A Thousand Words, Or Less

 Susan Sarah here … joining in on the warm welcome to our new Wench, Anne Gracie!! 

I'm waiting to see a new cover soon for the trade paperback edition of LADY MACBETH (release date is April '09), which I will be happy to show you all once it's actually and finally here! In the meantime, while my mind is on images, I thought it might be fun to play around with some images and the stories they can immediately conjure in our imaginations. Being a  Very Visual Person (my degrees in studio art and graduate art history still come in handy) — I am a sucker for artwork. A painting that seems to tell a story can evoke all sorts of stories in my head — ideas bubble up as I wonder what's going on, who the people are, what the circumstances may be, the time frame, the location … this can be an easy way to feed an exhausted creative well sometimes.

Also, being a Very Visual sort, I find looking at paintings just very soothing and refreshing. I really do begin to feel more creative myself. Looking at art can be a great, fun way to limber up the writing and storytelling muscles. So let's take an art break on the blog today …. 

And since our blog server has changed its formatting parameters so that some images seem to be coming out ABSOLUTELY FLIPPIN' HUGE, I thought I'd take advantage of that (until we figure out how to use the "new and improved" features), post a few pictures and let you all have at them. 

Do these paintings conjure stories in your heads? If so, if you're not already a writer in actuality, you probably are in spirit! Take a look through today's art gallery and tell us what you think is going on … captions always welcome, or play with quick stories … and if you don't have time for that, just enjoy a little visual break today….

Good luck, have fun!

Susan Sarah

Painter's Honeymoon, Lord Leighton

  Leight117

  

Sir Frank Dicksee, Yseult

Yseult-dicksee2 

Vermeer, Young Lady and Gentleman at the Virginals

Vermeer_A_Lady_at_the_Virginals_with_a_Gentleman_detail1 

J.W.W. Waterhouse, The Tempest

Waterhousemiranda 

Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Silent Greeting

Alma_Tadema_A_Silent_Greeting

70 thoughts on “A Thousand Words, Or Less”

  1. I notice a number of Pre-Raphaelite paintings posted, don’t you just love them? I also majored in art (painting was my major, printmaking my minor), 4 years of art history and nary a mention of the brotherhood, except to call them illustrators instead of artist. Blah blah blah. If only I could do so well. Anyway, here are some wonderful websites with other fabulous illustrators, a lot of them women.
    http://faculty.pittstate.edu/~knichols/flaming.html#brickdale
    http://www.artpassions.net/
    http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/illustrations/illustrators/batten.html

    Reply
  2. I notice a number of Pre-Raphaelite paintings posted, don’t you just love them? I also majored in art (painting was my major, printmaking my minor), 4 years of art history and nary a mention of the brotherhood, except to call them illustrators instead of artist. Blah blah blah. If only I could do so well. Anyway, here are some wonderful websites with other fabulous illustrators, a lot of them women.
    http://faculty.pittstate.edu/~knichols/flaming.html#brickdale
    http://www.artpassions.net/
    http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/illustrations/illustrators/batten.html

    Reply
  3. I notice a number of Pre-Raphaelite paintings posted, don’t you just love them? I also majored in art (painting was my major, printmaking my minor), 4 years of art history and nary a mention of the brotherhood, except to call them illustrators instead of artist. Blah blah blah. If only I could do so well. Anyway, here are some wonderful websites with other fabulous illustrators, a lot of them women.
    http://faculty.pittstate.edu/~knichols/flaming.html#brickdale
    http://www.artpassions.net/
    http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/illustrations/illustrators/batten.html

    Reply
  4. I notice a number of Pre-Raphaelite paintings posted, don’t you just love them? I also majored in art (painting was my major, printmaking my minor), 4 years of art history and nary a mention of the brotherhood, except to call them illustrators instead of artist. Blah blah blah. If only I could do so well. Anyway, here are some wonderful websites with other fabulous illustrators, a lot of them women.
    http://faculty.pittstate.edu/~knichols/flaming.html#brickdale
    http://www.artpassions.net/
    http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/illustrations/illustrators/batten.html

    Reply
  5. I notice a number of Pre-Raphaelite paintings posted, don’t you just love them? I also majored in art (painting was my major, printmaking my minor), 4 years of art history and nary a mention of the brotherhood, except to call them illustrators instead of artist. Blah blah blah. If only I could do so well. Anyway, here are some wonderful websites with other fabulous illustrators, a lot of them women.
    http://faculty.pittstate.edu/~knichols/flaming.html#brickdale
    http://www.artpassions.net/
    http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/illustrations/illustrators/batten.html

    Reply
  6. I know nothing about paintings, but I certainly like “Painter’s Honeymoon” and “Silent Greeeting”. Both drip romance.
    “Painter’s Homeymoon” shows the man as much in love as the woman, which we don’t see too often. I like it.
    “Silent Greeting” seems like a wonderful way for a man home from the wars to greet the wife he left behind. What a great starting point for a scene.

