A roving…

Valchloesmall Anne here, back from the RWA conference in Washington DC and posting from New York City and soon to be hopping on a plane for a lonnnnng flight home. And although my dog is at home–more accurately, at dog camp — I'll put her pic up regardless, as I miss her…

Dog camp is actually a dog boarding kennels. She usually stays with friends, but that's not always possible. The first time I took her to a kennels — one which came highly recommended — she seemed fine, albeit tired when I picked her up again and a little bit clingy. But when, months later, I took her back there, dropping her off just hours before I was due to catch a plane, she refused to get out of the car and I had to carry her, shivering to the office. I felt sick at having to leave her but I had no choice at the time. Of course she never went back there.

The place she's at now is great and she actually loves it. She bounds from the car and practically breaks down the gate in her eagerness to get there, and when she gets into the office, she wants to say hello to everyone there. They lead her off–actually, she leads them, prancing, tail wagging furiously, with barely a backward glance at me. It's such a relief — I don't feel in the slightest bit guilty at leaving her there.

Anyway, I didn't plan to write about my dog and I will get onto some proper wenchly blogging in a moment, but it's a problem, isn't it, when you have animals and need to leave them occasionally, because they don't understand. And as most of my pets have been rescue animals, they do understand abandonment. So it's a huge relief to have a place where they're happy. Thank you Welcome Kennels.

So, the Romance Writers of America conference is over. My brain is exhausted. I've met so many people, made new friends, and strengthened old friendships. I met dozens of people I'd only known cyberly — several wordwenches I'd never met in person — both really lovely — as well as publishers, editors, reviewers, word wench readers, people from various other blogs and boards, people who'd read my books and came up to say hello, and people who didn't know me from a bar of soap who were just as friendly and kind and wonderful.

LoveIs4Letter And I met authors: people whose books sit on my keeper shelf and have given me hours of pleasure,  authors whose names I've heard but whose books I've not yet read but will now, and authors and books new to me. And then there's the excitement of the brand new author with her first book, like my friend, Kandy Shepherd, with her first book, LOVE IS A FOUR LEGGED WORD — Isn't that an adorable title? And it's about a dog, so of course I'm going to love it. I have it to read on the plane trip home.

There is a such a warm and lovely atmosphere at romance conferences. I suppose most romance writers are optimists and like to have happy endings, and that leaks into the atmosphere. And then, of course there are all the workshops, and the discussions and the gossip, so no wonder my brain is exhausted.

After the conference, I went to stay with a writer friend and we planned a long, intensive workshop we're taking together. It should have been all work but we spent a lot of time just sharing ideas about books and finding how much we had in common and talking about books we both loved. She kept pulling out books from her many shelves crammed with wonderful books — my idea of the perfect home– and we pored over them, finding passages we loved, and talking in the way book-lovers do everywhere.

And then there were moments of pure magic! At one stage I glanced up fromHummingbird our table deep in papers and saw a hummingbird hovering, feeding from flowers in a hanging basket outside the window. I'd loved the idea of hummingbirds since I was a tiny girl, but I'd never ever seen one. And later that evening, fireflies winked and sparked in the warm darkness. More magic — I'd never seen a firefly, either. And there were squirrels. I know, I know — my hosts laughed, too but to me, they're magic, exotic creatures, just as a kangaroo or koala might be to you. As a child, growing up reading Enid Blyton and other English storybooks, squirrels were often mentioned and I'd longed to have one sit on my shoulder, as Benjy did, in THE CHILDREN OF CHERRY TREE FARM or was it THE MAGIC FARAWAY TREE books?

I also walked a labyrinth. I'd become fascinated with them after reading Mary Jo Putney's contemporary novel, THE SPIRAL PATH, but I'd only ever walked one that we'd drawn in the sand once, on retreat, so on this visit I walked my first 'real' labyrinth, in the beautiful, peaceful, green wooded grounds of a convent. It, too was magic.

So, books and book discussions, a labyrinth, fireflies, humming birds and squirrels, what more could I ask for? Well I got fireworks — a special display in my honor– and lashings of delicious food. My hostess was determined I taste some regional specialities. I remember the best gumbo I've ever had,  superb crabcakes with sweet white corn and potato salad, a cherry dessert, pulled, spicy pork, and slow, delicious breakfasts over good coffee and books. Thank you, my friend, for a wonderful visit.

Now I'm in New York and my brain is full.  I have one day left. and I'm not sure what to do. I'm thinking maybe a harbour tour — I've never been to the Statue of Liberty. It's not my first visit to New York and I've visited most of the "usual sites." I'm in the Soho/Tribeca are, and I'm told there's a magic cocoa/chocolate shop somewhere around, so I might go looking for small gifts to take home. Any suggestions most welcome. Sorry about the lack of pictures — It's very difficult to harvest them on this little computer.

So, any suggestions for what I should do in New York?
And what do you do with your pets when you have to go away?
And have you ever been on a visit where magic happened? Where you saw your first hummingbird or firefly, or some other magic creature?

115 thoughts on “A roving…”

  1. Anne, I’d just spend the day in Bloomingdales, because I am shallow.:) But if you haven’t been to the Cloisters, they’re lovely.Metropolitan Museum of Art.Museum of Natural History.Central Park with a hotdog. Have a wonderful time!
    We were once stranded on Nantucket in a snowstorm. Being there was like stepping back into the nineteenth century, totally dependent on the whims of the weather before a roaring fire. And no TV reception, LOL. The ocean was wild and primal. I was so sorry when the ferry schedule resumed.

    Reply
  2. Anne, I’d just spend the day in Bloomingdales, because I am shallow.:) But if you haven’t been to the Cloisters, they’re lovely.Metropolitan Museum of Art.Museum of Natural History.Central Park with a hotdog. Have a wonderful time!
    We were once stranded on Nantucket in a snowstorm. Being there was like stepping back into the nineteenth century, totally dependent on the whims of the weather before a roaring fire. And no TV reception, LOL. The ocean was wild and primal. I was so sorry when the ferry schedule resumed.

    Reply
  3. Anne, I’d just spend the day in Bloomingdales, because I am shallow.:) But if you haven’t been to the Cloisters, they’re lovely.Metropolitan Museum of Art.Museum of Natural History.Central Park with a hotdog. Have a wonderful time!
    We were once stranded on Nantucket in a snowstorm. Being there was like stepping back into the nineteenth century, totally dependent on the whims of the weather before a roaring fire. And no TV reception, LOL. The ocean was wild and primal. I was so sorry when the ferry schedule resumed.

    Reply
  4. Anne, I’d just spend the day in Bloomingdales, because I am shallow.:) But if you haven’t been to the Cloisters, they’re lovely.Metropolitan Museum of Art.Museum of Natural History.Central Park with a hotdog. Have a wonderful time!
    We were once stranded on Nantucket in a snowstorm. Being there was like stepping back into the nineteenth century, totally dependent on the whims of the weather before a roaring fire. And no TV reception, LOL. The ocean was wild and primal. I was so sorry when the ferry schedule resumed.

    Reply
  5. Anne, I’d just spend the day in Bloomingdales, because I am shallow.:) But if you haven’t been to the Cloisters, they’re lovely.Metropolitan Museum of Art.Museum of Natural History.Central Park with a hotdog. Have a wonderful time!
    We were once stranded on Nantucket in a snowstorm. Being there was like stepping back into the nineteenth century, totally dependent on the whims of the weather before a roaring fire. And no TV reception, LOL. The ocean was wild and primal. I was so sorry when the ferry schedule resumed.

    Reply
  6. Have a great time in New York, Anne. Wish I was there!
    One of my great memories is seeing my first glow worm. It was on the island of Jersey and I was waiting with my family for a bus. There was a wall with a raised bed behind it and shrubs and this green glowing magical thing. Unforgettable.

    Reply
  7. Have a great time in New York, Anne. Wish I was there!
    One of my great memories is seeing my first glow worm. It was on the island of Jersey and I was waiting with my family for a bus. There was a wall with a raised bed behind it and shrubs and this green glowing magical thing. Unforgettable.

    Reply
  8. Have a great time in New York, Anne. Wish I was there!
    One of my great memories is seeing my first glow worm. It was on the island of Jersey and I was waiting with my family for a bus. There was a wall with a raised bed behind it and shrubs and this green glowing magical thing. Unforgettable.

