A Taste of Autumn . . .

Images-1Cara/Andrea here, Regardless of what the lunar calendar says, here in the U. S. this first Monday in September marks the End of Summer. We reluctantly kick off the flip-flops, shed shorts and bathing suits for “real” clothing and say goodbye to lazy afternoons in the hammock. Yes, the weather is still hot and the noonday sun feels as bright as a July firecracker, but here in the Northeast, I’m already seeing the first small hints of Autumn.

Images-3Apples are a big part of the traditional change of seasons—the first crop of Macintoshes are starting to appear in the farmer’s markets. Fresh pressed cider, an iconic part of my childhood, is also hitting the shelves, its cinnamon-dark hue and spicy scent setting off all sorts of sweet memories.

Images-2Cider was also an integral part of Autumn in Regency times, where it was hugely popular, but its roots go much deeper into history. It’s thought that the apple tree originated in the area of present-day Kazakhstan and spread across Asia and Europe. There are references to apples trees along the Nile River delta in Ancient Egyptian writings, and both the Greeks and the Romans created libations from apples. The Romans found that the local tribes also were making cider when they arrived in the British Isles. (It likely was learned from contact with Brittany, whose weather and soil is particularly well-suited to apple cultivation.) And by early medieval times, cider was popular throughout Europe. (The word cider is likely derived from the Hebrew word shekar, which means “strong drink.” Most cider was what we today call hard cider—fermented with natural yeast to create an alcoholic drink.)

Apple+cider+millThe Norman invasion of Britain brought with it an even greater thirst for the beverage, and cider became an integral part of British life. (The famous Wycliffe Bible, created in the early 15th century, makes reference to cider!) By the 18th century, orchards were a common part of the landscape, and it had become common to pay farm laborers in Britain their wages in part with cider.

Wycliffe_GospelSo it's no surprise that the early English colonists brought their love for cider to the New World. New England had only a very bitter type of native crab apple, so seeds from Britain were quickly planted and grafts made (grafting is important to establish a trees that bear the desired fruit—a botanist will explain this better than I can!) so the colonist in America were soon enjoying their favorite brew. The fact that barley and other grains—the raw material for beer—didn’t grow well in the rocky soil of New England helped ensure that apple-based alcohol was the beverage of choice.
According to historical records, by the end of the 18th century, New England was producing over 300,000 gallons of cider per year, and the average individual consumption in Massachusetts was 35 gallons!

Johnny appleseedAs settlers headed West, they brought the apple with them—you’ve probably all heard the legend of Johnny Appleseed, a man who supposedly was responsible for planted myriad trees on the journey across the continent. Cider remained extremely popular in America until the beginning of the 20th century, when a wave of German and Middle European immigrants to the Midwest brought a thirst for beer. The farmland there was well-suited to hops and grain, and improved transportation allowed for beer to be easily distributed to other areas of the country. Cider, which has a very low alcohol content due to having less sugar than grapes, slowly gave way to the more potent punch of beer.

Images-4But it was Prohibition and the Volstead Act which caused cider to evaporate as a staple of American life. Hard cider became illegal, and many of the orchards devoted to cider apples—they are too tart to be used as eating apples—were destroyed by Prohibitionists. And with the Volstead Act limiting “sweet” cider to 200 gallons per year per orchard (to prevent people from making their own apple moonshine) the remaining orchards were hard-pressed to stay in business.

ImagesToday there is a resurgence in hard cider production. Like the microbrewery trend, local orchards are developing an enthusiastic following for their handcrafted brews. So while many people toast the end of summer with gin and tonics or other summer cocktails, I think I’ll raise a glass to cider, and salute its sweet place in history!

How about you—do you like cider (either sweet or hard)? And what’s your favorite eating apple? Mine is the Macoun, which doesn’t keep well, so is best right now. And if apples aren’t to your taste, what’s your favorite Autumn drink or food?

175 thoughts on “A Taste of Autumn . . .”

  1. Being a loyal Minnesotan, I claim partiality to the Honeycrisp, which I always crave at this time of year. In fact, I have one and some good cheddar waiting in the fridge. That sounds good right about now …

    Reply
  2. Being a loyal Minnesotan, I claim partiality to the Honeycrisp, which I always crave at this time of year. In fact, I have one and some good cheddar waiting in the fridge. That sounds good right about now …

    Reply
  3. Being a loyal Minnesotan, I claim partiality to the Honeycrisp, which I always crave at this time of year. In fact, I have one and some good cheddar waiting in the fridge. That sounds good right about now …

    Reply
  4. Being a loyal Minnesotan, I claim partiality to the Honeycrisp, which I always crave at this time of year. In fact, I have one and some good cheddar waiting in the fridge. That sounds good right about now …

    Reply
  5. Being a loyal Minnesotan, I claim partiality to the Honeycrisp, which I always crave at this time of year. In fact, I have one and some good cheddar waiting in the fridge. That sounds good right about now …

    Reply
  6. I enjoy hard cider. I love its resurgence in popularity, because I’ve never learned to like beer (I dislike the taste of hops). I’m not very adventurous when it comes to eating apples — my favorite is Golden Delicious. When I was a child, there were very few commercially-available varieties (Red Delicious, Granny Smith and McIntosh were often the only options at our grocery store). We made visits to a local orchard every Fall and filled bushel baskets with their Golden Delicious apples. They were only available for a narrow window each year, so they still taste like something special to me.