    Reply
  7. I know nothing about paintings, but I certainly like “Painter’s Honeymoon” and “Silent Greeeting”. Both drip romance.
    “Painter’s Homeymoon” shows the man as much in love as the woman, which we don’t see too often. I like it.
    “Silent Greeting” seems like a wonderful way for a man home from the wars to greet the wife he left behind. What a great starting point for a scene.

    Reply
  8. I know nothing about paintings, but I certainly like “Painter’s Honeymoon” and “Silent Greeeting”. Both drip romance.
    “Painter’s Homeymoon” shows the man as much in love as the woman, which we don’t see too often. I like it.
    “Silent Greeting” seems like a wonderful way for a man home from the wars to greet the wife he left behind. What a great starting point for a scene.

    Reply
  9. I know nothing about paintings, but I certainly like “Painter’s Honeymoon” and “Silent Greeeting”. Both drip romance.
    “Painter’s Homeymoon” shows the man as much in love as the woman, which we don’t see too often. I like it.
    “Silent Greeting” seems like a wonderful way for a man home from the wars to greet the wife he left behind. What a great starting point for a scene.

    Reply
  10. I know nothing about paintings, but I certainly like “Painter’s Honeymoon” and “Silent Greeeting”. Both drip romance.
    “Painter’s Homeymoon” shows the man as much in love as the woman, which we don’t see too often. I like it.
    “Silent Greeting” seems like a wonderful way for a man home from the wars to greet the wife he left behind. What a great starting point for a scene.

    Reply
  11. Such gorgeous pictures, Susan!v As you know, I’m a long time fan of the Pre-Raphaelite painters because their pictures always evoke stories. I even had a sort of proto-Pre-Raphaelite heroine in my RIVER OF FIRE. I don’t know the paintings anything like as well as you do, so I always love when you do art posts.
    Oooh, wouldn’t it be fun if some publisher wanted us to do an anthology of stories inspired by these paintings?
    Mary Jo, slightly woozy and hallucinatory from cold medicine 🙂

    Reply
  12. Such gorgeous pictures, Susan!v As you know, I’m a long time fan of the Pre-Raphaelite painters because their pictures always evoke stories. I even had a sort of proto-Pre-Raphaelite heroine in my RIVER OF FIRE. I don’t know the paintings anything like as well as you do, so I always love when you do art posts.
    Oooh, wouldn’t it be fun if some publisher wanted us to do an anthology of stories inspired by these paintings?
    Mary Jo, slightly woozy and hallucinatory from cold medicine 🙂

    Reply
  13. Such gorgeous pictures, Susan!v As you know, I’m a long time fan of the Pre-Raphaelite painters because their pictures always evoke stories. I even had a sort of proto-Pre-Raphaelite heroine in my RIVER OF FIRE. I don’t know the paintings anything like as well as you do, so I always love when you do art posts.
    Oooh, wouldn’t it be fun if some publisher wanted us to do an anthology of stories inspired by these paintings?
    Mary Jo, slightly woozy and hallucinatory from cold medicine 🙂

    Reply
  14. Such gorgeous pictures, Susan!v As you know, I’m a long time fan of the Pre-Raphaelite painters because their pictures always evoke stories. I even had a sort of proto-Pre-Raphaelite heroine in my RIVER OF FIRE. I don’t know the paintings anything like as well as you do, so I always love when you do art posts.
    Oooh, wouldn’t it be fun if some publisher wanted us to do an anthology of stories inspired by these paintings?
    Mary Jo, slightly woozy and hallucinatory from cold medicine 🙂

    Reply
  15. Such gorgeous pictures, Susan!v As you know, I’m a long time fan of the Pre-Raphaelite painters because their pictures always evoke stories. I even had a sort of proto-Pre-Raphaelite heroine in my RIVER OF FIRE. I don’t know the paintings anything like as well as you do, so I always love when you do art posts.
    Oooh, wouldn’t it be fun if some publisher wanted us to do an anthology of stories inspired by these paintings?
    Mary Jo, slightly woozy and hallucinatory from cold medicine 🙂

    Reply
  16. beautiful, evocative paintings all, but that first one – wow! the exquisite emotion in the joined hands! the luxurious light on the folds of her dress! the perfection of her hairdo! please, please, please let them have lived many happy decades together and his art have sold enough for it not to have been in a starving manner.