    Reply
  9. Have a great time in New York, Anne. Wish I was there!
    One of my great memories is seeing my first glow worm. It was on the island of Jersey and I was waiting with my family for a bus. There was a wall with a raised bed behind it and shrubs and this green glowing magical thing. Unforgettable.

    Reply
  10. Have a great time in New York, Anne. Wish I was there!
    One of my great memories is seeing my first glow worm. It was on the island of Jersey and I was waiting with my family for a bus. There was a wall with a raised bed behind it and shrubs and this green glowing magical thing. Unforgettable.

    Reply
  11. Hey Anne — If I were you, I’d do Ellis Island. The museum of “stuff left behind” sparked the most magnificent stories for me. I roamed that place for hours on end, much to my patient family’s chagrin.

    Reply
  12. Hey Anne — If I were you, I’d do Ellis Island. The museum of “stuff left behind” sparked the most magnificent stories for me. I roamed that place for hours on end, much to my patient family’s chagrin.

    Reply
  13. Hey Anne — If I were you, I’d do Ellis Island. The museum of “stuff left behind” sparked the most magnificent stories for me. I roamed that place for hours on end, much to my patient family’s chagrin.

    Reply
  14. Hey Anne — If I were you, I’d do Ellis Island. The museum of “stuff left behind” sparked the most magnificent stories for me. I roamed that place for hours on end, much to my patient family’s chagrin.

    Reply
  15. Hey Anne — If I were you, I’d do Ellis Island. The museum of “stuff left behind” sparked the most magnificent stories for me. I roamed that place for hours on end, much to my patient family’s chagrin.

    Reply
  16. You have to do the proverbial Statue of Liberty climb. It’s been a long time now since I was there but I understand it hasn’t changed much. There’s one metal staircase up, and one down. The steps are about as big as the ball of your foot and every so often, there was a little ledge (VERY little) that you could step out on to rest and let the ‘traffic’ continue to flow. Once started, you can’t (or at least at the time, you couldn’t) go back. It was to the top or don’t go. But the view is just breathtaking. And the ferry ride to the island, for me, was a very emotional experience imagining what my grandparents must have thought when they caught their first clear glimpse of Lady Liberty.
    Make sure you stop by the site of the Twin Towers. It’s a very eerie, desolate feeling to stand there.
    I have a hummer feeder. They have wars to see who gets to reign over the diner. And they chirp. Loudly! Especially when they’re fighting.
    We always have lots of fireflies, but a couple years ago, we had an explosion of them. I had friends in from Nebraska who’d never seen more than a handful at a time. They sat in front of their windows the first night here for hours because there were thousands in the backyard. It was magic.
    I want to see a koala up close. I know they’re not the friendliest things, but they’re so doggone cute!
    We had an experience with one of our dogs once and a kennel that came highly recommended. We dropped him off with confidence and picked up an almost completely different dog. He was upset, nervous, filthy and for the five days we were gone, he looked like he’d lost 15 pounds. I’m glad you found a good spot for your doggie.

    Reply
  17. You have to do the proverbial Statue of Liberty climb. It’s been a long time now since I was there but I understand it hasn’t changed much. There’s one metal staircase up, and one down. The steps are about as big as the ball of your foot and every so often, there was a little ledge (VERY little) that you could step out on to rest and let the ‘traffic’ continue to flow. Once started, you can’t (or at least at the time, you couldn’t) go back. It was to the top or don’t go. But the view is just breathtaking. And the ferry ride to the island, for me, was a very emotional experience imagining what my grandparents must have thought when they caught their first clear glimpse of Lady Liberty.
    Make sure you stop by the site of the Twin Towers. It’s a very eerie, desolate feeling to stand there.
    I have a hummer feeder. They have wars to see who gets to reign over the diner. And they chirp. Loudly! Especially when they’re fighting.
    We always have lots of fireflies, but a couple years ago, we had an explosion of them. I had friends in from Nebraska who’d never seen more than a handful at a time. They sat in front of their windows the first night here for hours because there were thousands in the backyard. It was magic.
    I want to see a koala up close. I know they’re not the friendliest things, but they’re so doggone cute!
    We had an experience with one of our dogs once and a kennel that came highly recommended. We dropped him off with confidence and picked up an almost completely different dog. He was upset, nervous, filthy and for the five days we were gone, he looked like he’d lost 15 pounds. I’m glad you found a good spot for your doggie.

    Reply
  18. You have to do the proverbial Statue of Liberty climb. It’s been a long time now since I was there but I understand it hasn’t changed much. There’s one metal staircase up, and one down. The steps are about as big as the ball of your foot and every so often, there was a little ledge (VERY little) that you could step out on to rest and let the ‘traffic’ continue to flow. Once started, you can’t (or at least at the time, you couldn’t) go back. It was to the top or don’t go. But the view is just breathtaking. And the ferry ride to the island, for me, was a very emotional experience imagining what my grandparents must have thought when they caught their first clear glimpse of Lady Liberty.
    Make sure you stop by the site of the Twin Towers. It’s a very eerie, desolate feeling to stand there.
    I have a hummer feeder. They have wars to see who gets to reign over the diner. And they chirp. Loudly! Especially when they’re fighting.
    We always have lots of fireflies, but a couple years ago, we had an explosion of them. I had friends in from Nebraska who’d never seen more than a handful at a time. They sat in front of their windows the first night here for hours because there were thousands in the backyard. It was magic.
    I want to see a koala up close. I know they’re not the friendliest things, but they’re so doggone cute!
    We had an experience with one of our dogs once and a kennel that came highly recommended. We dropped him off with confidence and picked up an almost completely different dog. He was upset, nervous, filthy and for the five days we were gone, he looked like he’d lost 15 pounds. I’m glad you found a good spot for your doggie.

    Reply
  19. You have to do the proverbial Statue of Liberty climb. It’s been a long time now since I was there but I understand it hasn’t changed much. There’s one metal staircase up, and one down. The steps are about as big as the ball of your foot and every so often, there was a little ledge (VERY little) that you could step out on to rest and let the ‘traffic’ continue to flow. Once started, you can’t (or at least at the time, you couldn’t) go back. It was to the top or don’t go. But the view is just breathtaking. And the ferry ride to the island, for me, was a very emotional experience imagining what my grandparents must have thought when they caught their first clear glimpse of Lady Liberty.
    Make sure you stop by the site of the Twin Towers. It’s a very eerie, desolate feeling to stand there.
    I have a hummer feeder. They have wars to see who gets to reign over the diner. And they chirp. Loudly! Especially when they’re fighting.
    We always have lots of fireflies, but a couple years ago, we had an explosion of them. I had friends in from Nebraska who’d never seen more than a handful at a time. They sat in front of their windows the first night here for hours because there were thousands in the backyard. It was magic.
    I want to see a koala up close. I know they’re not the friendliest things, but they’re so doggone cute!
    We had an experience with one of our dogs once and a kennel that came highly recommended. We dropped him off with confidence and picked up an almost completely different dog. He was upset, nervous, filthy and for the five days we were gone, he looked like he’d lost 15 pounds. I’m glad you found a good spot for your doggie.

    Reply
  20. You have to do the proverbial Statue of Liberty climb. It’s been a long time now since I was there but I understand it hasn’t changed much. There’s one metal staircase up, and one down. The steps are about as big as the ball of your foot and every so often, there was a little ledge (VERY little) that you could step out on to rest and let the ‘traffic’ continue to flow. Once started, you can’t (or at least at the time, you couldn’t) go back. It was to the top or don’t go. But the view is just breathtaking. And the ferry ride to the island, for me, was a very emotional experience imagining what my grandparents must have thought when they caught their first clear glimpse of Lady Liberty.
    Make sure you stop by the site of the Twin Towers. It’s a very eerie, desolate feeling to stand there.
    I have a hummer feeder. They have wars to see who gets to reign over the diner. And they chirp. Loudly! Especially when they’re fighting.
    We always have lots of fireflies, but a couple years ago, we had an explosion of them. I had friends in from Nebraska who’d never seen more than a handful at a time. They sat in front of their windows the first night here for hours because there were thousands in the backyard. It was magic.
    I want to see a koala up close. I know they’re not the friendliest things, but they’re so doggone cute!
    We had an experience with one of our dogs once and a kennel that came highly recommended. We dropped him off with confidence and picked up an almost completely different dog. He was upset, nervous, filthy and for the five days we were gone, he looked like he’d lost 15 pounds. I’m glad you found a good spot for your doggie.