    Reply
  7. I enjoy hard cider. I love its resurgence in popularity, because I’ve never learned to like beer (I dislike the taste of hops). I’m not very adventurous when it comes to eating apples — my favorite is Golden Delicious. When I was a child, there were very few commercially-available varieties (Red Delicious, Granny Smith and McIntosh were often the only options at our grocery store). We made visits to a local orchard every Fall and filled bushel baskets with their Golden Delicious apples. They were only available for a narrow window each year, so they still taste like something special to me.

    Reply
  8. I enjoy hard cider. I love its resurgence in popularity, because I’ve never learned to like beer (I dislike the taste of hops). I’m not very adventurous when it comes to eating apples — my favorite is Golden Delicious. When I was a child, there were very few commercially-available varieties (Red Delicious, Granny Smith and McIntosh were often the only options at our grocery store). We made visits to a local orchard every Fall and filled bushel baskets with their Golden Delicious apples. They were only available for a narrow window each year, so they still taste like something special to me.

    Reply
  9. I enjoy hard cider. I love its resurgence in popularity, because I’ve never learned to like beer (I dislike the taste of hops). I’m not very adventurous when it comes to eating apples — my favorite is Golden Delicious. When I was a child, there were very few commercially-available varieties (Red Delicious, Granny Smith and McIntosh were often the only options at our grocery store). We made visits to a local orchard every Fall and filled bushel baskets with their Golden Delicious apples. They were only available for a narrow window each year, so they still taste like something special to me.

    Reply
  10. I enjoy hard cider. I love its resurgence in popularity, because I’ve never learned to like beer (I dislike the taste of hops). I’m not very adventurous when it comes to eating apples — my favorite is Golden Delicious. When I was a child, there were very few commercially-available varieties (Red Delicious, Granny Smith and McIntosh were often the only options at our grocery store). We made visits to a local orchard every Fall and filled bushel baskets with their Golden Delicious apples. They were only available for a narrow window each year, so they still taste like something special to me.

    Reply
  11. I like beer, but not a real aficianado. I do like wine . . .but hard cider really is becoming more and more appealing, what with all the local-sourced brews. The old types were too sweet and strong, but the new types have more sophistication and subtle a sparkle. But of course I will have to sample a lot more to make a definitive decision

    Reply
  12. I like beer, but not a real aficianado. I do like wine . . .but hard cider really is becoming more and more appealing, what with all the local-sourced brews. The old types were too sweet and strong, but the new types have more sophistication and subtle a sparkle. But of course I will have to sample a lot more to make a definitive decision

    Reply
  13. I like beer, but not a real aficianado. I do like wine . . .but hard cider really is becoming more and more appealing, what with all the local-sourced brews. The old types were too sweet and strong, but the new types have more sophistication and subtle a sparkle. But of course I will have to sample a lot more to make a definitive decision

    Reply
  14. I like beer, but not a real aficianado. I do like wine . . .but hard cider really is becoming more and more appealing, what with all the local-sourced brews. The old types were too sweet and strong, but the new types have more sophistication and subtle a sparkle. But of course I will have to sample a lot more to make a definitive decision

    Reply
  15. I like beer, but not a real aficianado. I do like wine . . .but hard cider really is becoming more and more appealing, what with all the local-sourced brews. The old types were too sweet and strong, but the new types have more sophistication and subtle a sparkle. But of course I will have to sample a lot more to make a definitive decision

    Reply
  16. The scent and taste of autumn! When I was a kid, we’d go to the local ramshackle cider mill to get cider of the fresh, non-alcoholic variety. That’s still my favorite. These days, my favorite eating apple is the Honeycrisp. Particularly with chunky peanut butter. *G*

    Reply
  17. The scent and taste of autumn! When I was a kid, we’d go to the local ramshackle cider mill to get cider of the fresh, non-alcoholic variety. That’s still my favorite. These days, my favorite eating apple is the Honeycrisp. Particularly with chunky peanut butter. *G*

    Reply
  18. The scent and taste of autumn! When I was a kid, we’d go to the local ramshackle cider mill to get cider of the fresh, non-alcoholic variety. That’s still my favorite. These days, my favorite eating apple is the Honeycrisp. Particularly with chunky peanut butter. *G*

    Reply
  19. The scent and taste of autumn! When I was a kid, we’d go to the local ramshackle cider mill to get cider of the fresh, non-alcoholic variety. That’s still my favorite. These days, my favorite eating apple is the Honeycrisp. Particularly with chunky peanut butter. *G*

    Reply
  20. The scent and taste of autumn! When I was a kid, we’d go to the local ramshackle cider mill to get cider of the fresh, non-alcoholic variety. That’s still my favorite. These days, my favorite eating apple is the Honeycrisp. Particularly with chunky peanut butter. *G*

    Reply
  21. Oh, the scent and taste really do work together. I loved going to a big orchard nearby our home, where three generations of the family ran the operation. The grandmother would take the money after we’d chosen our bushels baskets in the old barn, and picked up a jug of fresh pressed cider. For me, the scent of apples brings back memories of crisp Fall days, and the joy of those first few bites into a just-picked apple. Wonderful!
    Peanut butter on an apple—why didn’t I think of that!

    Reply
  22. Oh, the scent and taste really do work together. I loved going to a big orchard nearby our home, where three generations of the family ran the operation. The grandmother would take the money after we’d chosen our bushels baskets in the old barn, and picked up a jug of fresh pressed cider. For me, the scent of apples brings back memories of crisp Fall days, and the joy of those first few bites into a just-picked apple. Wonderful!
    Peanut butter on an apple—why didn’t I think of that!

    Reply
  23. Oh, the scent and taste really do work together. I loved going to a big orchard nearby our home, where three generations of the family ran the operation. The grandmother would take the money after we’d chosen our bushels baskets in the old barn, and picked up a jug of fresh pressed cider. For me, the scent of apples brings back memories of crisp Fall days, and the joy of those first few bites into a just-picked apple. Wonderful!
    Peanut butter on an apple—why didn’t I think of that!