    Reply
  17. beautiful, evocative paintings all, but that first one – wow! the exquisite emotion in the joined hands! the luxurious light on the folds of her dress! the perfection of her hairdo! please, please, please let them have lived many happy decades together and his art have sold enough for it not to have been in a starving manner.

    Reply
  18. beautiful, evocative paintings all, but that first one – wow! the exquisite emotion in the joined hands! the luxurious light on the folds of her dress! the perfection of her hairdo! please, please, please let them have lived many happy decades together and his art have sold enough for it not to have been in a starving manner.

    Reply
  19. beautiful, evocative paintings all, but that first one – wow! the exquisite emotion in the joined hands! the luxurious light on the folds of her dress! the perfection of her hairdo! please, please, please let them have lived many happy decades together and his art have sold enough for it not to have been in a starving manner.

    Reply
  20. beautiful, evocative paintings all, but that first one – wow! the exquisite emotion in the joined hands! the luxurious light on the folds of her dress! the perfection of her hairdo! please, please, please let them have lived many happy decades together and his art have sold enough for it not to have been in a starving manner.

    Reply
  21. Waterhouse’s Miranda is wonderful. I love his Ophelias and his Thisbe too. The Yseult painting is new to me, but I’m fascinated by the poignance and yearning in just the profile.
    I think Mary Jo’s anthology idea is terrific. I would stand in line to buy it. 🙂 (And I love River of Fire, Mary Jo. I reread it not long ago.)
    Regular wenchly poster Maggie does an incredible job of finding paintings to go with her blog topics. Seeing them is one of the perks of visiting Maggie’s blog.

    Reply
  22. Waterhouse’s Miranda is wonderful. I love his Ophelias and his Thisbe too. The Yseult painting is new to me, but I’m fascinated by the poignance and yearning in just the profile.
    I think Mary Jo’s anthology idea is terrific. I would stand in line to buy it. 🙂 (And I love River of Fire, Mary Jo. I reread it not long ago.)
    Regular wenchly poster Maggie does an incredible job of finding paintings to go with her blog topics. Seeing them is one of the perks of visiting Maggie’s blog.

    Reply
  23. Waterhouse’s Miranda is wonderful. I love his Ophelias and his Thisbe too. The Yseult painting is new to me, but I’m fascinated by the poignance and yearning in just the profile.
    I think Mary Jo’s anthology idea is terrific. I would stand in line to buy it. 🙂 (And I love River of Fire, Mary Jo. I reread it not long ago.)
    Regular wenchly poster Maggie does an incredible job of finding paintings to go with her blog topics. Seeing them is one of the perks of visiting Maggie’s blog.

    Reply
  24. Waterhouse’s Miranda is wonderful. I love his Ophelias and his Thisbe too. The Yseult painting is new to me, but I’m fascinated by the poignance and yearning in just the profile.
    I think Mary Jo’s anthology idea is terrific. I would stand in line to buy it. 🙂 (And I love River of Fire, Mary Jo. I reread it not long ago.)
    Regular wenchly poster Maggie does an incredible job of finding paintings to go with her blog topics. Seeing them is one of the perks of visiting Maggie’s blog.

    Reply
  25. Waterhouse’s Miranda is wonderful. I love his Ophelias and his Thisbe too. The Yseult painting is new to me, but I’m fascinated by the poignance and yearning in just the profile.
    I think Mary Jo’s anthology idea is terrific. I would stand in line to buy it. 🙂 (And I love River of Fire, Mary Jo. I reread it not long ago.)
    Regular wenchly poster Maggie does an incredible job of finding paintings to go with her blog topics. Seeing them is one of the perks of visiting Maggie’s blog.

    Reply
  26. I’m afraid the only one of these I like is the Vermeer, maybe because it doesn’t demand a particular story, or even a particular type of story. Instead, it’s full of possibilities.

    Reply
  27. I’m afraid the only one of these I like is the Vermeer, maybe because it doesn’t demand a particular story, or even a particular type of story. Instead, it’s full of possibilities.