    Reply
  21. I hope you can sleep all the way home, Anne, because you must be exhausted! RWA was terrific fun, but tiring indeed.
    I’d go with the harbor boat ride and/or a visit to Ellis Island. As Nina said, it’s a very evocative place. Of course, Australia has its own haunting tradition of immigration.
    As to pets–since I have cats, they can stay at my house, being lower maintenance than dogs. Ideally a friend stays, but I also have a good pet sitting service that comes in once a day, brings in mail, etc. But the kitties are particularly affectionate when I return from a trip. After RWA, the Fluffster hacked up a huge hairball right in front of me to prove what happens when I’m not around to brush all that fur. *g*
    Have a safe and not too stressful journey home!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  22. I hope you can sleep all the way home, Anne, because you must be exhausted! RWA was terrific fun, but tiring indeed.
    I’d go with the harbor boat ride and/or a visit to Ellis Island. As Nina said, it’s a very evocative place. Of course, Australia has its own haunting tradition of immigration.
    As to pets–since I have cats, they can stay at my house, being lower maintenance than dogs. Ideally a friend stays, but I also have a good pet sitting service that comes in once a day, brings in mail, etc. But the kitties are particularly affectionate when I return from a trip. After RWA, the Fluffster hacked up a huge hairball right in front of me to prove what happens when I’m not around to brush all that fur. *g*
    Have a safe and not too stressful journey home!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  23. I hope you can sleep all the way home, Anne, because you must be exhausted! RWA was terrific fun, but tiring indeed.
    I’d go with the harbor boat ride and/or a visit to Ellis Island. As Nina said, it’s a very evocative place. Of course, Australia has its own haunting tradition of immigration.
    As to pets–since I have cats, they can stay at my house, being lower maintenance than dogs. Ideally a friend stays, but I also have a good pet sitting service that comes in once a day, brings in mail, etc. But the kitties are particularly affectionate when I return from a trip. After RWA, the Fluffster hacked up a huge hairball right in front of me to prove what happens when I’m not around to brush all that fur. *g*
    Have a safe and not too stressful journey home!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  24. I hope you can sleep all the way home, Anne, because you must be exhausted! RWA was terrific fun, but tiring indeed.
    I’d go with the harbor boat ride and/or a visit to Ellis Island. As Nina said, it’s a very evocative place. Of course, Australia has its own haunting tradition of immigration.
    As to pets–since I have cats, they can stay at my house, being lower maintenance than dogs. Ideally a friend stays, but I also have a good pet sitting service that comes in once a day, brings in mail, etc. But the kitties are particularly affectionate when I return from a trip. After RWA, the Fluffster hacked up a huge hairball right in front of me to prove what happens when I’m not around to brush all that fur. *g*
    Have a safe and not too stressful journey home!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  25. I hope you can sleep all the way home, Anne, because you must be exhausted! RWA was terrific fun, but tiring indeed.
    I’d go with the harbor boat ride and/or a visit to Ellis Island. As Nina said, it’s a very evocative place. Of course, Australia has its own haunting tradition of immigration.
    As to pets–since I have cats, they can stay at my house, being lower maintenance than dogs. Ideally a friend stays, but I also have a good pet sitting service that comes in once a day, brings in mail, etc. But the kitties are particularly affectionate when I return from a trip. After RWA, the Fluffster hacked up a huge hairball right in front of me to prove what happens when I’m not around to brush all that fur. *g*
    Have a safe and not too stressful journey home!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  26. Anne,
    Wednesday there is a wonderful farmer’s market in Union Square (14th Street) with all sorts of homemade goodies and produce. Many of the top chefs shop there for the evening’s menu, and you can make a fabulous lunch from all the offerings. Right on the square is one of the biggest Barnes and Noble stores, with more erudite and offbeat titles than usual. And close by is the Strand used book store, which is always a treasure trove of funky books. So a visit to that area would probably suit your fancy.
    Have a good and relaxing trip home. I so enjoyed meeting you in person at RWA!

    Reply
  27. Anne,
    Wednesday there is a wonderful farmer’s market in Union Square (14th Street) with all sorts of homemade goodies and produce. Many of the top chefs shop there for the evening’s menu, and you can make a fabulous lunch from all the offerings. Right on the square is one of the biggest Barnes and Noble stores, with more erudite and offbeat titles than usual. And close by is the Strand used book store, which is always a treasure trove of funky books. So a visit to that area would probably suit your fancy.
    Have a good and relaxing trip home. I so enjoyed meeting you in person at RWA!

    Reply
  28. Anne,
    Wednesday there is a wonderful farmer’s market in Union Square (14th Street) with all sorts of homemade goodies and produce. Many of the top chefs shop there for the evening’s menu, and you can make a fabulous lunch from all the offerings. Right on the square is one of the biggest Barnes and Noble stores, with more erudite and offbeat titles than usual. And close by is the Strand used book store, which is always a treasure trove of funky books. So a visit to that area would probably suit your fancy.
    Have a good and relaxing trip home. I so enjoyed meeting you in person at RWA!

    Reply
  29. Anne,
    Wednesday there is a wonderful farmer’s market in Union Square (14th Street) with all sorts of homemade goodies and produce. Many of the top chefs shop there for the evening’s menu, and you can make a fabulous lunch from all the offerings. Right on the square is one of the biggest Barnes and Noble stores, with more erudite and offbeat titles than usual. And close by is the Strand used book store, which is always a treasure trove of funky books. So a visit to that area would probably suit your fancy.
    Have a good and relaxing trip home. I so enjoyed meeting you in person at RWA!

    Reply
  30. Anne,
    Wednesday there is a wonderful farmer’s market in Union Square (14th Street) with all sorts of homemade goodies and produce. Many of the top chefs shop there for the evening’s menu, and you can make a fabulous lunch from all the offerings. Right on the square is one of the biggest Barnes and Noble stores, with more erudite and offbeat titles than usual. And close by is the Strand used book store, which is always a treasure trove of funky books. So a visit to that area would probably suit your fancy.
    Have a good and relaxing trip home. I so enjoyed meeting you in person at RWA!

    Reply
  31. If you have time, the link below is to a walking tour of chocolate shops in New York.
    http://www.sweetwalks.com/
    A number of sources recommended the City Bakery as a great place for hot chocolate and other stuff. My son and I had wonderful pastries and chocolate at a restaurant on Madison near the Metropolitan Museum of Art, but I’m blanking on the name.

    Reply
  32. If you have time, the link below is to a walking tour of chocolate shops in New York.
    http://www.sweetwalks.com/
    A number of sources recommended the City Bakery as a great place for hot chocolate and other stuff. My son and I had wonderful pastries and chocolate at a restaurant on Madison near the Metropolitan Museum of Art, but I’m blanking on the name.

    Reply
  33. If you have time, the link below is to a walking tour of chocolate shops in New York.
    http://www.sweetwalks.com/
    A number of sources recommended the City Bakery as a great place for hot chocolate and other stuff. My son and I had wonderful pastries and chocolate at a restaurant on Madison near the Metropolitan Museum of Art, but I’m blanking on the name.

    Reply
  34. If you have time, the link below is to a walking tour of chocolate shops in New York.
    http://www.sweetwalks.com/
    A number of sources recommended the City Bakery as a great place for hot chocolate and other stuff. My son and I had wonderful pastries and chocolate at a restaurant on Madison near the Metropolitan Museum of Art, but I’m blanking on the name.

    Reply
  35. If you have time, the link below is to a walking tour of chocolate shops in New York.
    http://www.sweetwalks.com/
    A number of sources recommended the City Bakery as a great place for hot chocolate and other stuff. My son and I had wonderful pastries and chocolate at a restaurant on Madison near the Metropolitan Museum of Art, but I’m blanking on the name.

    Reply
  36. Love the humming birds. I see a large flowering bush out the window behind the computer, frequently humming birds flit around the blooms. Also have feeders out and love the ‘lil buzz bombs fliting around and fighting to feed.

    Reply
  37. Love the humming birds. I see a large flowering bush out the window behind the computer, frequently humming birds flit around the blooms. Also have feeders out and love the ‘lil buzz bombs fliting around and fighting to feed.