    Reply
  24. Oh, the scent and taste really do work together. I loved going to a big orchard nearby our home, where three generations of the family ran the operation. The grandmother would take the money after we’d chosen our bushels baskets in the old barn, and picked up a jug of fresh pressed cider. For me, the scent of apples brings back memories of crisp Fall days, and the joy of those first few bites into a just-picked apple. Wonderful!
    Peanut butter on an apple—why didn’t I think of that!

    Reply
  25. Oh, the scent and taste really do work together. I loved going to a big orchard nearby our home, where three generations of the family ran the operation. The grandmother would take the money after we’d chosen our bushels baskets in the old barn, and picked up a jug of fresh pressed cider. For me, the scent of apples brings back memories of crisp Fall days, and the joy of those first few bites into a just-picked apple. Wonderful!
    Peanut butter on an apple—why didn’t I think of that!

    Reply
  26. Love sweet cider! Ever since my kids were little (they’re teenaged now) we would take a trek out to the orchard for cider and cider donuts. Since our orchard also has a pumpkin patch, we bring home the fall pumpkins as well. Even if they never get made into jack o lanterns, they make great autumn decor. And the favorite apple in our family is the Fuji–very crisp and sweet!

    Reply
  27. Love sweet cider! Ever since my kids were little (they’re teenaged now) we would take a trek out to the orchard for cider and cider donuts. Since our orchard also has a pumpkin patch, we bring home the fall pumpkins as well. Even if they never get made into jack o lanterns, they make great autumn decor. And the favorite apple in our family is the Fuji–very crisp and sweet!

    Reply
  28. Love sweet cider! Ever since my kids were little (they’re teenaged now) we would take a trek out to the orchard for cider and cider donuts. Since our orchard also has a pumpkin patch, we bring home the fall pumpkins as well. Even if they never get made into jack o lanterns, they make great autumn decor. And the favorite apple in our family is the Fuji–very crisp and sweet!

    Reply
  29. Love sweet cider! Ever since my kids were little (they’re teenaged now) we would take a trek out to the orchard for cider and cider donuts. Since our orchard also has a pumpkin patch, we bring home the fall pumpkins as well. Even if they never get made into jack o lanterns, they make great autumn decor. And the favorite apple in our family is the Fuji–very crisp and sweet!

    Reply
  30. Love sweet cider! Ever since my kids were little (they’re teenaged now) we would take a trek out to the orchard for cider and cider donuts. Since our orchard also has a pumpkin patch, we bring home the fall pumpkins as well. Even if they never get made into jack o lanterns, they make great autumn decor. And the favorite apple in our family is the Fuji–very crisp and sweet!

    Reply
  31. I’m glad hard cider is making a reappearance because I like it so much more than beer. I like the sweet fresh-pressed too—hard to believe it’s related to apple juice.
    For eting, I don’t think I have a favorite variety, but for pies, I love Winesaps. Unfortunately they don’t always make an appearance in my neighborhood, even at the farmstands.

    Reply
  32. I’m glad hard cider is making a reappearance because I like it so much more than beer. I like the sweet fresh-pressed too—hard to believe it’s related to apple juice.
    For eting, I don’t think I have a favorite variety, but for pies, I love Winesaps. Unfortunately they don’t always make an appearance in my neighborhood, even at the farmstands.

    Reply
  33. I’m glad hard cider is making a reappearance because I like it so much more than beer. I like the sweet fresh-pressed too—hard to believe it’s related to apple juice.
    For eting, I don’t think I have a favorite variety, but for pies, I love Winesaps. Unfortunately they don’t always make an appearance in my neighborhood, even at the farmstands.

    Reply
  34. I’m glad hard cider is making a reappearance because I like it so much more than beer. I like the sweet fresh-pressed too—hard to believe it’s related to apple juice.
    For eting, I don’t think I have a favorite variety, but for pies, I love Winesaps. Unfortunately they don’t always make an appearance in my neighborhood, even at the farmstands.

    Reply
  35. I’m glad hard cider is making a reappearance because I like it so much more than beer. I like the sweet fresh-pressed too—hard to believe it’s related to apple juice.
    For eting, I don’t think I have a favorite variety, but for pies, I love Winesaps. Unfortunately they don’t always make an appearance in my neighborhood, even at the farmstands.

    Reply
  36. Cider is making a resurgence here (downunder) too, and the many varieties available entice you to keep tasting. It’s Spring here so the trees are just coming into blossom, so I’ll raise a toast to Spring instead.
    I also have fond memories of crab-apples — we had several trees in one house we lived in and my mother sent us up the tree to pick them, and made crab apple jelly — wine red and delicious. I’d make some myself, but nobody I know has a crab-apple tree.
    As for my favorite apple — it’s the Fuji — script and sweet but not too sweet.

    Reply
  37. Cider is making a resurgence here (downunder) too, and the many varieties available entice you to keep tasting. It’s Spring here so the trees are just coming into blossom, so I’ll raise a toast to Spring instead.
    I also have fond memories of crab-apples — we had several trees in one house we lived in and my mother sent us up the tree to pick them, and made crab apple jelly — wine red and delicious. I’d make some myself, but nobody I know has a crab-apple tree.
    As for my favorite apple — it’s the Fuji — script and sweet but not too sweet.

