and we all need an escape now and then to keep our stress of daily living at bay), I seem to care more about characters who think beyond pretty clothes and dashing dance partners.

    Reply
  179. I like stories that delve into (or at least highlight) social issues of the time period. Although the ballrooms and bedrooms of luxurious mansions make for great escapism reading (and we all need an escape now and then to keep our stress of daily living at bay), I seem to care more about characters who think beyond pretty clothes and dashing dance partners.

    Reply
  180. I like stories that delve into (or at least highlight) social issues of the time period. Although the ballrooms and bedrooms of luxurious mansions make for great escapism reading (and we all need an escape now and then to keep our stress of daily living at bay), I seem to care more about characters who think beyond pretty clothes and dashing dance partners.

    Reply
  181. I agree with all the others real evens and fictional events are both fun for me. I much prefer that authors tell me when the events are manufactured.
    But the points that caught me in all this discussion is Jo’s statement that there are more fictional soldiers and spies than in reality and that some real events leave loopholes for the insertion of fictional characters.
    I have begun to notice that (starting with Becky Sharp) there are so many fictional characters attending the Duchess of Richmond’s ball, I don’t see how there is any room at all for the real folk! (And in U S. history — especially for young adults — so many fictional drummer-boys are riding on that infantryman’s shoulder on the way to Vincennes, it’s a wonder they don’t fill in the swamp!)
    I’m not complaining! It makes for lots of fun in the reading. But I also wonder if the Titanic and the Lusitania may have sunk from the load of fictional characters aboard instead of the iceberg and the torpedo!

    Reply
  182. I agree with all the others real evens and fictional events are both fun for me. I much prefer that authors tell me when the events are manufactured.
    But the points that caught me in all this discussion is Jo’s statement that there are more fictional soldiers and spies than in reality and that some real events leave loopholes for the insertion of fictional characters.
    I have begun to notice that (starting with Becky Sharp) there are so many fictional characters attending the Duchess of Richmond’s ball, I don’t see how there is any room at all for the real folk! (And in U S. history — especially for young adults — so many fictional drummer-boys are riding on that infantryman’s shoulder on the way to Vincennes, it’s a wonder they don’t fill in the swamp!)
    I’m not complaining! It makes for lots of fun in the reading. But I also wonder if the Titanic and the Lusitania may have sunk from the load of fictional characters aboard instead of the iceberg and the torpedo!

    Reply
  183. I agree with all the others real evens and fictional events are both fun for me. I much prefer that authors tell me when the events are manufactured.
    But the points that caught me in all this discussion is Jo’s statement that there are more fictional soldiers and spies than in reality and that some real events leave loopholes for the insertion of fictional characters.
    I have begun to notice that (starting with Becky Sharp) there are so many fictional characters attending the Duchess of Richmond’s ball, I don’t see how there is any room at all for the real folk! (And in U S. history — especially for young adults — so many fictional drummer-boys are riding on that infantryman’s shoulder on the way to Vincennes, it’s a wonder they don’t fill in the swamp!)
    I’m not complaining! It makes for lots of fun in the reading. But I also wonder if the Titanic and the Lusitania may have sunk from the load of fictional characters aboard instead of the iceberg and the torpedo!

    Reply
  184. I agree with all the others real evens and fictional events are both fun for me. I much prefer that authors tell me when the events are manufactured.
    But the points that caught me in all this discussion is Jo’s statement that there are more fictional soldiers and spies than in reality and that some real events leave loopholes for the insertion of fictional characters.
    I have begun to notice that (starting with Becky Sharp) there are so many fictional characters attending the Duchess of Richmond’s ball, I don’t see how there is any room at all for the real folk! (And in U S. history — especially for young adults — so many fictional drummer-boys are riding on that infantryman’s shoulder on the way to Vincennes, it’s a wonder they don’t fill in the swamp!)
    I’m not complaining! It makes for lots of fun in the reading. But I also wonder if the Titanic and the Lusitania may have sunk from the load of fictional characters aboard instead of the iceberg and the torpedo!

    Reply
  185. I agree with all the others real evens and fictional events are both fun for me. I much prefer that authors tell me when the events are manufactured.
    But the points that caught me in all this discussion is Jo’s statement that there are more fictional soldiers and spies than in reality and that some real events leave loopholes for the insertion of fictional characters.
    I have begun to notice that (starting with Becky Sharp) there are so many fictional characters attending the Duchess of Richmond’s ball, I don’t see how there is any room at all for the real folk! (And in U S. history — especially for young adults — so many fictional drummer-boys are riding on that infantryman’s shoulder on the way to Vincennes, it’s a wonder they don’t fill in the swamp!)
    I’m not complaining! It makes for lots of fun in the reading. But I also wonder if the Titanic and the Lusitania may have sunk from the load of fictional characters aboard instead of the iceberg and the torpedo!