    Reply
  38. Love the humming birds. I see a large flowering bush out the window behind the computer, frequently humming birds flit around the blooms. Also have feeders out and love the ‘lil buzz bombs fliting around and fighting to feed.

    Reply
  39. Love the humming birds. I see a large flowering bush out the window behind the computer, frequently humming birds flit around the blooms. Also have feeders out and love the ‘lil buzz bombs fliting around and fighting to feed.

    Reply
  40. Love the humming birds. I see a large flowering bush out the window behind the computer, frequently humming birds flit around the blooms. Also have feeders out and love the ‘lil buzz bombs fliting around and fighting to feed.

    Reply
  41. Anne, sounds like you’ve had a fabulous time, so let’s hope you top it off with a smooth, comfortable journey home.
    Since we’ve moved to the country, we’ve been visited by fireflies every summer. Pure magic.
    And last year, when I went to the San Francisco conference, I saw baby black (brown?) bears in Yosemite. Very exciting.
    I’ve heard so much about Ellis Island, and knowing your love of history, I’m sure it would be perfect for you.

    Reply
  42. Anne, sounds like you’ve had a fabulous time, so let’s hope you top it off with a smooth, comfortable journey home.
    Since we’ve moved to the country, we’ve been visited by fireflies every summer. Pure magic.
    And last year, when I went to the San Francisco conference, I saw baby black (brown?) bears in Yosemite. Very exciting.
    I’ve heard so much about Ellis Island, and knowing your love of history, I’m sure it would be perfect for you.

    Reply
  43. Anne, sounds like you’ve had a fabulous time, so let’s hope you top it off with a smooth, comfortable journey home.
    Since we’ve moved to the country, we’ve been visited by fireflies every summer. Pure magic.
    And last year, when I went to the San Francisco conference, I saw baby black (brown?) bears in Yosemite. Very exciting.
    I’ve heard so much about Ellis Island, and knowing your love of history, I’m sure it would be perfect for you.

    Reply
  44. Anne, sounds like you’ve had a fabulous time, so let’s hope you top it off with a smooth, comfortable journey home.
    Since we’ve moved to the country, we’ve been visited by fireflies every summer. Pure magic.
    And last year, when I went to the San Francisco conference, I saw baby black (brown?) bears in Yosemite. Very exciting.
    I’ve heard so much about Ellis Island, and knowing your love of history, I’m sure it would be perfect for you.

    Reply
  45. Anne, sounds like you’ve had a fabulous time, so let’s hope you top it off with a smooth, comfortable journey home.
    Since we’ve moved to the country, we’ve been visited by fireflies every summer. Pure magic.
    And last year, when I went to the San Francisco conference, I saw baby black (brown?) bears in Yosemite. Very exciting.
    I’ve heard so much about Ellis Island, and knowing your love of history, I’m sure it would be perfect for you.

    Reply
  46. I’m too late to make NYC suggestions so I’ll just stop in and wish you a safe journey home! I’m glad the world is small enough now that we can make friends on other continents.

    Reply
  47. I’m too late to make NYC suggestions so I’ll just stop in and wish you a safe journey home! I’m glad the world is small enough now that we can make friends on other continents.

    Reply
  48. I’m too late to make NYC suggestions so I’ll just stop in and wish you a safe journey home! I’m glad the world is small enough now that we can make friends on other continents.

    Reply
  49. I’m too late to make NYC suggestions so I’ll just stop in and wish you a safe journey home! I’m glad the world is small enough now that we can make friends on other continents.

    Reply
  50. I’m too late to make NYC suggestions so I’ll just stop in and wish you a safe journey home! I’m glad the world is small enough now that we can make friends on other continents.

    Reply
  51. It sounds as if you had a marvelous time, Anne.
    Wave when you fly over LA — where we have squirrels, the greedy little devils, and hummbirdies — but no fireflies 🙁

    Reply
  52. It sounds as if you had a marvelous time, Anne.
    Wave when you fly over LA — where we have squirrels, the greedy little devils, and hummbirdies — but no fireflies 🙁

    Reply
  53. It sounds as if you had a marvelous time, Anne.
    Wave when you fly over LA — where we have squirrels, the greedy little devils, and hummbirdies — but no fireflies 🙁

    Reply
  54. It sounds as if you had a marvelous time, Anne.
    Wave when you fly over LA — where we have squirrels, the greedy little devils, and hummbirdies — but no fireflies 🙁

    Reply
  55. It sounds as if you had a marvelous time, Anne.
    Wave when you fly over LA — where we have squirrels, the greedy little devils, and hummbirdies — but no fireflies 🙁

    Reply
  56. When we travel, we have someone come to the house to take care of the animals. We left our beagle in a kennel once when we move and she developed kennel cough. She was so upset when we got her back, she was at our heels for weeks. We have had people come to our house and stay in the past, but now our children are grown and they some by to take care of the dogs, cats, peacocks, and snake.
    I grew up with fireflies and hummingbirds, but had wonderful experiences with them. When I was in the Philippines, the firefly varieties there live in different levels of the trees. One night we were traveling back to the village and it was very dark. There was a single tree on a hill and it was covered with fireflies blinking away. Truly magical. When we lived in Colorado, We spent a lot of time up at the Girl Scout camp in the mountains. You would be sitting near the hummingbird feeders and they would buzz you to get to them. There were always dozens of birds around. My sister in Virginia has 3 feeders out and must refill them every day because there are so many hummingbirds.
    Have a good trip home!

    Reply
  57. When we travel, we have someone come to the house to take care of the animals. We left our beagle in a kennel once when we move and she developed kennel cough. She was so upset when we got her back, she was at our heels for weeks. We have had people come to our house and stay in the past, but now our children are grown and they some by to take care of the dogs, cats, peacocks, and snake.
    I grew up with fireflies and hummingbirds, but had wonderful experiences with them. When I was in the Philippines, the firefly varieties there live in different levels of the trees. One night we were traveling back to the village and it was very dark. There was a single tree on a hill and it was covered with fireflies blinking away. Truly magical. When we lived in Colorado, We spent a lot of time up at the Girl Scout camp in the mountains. You would be sitting near the hummingbird feeders and they would buzz you to get to them. There were always dozens of birds around. My sister in Virginia has 3 feeders out and must refill them every day because there are so many hummingbirds.
    Have a good trip home!

    Reply
  58. When we travel, we have someone come to the house to take care of the animals. We left our beagle in a kennel once when we move and she developed kennel cough. She was so upset when we got her back, she was at our heels for weeks. We have had people come to our house and stay in the past, but now our children are grown and they some by to take care of the dogs, cats, peacocks, and snake.
    I grew up with fireflies and hummingbirds, but had wonderful experiences with them. When I was in the Philippines, the firefly varieties there live in different levels of the trees. One night we were traveling back to the village and it was very dark. There was a single tree on a hill and it was covered with fireflies blinking away. Truly magical. When we lived in Colorado, We spent a lot of time up at the Girl Scout camp in the mountains. You would be sitting near the hummingbird feeders and they would buzz you to get to them. There were always dozens of birds around. My sister in Virginia has 3 feeders out and must refill them every day because there are so many hummingbirds.
    Have a good trip home!

    Reply
  59. When we travel, we have someone come to the house to take care of the animals. We left our beagle in a kennel once when we move and she developed kennel cough. She was so upset when we got her back, she was at our heels for weeks. We have had people come to our house and stay in the past, but now our children are grown and they some by to take care of the dogs, cats, peacocks, and snake.
    I grew up with fireflies and hummingbirds, but had wonderful experiences with them. When I was in the Philippines, the firefly varieties there live in different levels of the trees. One night we were traveling back to the village and it was very dark. There was a single tree on a hill and it was covered with fireflies blinking away. Truly magical. When we lived in Colorado, We spent a lot of time up at the Girl Scout camp in the mountains. You would be sitting near the hummingbird feeders and they would buzz you to get to them. There were always dozens of birds around. My sister in Virginia has 3 feeders out and must refill them every day because there are so many hummingbirds.
    Have a good trip home!