    Reply
  38. Cider is making a resurgence here (downunder) too, and the many varieties available entice you to keep tasting. It’s Spring here so the trees are just coming into blossom, so I’ll raise a toast to Spring instead.
    I also have fond memories of crab-apples — we had several trees in one house we lived in and my mother sent us up the tree to pick them, and made crab apple jelly — wine red and delicious. I’d make some myself, but nobody I know has a crab-apple tree.
    As for my favorite apple — it’s the Fuji — script and sweet but not too sweet.

    Reply
  39. Cider is making a resurgence here (downunder) too, and the many varieties available entice you to keep tasting. It’s Spring here so the trees are just coming into blossom, so I’ll raise a toast to Spring instead.
    I also have fond memories of crab-apples — we had several trees in one house we lived in and my mother sent us up the tree to pick them, and made crab apple jelly — wine red and delicious. I’d make some myself, but nobody I know has a crab-apple tree.
    As for my favorite apple — it’s the Fuji — script and sweet but not too sweet.

    Reply
  40. Cider is making a resurgence here (downunder) too, and the many varieties available entice you to keep tasting. It’s Spring here so the trees are just coming into blossom, so I’ll raise a toast to Spring instead.
    I also have fond memories of crab-apples — we had several trees in one house we lived in and my mother sent us up the tree to pick them, and made crab apple jelly — wine red and delicious. I’d make some myself, but nobody I know has a crab-apple tree.
    As for my favorite apple — it’s the Fuji — script and sweet but not too sweet.

    Reply
  41. Being English, there’s no cider that’s not alcoholic! The other stuff is apple juice. *G*
    I do like cider as a summer drink, but for some reason I’d not drink it in the colder months, not even hot spiced cider.

    Reply
  42. Being English, there’s no cider that’s not alcoholic! The other stuff is apple juice. *G*
    I do like cider as a summer drink, but for some reason I’d not drink it in the colder months, not even hot spiced cider.

    Reply
  43. Being English, there’s no cider that’s not alcoholic! The other stuff is apple juice. *G*
    I do like cider as a summer drink, but for some reason I’d not drink it in the colder months, not even hot spiced cider.

    Reply
  44. Being English, there’s no cider that’s not alcoholic! The other stuff is apple juice. *G*
    I do like cider as a summer drink, but for some reason I’d not drink it in the colder months, not even hot spiced cider.

    Reply
  45. Being English, there’s no cider that’s not alcoholic! The other stuff is apple juice. *G*
    I do like cider as a summer drink, but for some reason I’d not drink it in the colder months, not even hot spiced cider.

    Reply
  46. Fresh (sweet) cider for me. I’m also a Honeycrisp fan. Good substitutes for the Honeycrips are the already mention Fuji, the Gala, and the Pink Lady. All four are great eating apples and also great cooking apples.
    For Applesauce (best made in spring and early summer) the best apples ever were the Transparents, which are too tart to make a good eating apple. They make excellent applesauce. Unfortunately I cannot find them these days.

    Reply
  47. Fresh (sweet) cider for me. I’m also a Honeycrisp fan. Good substitutes for the Honeycrips are the already mention Fuji, the Gala, and the Pink Lady. All four are great eating apples and also great cooking apples.
    For Applesauce (best made in spring and early summer) the best apples ever were the Transparents, which are too tart to make a good eating apple. They make excellent applesauce. Unfortunately I cannot find them these days.

    Reply
  48. Fresh (sweet) cider for me. I’m also a Honeycrisp fan. Good substitutes for the Honeycrips are the already mention Fuji, the Gala, and the Pink Lady. All four are great eating apples and also great cooking apples.
    For Applesauce (best made in spring and early summer) the best apples ever were the Transparents, which are too tart to make a good eating apple. They make excellent applesauce. Unfortunately I cannot find them these days.

    Reply
  49. Fresh (sweet) cider for me. I’m also a Honeycrisp fan. Good substitutes for the Honeycrips are the already mention Fuji, the Gala, and the Pink Lady. All four are great eating apples and also great cooking apples.
    For Applesauce (best made in spring and early summer) the best apples ever were the Transparents, which are too tart to make a good eating apple. They make excellent applesauce. Unfortunately I cannot find them these days.

    Reply
  50. Fresh (sweet) cider for me. I’m also a Honeycrisp fan. Good substitutes for the Honeycrips are the already mention Fuji, the Gala, and the Pink Lady. All four are great eating apples and also great cooking apples.
    For Applesauce (best made in spring and early summer) the best apples ever were the Transparents, which are too tart to make a good eating apple. They make excellent applesauce. Unfortunately I cannot find them these days.

    Reply
  51. I thought I’d chime in again. I love some of the old apple varieties—they don’t sound as if they were named by a marketing executive: Foxwhelp, Tremlett’s Bitter, Knobbed Russet. (A character in my first book was planting orchards.)

    Reply
  52. I thought I’d chime in again. I love some of the old apple varieties—they don’t sound as if they were named by a marketing executive: Foxwhelp, Tremlett’s Bitter, Knobbed Russet. (A character in my first book was planting orchards.)

    Reply
  53. I thought I’d chime in again. I love some of the old apple varieties—they don’t sound as if they were named by a marketing executive: Foxwhelp, Tremlett’s Bitter, Knobbed Russet. (A character in my first book was planting orchards.)

    Reply
  54. I thought I’d chime in again. I love some of the old apple varieties—they don’t sound as if they were named by a marketing executive: Foxwhelp, Tremlett’s Bitter, Knobbed Russet. (A character in my first book was planting orchards.)

    Reply
  55. I thought I’d chime in again. I love some of the old apple varieties—they don’t sound as if they were named by a marketing executive: Foxwhelp, Tremlett’s Bitter, Knobbed Russet. (A character in my first book was planting orchards.)