    Reply
  186. I really enjoy it when I read about real historical situations in historical romances, or if the author makes something up, based on real events, it peaks my curiosity to find out more. Actually one of my fave examples is in a book written by Ms. Beverley herself – Devilish. I loved finding out that the cross-dressing Chevalier D’ Eon was a real person and his incorporation into the storyline of the book was just totally seamless.

    Reply
  187. I really enjoy it when I read about real historical situations in historical romances, or if the author makes something up, based on real events, it peaks my curiosity to find out more. Actually one of my fave examples is in a book written by Ms. Beverley herself – Devilish. I loved finding out that the cross-dressing Chevalier D’ Eon was a real person and his incorporation into the storyline of the book was just totally seamless.

    Reply
  188. I really enjoy it when I read about real historical situations in historical romances, or if the author makes something up, based on real events, it peaks my curiosity to find out more. Actually one of my fave examples is in a book written by Ms. Beverley herself – Devilish. I loved finding out that the cross-dressing Chevalier D’ Eon was a real person and his incorporation into the storyline of the book was just totally seamless.

    Reply
  189. I really enjoy it when I read about real historical situations in historical romances, or if the author makes something up, based on real events, it peaks my curiosity to find out more. Actually one of my fave examples is in a book written by Ms. Beverley herself – Devilish. I loved finding out that the cross-dressing Chevalier D’ Eon was a real person and his incorporation into the storyline of the book was just totally seamless.

    Reply
  190. I really enjoy it when I read about real historical situations in historical romances, or if the author makes something up, based on real events, it peaks my curiosity to find out more. Actually one of my fave examples is in a book written by Ms. Beverley herself – Devilish. I loved finding out that the cross-dressing Chevalier D’ Eon was a real person and his incorporation into the storyline of the book was just totally seamless.

    Reply
  191. The reviewers thought they didn’t have indoor plumbing, Margaret? It was still a work in progress, but they were definitely working on it and some had it.

    Reply
  192. The reviewers thought they didn’t have indoor plumbing, Margaret? It was still a work in progress, but they were definitely working on it and some had it.

    Reply
  193. The reviewers thought they didn’t have indoor plumbing, Margaret? It was still a work in progress, but they were definitely working on it and some had it.

    Reply
  194. The reviewers thought they didn’t have indoor plumbing, Margaret? It was still a work in progress, but they were definitely working on it and some had it.

    Reply
  195. The reviewers thought they didn’t have indoor plumbing, Margaret? It was still a work in progress, but they were definitely working on it and some had it.

    Reply
  196. Many of the nobility were involved in “good works” either out of conviction or because it was expected of them. Then as now not everyone agreed on what should or could be done and how.
    There were practical issues like support for the desperate, which again as now, could be controversial. How much public money should be spent on those who could be said to have brought their misery on themselves? Shouldn’t people pick themselves up and sort out their own problems? Who should fund health care or care for the impoverished elderly?
    Some nobility were very active in particular areas — almshouses, hospitals, refuges for orphans, schools to teach skills to poor children etc. Some just gave money and did little more. Some did nothing.
    Pretty well like people today.

    Reply
  197. Many of the nobility were involved in “good works” either out of conviction or because it was expected of them. Then as now not everyone agreed on what should or could be done and how.
    There were practical issues like support for the desperate, which again as now, could be controversial. How much public money should be spent on those who could be said to have brought their misery on themselves? Shouldn’t people pick themselves up and sort out their own problems? Who should fund health care or care for the impoverished elderly?
    Some nobility were very active in particular areas — almshouses, hospitals, refuges for orphans, schools to teach skills to poor children etc. Some just gave money and did little more. Some did nothing.
    Pretty well like people today.

    Reply
  198. Many of the nobility were involved in “good works” either out of conviction or because it was expected of them. Then as now not everyone agreed on what should or could be done and how.
    There were practical issues like support for the desperate, which again as now, could be controversial. How much public money should be spent on those who could be said to have brought their misery on themselves? Shouldn’t people pick themselves up and sort out their own problems? Who should fund health care or care for the impoverished elderly?
    Some nobility were very active in particular areas — almshouses, hospitals, refuges for orphans, schools to teach skills to poor children etc. Some just gave money and did little more. Some did nothing.
    Pretty well like people today.