    Reply
  60. When we travel, we have someone come to the house to take care of the animals. We left our beagle in a kennel once when we move and she developed kennel cough. She was so upset when we got her back, she was at our heels for weeks. We have had people come to our house and stay in the past, but now our children are grown and they some by to take care of the dogs, cats, peacocks, and snake.
    I grew up with fireflies and hummingbirds, but had wonderful experiences with them. When I was in the Philippines, the firefly varieties there live in different levels of the trees. One night we were traveling back to the village and it was very dark. There was a single tree on a hill and it was covered with fireflies blinking away. Truly magical. When we lived in Colorado, We spent a lot of time up at the Girl Scout camp in the mountains. You would be sitting near the hummingbird feeders and they would buzz you to get to them. There were always dozens of birds around. My sister in Virginia has 3 feeders out and must refill them every day because there are so many hummingbirds.
    Have a good trip home!

    Reply
  61. Maggie, I didn’t get to Bloomingdales, but one day I will.I visited the Cloisters some years ago — it’s wonderful. I actually headed for the Met last week, the day after I arrived, not realizing it was Monday (not Tuesday as it was at home) and it would be closed. Still, Central park was lovely, and the long walk was great after being cooped up in a plane for 24 hours.
    Your Nantucket experience sounds amazing. I’ve never experienced a snowstorm, but I have sat by a fire, reading with waves crashing nearby and the wind and rain roaring. I love that sense of cosy isolation — espcially as I’m in no real danger 😉

    Reply
  62. Maggie, I didn’t get to Bloomingdales, but one day I will.I visited the Cloisters some years ago — it’s wonderful. I actually headed for the Met last week, the day after I arrived, not realizing it was Monday (not Tuesday as it was at home) and it would be closed. Still, Central park was lovely, and the long walk was great after being cooped up in a plane for 24 hours.
    Your Nantucket experience sounds amazing. I’ve never experienced a snowstorm, but I have sat by a fire, reading with waves crashing nearby and the wind and rain roaring. I love that sense of cosy isolation — espcially as I’m in no real danger 😉

    Reply
  63. Maggie, I didn’t get to Bloomingdales, but one day I will.I visited the Cloisters some years ago — it’s wonderful. I actually headed for the Met last week, the day after I arrived, not realizing it was Monday (not Tuesday as it was at home) and it would be closed. Still, Central park was lovely, and the long walk was great after being cooped up in a plane for 24 hours.
    Your Nantucket experience sounds amazing. I’ve never experienced a snowstorm, but I have sat by a fire, reading with waves crashing nearby and the wind and rain roaring. I love that sense of cosy isolation — espcially as I’m in no real danger 😉

    Reply
  64. Maggie, I didn’t get to Bloomingdales, but one day I will.I visited the Cloisters some years ago — it’s wonderful. I actually headed for the Met last week, the day after I arrived, not realizing it was Monday (not Tuesday as it was at home) and it would be closed. Still, Central park was lovely, and the long walk was great after being cooped up in a plane for 24 hours.
    Your Nantucket experience sounds amazing. I’ve never experienced a snowstorm, but I have sat by a fire, reading with waves crashing nearby and the wind and rain roaring. I love that sense of cosy isolation — espcially as I’m in no real danger 😉

    Reply
  65. Maggie, I didn’t get to Bloomingdales, but one day I will.I visited the Cloisters some years ago — it’s wonderful. I actually headed for the Met last week, the day after I arrived, not realizing it was Monday (not Tuesday as it was at home) and it would be closed. Still, Central park was lovely, and the long walk was great after being cooped up in a plane for 24 hours.
    Your Nantucket experience sounds amazing. I’ve never experienced a snowstorm, but I have sat by a fire, reading with waves crashing nearby and the wind and rain roaring. I love that sense of cosy isolation — espcially as I’m in no real danger 😉

    Reply
  66. Liz, how lovely of you to drop in. I thought of you last week atthe Harlequin party — I first met you at the one 10 years ago when I was a brand-new author 😉 and we danced our feet off, and your beautiful daughter was there dazzling the waiters and getting us excellent service — and now she’s about to have a child. My, how time slips away.
    Glow-worms are magical indeed. I first saw one in a forest in New Zealand, and later I saw a whole cave glowing with their unearthly light.

    Reply
  67. Liz, how lovely of you to drop in. I thought of you last week atthe Harlequin party — I first met you at the one 10 years ago when I was a brand-new author 😉 and we danced our feet off, and your beautiful daughter was there dazzling the waiters and getting us excellent service — and now she’s about to have a child. My, how time slips away.
    Glow-worms are magical indeed. I first saw one in a forest in New Zealand, and later I saw a whole cave glowing with their unearthly light.

    Reply
  68. Liz, how lovely of you to drop in. I thought of you last week atthe Harlequin party — I first met you at the one 10 years ago when I was a brand-new author 😉 and we danced our feet off, and your beautiful daughter was there dazzling the waiters and getting us excellent service — and now she’s about to have a child. My, how time slips away.
    Glow-worms are magical indeed. I first saw one in a forest in New Zealand, and later I saw a whole cave glowing with their unearthly light.

    Reply
  69. Liz, how lovely of you to drop in. I thought of you last week atthe Harlequin party — I first met you at the one 10 years ago when I was a brand-new author 😉 and we danced our feet off, and your beautiful daughter was there dazzling the waiters and getting us excellent service — and now she’s about to have a child. My, how time slips away.
    Glow-worms are magical indeed. I first saw one in a forest in New Zealand, and later I saw a whole cave glowing with their unearthly light.

    Reply
  70. Liz, how lovely of you to drop in. I thought of you last week atthe Harlequin party — I first met you at the one 10 years ago when I was a brand-new author 😉 and we danced our feet off, and your beautiful daughter was there dazzling the waiters and getting us excellent service — and now she’s about to have a child. My, how time slips away.
    Glow-worms are magical indeed. I first saw one in a forest in New Zealand, and later I saw a whole cave glowing with their unearthly light.

    Reply
  71. Nina P I really wantto se that display of “stuff left behind.” It’s the kind of thing I love — guaranteed to make me cry and to get stories spinning. Inspired by your suggestion I headed there yesterday, only to find that it was a 90 minute + wait for the tickets and another 40 minutes for the boat and there were no tickets left the Statue of Liberty crown. It was really hot and I only had a day, so I wimped out. I sometimes come to New York in March, so maybe I’ll come again at a less busy time of year.

    Reply
  72. Nina P I really wantto se that display of “stuff left behind.” It’s the kind of thing I love — guaranteed to make me cry and to get stories spinning. Inspired by your suggestion I headed there yesterday, only to find that it was a 90 minute + wait for the tickets and another 40 minutes for the boat and there were no tickets left the Statue of Liberty crown. It was really hot and I only had a day, so I wimped out. I sometimes come to New York in March, so maybe I’ll come again at a less busy time of year.

    Reply
  73. Nina P I really wantto se that display of “stuff left behind.” It’s the kind of thing I love — guaranteed to make me cry and to get stories spinning. Inspired by your suggestion I headed there yesterday, only to find that it was a 90 minute + wait for the tickets and another 40 minutes for the boat and there were no tickets left the Statue of Liberty crown. It was really hot and I only had a day, so I wimped out. I sometimes come to New York in March, so maybe I’ll come again at a less busy time of year.

    Reply
  74. Nina P I really wantto se that display of “stuff left behind.” It’s the kind of thing I love — guaranteed to make me cry and to get stories spinning. Inspired by your suggestion I headed there yesterday, only to find that it was a 90 minute + wait for the tickets and another 40 minutes for the boat and there were no tickets left the Statue of Liberty crown. It was really hot and I only had a day, so I wimped out. I sometimes come to New York in March, so maybe I’ll come again at a less busy time of year.

    Reply
  75. Nina P I really wantto se that display of “stuff left behind.” It’s the kind of thing I love — guaranteed to make me cry and to get stories spinning. Inspired by your suggestion I headed there yesterday, only to find that it was a 90 minute + wait for the tickets and another 40 minutes for the boat and there were no tickets left the Statue of Liberty crown. It was really hot and I only had a day, so I wimped out. I sometimes come to New York in March, so maybe I’ll come again at a less busy time of year.