    Reply
  56. How nice to hear an orchard visit was/is part of your autumn rituals. Just got back from a weekend in Vermont and one stop was a famous mill with cider donuts. Next weekend will be a trip to the local apple barn for fresh cider and the first crop of local apples. Can’t wait!

    Reply
  57. How nice to hear an orchard visit was/is part of your autumn rituals. Just got back from a weekend in Vermont and one stop was a famous mill with cider donuts. Next weekend will be a trip to the local apple barn for fresh cider and the first crop of local apples. Can’t wait!

    Reply
  58. How nice to hear an orchard visit was/is part of your autumn rituals. Just got back from a weekend in Vermont and one stop was a famous mill with cider donuts. Next weekend will be a trip to the local apple barn for fresh cider and the first crop of local apples. Can’t wait!

    Reply
  59. How nice to hear an orchard visit was/is part of your autumn rituals. Just got back from a weekend in Vermont and one stop was a famous mill with cider donuts. Next weekend will be a trip to the local apple barn for fresh cider and the first crop of local apples. Can’t wait!

    Reply
  60. How nice to hear an orchard visit was/is part of your autumn rituals. Just got back from a weekend in Vermont and one stop was a famous mill with cider donuts. Next weekend will be a trip to the local apple barn for fresh cider and the first crop of local apples. Can’t wait!

    Reply
  61. Anne,sorry for the season reference, which I know is opposite Down Under. But in the U.S., this Monday is the traditional end of summer, (though many schoolkids have already gone back to classes at the end of August) so I was thinking of what sorts of things I look forward to in Autumn. Glad to hear the Aussie like cider too!
    I’ve never had crab apple jelly, though I’ve heard a lot about it. Will now have to look for it at farmer’s markets.

    Reply
  62. Anne,sorry for the season reference, which I know is opposite Down Under. But in the U.S., this Monday is the traditional end of summer, (though many schoolkids have already gone back to classes at the end of August) so I was thinking of what sorts of things I look forward to in Autumn. Glad to hear the Aussie like cider too!
    I’ve never had crab apple jelly, though I’ve heard a lot about it. Will now have to look for it at farmer’s markets.

    Reply
  63. Anne,sorry for the season reference, which I know is opposite Down Under. But in the U.S., this Monday is the traditional end of summer, (though many schoolkids have already gone back to classes at the end of August) so I was thinking of what sorts of things I look forward to in Autumn. Glad to hear the Aussie like cider too!
    I’ve never had crab apple jelly, though I’ve heard a lot about it. Will now have to look for it at farmer’s markets.

    Reply
  64. Anne,sorry for the season reference, which I know is opposite Down Under. But in the U.S., this Monday is the traditional end of summer, (though many schoolkids have already gone back to classes at the end of August) so I was thinking of what sorts of things I look forward to in Autumn. Glad to hear the Aussie like cider too!
    I’ve never had crab apple jelly, though I’ve heard a lot about it. Will now have to look for it at farmer’s markets.

    Reply
  65. Anne,sorry for the season reference, which I know is opposite Down Under. But in the U.S., this Monday is the traditional end of summer, (though many schoolkids have already gone back to classes at the end of August) so I was thinking of what sorts of things I look forward to in Autumn. Glad to hear the Aussie like cider too!
    I’ve never had crab apple jelly, though I’ve heard a lot about it. Will now have to look for it at farmer’s markets.

    Reply
  66. Wow! Who knew? Well, you, obviously, and now the rest of us! Thanks for the interesting info…darn those Prohibitionists. I don’t really drink much, but usually order cider when I’m in England. But it’s Magner’s Pear Cider, which is delicious. We met a couple there who own a cider apple orchard, and most of their apples go to American companies.
    When my kids were little we lived near a farm stand that sold Wolf River apples. They were as large as a baby’s head, and were great for pies. 2 would do, so you never got tired peeling, LOL. The kids like to see if they could eat the whole apple, though they’re recommended for cooking. We like Honeycrisps now.
    There’s nothing so homey as a bowl of apples on the kitchen table.

    Reply
  67. Wow! Who knew? Well, you, obviously, and now the rest of us! Thanks for the interesting info…darn those Prohibitionists. I don’t really drink much, but usually order cider when I’m in England. But it’s Magner’s Pear Cider, which is delicious. We met a couple there who own a cider apple orchard, and most of their apples go to American companies.
    When my kids were little we lived near a farm stand that sold Wolf River apples. They were as large as a baby’s head, and were great for pies. 2 would do, so you never got tired peeling, LOL. The kids like to see if they could eat the whole apple, though they’re recommended for cooking. We like Honeycrisps now.
    There’s nothing so homey as a bowl of apples on the kitchen table.

    Reply
  68. Wow! Who knew? Well, you, obviously, and now the rest of us! Thanks for the interesting info…darn those Prohibitionists. I don’t really drink much, but usually order cider when I’m in England. But it’s Magner’s Pear Cider, which is delicious. We met a couple there who own a cider apple orchard, and most of their apples go to American companies.
    When my kids were little we lived near a farm stand that sold Wolf River apples. They were as large as a baby’s head, and were great for pies. 2 would do, so you never got tired peeling, LOL. The kids like to see if they could eat the whole apple, though they’re recommended for cooking. We like Honeycrisps now.
    There’s nothing so homey as a bowl of apples on the kitchen table.

    Reply
  69. Wow! Who knew? Well, you, obviously, and now the rest of us! Thanks for the interesting info…darn those Prohibitionists. I don’t really drink much, but usually order cider when I’m in England. But it’s Magner’s Pear Cider, which is delicious. We met a couple there who own a cider apple orchard, and most of their apples go to American companies.
    When my kids were little we lived near a farm stand that sold Wolf River apples. They were as large as a baby’s head, and were great for pies. 2 would do, so you never got tired peeling, LOL. The kids like to see if they could eat the whole apple, though they’re recommended for cooking. We like Honeycrisps now.
    There’s nothing so homey as a bowl of apples on the kitchen table.