    Reply
  199. Many of the nobility were involved in “good works” either out of conviction or because it was expected of them. Then as now not everyone agreed on what should or could be done and how.
    There were practical issues like support for the desperate, which again as now, could be controversial. How much public money should be spent on those who could be said to have brought their misery on themselves? Shouldn’t people pick themselves up and sort out their own problems? Who should fund health care or care for the impoverished elderly?
    Some nobility were very active in particular areas — almshouses, hospitals, refuges for orphans, schools to teach skills to poor children etc. Some just gave money and did little more. Some did nothing.
    Pretty well like people today.

    Reply
  200. Many of the nobility were involved in “good works” either out of conviction or because it was expected of them. Then as now not everyone agreed on what should or could be done and how.
    There were practical issues like support for the desperate, which again as now, could be controversial. How much public money should be spent on those who could be said to have brought their misery on themselves? Shouldn’t people pick themselves up and sort out their own problems? Who should fund health care or care for the impoverished elderly?
    Some nobility were very active in particular areas — almshouses, hospitals, refuges for orphans, schools to teach skills to poor children etc. Some just gave money and did little more. Some did nothing.
    Pretty well like people today.

    Reply
  201. Kanch, that was a fun one. Because I know when my books take place, there was d’Eon, completely unignorable, so I had to involve him. It turned into a lovely plot thread and I like to think that Rothgar’s machinations explain much of the mystery about d’Eon’s activities at that time.

    Reply
  202. Kanch, that was a fun one. Because I know when my books take place, there was d’Eon, completely unignorable, so I had to involve him. It turned into a lovely plot thread and I like to think that Rothgar’s machinations explain much of the mystery about d’Eon’s activities at that time.

    Reply
  203. Kanch, that was a fun one. Because I know when my books take place, there was d’Eon, completely unignorable, so I had to involve him. It turned into a lovely plot thread and I like to think that Rothgar’s machinations explain much of the mystery about d’Eon’s activities at that time.

    Reply
  204. Kanch, that was a fun one. Because I know when my books take place, there was d’Eon, completely unignorable, so I had to involve him. It turned into a lovely plot thread and I like to think that Rothgar’s machinations explain much of the mystery about d’Eon’s activities at that time.

    Reply
  205. Kanch, that was a fun one. Because I know when my books take place, there was d’Eon, completely unignorable, so I had to involve him. It turned into a lovely plot thread and I like to think that Rothgar’s machinations explain much of the mystery about d’Eon’s activities at that time.

    Reply
  206. I like real historical situations in historical romances. As a matter of fact, I’d like to see more of those. In Old Skool times, one of the good things is that the writers, many times tried to introduce these events in their novels.
    But perhaps this is just me, as I like History and historical (non romance) novels, from Graves to Vidal, including Scarrow, Cornwell, Druon et alii.
    I don’t particularly care if an author creates a historical event, as long as it is plausible, and has to do with the real circumstances of the time. And in the end he/she says that it didn’t happened exactly that way but…and explains the historical sources of the events.
    What I don’t like is something obvious happening in a certain year and the characters of the story ignoring it. Like a contemporary novel set in september 2001 and nobody mentions 9/11. It’s weird and takes me out of the story.
    For instance, as your book is set in 1817, I remembered that the previous year, 1816 was the Year Without a Summer. Food shortages, riots, famine, terrible things happened, all through Europe. Then, if there’s a novel set in that year, and it’s summer and someone says ‘it’s hot here, isn’t it?’ or ‘how rich the crop is this year’ or they don’t talk about the terrible things happening, I would close the book because it crashes completely with what I know about that year. I wouldn’t be able to suspend my disbelief.
    Spies and soldiers could seem more dashing and it’s easier to create a suspenseful plot with them I guess. But, personally, I’d rather see characters with worries about economy, or political or social issues.

    Reply
  207. I like real historical situations in historical romances. As a matter of fact, I’d like to see more of those. In Old Skool times, one of the good things is that the writers, many times tried to introduce these events in their novels.
    But perhaps this is just me, as I like History and historical (non romance) novels, from Graves to Vidal, including Scarrow, Cornwell, Druon et alii.
    I don’t particularly care if an author creates a historical event, as long as it is plausible, and has to do with the real circumstances of the time. And in the end he/she says that it didn’t happened exactly that way but…and explains the historical sources of the events.
    What I don’t like is something obvious happening in a certain year and the characters of the story ignoring it. Like a contemporary novel set in september 2001 and nobody mentions 9/11. It’s weird and takes me out of the story.
    For instance, as your book is set in 1817, I remembered that the previous year, 1816 was the Year Without a Summer. Food shortages, riots, famine, terrible things happened, all through Europe. Then, if there’s a novel set in that year, and it’s summer and someone says ‘it’s hot here, isn’t it?’ or ‘how rich the crop is this year’ or they don’t talk about the terrible things happening, I would close the book because it crashes completely with what I know about that year. I wouldn’t be able to suspend my disbelief.
    Spies and soldiers could seem more dashing and it’s easier to create a suspenseful plot with them I guess. But, personally, I’d rather see characters with worries about economy, or political or social issues.