    Reply
  76. Theo, not getting in to the Statue of Liberty was the deal-breaker for me yesterday. My first visit to NY was umpteen years ago when it was her 200th birthday, but I couldn’t get in then because they were renovating her. I want both her and Ellis Island and the “stuff left behind.”
    An explosion of fireflies, what a gorgeous image! And Koala’s are pretty big and dopey, though the little ones are cute. One of my favorite Australian animals are sugar gliders — tiny nocturnal flying possums, very sweet-looking.And where you have squabbling hummingbirds, I have chittering rainbow lorikeets… We’re lucky, aren’t we?
    Your poor dog probably got put in with a bullying sort of dog. I suspect the same thing happened to my Chloe that time. She also lost weight. The first time I thought it was just fretting –she’s a one person dog– but after we’d gone back, I knew. It’s a real skill to match dogs in kennels. My first holiday job was in a kennels, and I was told I had a knack for dog-matching. ;).

    Reply
  77. Theo, not getting in to the Statue of Liberty was the deal-breaker for me yesterday. My first visit to NY was umpteen years ago when it was her 200th birthday, but I couldn’t get in then because they were renovating her. I want both her and Ellis Island and the “stuff left behind.”
    An explosion of fireflies, what a gorgeous image! And Koala’s are pretty big and dopey, though the little ones are cute. One of my favorite Australian animals are sugar gliders — tiny nocturnal flying possums, very sweet-looking.And where you have squabbling hummingbirds, I have chittering rainbow lorikeets… We’re lucky, aren’t we?
    Your poor dog probably got put in with a bullying sort of dog. I suspect the same thing happened to my Chloe that time. She also lost weight. The first time I thought it was just fretting –she’s a one person dog– but after we’d gone back, I knew. It’s a real skill to match dogs in kennels. My first holiday job was in a kennels, and I was told I had a knack for dog-matching. ;).

    Reply
  78. Theo, not getting in to the Statue of Liberty was the deal-breaker for me yesterday. My first visit to NY was umpteen years ago when it was her 200th birthday, but I couldn’t get in then because they were renovating her. I want both her and Ellis Island and the “stuff left behind.”
    An explosion of fireflies, what a gorgeous image! And Koala’s are pretty big and dopey, though the little ones are cute. One of my favorite Australian animals are sugar gliders — tiny nocturnal flying possums, very sweet-looking.And where you have squabbling hummingbirds, I have chittering rainbow lorikeets… We’re lucky, aren’t we?
    Your poor dog probably got put in with a bullying sort of dog. I suspect the same thing happened to my Chloe that time. She also lost weight. The first time I thought it was just fretting –she’s a one person dog– but after we’d gone back, I knew. It’s a real skill to match dogs in kennels. My first holiday job was in a kennels, and I was told I had a knack for dog-matching. ;).

    Reply
  79. Theo, not getting in to the Statue of Liberty was the deal-breaker for me yesterday. My first visit to NY was umpteen years ago when it was her 200th birthday, but I couldn’t get in then because they were renovating her. I want both her and Ellis Island and the “stuff left behind.”
    An explosion of fireflies, what a gorgeous image! And Koala’s are pretty big and dopey, though the little ones are cute. One of my favorite Australian animals are sugar gliders — tiny nocturnal flying possums, very sweet-looking.And where you have squabbling hummingbirds, I have chittering rainbow lorikeets… We’re lucky, aren’t we?
    Your poor dog probably got put in with a bullying sort of dog. I suspect the same thing happened to my Chloe that time. She also lost weight. The first time I thought it was just fretting –she’s a one person dog– but after we’d gone back, I knew. It’s a real skill to match dogs in kennels. My first holiday job was in a kennels, and I was told I had a knack for dog-matching. ;).

    Reply
  80. Theo, not getting in to the Statue of Liberty was the deal-breaker for me yesterday. My first visit to NY was umpteen years ago when it was her 200th birthday, but I couldn’t get in then because they were renovating her. I want both her and Ellis Island and the “stuff left behind.”
    An explosion of fireflies, what a gorgeous image! And Koala’s are pretty big and dopey, though the little ones are cute. One of my favorite Australian animals are sugar gliders — tiny nocturnal flying possums, very sweet-looking.And where you have squabbling hummingbirds, I have chittering rainbow lorikeets… We’re lucky, aren’t we?
    Your poor dog probably got put in with a bullying sort of dog. I suspect the same thing happened to my Chloe that time. She also lost weight. The first time I thought it was just fretting –she’s a one person dog– but after we’d gone back, I knew. It’s a real skill to match dogs in kennels. My first holiday job was in a kennels, and I was told I had a knack for dog-matching. ;).

    Reply
  81. Mary Jo, immigration is such an emotional thing. I recently read Cafe Sheherazade (sp?)by Arnold Zable, which wove dozens of stories told by Jews displaced by the horrors of WW2, gathering at their local cafe in Melbourne, on the other side of the world, eating the foods of their childhood, and telling their stories. Very moving and evocative, in in many ways, universal. Migration and displacement is part of the human condition, isn’t it? My own ancestors were driven from the highlands by their overlords to make room for sheep. They ended up on the other side of the world, driving off the Aborigines… to make room for sheep. Dreadful.
    The Fluffster is certainly a personality. I one had a cat pee on my bed as a display of anger that I’d left her for a week! She was normally an immaculate cat, so this was definitely revenge.
    Andrea, I’m currently eating strawberries, blueberries and the most delicious cherries I’ve ever had. The next 24 hours will be airline food, so I’m enjoying this. It was wonderful to meet you in person, BTW.

    Reply
  82. Mary Jo, immigration is such an emotional thing. I recently read Cafe Sheherazade (sp?)by Arnold Zable, which wove dozens of stories told by Jews displaced by the horrors of WW2, gathering at their local cafe in Melbourne, on the other side of the world, eating the foods of their childhood, and telling their stories. Very moving and evocative, in in many ways, universal. Migration and displacement is part of the human condition, isn’t it? My own ancestors were driven from the highlands by their overlords to make room for sheep. They ended up on the other side of the world, driving off the Aborigines… to make room for sheep. Dreadful.
    The Fluffster is certainly a personality. I one had a cat pee on my bed as a display of anger that I’d left her for a week! She was normally an immaculate cat, so this was definitely revenge.
    Andrea, I’m currently eating strawberries, blueberries and the most delicious cherries I’ve ever had. The next 24 hours will be airline food, so I’m enjoying this. It was wonderful to meet you in person, BTW.

    Reply
  83. Mary Jo, immigration is such an emotional thing. I recently read Cafe Sheherazade (sp?)by Arnold Zable, which wove dozens of stories told by Jews displaced by the horrors of WW2, gathering at their local cafe in Melbourne, on the other side of the world, eating the foods of their childhood, and telling their stories. Very moving and evocative, in in many ways, universal. Migration and displacement is part of the human condition, isn’t it? My own ancestors were driven from the highlands by their overlords to make room for sheep. They ended up on the other side of the world, driving off the Aborigines… to make room for sheep. Dreadful.
    The Fluffster is certainly a personality. I one had a cat pee on my bed as a display of anger that I’d left her for a week! She was normally an immaculate cat, so this was definitely revenge.
    Andrea, I’m currently eating strawberries, blueberries and the most delicious cherries I’ve ever had. The next 24 hours will be airline food, so I’m enjoying this. It was wonderful to meet you in person, BTW.

    Reply
  84. Mary Jo, immigration is such an emotional thing. I recently read Cafe Sheherazade (sp?)by Arnold Zable, which wove dozens of stories told by Jews displaced by the horrors of WW2, gathering at their local cafe in Melbourne, on the other side of the world, eating the foods of their childhood, and telling their stories. Very moving and evocative, in in many ways, universal. Migration and displacement is part of the human condition, isn’t it? My own ancestors were driven from the highlands by their overlords to make room for sheep. They ended up on the other side of the world, driving off the Aborigines… to make room for sheep. Dreadful.
    The Fluffster is certainly a personality. I one had a cat pee on my bed as a display of anger that I’d left her for a week! She was normally an immaculate cat, so this was definitely revenge.
    Andrea, I’m currently eating strawberries, blueberries and the most delicious cherries I’ve ever had. The next 24 hours will be airline food, so I’m enjoying this. It was wonderful to meet you in person, BTW.