    Reply
  70. Wow! Who knew? Well, you, obviously, and now the rest of us! Thanks for the interesting info…darn those Prohibitionists. I don’t really drink much, but usually order cider when I’m in England. But it’s Magner’s Pear Cider, which is delicious. We met a couple there who own a cider apple orchard, and most of their apples go to American companies.
    When my kids were little we lived near a farm stand that sold Wolf River apples. They were as large as a baby’s head, and were great for pies. 2 would do, so you never got tired peeling, LOL. The kids like to see if they could eat the whole apple, though they’re recommended for cooking. We like Honeycrisps now.
    There’s nothing so homey as a bowl of apples on the kitchen table.

    Reply
  71. I’ve never tried pear cider, but it sounds delicious!
    LOL on the Wolf River apples. The less-peeling is very attractive, but they sound like a handful for eating! Honeycrisps seem to be every popular, though I still like a nice fresh Macoun.And yes, nothing nicer than a bowl of apples on the table, especially at this time of year!

    Reply
  72. I’ve never tried pear cider, but it sounds delicious!
    LOL on the Wolf River apples. The less-peeling is very attractive, but they sound like a handful for eating! Honeycrisps seem to be every popular, though I still like a nice fresh Macoun.And yes, nothing nicer than a bowl of apples on the table, especially at this time of year!

    Reply
  73. I’ve never tried pear cider, but it sounds delicious!
    LOL on the Wolf River apples. The less-peeling is very attractive, but they sound like a handful for eating! Honeycrisps seem to be every popular, though I still like a nice fresh Macoun.And yes, nothing nicer than a bowl of apples on the table, especially at this time of year!

    Reply
  74. I’ve never tried pear cider, but it sounds delicious!
    LOL on the Wolf River apples. The less-peeling is very attractive, but they sound like a handful for eating! Honeycrisps seem to be every popular, though I still like a nice fresh Macoun.And yes, nothing nicer than a bowl of apples on the table, especially at this time of year!

    Reply
  75. I’ve never tried pear cider, but it sounds delicious!
    LOL on the Wolf River apples. The less-peeling is very attractive, but they sound like a handful for eating! Honeycrisps seem to be every popular, though I still like a nice fresh Macoun.And yes, nothing nicer than a bowl of apples on the table, especially at this time of year!

    Reply
  76. When I lived in London and was working in a pub, we had an entire class of American students (about twelve years old) come in and order cider. Not sure what their teachers were thinking: pub+England+cider does not = child-friendly afternoon break!
    One of our less experienced staff members started serving them before we pointed out she was getting children drunk!

    Reply
  77. When I lived in London and was working in a pub, we had an entire class of American students (about twelve years old) come in and order cider. Not sure what their teachers were thinking: pub+England+cider does not = child-friendly afternoon break!
    One of our less experienced staff members started serving them before we pointed out she was getting children drunk!

    Reply
  78. When I lived in London and was working in a pub, we had an entire class of American students (about twelve years old) come in and order cider. Not sure what their teachers were thinking: pub+England+cider does not = child-friendly afternoon break!
    One of our less experienced staff members started serving them before we pointed out she was getting children drunk!

    Reply
  79. When I lived in London and was working in a pub, we had an entire class of American students (about twelve years old) come in and order cider. Not sure what their teachers were thinking: pub+England+cider does not = child-friendly afternoon break!
    One of our less experienced staff members started serving them before we pointed out she was getting children drunk!

    Reply
  80. When I lived in London and was working in a pub, we had an entire class of American students (about twelve years old) come in and order cider. Not sure what their teachers were thinking: pub+England+cider does not = child-friendly afternoon break!
    One of our less experienced staff members started serving them before we pointed out she was getting children drunk!

    Reply
  81. I think that they are off the commercial market but can still be found at Farmers Markets.
    I grew up in the Midwest; we knew them in Missouri. My father’s family in Northeastern Indiana also knew them, so I don’t think they were very regional.

    Reply
  82. I think that they are off the commercial market but can still be found at Farmers Markets.
    I grew up in the Midwest; we knew them in Missouri. My father’s family in Northeastern Indiana also knew them, so I don’t think they were very regional.

    Reply
  83. I think that they are off the commercial market but can still be found at Farmers Markets.
    I grew up in the Midwest; we knew them in Missouri. My father’s family in Northeastern Indiana also knew them, so I don’t think they were very regional.

    Reply
  84. I think that they are off the commercial market but can still be found at Farmers Markets.
    I grew up in the Midwest; we knew them in Missouri. My father’s family in Northeastern Indiana also knew them, so I don’t think they were very regional.

    Reply
  85. I think that they are off the commercial market but can still be found at Farmers Markets.
    I grew up in the Midwest; we knew them in Missouri. My father’s family in Northeastern Indiana also knew them, so I don’t think they were very regional.

    Reply
  86. I love cider – hard and sweet! It’s difficult for me to find a hard cider that doesn’t have sulfides in it as a preservative though – and sulfides give me horrible migraines. 🙁
    As for favorite apples, I love Honeycrisp apples – especially for caramel apples! I usually get Gala apples since they are generally good year round.

    Reply
  87. I love cider – hard and sweet! It’s difficult for me to find a hard cider that doesn’t have sulfides in it as a preservative though – and sulfides give me horrible migraines. 🙁
    As for favorite apples, I love Honeycrisp apples – especially for caramel apples! I usually get Gala apples since they are generally good year round.