    Reply
  28. I’m afraid the only one of these I like is the Vermeer, maybe because it doesn’t demand a particular story, or even a particular type of story. Instead, it’s full of possibilities.

    Reply
  29. I’m afraid the only one of these I like is the Vermeer, maybe because it doesn’t demand a particular story, or even a particular type of story. Instead, it’s full of possibilities.

    Reply
  30. I’m afraid the only one of these I like is the Vermeer, maybe because it doesn’t demand a particular story, or even a particular type of story. Instead, it’s full of possibilities.

    Reply
  31. I love these paintings, too, Susan Sarah, and yes, it’s the implicit story that pulls me in, too. But it’s also the softness of the light and the lushness of the textures. I love the preRaphaelites and the honest romanticism in them.
    Mary Jo, I love that anthology idea. I’d choose the Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Silent Greeting.
    When I was a teacher I used to take students to the art gallery for English class and get them to find a painting that made them think of a story. We used to make books out of them with each painting and story side by side. Do you suppose it was wish fulfilment on my part? LOL.

    Reply
  32. I love these paintings, too, Susan Sarah, and yes, it’s the implicit story that pulls me in, too. But it’s also the softness of the light and the lushness of the textures. I love the preRaphaelites and the honest romanticism in them.
    Mary Jo, I love that anthology idea. I’d choose the Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Silent Greeting.
    When I was a teacher I used to take students to the art gallery for English class and get them to find a painting that made them think of a story. We used to make books out of them with each painting and story side by side. Do you suppose it was wish fulfilment on my part? LOL.

    Reply
  33. I love these paintings, too, Susan Sarah, and yes, it’s the implicit story that pulls me in, too. But it’s also the softness of the light and the lushness of the textures. I love the preRaphaelites and the honest romanticism in them.
    Mary Jo, I love that anthology idea. I’d choose the Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Silent Greeting.
    When I was a teacher I used to take students to the art gallery for English class and get them to find a painting that made them think of a story. We used to make books out of them with each painting and story side by side. Do you suppose it was wish fulfilment on my part? LOL.

    Reply
  34. I love these paintings, too, Susan Sarah, and yes, it’s the implicit story that pulls me in, too. But it’s also the softness of the light and the lushness of the textures. I love the preRaphaelites and the honest romanticism in them.
    Mary Jo, I love that anthology idea. I’d choose the Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Silent Greeting.
    When I was a teacher I used to take students to the art gallery for English class and get them to find a painting that made them think of a story. We used to make books out of them with each painting and story side by side. Do you suppose it was wish fulfilment on my part? LOL.

    Reply
  35. I love these paintings, too, Susan Sarah, and yes, it’s the implicit story that pulls me in, too. But it’s also the softness of the light and the lushness of the textures. I love the preRaphaelites and the honest romanticism in them.
    Mary Jo, I love that anthology idea. I’d choose the Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Silent Greeting.
    When I was a teacher I used to take students to the art gallery for English class and get them to find a painting that made them think of a story. We used to make books out of them with each painting and story side by side. Do you suppose it was wish fulfilment on my part? LOL.