    Reply
  85. Mary Jo, immigration is such an emotional thing. I recently read Cafe Sheherazade (sp?)by Arnold Zable, which wove dozens of stories told by Jews displaced by the horrors of WW2, gathering at their local cafe in Melbourne, on the other side of the world, eating the foods of their childhood, and telling their stories. Very moving and evocative, in in many ways, universal. Migration and displacement is part of the human condition, isn’t it? My own ancestors were driven from the highlands by their overlords to make room for sheep. They ended up on the other side of the world, driving off the Aborigines… to make room for sheep. Dreadful.
    The Fluffster is certainly a personality. I one had a cat pee on my bed as a display of anger that I’d left her for a week! She was normally an immaculate cat, so this was definitely revenge.
    Andrea, I’m currently eating strawberries, blueberries and the most delicious cherries I’ve ever had. The next 24 hours will be airline food, so I’m enjoying this. It was wonderful to meet you in person, BTW.

    Reply
  86. Jane, I’ll revisit the Cloisters next time. It’s a beautiful place.
    Susan/DC – a chocolate walk? What a temptress! Perhaps next time. 😉
    Louis, the hummingbirds lived up to all my childhood expectations. I envy you your many hours of entertainment. I hope they never lose their magic.
    Barb, Fireflies? Really? I can see I’ll have to visit your neck of the woods some time soon. You have the coolest things.
    It was Barb Hannay who gave me the information on swimming in phosphorescence that I used in Perfect Stranger, BTW – she’s actually done it. Doesn’t that sound like a gorgeous thing to do?

    Reply
  87. Jane, I’ll revisit the Cloisters next time. It’s a beautiful place.
    Susan/DC – a chocolate walk? What a temptress! Perhaps next time. 😉
    Louis, the hummingbirds lived up to all my childhood expectations. I envy you your many hours of entertainment. I hope they never lose their magic.
    Barb, Fireflies? Really? I can see I’ll have to visit your neck of the woods some time soon. You have the coolest things.
    It was Barb Hannay who gave me the information on swimming in phosphorescence that I used in Perfect Stranger, BTW – she’s actually done it. Doesn’t that sound like a gorgeous thing to do?

    Reply
  88. Jane, I’ll revisit the Cloisters next time. It’s a beautiful place.
    Susan/DC – a chocolate walk? What a temptress! Perhaps next time. 😉
    Louis, the hummingbirds lived up to all my childhood expectations. I envy you your many hours of entertainment. I hope they never lose their magic.
    Barb, Fireflies? Really? I can see I’ll have to visit your neck of the woods some time soon. You have the coolest things.
    It was Barb Hannay who gave me the information on swimming in phosphorescence that I used in Perfect Stranger, BTW – she’s actually done it. Doesn’t that sound like a gorgeous thing to do?

    Reply
  89. Jane, I’ll revisit the Cloisters next time. It’s a beautiful place.
    Susan/DC – a chocolate walk? What a temptress! Perhaps next time. 😉
    Louis, the hummingbirds lived up to all my childhood expectations. I envy you your many hours of entertainment. I hope they never lose their magic.
    Barb, Fireflies? Really? I can see I’ll have to visit your neck of the woods some time soon. You have the coolest things.
    It was Barb Hannay who gave me the information on swimming in phosphorescence that I used in Perfect Stranger, BTW – she’s actually done it. Doesn’t that sound like a gorgeous thing to do?

    Reply
  90. Jane, I’ll revisit the Cloisters next time. It’s a beautiful place.
    Susan/DC – a chocolate walk? What a temptress! Perhaps next time. 😉
    Louis, the hummingbirds lived up to all my childhood expectations. I envy you your many hours of entertainment. I hope they never lose their magic.
    Barb, Fireflies? Really? I can see I’ll have to visit your neck of the woods some time soon. You have the coolest things.
    It was Barb Hannay who gave me the information on swimming in phosphorescence that I used in Perfect Stranger, BTW – she’s actually done it. Doesn’t that sound like a gorgeous thing to do?

    Reply
  91. Janice, I usually do think of you as I fly over LA. The last few times I’ve come to the US I’ve only changed planes at LA – no stopover, but one day… I owe you and some Heyer-ites afternoon tea. 😉

    Reply
  92. Janice, I usually do think of you as I fly over LA. The last few times I’ve come to the US I’ve only changed planes at LA – no stopover, but one day… I owe you and some Heyer-ites afternoon tea. 😉

    Reply
  93. Janice, I usually do think of you as I fly over LA. The last few times I’ve come to the US I’ve only changed planes at LA – no stopover, but one day… I owe you and some Heyer-ites afternoon tea. 😉

    Reply
  94. Janice, I usually do think of you as I fly over LA. The last few times I’ve come to the US I’ve only changed planes at LA – no stopover, but one day… I owe you and some Heyer-ites afternoon tea. 😉

    Reply
  95. Janice, I usually do think of you as I fly over LA. The last few times I’ve come to the US I’ve only changed planes at LA – no stopover, but one day… I owe you and some Heyer-ites afternoon tea. 😉

    Reply
  96. Anne, I’m so glad I caught up wiht you for breakfast at RWA! I enjoy spending time with you.
    I love fireflies! My second book was originally titled (and was a GH finalist under the original title) Firefly Wishes. The cover was gorgeous! I think fireflies are truly magic.
    I saw my first hummingbird in San Antonio, TX a few years ago. Then this summer, my son and I went to Maine to visit my parents. We weren’t there a half-hour and my son discovered a hummingbird trapped in their shed, trying to get out the roof. My son eventually caught the frightened little thing and released it outside. (My kid, the hummingbird hero!)
    Hope you’ve had an uneventful trip home!

    Reply
  97. Anne, I’m so glad I caught up wiht you for breakfast at RWA! I enjoy spending time with you.
    I love fireflies! My second book was originally titled (and was a GH finalist under the original title) Firefly Wishes. The cover was gorgeous! I think fireflies are truly magic.
    I saw my first hummingbird in San Antonio, TX a few years ago. Then this summer, my son and I went to Maine to visit my parents. We weren’t there a half-hour and my son discovered a hummingbird trapped in their shed, trying to get out the roof. My son eventually caught the frightened little thing and released it outside. (My kid, the hummingbird hero!)
    Hope you’ve had an uneventful trip home!

    Reply
  98. Anne, I’m so glad I caught up wiht you for breakfast at RWA! I enjoy spending time with you.
    I love fireflies! My second book was originally titled (and was a GH finalist under the original title) Firefly Wishes. The cover was gorgeous! I think fireflies are truly magic.
    I saw my first hummingbird in San Antonio, TX a few years ago. Then this summer, my son and I went to Maine to visit my parents. We weren’t there a half-hour and my son discovered a hummingbird trapped in their shed, trying to get out the roof. My son eventually caught the frightened little thing and released it outside. (My kid, the hummingbird hero!)
    Hope you’ve had an uneventful trip home!

    Reply
  99. Anne, I’m so glad I caught up wiht you for breakfast at RWA! I enjoy spending time with you.
    I love fireflies! My second book was originally titled (and was a GH finalist under the original title) Firefly Wishes. The cover was gorgeous! I think fireflies are truly magic.
    I saw my first hummingbird in San Antonio, TX a few years ago. Then this summer, my son and I went to Maine to visit my parents. We weren’t there a half-hour and my son discovered a hummingbird trapped in their shed, trying to get out the roof. My son eventually caught the frightened little thing and released it outside. (My kid, the hummingbird hero!)
    Hope you’ve had an uneventful trip home!

    Reply
  100. Anne, I’m so glad I caught up wiht you for breakfast at RWA! I enjoy spending time with you.
    I love fireflies! My second book was originally titled (and was a GH finalist under the original title) Firefly Wishes. The cover was gorgeous! I think fireflies are truly magic.
    I saw my first hummingbird in San Antonio, TX a few years ago. Then this summer, my son and I went to Maine to visit my parents. We weren’t there a half-hour and my son discovered a hummingbird trapped in their shed, trying to get out the roof. My son eventually caught the frightened little thing and released it outside. (My kid, the hummingbird hero!)
    Hope you’ve had an uneventful trip home!