    Reply
  88. I love cider – hard and sweet! It’s difficult for me to find a hard cider that doesn’t have sulfides in it as a preservative though – and sulfides give me horrible migraines. 🙁
    As for favorite apples, I love Honeycrisp apples – especially for caramel apples! I usually get Gala apples since they are generally good year round.

    Reply
  89. I love cider – hard and sweet! It’s difficult for me to find a hard cider that doesn’t have sulfides in it as a preservative though – and sulfides give me horrible migraines. 🙁
    As for favorite apples, I love Honeycrisp apples – especially for caramel apples! I usually get Gala apples since they are generally good year round.

    Reply
  90. I love cider – hard and sweet! It’s difficult for me to find a hard cider that doesn’t have sulfides in it as a preservative though – and sulfides give me horrible migraines. 🙁
    As for favorite apples, I love Honeycrisp apples – especially for caramel apples! I usually get Gala apples since they are generally good year round.

    Reply
  91. Transparent apples grow here on Vancouver Island but you never seem to see them at the Farmer’s Markets – you have to know someone who has a tree. They’re the first apples to ripen in the summer and make fantastic applesauce. I also like Gravenstein apples for applesauce and those do show up at the Farmer’s Markets. Lucky me, I have a sister with a tree so don’t have to pay for them! They also make great pies. I like them for eating but only just before they’re ripe; I really like Honeycrisp apples but they’re not available all year so I will try Galas.
    When I was very young a neighbour had an apple that only became really tasty after a frost – I’ve never been able to find out the name of that apple. It kept really well, was crunchy and juicy.

    Reply
  92. Transparent apples grow here on Vancouver Island but you never seem to see them at the Farmer’s Markets – you have to know someone who has a tree. They’re the first apples to ripen in the summer and make fantastic applesauce. I also like Gravenstein apples for applesauce and those do show up at the Farmer’s Markets. Lucky me, I have a sister with a tree so don’t have to pay for them! They also make great pies. I like them for eating but only just before they’re ripe; I really like Honeycrisp apples but they’re not available all year so I will try Galas.
    When I was very young a neighbour had an apple that only became really tasty after a frost – I’ve never been able to find out the name of that apple. It kept really well, was crunchy and juicy.

    Reply
  93. Transparent apples grow here on Vancouver Island but you never seem to see them at the Farmer’s Markets – you have to know someone who has a tree. They’re the first apples to ripen in the summer and make fantastic applesauce. I also like Gravenstein apples for applesauce and those do show up at the Farmer’s Markets. Lucky me, I have a sister with a tree so don’t have to pay for them! They also make great pies. I like them for eating but only just before they’re ripe; I really like Honeycrisp apples but they’re not available all year so I will try Galas.
    When I was very young a neighbour had an apple that only became really tasty after a frost – I’ve never been able to find out the name of that apple. It kept really well, was crunchy and juicy.

    Reply
  94. Transparent apples grow here on Vancouver Island but you never seem to see them at the Farmer’s Markets – you have to know someone who has a tree. They’re the first apples to ripen in the summer and make fantastic applesauce. I also like Gravenstein apples for applesauce and those do show up at the Farmer’s Markets. Lucky me, I have a sister with a tree so don’t have to pay for them! They also make great pies. I like them for eating but only just before they’re ripe; I really like Honeycrisp apples but they’re not available all year so I will try Galas.
    When I was very young a neighbour had an apple that only became really tasty after a frost – I’ve never been able to find out the name of that apple. It kept really well, was crunchy and juicy.

    Reply
  95. Transparent apples grow here on Vancouver Island but you never seem to see them at the Farmer’s Markets – you have to know someone who has a tree. They’re the first apples to ripen in the summer and make fantastic applesauce. I also like Gravenstein apples for applesauce and those do show up at the Farmer’s Markets. Lucky me, I have a sister with a tree so don’t have to pay for them! They also make great pies. I like them for eating but only just before they’re ripe; I really like Honeycrisp apples but they’re not available all year so I will try Galas.
    When I was very young a neighbour had an apple that only became really tasty after a frost – I’ve never been able to find out the name of that apple. It kept really well, was crunchy and juicy.

    Reply
  96. Coincidentally, I just picked up a basket of Yellow Transparents two weekends ago; they do not keep, so I probably will try for a second basket this weekend. In Ontario, the area around Georgian Bay/Huronia is apple country. Within half an hour are 2 major private heritage orchards , one with 400 trees and one specializing in Canadian varieties with 150. Also the Farmer’s Market, who keeps a few heritage trees which you have to ask for. Within 1& 1/2 hours’ drive are two more heritage orchards, both of whom graft and sell rare varieties on order. All of the trees’ germ plasm have been collected by the ON dept of Ag. I’ve spent 2 years tasting to decide which varieties I want on my own property!

    Reply
  97. Coincidentally, I just picked up a basket of Yellow Transparents two weekends ago; they do not keep, so I probably will try for a second basket this weekend. In Ontario, the area around Georgian Bay/Huronia is apple country. Within half an hour are 2 major private heritage orchards , one with 400 trees and one specializing in Canadian varieties with 150. Also the Farmer’s Market, who keeps a few heritage trees which you have to ask for. Within 1& 1/2 hours’ drive are two more heritage orchards, both of whom graft and sell rare varieties on order. All of the trees’ germ plasm have been collected by the ON dept of Ag. I’ve spent 2 years tasting to decide which varieties I want on my own property!