    Reply
  36. Glad to see you all are having some fun with this.
    Great idea for an anthology, Mary Jo, sign me up, though with ownership and image printing issues, it might remain an “air anthology!” 😉
    Definitely, Anne, the qualities of light, texture, color, technique, composition, etc. are huge factors in how deeply we’re drawn into these and other paintings. Looking at story potential seemed like a fun break this time.
    Virginia ~ LOL on the Sonny Bono as 19th c. artist!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  37. Glad to see you all are having some fun with this.
    Great idea for an anthology, Mary Jo, sign me up, though with ownership and image printing issues, it might remain an “air anthology!” 😉
    Definitely, Anne, the qualities of light, texture, color, technique, composition, etc. are huge factors in how deeply we’re drawn into these and other paintings. Looking at story potential seemed like a fun break this time.
    Virginia ~ LOL on the Sonny Bono as 19th c. artist!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  38. Glad to see you all are having some fun with this.
    Great idea for an anthology, Mary Jo, sign me up, though with ownership and image printing issues, it might remain an “air anthology!” 😉
    Definitely, Anne, the qualities of light, texture, color, technique, composition, etc. are huge factors in how deeply we’re drawn into these and other paintings. Looking at story potential seemed like a fun break this time.
    Virginia ~ LOL on the Sonny Bono as 19th c. artist!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  39. Glad to see you all are having some fun with this.
    Great idea for an anthology, Mary Jo, sign me up, though with ownership and image printing issues, it might remain an “air anthology!” 😉
    Definitely, Anne, the qualities of light, texture, color, technique, composition, etc. are huge factors in how deeply we’re drawn into these and other paintings. Looking at story potential seemed like a fun break this time.
    Virginia ~ LOL on the Sonny Bono as 19th c. artist!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  40. Glad to see you all are having some fun with this.
    Great idea for an anthology, Mary Jo, sign me up, though with ownership and image printing issues, it might remain an “air anthology!” 😉
    Definitely, Anne, the qualities of light, texture, color, technique, composition, etc. are huge factors in how deeply we’re drawn into these and other paintings. Looking at story potential seemed like a fun break this time.
    Virginia ~ LOL on the Sonny Bono as 19th c. artist!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  41. Ooooh, this is fun! And I do need a creative pick-me-up.
    Let see…
    The Painter’s Honeymoon — He is sketching how he imagines their first child, or planning out their first home when he makes it big.
    Yseult — She is yearning for her lover who is to come home from the sea.
    The Tempest — No more will she love him!
    Silent Greeting (I would name the piece Silent Good-bye) The king he serves is going to war. He lays the roses upon the wedding gown she’s been feverishly preparing. He will not marry her, only to leave her with a broken heart.
    Nina, feeling inspired.

    Reply
  42. Ooooh, this is fun! And I do need a creative pick-me-up.
    Let see…
    The Painter’s Honeymoon — He is sketching how he imagines their first child, or planning out their first home when he makes it big.
    Yseult — She is yearning for her lover who is to come home from the sea.
    The Tempest — No more will she love him!
    Silent Greeting (I would name the piece Silent Good-bye) The king he serves is going to war. He lays the roses upon the wedding gown she’s been feverishly preparing. He will not marry her, only to leave her with a broken heart.
    Nina, feeling inspired.

    Reply
  43. Ooooh, this is fun! And I do need a creative pick-me-up.
    Let see…
    The Painter’s Honeymoon — He is sketching how he imagines their first child, or planning out their first home when he makes it big.
    Yseult — She is yearning for her lover who is to come home from the sea.
    The Tempest — No more will she love him!
    Silent Greeting (I would name the piece Silent Good-bye) The king he serves is going to war. He lays the roses upon the wedding gown she’s been feverishly preparing. He will not marry her, only to leave her with a broken heart.
    Nina, feeling inspired.

    Reply
  44. Ooooh, this is fun! And I do need a creative pick-me-up.
    Let see…
    The Painter’s Honeymoon — He is sketching how he imagines their first child, or planning out their first home when he makes it big.
    Yseult — She is yearning for her lover who is to come home from the sea.
    The Tempest — No more will she love him!
    Silent Greeting (I would name the piece Silent Good-bye) The king he serves is going to war. He lays the roses upon the wedding gown she’s been feverishly preparing. He will not marry her, only to leave her with a broken heart.
    Nina, feeling inspired.

    Reply
  45. Ooooh, this is fun! And I do need a creative pick-me-up.
    Let see…
    The Painter’s Honeymoon — He is sketching how he imagines their first child, or planning out their first home when he makes it big.
    Yseult — She is yearning for her lover who is to come home from the sea.
    The Tempest — No more will she love him!
    Silent Greeting (I would name the piece Silent Good-bye) The king he serves is going to war. He lays the roses upon the wedding gown she’s been feverishly preparing. He will not marry her, only to leave her with a broken heart.
    Nina, feeling inspired.

    Reply
  46. Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Silent Greeting
    “After an exhausting week of sewing costumes so her wicked stepbrothers can attend the masquerade ball, poor Cinderella collapses on the sofa with exhaustion.”

    Reply
  47. Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Silent Greeting
    “After an exhausting week of sewing costumes so her wicked stepbrothers can attend the masquerade ball, poor Cinderella collapses on the sofa with exhaustion.”

    Reply
  48. Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Silent Greeting
    “After an exhausting week of sewing costumes so her wicked stepbrothers can attend the masquerade ball, poor Cinderella collapses on the sofa with exhaustion.”

    Reply
  49. Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Silent Greeting
    “After an exhausting week of sewing costumes so her wicked stepbrothers can attend the masquerade ball, poor Cinderella collapses on the sofa with exhaustion.”