    Reply
  101. You kennel stories bring back memories of our very missed 125 lb black German Shepherd. Looked like the big bad wolf, but the sweetest dog to friends. We would visit my in-laws and be gone 5 days. For one trip we extended our visit to go to Disney World. On the 5th day our dog was acting weird at the kennel. When the staff came in on the morning of the 6th day he was sitting in the waiting room, waiting. Back in the kennel the solid steel door had been taken right off the hinges. I knew he was smart, but didn’t realize he understood the passing of time. The kennel thank goodness did not charge us for the door. They were beyond stunned that it was removed.
    Best wishes for a safe trip home. Thank you for traveling to RWA. Silly me, I live just west of DC and didn’t realize that RWA wasn’t just for the trade. I am glad you enjoyed your time in the Mid-Atlantic. I find fireflies, hummingbirds and even the little bats that come out at dusk magical. (for that matter Disney World is very magical too).
    Lyn S

    Reply
  102. You kennel stories bring back memories of our very missed 125 lb black German Shepherd. Looked like the big bad wolf, but the sweetest dog to friends. We would visit my in-laws and be gone 5 days. For one trip we extended our visit to go to Disney World. On the 5th day our dog was acting weird at the kennel. When the staff came in on the morning of the 6th day he was sitting in the waiting room, waiting. Back in the kennel the solid steel door had been taken right off the hinges. I knew he was smart, but didn’t realize he understood the passing of time. The kennel thank goodness did not charge us for the door. They were beyond stunned that it was removed.
    Best wishes for a safe trip home. Thank you for traveling to RWA. Silly me, I live just west of DC and didn’t realize that RWA wasn’t just for the trade. I am glad you enjoyed your time in the Mid-Atlantic. I find fireflies, hummingbirds and even the little bats that come out at dusk magical. (for that matter Disney World is very magical too).
    Lyn S

    Reply
  103. You kennel stories bring back memories of our very missed 125 lb black German Shepherd. Looked like the big bad wolf, but the sweetest dog to friends. We would visit my in-laws and be gone 5 days. For one trip we extended our visit to go to Disney World. On the 5th day our dog was acting weird at the kennel. When the staff came in on the morning of the 6th day he was sitting in the waiting room, waiting. Back in the kennel the solid steel door had been taken right off the hinges. I knew he was smart, but didn’t realize he understood the passing of time. The kennel thank goodness did not charge us for the door. They were beyond stunned that it was removed.
    Best wishes for a safe trip home. Thank you for traveling to RWA. Silly me, I live just west of DC and didn’t realize that RWA wasn’t just for the trade. I am glad you enjoyed your time in the Mid-Atlantic. I find fireflies, hummingbirds and even the little bats that come out at dusk magical. (for that matter Disney World is very magical too).
    Lyn S

    Reply
  104. You kennel stories bring back memories of our very missed 125 lb black German Shepherd. Looked like the big bad wolf, but the sweetest dog to friends. We would visit my in-laws and be gone 5 days. For one trip we extended our visit to go to Disney World. On the 5th day our dog was acting weird at the kennel. When the staff came in on the morning of the 6th day he was sitting in the waiting room, waiting. Back in the kennel the solid steel door had been taken right off the hinges. I knew he was smart, but didn’t realize he understood the passing of time. The kennel thank goodness did not charge us for the door. They were beyond stunned that it was removed.
    Best wishes for a safe trip home. Thank you for traveling to RWA. Silly me, I live just west of DC and didn’t realize that RWA wasn’t just for the trade. I am glad you enjoyed your time in the Mid-Atlantic. I find fireflies, hummingbirds and even the little bats that come out at dusk magical. (for that matter Disney World is very magical too).
    Lyn S

    Reply
  105. You kennel stories bring back memories of our very missed 125 lb black German Shepherd. Looked like the big bad wolf, but the sweetest dog to friends. We would visit my in-laws and be gone 5 days. For one trip we extended our visit to go to Disney World. On the 5th day our dog was acting weird at the kennel. When the staff came in on the morning of the 6th day he was sitting in the waiting room, waiting. Back in the kennel the solid steel door had been taken right off the hinges. I knew he was smart, but didn’t realize he understood the passing of time. The kennel thank goodness did not charge us for the door. They were beyond stunned that it was removed.
    Best wishes for a safe trip home. Thank you for traveling to RWA. Silly me, I live just west of DC and didn’t realize that RWA wasn’t just for the trade. I am glad you enjoyed your time in the Mid-Atlantic. I find fireflies, hummingbirds and even the little bats that come out at dusk magical. (for that matter Disney World is very magical too).
    Lyn S

    Reply
  106. Susan, it was great to catch up with you, too. And amazing, given the numbers at the conference. There were people I knew were there but I never saw them.
    Lovely story about your son’s rescue of the hummingbird. And, so you and Nathan Fillion share a title, eh? Fireflies indeed 🙂
    Lyn, your dog sounds amazing. Dogs are such fine observers of ritual, aren’t they? I swear my dog notices things about my behavior that I’m not aware of myself, for instance, knowing the difference between my cleaning my teeth just because they need it and the cleaning of the teeth prior to going out. The second one is accompanied by much wagging and bouncing, as she’s assuming she’s also going out, too. It’s extraordinary how they live entirely in the moment, but also observe ritual so closely.
    We have large fruit bats that come out at night, soaring silently overhead in search of fruit. By day they hang in trees like dusty old umbrellas…

    Reply
  107. Susan, it was great to catch up with you, too. And amazing, given the numbers at the conference. There were people I knew were there but I never saw them.
    Lovely story about your son’s rescue of the hummingbird. And, so you and Nathan Fillion share a title, eh? Fireflies indeed 🙂
    Lyn, your dog sounds amazing. Dogs are such fine observers of ritual, aren’t they? I swear my dog notices things about my behavior that I’m not aware of myself, for instance, knowing the difference between my cleaning my teeth just because they need it and the cleaning of the teeth prior to going out. The second one is accompanied by much wagging and bouncing, as she’s assuming she’s also going out, too. It’s extraordinary how they live entirely in the moment, but also observe ritual so closely.
    We have large fruit bats that come out at night, soaring silently overhead in search of fruit. By day they hang in trees like dusty old umbrellas…

    Reply
  108. Susan, it was great to catch up with you, too. And amazing, given the numbers at the conference. There were people I knew were there but I never saw them.
    Lovely story about your son’s rescue of the hummingbird. And, so you and Nathan Fillion share a title, eh? Fireflies indeed 🙂
    Lyn, your dog sounds amazing. Dogs are such fine observers of ritual, aren’t they? I swear my dog notices things about my behavior that I’m not aware of myself, for instance, knowing the difference between my cleaning my teeth just because they need it and the cleaning of the teeth prior to going out. The second one is accompanied by much wagging and bouncing, as she’s assuming she’s also going out, too. It’s extraordinary how they live entirely in the moment, but also observe ritual so closely.
    We have large fruit bats that come out at night, soaring silently overhead in search of fruit. By day they hang in trees like dusty old umbrellas…

    Reply
  109. Susan, it was great to catch up with you, too. And amazing, given the numbers at the conference. There were people I knew were there but I never saw them.
    Lovely story about your son’s rescue of the hummingbird. And, so you and Nathan Fillion share a title, eh? Fireflies indeed 🙂
    Lyn, your dog sounds amazing. Dogs are such fine observers of ritual, aren’t they? I swear my dog notices things about my behavior that I’m not aware of myself, for instance, knowing the difference between my cleaning my teeth just because they need it and the cleaning of the teeth prior to going out. The second one is accompanied by much wagging and bouncing, as she’s assuming she’s also going out, too. It’s extraordinary how they live entirely in the moment, but also observe ritual so closely.
    We have large fruit bats that come out at night, soaring silently overhead in search of fruit. By day they hang in trees like dusty old umbrellas…

    Reply
  110. Susan, it was great to catch up with you, too. And amazing, given the numbers at the conference. There were people I knew were there but I never saw them.
    Lovely story about your son’s rescue of the hummingbird. And, so you and Nathan Fillion share a title, eh? Fireflies indeed 🙂
    Lyn, your dog sounds amazing. Dogs are such fine observers of ritual, aren’t they? I swear my dog notices things about my behavior that I’m not aware of myself, for instance, knowing the difference between my cleaning my teeth just because they need it and the cleaning of the teeth prior to going out. The second one is accompanied by much wagging and bouncing, as she’s assuming she’s also going out, too. It’s extraordinary how they live entirely in the moment, but also observe ritual so closely.
    We have large fruit bats that come out at night, soaring silently overhead in search of fruit. By day they hang in trees like dusty old umbrellas…

    Reply

Leave a Comment