    Reply
  98. Coincidentally, I just picked up a basket of Yellow Transparents two weekends ago; they do not keep, so I probably will try for a second basket this weekend. In Ontario, the area around Georgian Bay/Huronia is apple country. Within half an hour are 2 major private heritage orchards , one with 400 trees and one specializing in Canadian varieties with 150. Also the Farmer’s Market, who keeps a few heritage trees which you have to ask for. Within 1& 1/2 hours’ drive are two more heritage orchards, both of whom graft and sell rare varieties on order. All of the trees’ germ plasm have been collected by the ON dept of Ag. I’ve spent 2 years tasting to decide which varieties I want on my own property!

    Reply
  99. Coincidentally, I just picked up a basket of Yellow Transparents two weekends ago; they do not keep, so I probably will try for a second basket this weekend. In Ontario, the area around Georgian Bay/Huronia is apple country. Within half an hour are 2 major private heritage orchards , one with 400 trees and one specializing in Canadian varieties with 150. Also the Farmer’s Market, who keeps a few heritage trees which you have to ask for. Within 1& 1/2 hours’ drive are two more heritage orchards, both of whom graft and sell rare varieties on order. All of the trees’ germ plasm have been collected by the ON dept of Ag. I’ve spent 2 years tasting to decide which varieties I want on my own property!

    Reply
  100. Coincidentally, I just picked up a basket of Yellow Transparents two weekends ago; they do not keep, so I probably will try for a second basket this weekend. In Ontario, the area around Georgian Bay/Huronia is apple country. Within half an hour are 2 major private heritage orchards , one with 400 trees and one specializing in Canadian varieties with 150. Also the Farmer’s Market, who keeps a few heritage trees which you have to ask for. Within 1& 1/2 hours’ drive are two more heritage orchards, both of whom graft and sell rare varieties on order. All of the trees’ germ plasm have been collected by the ON dept of Ag. I’ve spent 2 years tasting to decide which varieties I want on my own property!

    Reply
  101. Thanks for sharing this, lor! I love homemade applesauce, and Gravensteins make a wonderful one.
    That’s so interesting about the “frost” apple. Would love to know the name. Please share if you ever discover it! (There is ice wine, a very sweet dessert wine made with grapes that have been frozen by frost. It concentrates the sugar.)

    Reply
  102. Thanks for sharing this, lor! I love homemade applesauce, and Gravensteins make a wonderful one.
    That’s so interesting about the “frost” apple. Would love to know the name. Please share if you ever discover it! (There is ice wine, a very sweet dessert wine made with grapes that have been frozen by frost. It concentrates the sugar.)

    Reply
  103. Thanks for sharing this, lor! I love homemade applesauce, and Gravensteins make a wonderful one.
    That’s so interesting about the “frost” apple. Would love to know the name. Please share if you ever discover it! (There is ice wine, a very sweet dessert wine made with grapes that have been frozen by frost. It concentrates the sugar.)

    Reply
  104. Thanks for sharing this, lor! I love homemade applesauce, and Gravensteins make a wonderful one.
    That’s so interesting about the “frost” apple. Would love to know the name. Please share if you ever discover it! (There is ice wine, a very sweet dessert wine made with grapes that have been frozen by frost. It concentrates the sugar.)

    Reply
  105. Thanks for sharing this, lor! I love homemade applesauce, and Gravensteins make a wonderful one.
    That’s so interesting about the “frost” apple. Would love to know the name. Please share if you ever discover it! (There is ice wine, a very sweet dessert wine made with grapes that have been frozen by frost. It concentrates the sugar.)

    Reply
  106. I grew up in New York State and apple picking was something we did every fall. One year after we returned with our bounty, family friends visited for the evening and they had a big brood of kids equal to our family. We were left pretty much to our own devices in the basement family room while the adults visited upstairs. We older kids quickly discovered the cider we had got had turned hard! Much to our delight we drank it, keeping it away from the younger kids. We had a high old time that night. I bet our parents wondered why we slept so well!! Lol!

    Reply
  107. I grew up in New York State and apple picking was something we did every fall. One year after we returned with our bounty, family friends visited for the evening and they had a big brood of kids equal to our family. We were left pretty much to our own devices in the basement family room while the adults visited upstairs. We older kids quickly discovered the cider we had got had turned hard! Much to our delight we drank it, keeping it away from the younger kids. We had a high old time that night. I bet our parents wondered why we slept so well!! Lol!

    Reply
  108. I grew up in New York State and apple picking was something we did every fall. One year after we returned with our bounty, family friends visited for the evening and they had a big brood of kids equal to our family. We were left pretty much to our own devices in the basement family room while the adults visited upstairs. We older kids quickly discovered the cider we had got had turned hard! Much to our delight we drank it, keeping it away from the younger kids. We had a high old time that night. I bet our parents wondered why we slept so well!! Lol!

    Reply
  109. I grew up in New York State and apple picking was something we did every fall. One year after we returned with our bounty, family friends visited for the evening and they had a big brood of kids equal to our family. We were left pretty much to our own devices in the basement family room while the adults visited upstairs. We older kids quickly discovered the cider we had got had turned hard! Much to our delight we drank it, keeping it away from the younger kids. We had a high old time that night. I bet our parents wondered why we slept so well!! Lol!

    Reply
  110. I grew up in New York State and apple picking was something we did every fall. One year after we returned with our bounty, family friends visited for the evening and they had a big brood of kids equal to our family. We were left pretty much to our own devices in the basement family room while the adults visited upstairs. We older kids quickly discovered the cider we had got had turned hard! Much to our delight we drank it, keeping it away from the younger kids. We had a high old time that night. I bet our parents wondered why we slept so well!! Lol!

    Reply

Leave a Comment