    Reply
  50. Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Silent Greeting
    “After an exhausting week of sewing costumes so her wicked stepbrothers can attend the masquerade ball, poor Cinderella collapses on the sofa with exhaustion.”

    Reply
  51. Oh, I could cry! These paintings just … just … they are so filled with palpable passion!
    I’m an artist and painter, though I have never had any formal study of paintings like symbolism, etc. But I knows what I likes. And the pre-Raphaelites speak to me big time.
    In Painter’s Honeymoon, I see hearts all over the place. Literally. I noticed how the faces & hair of the man and woman form hearts. Each has a part in the middle, and the way the hair sweeps from the part, and the shape of each face–her pointed chin, his beard making his jaw pointed–it turns their faces into hearts.
    The heart theme is also carried out in the lower half of her billowy skirt and by his crossed legs.
    Silent Greeting just pulls at my heartstrings with its tenderness! He has obviously just placed the flowers on the garment she’s been sewing. When she awakens, she will know he has been there. She will know, because she dreamed of him while she slept.

    Reply
  52. Oh, I could cry! These paintings just … just … they are so filled with palpable passion!
    I’m an artist and painter, though I have never had any formal study of paintings like symbolism, etc. But I knows what I likes. And the pre-Raphaelites speak to me big time.
    In Painter’s Honeymoon, I see hearts all over the place. Literally. I noticed how the faces & hair of the man and woman form hearts. Each has a part in the middle, and the way the hair sweeps from the part, and the shape of each face–her pointed chin, his beard making his jaw pointed–it turns their faces into hearts.
    The heart theme is also carried out in the lower half of her billowy skirt and by his crossed legs.
    Silent Greeting just pulls at my heartstrings with its tenderness! He has obviously just placed the flowers on the garment she’s been sewing. When she awakens, she will know he has been there. She will know, because she dreamed of him while she slept.

    Reply
  53. Oh, I could cry! These paintings just … just … they are so filled with palpable passion!
    I’m an artist and painter, though I have never had any formal study of paintings like symbolism, etc. But I knows what I likes. And the pre-Raphaelites speak to me big time.
    In Painter’s Honeymoon, I see hearts all over the place. Literally. I noticed how the faces & hair of the man and woman form hearts. Each has a part in the middle, and the way the hair sweeps from the part, and the shape of each face–her pointed chin, his beard making his jaw pointed–it turns their faces into hearts.
    The heart theme is also carried out in the lower half of her billowy skirt and by his crossed legs.
    Silent Greeting just pulls at my heartstrings with its tenderness! He has obviously just placed the flowers on the garment she’s been sewing. When she awakens, she will know he has been there. She will know, because she dreamed of him while she slept.

    Reply
  54. Oh, I could cry! These paintings just … just … they are so filled with palpable passion!
    I’m an artist and painter, though I have never had any formal study of paintings like symbolism, etc. But I knows what I likes. And the pre-Raphaelites speak to me big time.
    In Painter’s Honeymoon, I see hearts all over the place. Literally. I noticed how the faces & hair of the man and woman form hearts. Each has a part in the middle, and the way the hair sweeps from the part, and the shape of each face–her pointed chin, his beard making his jaw pointed–it turns their faces into hearts.
    The heart theme is also carried out in the lower half of her billowy skirt and by his crossed legs.
    Silent Greeting just pulls at my heartstrings with its tenderness! He has obviously just placed the flowers on the garment she’s been sewing. When she awakens, she will know he has been there. She will know, because she dreamed of him while she slept.

    Reply
  55. Oh, I could cry! These paintings just … just … they are so filled with palpable passion!
    I’m an artist and painter, though I have never had any formal study of paintings like symbolism, etc. But I knows what I likes. And the pre-Raphaelites speak to me big time.
    In Painter’s Honeymoon, I see hearts all over the place. Literally. I noticed how the faces & hair of the man and woman form hearts. Each has a part in the middle, and the way the hair sweeps from the part, and the shape of each face–her pointed chin, his beard making his jaw pointed–it turns their faces into hearts.
    The heart theme is also carried out in the lower half of her billowy skirt and by his crossed legs.
    Silent Greeting just pulls at my heartstrings with its tenderness! He has obviously just placed the flowers on the garment she’s been sewing. When she awakens, she will know he has been there. She will know, because she dreamed of him while she slept.

    Reply

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