    Reply
  208. I like real historical situations in historical romances. As a matter of fact, I’d like to see more of those. In Old Skool times, one of the good things is that the writers, many times tried to introduce these events in their novels.
    But perhaps this is just me, as I like History and historical (non romance) novels, from Graves to Vidal, including Scarrow, Cornwell, Druon et alii.
    I don’t particularly care if an author creates a historical event, as long as it is plausible, and has to do with the real circumstances of the time. And in the end he/she says that it didn’t happened exactly that way but…and explains the historical sources of the events.
    What I don’t like is something obvious happening in a certain year and the characters of the story ignoring it. Like a contemporary novel set in september 2001 and nobody mentions 9/11. It’s weird and takes me out of the story.
    For instance, as your book is set in 1817, I remembered that the previous year, 1816 was the Year Without a Summer. Food shortages, riots, famine, terrible things happened, all through Europe. Then, if there’s a novel set in that year, and it’s summer and someone says ‘it’s hot here, isn’t it?’ or ‘how rich the crop is this year’ or they don’t talk about the terrible things happening, I would close the book because it crashes completely with what I know about that year. I wouldn’t be able to suspend my disbelief.
    Spies and soldiers could seem more dashing and it’s easier to create a suspenseful plot with them I guess. But, personally, I’d rather see characters with worries about economy, or political or social issues.

    Reply
  209. I like real historical situations in historical romances. As a matter of fact, I’d like to see more of those. In Old Skool times, one of the good things is that the writers, many times tried to introduce these events in their novels.
    But perhaps this is just me, as I like History and historical (non romance) novels, from Graves to Vidal, including Scarrow, Cornwell, Druon et alii.
    I don’t particularly care if an author creates a historical event, as long as it is plausible, and has to do with the real circumstances of the time. And in the end he/she says that it didn’t happened exactly that way but…and explains the historical sources of the events.
    What I don’t like is something obvious happening in a certain year and the characters of the story ignoring it. Like a contemporary novel set in september 2001 and nobody mentions 9/11. It’s weird and takes me out of the story.
    For instance, as your book is set in 1817, I remembered that the previous year, 1816 was the Year Without a Summer. Food shortages, riots, famine, terrible things happened, all through Europe. Then, if there’s a novel set in that year, and it’s summer and someone says ‘it’s hot here, isn’t it?’ or ‘how rich the crop is this year’ or they don’t talk about the terrible things happening, I would close the book because it crashes completely with what I know about that year. I wouldn’t be able to suspend my disbelief.
    Spies and soldiers could seem more dashing and it’s easier to create a suspenseful plot with them I guess. But, personally, I’d rather see characters with worries about economy, or political or social issues.

    Reply
  210. I like real historical situations in historical romances. As a matter of fact, I’d like to see more of those. In Old Skool times, one of the good things is that the writers, many times tried to introduce these events in their novels.
    But perhaps this is just me, as I like History and historical (non romance) novels, from Graves to Vidal, including Scarrow, Cornwell, Druon et alii.
    I don’t particularly care if an author creates a historical event, as long as it is plausible, and has to do with the real circumstances of the time. And in the end he/she says that it didn’t happened exactly that way but…and explains the historical sources of the events.
    What I don’t like is something obvious happening in a certain year and the characters of the story ignoring it. Like a contemporary novel set in september 2001 and nobody mentions 9/11. It’s weird and takes me out of the story.
    For instance, as your book is set in 1817, I remembered that the previous year, 1816 was the Year Without a Summer. Food shortages, riots, famine, terrible things happened, all through Europe. Then, if there’s a novel set in that year, and it’s summer and someone says ‘it’s hot here, isn’t it?’ or ‘how rich the crop is this year’ or they don’t talk about the terrible things happening, I would close the book because it crashes completely with what I know about that year. I wouldn’t be able to suspend my disbelief.
    Spies and soldiers could seem more dashing and it’s easier to create a suspenseful plot with them I guess. But, personally, I’d rather see characters with worries about economy, or political or social issues.

    Reply

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